History Main / Oireland

29th Jun '16 1:32:00 PM Morgenthaler
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* Both played straight and subverted in the first ''BrokenSword'' game. Both played straight in that the Irish village you visit features a lot of folk music and hard drinking stereotypes; subverted in that the characters are NOT impressed by being greated with a 'Top of the morning to yeh' and references to 'The Little People'.

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* Both played straight and subverted in the first ''BrokenSword'' ''VideoGame/BrokenSword'' game. Both played straight in that the Irish village you visit features a lot of folk music and hard drinking stereotypes; subverted in that the characters are NOT impressed by being greated with a 'Top of the morning to yeh' and references to 'The Little People'.



* Parodied by ''MonkeyDust'' - a young man walks into a pub and sees the new landlord wearing an absurd leprechaun costume. When he asks why, he is told that it is now an "Oirish" pub. When he asks what happened to the previous landlord, who was Irish, he is told that he wasn't ''"Oirish"'' enough.

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* Parodied by ''MonkeyDust'' ''WesternAnimation/MonkeyDust'' - a young man walks into a pub and sees the new landlord wearing an absurd leprechaun costume. When he asks why, he is told that it is now an "Oirish" pub. When he asks what happened to the previous landlord, who was Irish, he is told that he wasn't ''"Oirish"'' enough.
10th Jun '16 4:00:35 PM malifee
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** This troper hasn't seen the series, but finds the idea that any Orangeman's kid would get involved with an "Irish gang" with IRA ties fairly laughable, as the majority of Irish immigrants to the U.S in the early-to-mid-20th century did so because they were Catholics who were either sick of the discrimination in the North or were upset by the Treaty—there was a strong, sympathetic Irish-Catholic community in America, as exemplified by the success of programs like NORAID in drumming up money for the IRA, whereas there wasn't so strong a population of Northern protestants abroad due to them not generally having to immigrate. It's an unusual demographic to become involved in that kind of organised crime—not necessarily an impossibility, but very unusual.






* ''WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy'': Peter finds out that his real father is an Irishman, and heads to "[=McSwiggen=] Village, where the hills are green, the streams are clear, and the sweaters are so thick, even the boniest-fingered nun could poke you in the chest and it wouldn't bother you none!" The pub is called Wifey [=McBeaty=]'s and Peter's father is the town drunk, which is an honored position in Irish society.

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* ''WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy'': Peter finds out that his real father is an Irishman, and heads to "[=McSwiggen=] Village, where the hills are green, the streams are clear, and the sweaters are so thick, even the boniest-fingered nun could poke you in the chest and it wouldn't bother you none!" The pub is called Wifey [=McBeaty=]'s and Peter's father is the town drunk, which is an honored honoured position in Irish society.


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** Special points for the incomprehensible, cod-''Germanic'' accents, the complete failure to accurately explain ''why'' there's resentment between the two groups beyond "they just hate each other", the almost-instant reconciliation between the two, and the foundation of a pan-religious bakery.
10th Jun '16 3:47:57 PM malifee
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** So much so that an Irish watch of it in the vein of Buzzfeed-style "X watch Y" videos resulted in the comment that the only thing he got right was the pronunciation of "Dun Laoghaire" (Done Leary, for the record).



* ''Film/FarAndAway'', particularly Tom Cruise's side of the story. He's a poor, plucky, hard-fightin' Irish farmer with a beautiful seaside plot. A few scenes have brawling and drunkenness involved. Nicole Kidman's side, however, shows some of the lesser-seen gentility of Irish society. The Irish-Americans portrayed later are also classic Irish-American archetypes.

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* ''Film/FarAndAway'', particularly Tom Cruise's side of the story. He's a poor, plucky, hard-fightin' Irish farmer with a beautiful seaside plot.plot and a beautiful, posh girl to fall in love with, not to mention support for the 'ra. A few scenes have brawling and drunkenness involved. Nicole Kidman's side, however, shows some of the lesser-seen gentility of Irish society. The Irish-Americans portrayed later are also classic Irish-American archetypes.



* ''Film/TheSecretOfRoanInish'': somewhat justified, as it's set in the late 1940s and in a community notable for its old-fashionedness. We briefly get to see other parts of Ireland, which are very industrial and modern

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* ''Film/TheSecretOfRoanInish'': somewhat justified, as it's set in the late 1940s and in a community notable for its old-fashionedness. We briefly get to see other parts of Ireland, which are very industrial and modern modern.



