History Main / Oireland

26th Sep '16 7:51:51 PM Kartoonkid95
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* The cartoon fox from ''Film/MaryPoppins''.
26th Sep '16 8:06:06 AM TabooViper
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* In ''Film/TheBirds'', there's a drunk man who's only contribution is to be Oirish and exclaim mystically that the bird attacks signal the end of the world.
22nd Sep '16 9:20:15 PM CaptEquinox
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This trope goes waaaaaaaay back to at least the days of [[ModernMinstrelsy stage Irishmen]] in eighteenth-century British theatre. Brought back to life by Creator/JohnFord in the iconic Creator/JohnWayne film ''Film/TheQuietMan'' -- which is not a bad movie, and was well-meant by the staunchly Irish-American Ford (something also seen in his later and lesser-known triptych film ''The Rising Of The Moon'', made with the Abbey Theatre players.)

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This trope goes waaaaaaaay back to at least the days of [[ModernMinstrelsy stage Irishmen]] in eighteenth-century British theatre. Brought back to life by Creator/JohnFord in the iconic Creator/JohnWayne film ''Film/TheQuietMan'' -- which is not a bad movie, and was well-meant by the staunchly Irish-American Ford (something also seen in his later and lesser-known triptych film ''The Rising Of The Moon'', made ''Film/TheRisingOfTheMoon'', filmed entirely in Ireland with the Abbey Theatre players.)
22nd Sep '16 1:47:12 PM DapperEntity
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9th Sep '16 12:46:23 PM Sharysa
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* Averted in the UrbanFantasy ''{{Literature/Moonflowers}}''. While the setting is explicitly a tourist town by the Cliffs of Moher, they are quite aware of what tourists expect and there are a lot of ugly things lurking around: [[TheFairFolk The Folk]] frequent the area, so the townsfolk carry [[ColdIron iron knives]], wear their clothes inside-out, and/or eat salt, and TheWildHunt is terrorizing the protagonist and her family for petty amusement. Christian/pagan tensions are mentioned a couple of times, and the homophobia that Owen O'Luain faces has reached violence at least twice--once in the backstory, when the town [[ChangelingTale claimed he was half-Folk and tried to kill him]], and then in the current time when three people in Galway have heard of Owen's attack [[NoHoldsBarredBeatdown and try to finish the job]]. Brighid Brennan, the friendly blonde nurse, [[spoiler: hasn't told ANYONE that she's a lesbian thanks to witnessing so much violence directed at one of her friends.]]

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* Averted in the UrbanFantasy ''{{Literature/Moonflowers}}''. While the setting is explicitly a tourist town by the Cliffs of Moher, they are quite aware of what tourists expect and there are a lot of ugly things lurking around: [[TheFairFolk The Folk]] frequent the area, so the townsfolk carry [[ColdIron iron knives]], wear their clothes inside-out, and/or eat salt, and TheWildHunt is terrorizing the protagonist and her family for petty amusement. Christian/pagan tensions are mentioned a couple of times, and the homophobia that Owen O'Luain faces has reached violence at least twice--once in the backstory, when the town [[ChangelingTale claimed he was half-Folk and tried to kill him]], and then in the current time when three people in Galway have heard of Owen's attack [[NoHoldsBarredBeatdown and try to finish the job]]. Brighid Brennan, the friendly blonde nurse, [[spoiler: hasn't has only told ANYONE two people that she's a lesbian thanks to witnessing so much violence directed at one of her friends.]]
9th Sep '16 12:42:21 PM Sharysa
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* Averted in the UrbanFantasy ''{{Literature/Moonflowers}}''. While the setting is explicitly a tourist town by the Cliffs of Moher, there are a lot of ugly things lurking around: [[TheFairFolk The Folk]] frequent the area, so the townsfolk carry [[ColdIron iron knives]], wear their clothes inside-out, and/or eat salt, and TheWildHunt is terrorizing the protagonist and her family for petty amusement. Christian/pagan tensions are mentioned a couple of times, and the homophobia that Owen O'Luain faces has reached violence at least twice--once in the backstory, when the town [[ChangelingTale claimed he was half-Folk and tried to kill him]], and then in the current time when three people in Galway have heard of Owen's attack [[NoHoldsBarredBeatdown and try to finish the job]].

