History Main / Oireland

22nd Jan '16 1:35:18 PM SnakeRambo
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* ''Series/MissionImpossible'' had an episode titled "Banshee". While it did manage to establish that there Protestants in Ireland, it managed to tick most of the other boxes by being set in a tiny village, have Irishmen who willing to start fighting at the drop of a hat, and the IMF's plan relied on the superstitious nature of one of the main villains.
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* ''Series/MissionImpossible'' had an episode titled "Banshee". While it did manage to establish that there are Protestants in Ireland, it managed to tick most of the other boxes by being set in a tiny village, have Irishmen who are willing to start fighting at the drop of a hat, and the IMF's plan relied on the superstitious nature of one of the main villains.
13th Jan '16 4:40:03 AM Morgenthaler
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Added namespaces. Word Cruft.
* Also by Creator/JohnFord, ''TheRisingOfTheMoon'' consists of three short plays based on stories by Irish writers, filmed entirely on location and starring the Abbey Players. "A Minute's Wait" is especially Oirish, with feisty train personnel, lots of drinking, repeated discomfiting of a stuffy British couple, storytelling, singing, dancing and the local hurley team. * ''TheMatchmaker'', featuring an American (Creator/JaneaneGarofalo) trying to do some genealogy for her boss in a town on the coast of Oireland. They play up the stereotypes, but there is also subversion, especially in scenes like the crotchety old bastard on Inis Mór who [[spoiler: swears at the protagonists in Irish before letting them into a quite nice house, mentions that he already gave this information over the phone the previous night, and offers them a cappucino.]] * ''PSILoveYou'', the film of the book by Cecilia Ahern- contains sheep, stone walls, rolling green hills, a rendition of Fairytale of New York after a funeral, and a cringe inducing Oirish accent by Gerard Butler, a man from Glasgow. * Played jaw-droppingly straight in the AmyAdams romcom ''LeapYear'' - superstitious elderly rural locals spouting cliches, bar brawls, tiny villages, cattle-blocked roads, ceilí bands, claddagh rings... it's impossible to ''dislike'' a film with AmyAdams in the lead role but you'd never believe it was made in 2009. (It also has an ''imaginative'' approach to Irish geography - seemingly [[ArtisticLicenseGeography the fastest way to reach Dublin by boat from Wales is via Cork.]]) * Possibly worse than ''LeapYear'' is the Eddie Griffen comedy ''IrishJam'' that also starred Anna Friel. The story involves am African American winning an Irish pub in a raffle somehow and who then has to save the village from the clutches of an evil landlord. The film is filled with such hideously bad stereotypes of Ireland that it wasn't even filmed in Ireland and contained not a single Irish actor (Friel has an Irish father but was born and grew up in England.) Empire magazine reviewed it mentioning that "presumably, any attempts to mount stereotypes this broad in actual Ireland would lead to kneecappings and punishment-beatings" * ''FarAndAway'', particularly Tom Cruise's side of the story. He's a poor, plucky, hard-fightin' Irish farmer with a beautiful seaside plot. A few scenes have brawling and drunkenness involved. Nicole Kidman's side, however, shows some of the lesser-seen gentility of Irish society. The Irish-Americans portrayed later are also classic Irish-American archetypes. * You see some of this in the Cloncraig scenes of ''TheStoryOfEstherCostello''. A bit more realistic version, showing grinding poverty, drenching rain, and pigs, not sheep. Esther was made blind and deaf in an explosion of stored weapons from "The Troubles" (1912-1922 version). The film even has Denis O'Dea as kindly old Father Devlin. Heather Sears (British) plays Esther with a soft Irish accent for her few lines at the very end. Esther's charity has shamrocks, girls in green outfits, and its theme song is a cheery version of "Wearing of the Green".