* Pat O'Shea's children's book ''Literature/TheHoundsOfTheMorrigan'' is mostly a genuinely well-written and atmospheric marrying of Irish myth and legend with modern characters - but for a few chapters it teeters dangerously on the bring of Disnified stage-Oirish. Having said this, it's the sort of children's book an adult can read and appreciate without shame.

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* Pat O'Shea's children's book ''Literature/TheHoundsOfTheMorrigan'' is mostly a genuinely well-written and atmospheric marrying of Irish myth and legend with modern characters - but for a few chapters it teeters dangerously on the bring of Disnified Disney-fied stage-Oirish. Having said this, it's the sort of children's book an adult can read and appreciate without shame.



* ''Series/{{Ballykissangel}}''

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* ''Series/{{Ballykissangel}}''''Series/{{Ballykissangel}}'':''Jesus Christ'', Ballykissangel. Doubly so as it's made by the BBC.


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** Notable for being a perfect storm of clichés, including mediaeval weaponry, dodgy accents, "Gaelic" and dark-haired "Black Irish" girls embroiled in romantic difficulty.


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** The documentary supplied on the box-set describes Countess Markiewicz as a "blood-thirsty aristocrat", missing out on her labour activism, involvement with the suffrage movement and the arts, House of Commons position and later Cabinet position in post-war Ireland & her role in the founding of the ICA.
4th May '16 4:53:35 PM nombretomado
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* [[CluelessAesop The Belfast sequence]] from the ''CaptainPlanetAndThePlaneteers'' episode "If It's Doomsday, It Must Be Belfast" was quite possibly the single most offensive example of both this trope and UsefulNotes/TheTroubles , making the struggle between Catholics and Protestants look like [[Theatre/WestSideStory The Jets against The Sharks]]. [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZQJrovKgrTw Highlights can be seen here]]. (And the comments. Dear God, the comments.)

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* [[CluelessAesop The Belfast sequence]] from the ''CaptainPlanetAndThePlaneteers'' ''WesternAnimation/CaptainPlanetAndThePlaneteers'' episode "If It's Doomsday, It Must Be Belfast" was quite possibly the single most offensive example of both this trope and UsefulNotes/TheTroubles , making the struggle between Catholics and Protestants look like [[Theatre/WestSideStory The Jets against The Sharks]]. [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZQJrovKgrTw Highlights can be seen here]]. (And the comments. Dear God, the comments.)
23rd Apr '16 2:49:47 PM Will
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* Siryn, Banshee, and Black Tom in ''Comicbook/XMen'' often lapse into this, depending on the writer.

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* The Cassidy family -- Siryn, Banshee, and Black Tom -- in ''Comicbook/XMen'' often lapse into this, depending on the writer.writer. They even own a castle full of leprechauns.



* The hero, Shamrock, from MarvelComics is from Ireland and is the main hero there until she retired to become a hairdresser. Her power, likewise, is [[WindsOfDestinyChange luck manipulation]], which, in an origin that is both extremely badass in its source and somewhat less impressive in its execution, she gains by channeling the spirits of innocent victims of war.

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* The hero, Shamrock, hero Shamrock from MarvelComics is from Ireland and is was the main hero there until she retired to become a hairdresser. Her power, likewise, power is [[WindsOfDestinyChange luck manipulation]], manipulation]] (as in, the luck of the Irish), which, in an origin that is both extremely badass in its source and somewhat less impressive in its execution, she gains by channeling the spirits of innocent victims of war.
20th Mar '16 12:53:56 PM AgProv
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* Pat O'Shea's children's book ''The Hounds of the Morrigan'' is mostly a genuinely well-written and atmospheric marrying of Irish myth and legend with modern characters - but for a few chapters it teeters dangerously on the bring of Disnified stage-Oirish. Having said this, it's the sort of children's book an adult can read and appreciate without shame.

to:

* Pat O'Shea's children's book ''The Hounds of the Morrigan'' ''Literature/TheHoundsOfTheMorrigan'' is mostly a genuinely well-written and atmospheric marrying of Irish myth and legend with modern characters - but for a few chapters it teeters dangerously on the bring of Disnified stage-Oirish. Having said this, it's the sort of children's book an adult can read and appreciate without shame.
17th Mar '16 11:39:49 AM strejda
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* ''Series/StarTrekVoyager'' (semi-justified as it wasn't meant to be the real Ireland, but a literal [[TheThemeParkVersion Theme Park Version]] on the holodeck).