to:

* Averted in the UrbanFantasy ''{{Literature/Moonflowers}}''. While the setting is explicitly a tourist town by the Cliffs of Moher, they are quite aware of what tourists expect and there are a lot of ugly things lurking around: [[TheFairFolk The Folk]] frequent the area, so the townsfolk carry [[ColdIron iron knives]], wear their clothes inside-out, and/or eat salt, and TheWildHunt is terrorizing the protagonist and her family for petty amusement. Christian/pagan tensions are mentioned a couple of times, and the homophobia that Owen O'Luain faces has reached violence at least twice--once in the backstory, when the town [[ChangelingTale claimed he was half-Folk and tried to kill him]], and then in the current time when three people in Galway have heard of Owen's attack [[NoHoldsBarredBeatdown and try to finish the job]]. Brighid Brennan, the friendly blonde nurse, [[spoiler: hasn't told ANYONE that she's a lesbian thanks to witnessing so much violence directed at one of her friends.]]
5th Sep '16 8:28:57 PM Chytus
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* ''Series/SonsOfAnarchy'': the gang has a strong alliance with the IRA, which is how they receive their guns for distribution in America. One season has the gang visit Belfast and get mixed up in an intra-IRA feud. One of the leaders of the IRA is shown to be a BadassGrandpa Catholic priest who holds his own in a fistfight. There's also quite a lot of drinking amongst the Irish, though not any more than the Americans. It's also pointed out that some of the Sons are Protestant, with one the son of an Orangeman. Though the greatest crime against Ireland may be the awful fake accents.
** This troper hasn't seen the series, but finds the idea that any Orangeman's kid would get involved with an "Irish gang" with IRA ties fairly laughable, as the majority of Irish immigrants to the U.S in the early-to-mid-20th century did so because they were Catholics who were either sick of the discrimination in the North or were upset by the Treaty—there was a strong, sympathetic Irish-Catholic community in America, as exemplified by the success of programs like NORAID in drumming up money for the IRA, whereas there wasn't so strong a population of Northern protestants abroad due to them not generally having to immigrate. It's an unusual demographic to become involved in that kind of organised crime—not necessarily an impossibility, but very unusual.
** And let's not even get started on the assumption that all Irish radio stations play nothing but traditional Irish folk or DropkickMurphys - style heavy metal / folk hybrids.
* Played for laughs in a sketch on ''Series/SaturdayNightLive'' when Creator/LiamNeeson guest-starred in 2004, in a sketch called "Ya Call This A House, Do Ya?", a parody of speedy home improvement shows like ''Series/ExtremeMakeoverHomeEdition.'' "Buildin' Finn [=McQuinn=]" and his team sent Neeson's character down the pub while they basically moved furniture around and drank beers. It was ActuallyPrettyFunny, mostly thanks to Neeson being a great sport.
* [[Series/TheIrishRM The Irish R.M. had a series adaptation]] (actually very good, and this comes from a half-Irishman), which skits, parodies, plays seriously and generally messes around with pre-independence (late Victorian until 1910) Ireland - in the little Irish town of Skebawn everyone is either drunk, or about to sell you a dud horse. The only tune played is 'Haste to the Wedding', and Irishmen are either lovable scamps or ruffians. However, it is actually kind hearted - the Irish villains are non-existent, the most unlikable characters are English (e.g. Lady Knox, when set against an Irish 'villain' like Tom Sheehy or Slipper. One of the main characters is Irish (in the twinkly-eyed scamp tradition) against the English straight-man, shebeens, pig's trotters, poteen and the like is trooped out mercilessly, but it is not at all malicious - quote [Slipper the groom] 'The English and the Irish understand each other like the fox and the hound,' [Lady Yeates] 'But which is which?' [Slipper] 'Ah well, if we knew that, we'd know everything!'. There is a Catholic Nationalist canon, and Roman Catholicism is skitted (the redoubtable Mrs Cadogan (pronounced kay-de-GAWN) is an example), but rather like Jeeves and Wooster, it avoids being offensive.

