History Main / Obviousbeta

12th Jul '16 1:07:52 AM Medinoc
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* ''VideoGame/MakaMaka'' was an obscure Japanese-exclusive RPG had several obviously unfinished parts and many bugs, some of which are [[GameBreaker game breaking]]. In fact, word has it that the game was released in its prototype form due to time constraints.

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* ''VideoGame/MakaMaka'' was an obscure Japanese-exclusive RPG had several obviously unfinished parts and many bugs, some of which are [[GameBreaker game breaking]].{{game breaking| bug}}. In fact, word has it that the game was released in its prototype form due to time constraints.
11th Jul '16 8:44:06 AM Midna
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* ''VideoGame/MakaMaka'': An obscure Japanese-exclusive RPG had several obviously unfinished parts and many bugs, some of which are [[GameBreaker game breaking]]. In fact, word has it that the game was released in its prototype form due to time constraints.

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* ''VideoGame/MakaMaka'': An ''VideoGame/MakaMaka'' was an obscure Japanese-exclusive RPG had several obviously unfinished parts and many bugs, some of which are [[GameBreaker game breaking]]. In fact, word has it that the game was released in its prototype form due to time constraints.



* ''VideoGame/StarOcean1'': The original SFC version came with several crashing bugs, an item creation system whose success rate in some circumstances was so low it almost wasn't worth trying, items that were obviously meant to exist (and referenced in places) but couldn't be found, and a final dungeon that (story-wise) came out of nowhere on a planet you couldn't explore. The enhanced remake for the PSP corrected most of these issues.

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* ''VideoGame/StarOcean1'': The original ''VideoGame/StarOcean1'' on SFC version came with several crashing bugs, an item creation system whose success rate in some circumstances was so low it almost wasn't worth trying, items that were obviously meant to exist (and referenced in places) but couldn't be found, and a final dungeon that (story-wise) came out of nowhere on a planet you couldn't explore. The enhanced remake for the PSP corrected most of these issues.



* ''Annet Futatabi'' (''Annet Again''): A somewhat obscure Japanese Sega Mega CD sequel to the Genesis semi-classic ''VideoGame/ElViento'' that was released in a very unfinished state. The protagonist's flashy spells are all unfinished, usually resulting in just a single animation frame blinking in and out. Basic combat controls work correctly, but enemies swarm you any time you get knocked down, effectively making getting up an impossibility. Enemies and even bosses will occasionally wander off screen and not return for anywhere between a few minutes and never, making the game randomly unwinnable. It is little surprise that the game was never released outside Japan.
* ''VideoGame/JurassicPark'': While not buggy, this game was released in a very unfinished state. Velociraptors, for instance, were the scariest and deadliest dinosaurs in the film, but here became slow, lumbering idiots who basically farted about the levels waiting to get shot, and the mighty T. rex can be thwarted as easily as chucking a single grenade at her and strolling by as she's stunned. Two things support the theory that it was a rushed project: the first is that the actual beta ROM is almost identical to the finished product, and the second is that developer Blue Sky software later released a loose sequel ''VideoGame/JurassicParkRampageEdition'' which ratcheted up the action and made all the dinosaurs significantly more dangerous enemies (for instance, Velociraptor encounters are now downright terrifying because of their aggressiveness, and the T. rex still only appears from the shoulders up, but now she ''chases you''). While the original was still an okay game, it's pretty obvious that ''Rampage Edition'' was the version Blue Sky meant to make the first time.
* ''[[VideoGame/Sonic3AndKnuckles Sonic the Hedgehog 3]]'': The initial release, while nowhere near as bad as other examples on this page, did have a load of glitches (such as getting stuck in the walls in Carnival Night Zone). It was very clearly rushed, as most evident because it was split into two parts to meet the deadline. Most of these were fixed when locked onto ''Sonic & Knuckles'', but others are only possible in the locked-on game (such as being able to take Hyper Sonic off-screen and get him to access areas only Knuckles should be able to reach).