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* ''Series/StarTrekVoyager'' (semi-justified as it wasn't (could be semi-justified not being meant to be the real Ireland, but a literal [[TheThemeParkVersion Theme Park Version]] on the holodeck).holodeck but it is said to be "completely authentic").
2nd Mar '16 12:30:25 AM KaminoNeko
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* The Zaffords in [[VideoGame/{{Borderlands2}} Borderlands 2]] are as Oirish as it's possible to be while living on a planet that doesn't actually include Ireland. Their logo is a clover, their leader is named Mick, their main hobby is booze, there is so much green, and Mick's accent is so thick you could stand on it.
22nd Jan '16 1:35:18 PM SnakeRambo
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* ''Series/MissionImpossible'' had an episode titled "Banshee". While it did manage to establish that there Protestants in Ireland, it managed to tick most of the other boxes by being set in a tiny village, have Irishmen who willing to start fighting at the drop of a hat, and the IMF's plan relied on the superstitious nature of one of the main villains.

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* ''Series/MissionImpossible'' had an episode titled "Banshee". While it did manage to establish that there are Protestants in Ireland, it managed to tick most of the other boxes by being set in a tiny village, have Irishmen who are willing to start fighting at the drop of a hat, and the IMF's plan relied on the superstitious nature of one of the main villains.
13th Jan '16 4:40:03 AM Morgenthaler
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* Also by Creator/JohnFord, ''TheRisingOfTheMoon'' consists of three short plays based on stories by Irish writers, filmed entirely on location and starring the Abbey Players. "A Minute's Wait" is especially Oirish, with feisty train personnel, lots of drinking, repeated discomfiting of a stuffy British couple, storytelling, singing, dancing and the local hurley team.
* ''TheMatchmaker'', featuring an American (Creator/JaneaneGarofalo) trying to do some genealogy for her boss in a town on the coast of Oireland. They play up the stereotypes, but there is also subversion, especially in scenes like the crotchety old bastard on Inis Mór who [[spoiler: swears at the protagonists in Irish before letting them into a quite nice house, mentions that he already gave this information over the phone the previous night, and offers them a cappucino.]]
* ''PSILoveYou'', the film of the book by Cecilia Ahern- contains sheep, stone walls, rolling green hills, a rendition of Fairytale of New York after a funeral, and a cringe inducing Oirish accent by Gerard Butler, a man from Glasgow.
* Played jaw-droppingly straight in the AmyAdams romcom ''LeapYear'' - superstitious elderly rural locals spouting cliches, bar brawls, tiny villages, cattle-blocked roads, ceilí bands, claddagh rings... it's impossible to ''dislike'' a film with AmyAdams in the lead role but you'd never believe it was made in 2009. (It also has an ''imaginative'' approach to Irish geography - seemingly [[ArtisticLicenseGeography the fastest way to reach Dublin by boat from Wales is via Cork.]])
* Possibly worse than ''LeapYear'' is the Eddie Griffen comedy ''IrishJam'' that also starred Anna Friel. The story involves am African American winning an Irish pub in a raffle somehow and who then has to save the village from the clutches of an evil landlord. The film is filled with such hideously bad stereotypes of Ireland that it wasn't even filmed in Ireland and contained not a single Irish actor (Friel has an Irish father but was born and grew up in England.) Empire magazine reviewed it mentioning that "presumably, any attempts to mount stereotypes this broad in actual Ireland would lead to kneecappings and punishment-beatings"
* ''FarAndAway'', particularly Tom Cruise's side of the story. He's a poor, plucky, hard-fightin' Irish farmer with a beautiful seaside plot. A few scenes have brawling and drunkenness involved. Nicole Kidman's side, however, shows some of the lesser-seen gentility of Irish society. The Irish-Americans portrayed later are also classic Irish-American archetypes.
* You see some of this in the Cloncraig scenes of ''TheStoryOfEstherCostello''. A bit more realistic version, showing grinding poverty, drenching rain, and pigs, not sheep. Esther was made blind and deaf in an explosion of stored weapons from "The Troubles" (1912-1922 version). The film even has Denis O'Dea as kindly old Father Devlin. Heather Sears (British) plays Esther with a soft Irish accent for her few lines at the very end. Esther's charity has shamrocks, girls in green outfits, and its theme song is a cheery version of "Wearing of the Green".

to:

* Also by Creator/JohnFord, ''TheRisingOfTheMoon'' ''Film/TheRisingOfTheMoon'' consists of three short plays based on stories by Irish writers, filmed entirely on location and starring the Abbey Players. "A Minute's Wait" is especially Oirish, with feisty train personnel, lots of drinking, repeated discomfiting of a stuffy British couple, storytelling, singing, dancing and the local hurley team.
* ''TheMatchmaker'', ''Film/TheMatchmaker'', featuring an American (Creator/JaneaneGarofalo) trying to do some genealogy for her boss in a town on the coast of Oireland. They play up the stereotypes, but there is also subversion, especially in scenes like the crotchety old bastard on Inis Mór who [[spoiler: swears at the protagonists in Irish before letting them into a quite nice house, mentions that he already gave this information over the phone the previous night, and offers them a cappucino.]]
* ''PSILoveYou'', ''Film/PSILoveYou'', the film of the book by Cecilia Ahern- contains sheep, stone walls, rolling green hills, a rendition of Fairytale of New York after a funeral, and a cringe inducing Oirish accent by Gerard Butler, a man from Glasgow.
* Played jaw-droppingly straight in the AmyAdams romcom ''LeapYear'' ''Film/LeapYear'' - superstitious elderly rural locals spouting cliches, bar brawls, tiny villages, cattle-blocked roads, ceilí bands, claddagh rings... it's impossible to ''dislike'' a film with AmyAdams in the lead role but you'd never believe it was made in 2009. (It also has an ''imaginative'' approach to Irish geography - seemingly [[ArtisticLicenseGeography the fastest way to reach Dublin by boat from Wales is via Cork.]])
* Possibly worse than ''LeapYear'' is the The Eddie Griffen comedy ''IrishJam'' ''Film/IrishJam'' that also starred Anna Friel. The story involves am African American winning an Irish pub in a raffle somehow and who then has to save the village from the clutches of an evil landlord. The film is filled with such hideously bad stereotypes of Ireland that it wasn't even filmed in Ireland and contained not a single Irish actor (Friel has an Irish father but was born and grew up in England.) Empire magazine reviewed it mentioning that "presumably, any attempts to mount stereotypes this broad in actual Ireland would lead to kneecappings and punishment-beatings"
* ''FarAndAway'', ''Film/FarAndAway'', particularly Tom Cruise's side of the story. He's a poor, plucky, hard-fightin' Irish farmer with a beautiful seaside plot. A few scenes have brawling and drunkenness involved. Nicole Kidman's side, however, shows some of the lesser-seen gentility of Irish society. The Irish-Americans portrayed later are also classic Irish-American archetypes.
* You see some of this in the Cloncraig scenes of ''TheStoryOfEstherCostello''.''Film/TheStoryOfEstherCostello''. A bit more realistic version, showing grinding poverty, drenching rain, and pigs, not sheep. Esther was made blind and deaf in an explosion of stored weapons from "The Troubles" (1912-1922 version). The film even has Denis O'Dea as kindly old Father Devlin. Heather Sears (British) plays Esther with a soft Irish accent for her few lines at the very end. Esther's charity has shamrocks, girls in green outfits, and its theme song is a cheery version of "Wearing of the Green".



* WilliamShakespeare and his fellow Elizabethan dramatists were among the first to record the Oirish stereotype in literature, albeit in a markedly less affectionate form than its modern equivalent. Shakespeare describes the Irish as "rough, rug-headed kernes" with "bloudy devilish hand[s]". His notorious Oirish character, MacMorris from ''Literature/HenryV'', declares, "Of my nation! What ish my nation? Ish a villain, and a bastard, and a knave, and a rascal. What ish my nation? Who talks of my nation?" Presumably the Oirish stereotype then was that all Irish spoke like SeanConnery. This unflattering depiction is largely due to the fact that England was facing numerous uprisings from the native Irish population, something they obviously ensured would [[UsefulNotes/OliverCromwell never]], [[HanoverStuartWars ever]], [[UsefulNotes/TheIrishRevolution ever]], ''[[TheTroubles ever]]'' happen again.

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* WilliamShakespeare Creator/WilliamShakespeare and his fellow Elizabethan dramatists were among the first to record the Oirish stereotype in literature, albeit in a markedly less affectionate form than its modern equivalent. Shakespeare describes the Irish as "rough, rug-headed kernes" with "bloudy devilish hand[s]". His notorious Oirish character, MacMorris from ''Literature/HenryV'', declares, "Of my nation! What ish my nation? Ish a villain, and a bastard, and a knave, and a rascal. What ish my nation? Who talks of my nation?" Presumably the Oirish stereotype then was that all Irish spoke like SeanConnery. This unflattering depiction is largely due to the fact that England was facing numerous uprisings from the native Irish population, something they obviously ensured would [[UsefulNotes/OliverCromwell never]], [[HanoverStuartWars ever]], [[UsefulNotes/TheIrishRevolution ever]], ''[[TheTroubles ever]]'' happen again.
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