to:
* Also by Creator/JohnFord, ''TheRisingOfTheMoon'' ''Film/TheRisingOfTheMoon'' consists of three short plays based on stories by Irish writers, filmed entirely on location and starring the Abbey Players. "A Minute's Wait" is especially Oirish, with feisty train personnel, lots of drinking, repeated discomfiting of a stuffy British couple, storytelling, singing, dancing and the local hurley team. * ''TheMatchmaker'', ''Film/TheMatchmaker'', featuring an American (Creator/JaneaneGarofalo) trying to do some genealogy for her boss in a town on the coast of Oireland. They play up the stereotypes, but there is also subversion, especially in scenes like the crotchety old bastard on Inis Mór who [[spoiler: swears at the protagonists in Irish before letting them into a quite nice house, mentions that he already gave this information over the phone the previous night, and offers them a cappucino.]] * ''PSILoveYou'', ''Film/PSILoveYou'', the film of the book by Cecilia Ahern- contains sheep, stone walls, rolling green hills, a rendition of Fairytale of New York after a funeral, and a cringe inducing Oirish accent by Gerard Butler, a man from Glasgow. * Played jaw-droppingly straight in the AmyAdams romcom ''LeapYear'' ''Film/LeapYear'' - superstitious elderly rural locals spouting cliches, bar brawls, tiny villages, cattle-blocked roads, ceilí bands, claddagh rings... it's impossible to ''dislike'' a film with AmyAdams in the lead role but you'd never believe it was made in 2009. (It also has an ''imaginative'' approach to Irish geography - seemingly [[ArtisticLicenseGeography the fastest way to reach Dublin by boat from Wales is via Cork.]]) * Possibly worse than ''LeapYear'' is the The Eddie Griffen comedy ''IrishJam'' ''Film/IrishJam'' that also starred Anna Friel. The story involves am African American winning an Irish pub in a raffle somehow and who then has to save the village from the clutches of an evil landlord. The film is filled with such hideously bad stereotypes of Ireland that it wasn't even filmed in Ireland and contained not a single Irish actor (Friel has an Irish father but was born and grew up in England.) Empire magazine reviewed it mentioning that "presumably, any attempts to mount stereotypes this broad in actual Ireland would lead to kneecappings and punishment-beatings" * ''FarAndAway'', ''Film/FarAndAway'', particularly Tom Cruise's side of the story. He's a poor, plucky, hard-fightin' Irish farmer with a beautiful seaside plot. A few scenes have brawling and drunkenness involved. Nicole Kidman's side, however, shows some of the lesser-seen gentility of Irish society. The Irish-Americans portrayed later are also classic Irish-American archetypes. * You see some of this in the Cloncraig scenes of ''TheStoryOfEstherCostello''.''Film/TheStoryOfEstherCostello''. A bit more realistic version, showing grinding poverty, drenching rain, and pigs, not sheep. Esther was made blind and deaf in an explosion of stored weapons from "The Troubles" (1912-1922 version). The film even has Denis O'Dea as kindly old Father Devlin. Heather Sears (British) plays Esther with a soft Irish accent for her few lines at the very end. Esther's charity has shamrocks, girls in green outfits, and its theme song is a cheery version of "Wearing of the Green".

* WilliamShakespeare and his fellow Elizabethan dramatists were among the first to record the Oirish stereotype in literature, albeit in a markedly less affectionate form than its modern equivalent. Shakespeare describes the Irish as "rough, rug-headed kernes" with "bloudy devilish hand[s]". His notorious Oirish character, MacMorris from ''Literature/HenryV'', declares, "Of my nation! What ish my nation? Ish a villain, and a bastard, and a knave, and a rascal. What ish my nation? Who talks of my nation?" Presumably the Oirish stereotype then was that all Irish spoke like SeanConnery. This unflattering depiction is largely due to the fact that England was facing numerous uprisings from the native Irish population, something they obviously ensured would [[UsefulNotes/OliverCromwell never]], [[HanoverStuartWars ever]], [[UsefulNotes/TheIrishRevolution ever]], ''[[TheTroubles ever]]'' happen again.