to:

* ''Series/SonsOfAnarchy'': the gang has a strong alliance with the IRA, which is how they receive their guns for distribution in America. One season has the gang visit Belfast and get mixed up in an intra-IRA feud. One of the leaders of the IRA is shown to be a BadassGrandpa Catholic priest who holds his own in a fistfight. There's also quite a lot of drinking amongst the Irish, though not any more than the Americans. It's also pointed out that some of the Sons are Protestant, with one the son of an Orangeman. Though the greatest crime against Ireland may be the awful fake accents.
** This troper hasn't seen the series, but finds the idea that any Orangeman's kid would get involved with an "Irish gang" with IRA ties fairly laughable, as the majority of Irish immigrants to the U.S in the early-to-mid-20th century did so because they were Catholics who were either sick of the discrimination in the North or were upset by the Treaty—there was a strong, sympathetic Irish-Catholic community in America, as exemplified by the success of programs like NORAID in drumming up money for the IRA, whereas there wasn't so strong a population of Northern protestants abroad due to them not generally having to immigrate. It's an unusual demographic to become involved in that kind of organised crime—not necessarily an impossibility, but very unusual.
**
accents. And let's not even get started on the assumption that all Irish radio stations play nothing but traditional Irish folk or DropkickMurphys - style heavy metal / folk hybrids.
* Played for laughs in a sketch on ''Series/SaturdayNightLive'' when Creator/LiamNeeson guest-starred in 2004, in a sketch called "Ya Call This A House, Do Ya?", a parody of speedy home improvement shows like ''Series/ExtremeMakeoverHomeEdition.'' "Buildin' Finn [=McQuinn=]" and his team sent Neeson's character down the pub while they basically moved furniture around and drank beers. It was ActuallyPrettyFunny, mostly thanks to Neeson being a great sport.
beers.
* [[Series/TheIrishRM The Irish R.M. had a series adaptation]] (actually very good, and this comes from a half-Irishman), adaptation,]] which skits, parodies, plays seriously and generally messes around with pre-independence (late Victorian until 1910) Ireland - in the little Irish town of Skebawn everyone is either drunk, or about to sell you a dud horse. The only tune played is 'Haste to the Wedding', and Irishmen are either lovable scamps or ruffians. However, it is actually kind hearted - the Irish villains are non-existent, the most unlikable characters are English (e.g. Lady Knox, when set against an Irish 'villain' like Tom Sheehy or Slipper. One of the main characters is Irish (in the twinkly-eyed scamp tradition) against the English straight-man, shebeens, pig's trotters, poteen and the like is trooped out mercilessly, but it is not at all malicious - quote [Slipper the groom] 'The English and the Irish understand each other like the fox and the hound,' [Lady Yeates] 'But which is which?' [Slipper] 'Ah well, if we knew that, we'd know everything!'. There is a Catholic Nationalist canon, and Roman Catholicism is skitted (the redoubtable Mrs Cadogan (pronounced kay-de-GAWN) is an example), but rather like Jeeves and Wooster, it avoids being offensive.



* Both played straight and subverted in the first ''VideoGame/BrokenSword'' game. Both played straight in that the Irish village you visit features a lot of folk music and hard drinking stereotypes; subverted in that the characters are NOT impressed by being greated with a 'Top of the morning to yeh' and references to 'The Little People'.

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* Both played straight and subverted in the first ''VideoGame/BrokenSword'' game. Both played straight in that the Irish village you visit features a lot of folk music and hard drinking stereotypes; subverted in that the characters are NOT impressed by being greated greeted with a 'Top of the morning to yeh' and references to 'The Little People'.
18th Aug '16 12:11:04 AM blackrick
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Lots of Americans have a fondness for UsefulNotes/{{Ireland}}. This is understandable, considering there are [[TheIrishDiaspora more Americans of Irish descent than there are people living in Ireland]] (bady a margin of about 11 to 1). This has a certain amount of AlwaysAnActor about it, in that Americans will sometimes claim Irish or Scots descent on the basis of third or fourth generation ancestors and near-homeopathic dilutions of actual genetic connection. Thus, it is only natural that some series would at some point have an episode or two on the Emerald Isle.