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* ''Annet Futatabi'' (''Annet Again''): A Again'', a somewhat obscure Japanese Sega Mega CD sequel to the Genesis semi-classic ''VideoGame/ElViento'' that was released in a very unfinished state. The protagonist's flashy spells are all unfinished, usually resulting in just a single animation frame blinking in and out. Basic combat controls work correctly, but enemies swarm you any time you get knocked down, effectively making getting up an impossibility. Enemies and even bosses will occasionally wander off screen and not return for anywhere between a few minutes and never, making the game randomly unwinnable. It is little surprise that the game was never released outside Japan.
* ''VideoGame/JurassicPark'': While ''VideoGame/JurassicPark'', while not buggy, this game was released in a very unfinished state. Velociraptors, for instance, were the scariest and deadliest dinosaurs in the film, but here became slow, lumbering idiots who basically farted about the levels waiting to get shot, and the mighty T. rex can be thwarted as easily as chucking a single grenade at her and strolling by as she's stunned. Two things support the theory that it was a rushed project: the first is that the actual beta ROM is almost identical to the finished product, and the second is that developer Blue Sky software later released a loose sequel ''VideoGame/JurassicParkRampageEdition'' which ratcheted up the action and made all the dinosaurs significantly more dangerous enemies (for instance, Velociraptor encounters are now downright terrifying because of their aggressiveness, and the T. rex still only appears from the shoulders up, but now she ''chases you''). While the original was still an okay game, it's pretty obvious that ''Rampage Edition'' was the version Blue Sky meant to make the first time.
* ''[[VideoGame/Sonic3AndKnuckles Sonic the Hedgehog 3]]'': The initial release, 3]]'', while nowhere near as bad as other examples on this page, did have a load of glitches (such as getting stuck in the walls in Carnival Night Zone). It was very clearly rushed, as most evident because it was split into two parts to meet the deadline. Most of these were fixed when locked onto ''Sonic & Knuckles'', but others are only possible in the locked-on game (such as being able to take Hyper Sonic off-screen and get him to access areas only Knuckles should be able to reach).



* ''VideoGame/CrashTwinsanity'': There are certain cinematics in the game that lack appropriate sound effects (in a couple cases, music), which makes it seem like parts of the game were rushed before release... and they very well ''were'', considering [[WhatCouldHaveBeen the sheer amount of cut content]] that one of the developers of the game [[http://crashmania.net/?menu=ts&page=concepts-1 decided to share on a Crash forum]]....

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* ''VideoGame/CrashTwinsanity'': There are certain cinematics in the game that lack ''VideoGame/CrashTwinsanity'' is lacking appropriate sound effects (in a couple cases, music), music) in certain cinematics, which makes it seem like parts of the game were rushed before release... and they very well ''were'', considering [[WhatCouldHaveBeen the sheer amount of cut content]] that one of the developers of the game [[http://crashmania.net/?menu=ts&page=concepts-1 decided to share on a Crash forum]]....
7th Jul '16 5:49:45 AM Quanyails
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* Kenneth the Page of ''Series/ThirtyRock'' once invented a game show similar to DealOrNoDeal in which contestants had to choose which model was holding a case full of solid gold. They caught on in no time that it was always the model struggling with a case full of heavy gold bricks.

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* Kenneth the Page of ''Series/ThirtyRock'' once invented a game show similar to DealOrNoDeal ''Series/DealOrNoDeal'' in which contestants had to choose which model was holding a case full of solid gold. They caught on in no time that it was always the model struggling with a case full of heavy gold bricks.
6th Jul '16 2:57:07 PM Quanyails
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* ''VideoGame/PlanetSide 2'' launched out of beta with beautiful grapichs paired with [[TechDemoGame massive performance issues]] due to a near total lack of optimization, and what little optimization it had only applied to a very specific set of hardware (Intel i5 or i7 CPU, NVIDIA GPU) that caused players on cheap $500 Intel rigs to have twice the framerate of players on monstrous $2,000 AMD setups. It launched with only two continents and a [[RiskStyleMap territory control system]] that made large direct fights very rare; players instead simply captured bases around the defenders and ignored them entirely. After release, the ''Operation Make Faster Game'' ([[FunWithAcronyms OMFG]]) update effectively doubled everyone's framerate and made the game playable on AMD hardware, along with loads of incremental content updates (such as a new map and a [[CoolCar sweet new dune buggy]]).