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* WilliamShakespeare Creator/WilliamShakespeare and his fellow Elizabethan dramatists were among the first to record the Oirish stereotype in literature, albeit in a markedly less affectionate form than its modern equivalent. Shakespeare describes the Irish as "rough, rug-headed kernes" with "bloudy devilish hand[s]". His notorious Oirish character, MacMorris from ''Literature/HenryV'', declares, "Of my nation! What ish my nation? Ish a villain, and a bastard, and a knave, and a rascal. What ish my nation? Who talks of my nation?" Presumably the Oirish stereotype then was that all Irish spoke like SeanConnery. This unflattering depiction is largely due to the fact that England was facing numerous uprisings from the native Irish population, something they obviously ensured would [[UsefulNotes/OliverCromwell never]], [[HanoverStuartWars ever]], [[UsefulNotes/TheIrishRevolution ever]], ''[[TheTroubles ever]]'' happen again.
6th Jan '16 5:00:39 AM Badger96
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Added DiffLines:
**They do tend (well, JBL tends) to play up that the Irish "love to fight". And his moveset includes the "Irish Curse" backbreaker, the "Brogue Kick" and the cloverleaf, which, while an actual legit term, was probably incorporated for the name.
4th Jan '16 2:19:19 PM nombretomado
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* Siryn, Banshee, and Black Tom in ''Comicbook/{{X-Men}}'' often lapse into this, depending on the writer. --> "[[TwistedToyfareTheatre And if'n ye cannae tell, I'm Irish.]]"
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* Siryn, Banshee, and Black Tom in ''Comicbook/{{X-Men}}'' ''Comicbook/XMen'' often lapse into this, depending on the writer. --> "[[TwistedToyfareTheatre "[[ComicStrip/TwistedToyfareTheatre And if'n ye cannae tell, I'm Irish.]]"
26th Dec '15 5:42:42 PM jormis29
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* Potatoes. Lots of potatoes. After their introduction from the Americas, the calorie-dense potatoes became the main diet of the Irish due to British policy reducing the size of family plots. Potatoes became permanently ingrained in Irish stereotypes when UsefulNotes/IrishPotatoFamine caused a massive influx of Irish immigrants to America.
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* Potatoes. Lots of potatoes. After their introduction from the Americas, the calorie-dense potatoes became the main diet of the Irish due to British policy reducing the size of family plots. Potatoes became permanently ingrained in Irish stereotypes when the UsefulNotes/IrishPotatoFamine caused a massive influx of Irish immigrants to America.
26th Dec '15 5:41:37 PM jormis29
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* Potatoes. Lots of potatoes. After their introduction from the Americas, the calorie-dense potatoes became the main diet of the Irish due to British policy reducing the size of family plots. Potatoes became permanently ingrained in Irish stereotypes when the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Famine_%28Ireland%29 The Irish Potato Famine]] caused a massive influx of Irish immigrants to America.
to:
* Potatoes. Lots of potatoes. After their introduction from the Americas, the calorie-dense potatoes became the main diet of the Irish due to British policy reducing the size of family plots. Potatoes became permanently ingrained in Irish stereotypes when the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Famine_%28Ireland%29 The Irish Potato Famine]] UsefulNotes/IrishPotatoFamine caused a massive influx of Irish immigrants to America.
26th Dec '15 10:06:31 AM SMARTALIENQT
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* The 'Irish R.M.' had a series adaptation (actually very good, and this comes from a half-Irishman), which skits, parodies, plays seriously and generally messes around with pre-independence (late Victorian until 1910) Ireland - in the little Irish town of Skebawn everyone is either drunk, or about to sell you a dud horse. The only tune played is 'Haste to the Wedding', and Irishmen are either lovable scamps or ruffians. However, it is actually kind hearted - the Irish villains are non-existent, the most unlikable characters are English (e.g. Lady Knox, when set against an Irish 'villain' like Tom Sheehy or Slipper. One of the main characters is Irish (in the twinkly-eyed scamp tradition) against the English straight-man, shebeens, pig's trotters, poteen and the like is trooped out mercilessly, but it is not at all malicious - quote [Slipper the groom] 'The English and the Irish understand each other like the fox and the hound,' [Lady Yeates] 'But which is which?' [Slipper] 'Ah well, if we knew that, we'd know everything!'. There is a Catholic Nationalist canon, and Roman Catholicism is skitted (the redoubtable Mrs Cadogan (pronounced kay-de-GAWN) is an example), but rather like Jeeves and Wooster, it avoids being offensive.