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Lots of Americans have a fondness for UsefulNotes/{{Ireland}}. This is understandable, considering there are [[TheIrishDiaspora more Americans of Irish descent than there are people living in Ireland]] (bady (by a margin of about 11 to 1). This has a certain amount of AlwaysAnActor about it, in that Americans will sometimes claim Irish or Scots descent on the basis of third or fourth generation ancestors and near-homeopathic dilutions of actual genetic connection. Thus, it is only natural that some series would at some point have an episode or two on the Emerald Isle.
16th Aug '16 12:12:24 AM Vir
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** The most {{egregious}} example may be "[[Recap/TheSimpsonsS20E14InTheNameOfTheGrandfather In the Name of the Grandfather]]", which has our favorite family being guilted by Grandpa into taking him to one last booze-up at an old pub he frequented during the war. In flashbacks, Grandpa describes it as a typical Oirish pub, with taps for Guinness, cabbage and corned beef (which isn't even Irish, as noted above), and sheep aplenty, also during one scene you can see two references to Celtic FC[[note]]The person in the green-and-white hooped shirt, plus there's something on a wall. For those who don't know, Celtic are a Scottish football club who are heavily associated with Ireland, tricolours can be seen in the stadium, and were founded by a priest from Sligo[[/note]] seen [[http://i42.tinypic.com/dnfypk.jpg here]]. The episode is a [[SubvertedTrope subversion of the trope]] as the town has become a [[UsefulNotes/TheCelticTiger bustling, modern metropolis]] where no one has time to go drinking. [[spoiler: [[DoubleSubvertedTrope The trope was double-subverted near the end]], when Homer and Grandpa unwittingly buy the pub, allow indoor smoking (which was banned in Ireland in 2004), and business picks up. It was too good to last, [[StatusQuoIsGod for in true sitcom fashion]], the police shut them down and deport them back to America.]] Ironically, this episode was broadcast [[FunnyAneurysmMoment as Ireland was entering a recession]].

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** The most {{egregious}} JustForFun/{{egregious}} example may be "[[Recap/TheSimpsonsS20E14InTheNameOfTheGrandfather In the Name of the Grandfather]]", which has our favorite family being guilted by Grandpa into taking him to one last booze-up at an old pub he frequented during the war. In flashbacks, Grandpa describes it as a typical Oirish pub, with taps for Guinness, cabbage and corned beef (which isn't even Irish, as noted above), and sheep aplenty, also during one scene you can see two references to Celtic FC[[note]]The person in the green-and-white hooped shirt, plus there's something on a wall. For those who don't know, Celtic are a Scottish football club who are heavily associated with Ireland, tricolours can be seen in the stadium, and were founded by a priest from Sligo[[/note]] seen [[http://i42.tinypic.com/dnfypk.jpg here]]. The episode is a [[SubvertedTrope subversion of the trope]] as the town has become a [[UsefulNotes/TheCelticTiger bustling, modern metropolis]] where no one has time to go drinking. [[spoiler: [[DoubleSubvertedTrope The trope was double-subverted near the end]], when Homer and Grandpa unwittingly buy the pub, allow indoor smoking (which was banned in Ireland in 2004), and business picks up. It was too good to last, [[StatusQuoIsGod for in true sitcom fashion]], the police shut them down and deport them back to America.]] Ironically, this episode was broadcast [[FunnyAneurysmMoment as Ireland was entering a recession]].
16th Aug '16 12:12:13 AM Vir
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** They lampshade the trope thus

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** They lampshade the trope thusthus:



--> '''Stewie''': Ah. Groundbreaking.

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--> '''Stewie''': [[SarcasmMode Ah. Groundbreaking.]]
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