to:
* [[Series/TheIrishRM The 'Irish Irish R.M.' had a series adaptation adaptation]] (actually very good, and this comes from a half-Irishman), which skits, parodies, plays seriously and generally messes around with pre-independence (late Victorian until 1910) Ireland - in the little Irish town of Skebawn everyone is either drunk, or about to sell you a dud horse. The only tune played is 'Haste to the Wedding', and Irishmen are either lovable scamps or ruffians. However, it is actually kind hearted - the Irish villains are non-existent, the most unlikable characters are English (e.g. Lady Knox, when set against an Irish 'villain' like Tom Sheehy or Slipper. One of the main characters is Irish (in the twinkly-eyed scamp tradition) against the English straight-man, shebeens, pig's trotters, poteen and the like is trooped out mercilessly, but it is not at all malicious - quote [Slipper the groom] 'The English and the Irish understand each other like the fox and the hound,' [Lady Yeates] 'But which is which?' [Slipper] 'Ah well, if we knew that, we'd know everything!'. There is a Catholic Nationalist canon, and Roman Catholicism is skitted (the redoubtable Mrs Cadogan (pronounced kay-de-GAWN) is an example), but rather like Jeeves and Wooster, it avoids being offensive.
18th Dec '15 10:52:10 PM nombretomado
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* Roy [=McManus=] from ''[[ShadowHearts Shadow Hearts From The New World]]''. An ill-tempered, violent and power hungry Irish gang boss, [=McManus=] tried to seize up Chicago while Capone was locked in [[TheAlcatraz Alcatraz]]. He also had a most unrequited crush on Capone's sister Edna that led him to kidnap her. Sadly for both of them, Edna did not return his feelings and an enraged [=McManus=] pulled a gun and shot her dead.
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* Roy [=McManus=] from ''[[ShadowHearts Shadow Hearts From The New World]]''.''VideoGame/ShadowHeartsFromTheNewWorld''. An ill-tempered, violent and power hungry Irish gang boss, [=McManus=] tried to seize up Chicago while Capone was locked in [[TheAlcatraz Alcatraz]]. He also had a most unrequited crush on Capone's sister Edna that led him to kidnap her. Sadly for both of them, Edna did not return his feelings and an enraged [=McManus=] pulled a gun and shot her dead.
5th Sep '15 8:53:51 PM Minni128
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10th Aug '15 10:47:09 AM moloch
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* ''Everybody'' drinks Guinness to the point where it could have its own trope. In reality, lager and cider are far more popular in Ireland, especially amongst younger people, as is Irish pale/red ale (e.g. Smithwick's). Other brands of stout (such as Murphy's or Beamish) are ignored in fiction. That said, Guinness ''is'' popular in its Greater Dublin home, while Murphy's and Beamish are popular in western Ireland (hence the prominence of Guinness--non-Irish tend to ignore Cork).
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* ''Everybody'' drinks Guinness to the point where it could have its own trope. In reality, lager and cider are far more popular in Ireland, especially amongst younger people, as is Irish pale/red ale (e.g. Smithwick's). Other brands of stout (such as Murphy's or Beamish) are ignored in fiction. That said, Guinness ''is'' popular in its Greater Dublin home, while Murphy's and Beamish are popular in western Ireland (hence the prominence of Guinness--non-Irish tend to ignore Cork). Cork). And it's never brought up that a ''very'' Republican character mightn't touch Guinness at all, as the Guinness dynasty were all prominent Unionists.[[note]]This one is very much a fantastical stereotype these days, as Guinness is just owned by MegaCorp Diageo, but once it was surprisingly prominent.[[/note]]
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