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* ''VideoGame/PlanetSide 2'' launched out of beta with beautiful grapichs graphics paired with [[TechDemoGame massive performance issues]] due to a near total lack of optimization, and what little optimization it had only applied to a very specific set of hardware (Intel i5 or i7 CPU, NVIDIA GPU) that caused players on cheap $500 Intel rigs to have twice the framerate of players on monstrous $2,000 AMD setups. It launched with only two continents and a [[RiskStyleMap territory control system]] that made large direct fights very rare; players instead simply captured bases around the defenders and ignored them entirely. After release, the ''Operation Make Faster Game'' ([[FunWithAcronyms OMFG]]) update effectively doubled everyone's framerate and made the game playable on AMD hardware, along with loads of incremental content updates (such as a new map and a [[CoolCar sweet new dune buggy]]).
5th Jul '16 5:40:40 AM GastonRabbit
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** [[VideoGame/PokemonRedAndBlue The original games]], especially the original ''Red'' and ''Green'', released only in Japan (after five years of development!), were notorious for this. The updated ''Blue'' engine (which was used for the international releases of ''Red'' and ''Green'', with ''Green'''s name being [[MarketBasedTitle changed]] to that of ''Blue''), despite fixing some of the more painful bugs, was still a mess, with the infamous Mew glitch, Glitch City, the old man exploit, and [[TheMissingno Missingno.]] (which is generally accessed via the aforementioned old man exploit), due to being a beta and because of some of the shortcuts taken to fit the game on the cartridge. In addition, several moves did not work as intended (e.g., Focus Energy, which ''lowered'' your crit chance instead of increasing it, and [[GameBreaker Psychic-types]] were immune to Ghost-type attacks by mistake). Even the UpdatedRerelease ''Yellow'' didn't fix much. By Generation II, which uses an upgraded engine, most of the bugs were fixed, but exploits involving the PC boxes that had a similar effect to the Mew glitch (e.g., manipulating cloning and PC boxes to get any Pokémon) remained. Note that this isn't always a bad thing -- the games were indeed playable (and many glitches you had to actually go ''out of your way'' to exploit) but it was one of those rare instances where they released a late beta and it actually ''worked''.

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** [[VideoGame/PokemonRedAndBlue The original games]], especially the original ''Red'' and ''Green'', released ''Green'' (released only in Japan (after Japan... after five years of development!), were notorious for this. The updated ''Blue'' engine (which was used for the international releases of ''Red'' and ''Green'', with ''Green'''s name being [[MarketBasedTitle changed]] to that of ''Blue''), despite fixing some of the more painful bugs, was still a mess, with the infamous Mew glitch, Glitch City, the old man exploit, and [[TheMissingno Missingno.]] (which is generally accessed via the aforementioned old man exploit), due to being a beta and because of some of the shortcuts taken to fit the game on the cartridge. In addition, several moves did not work as intended (e.g., Focus Energy, which ''lowered'' your crit chance instead of increasing it, and [[GameBreaker Psychic-types]] were immune to Ghost-type attacks by mistake). Even the UpdatedRerelease ''Yellow'' didn't fix much. By Generation II, which uses an upgraded engine, most of the bugs were fixed, but exploits involving the PC boxes that had a similar effect to the Mew glitch (e.g., manipulating cloning and PC boxes to get any Pokémon) remained. Note that this isn't always a bad thing -- the games were indeed playable (and many glitches you had to actually go ''out of your way'' to exploit) but it was one of those rare instances where they released a late beta and it actually ''worked''.



* The European version of ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaTheMinishCap'' appears to be based on an earlier, less polished build than every other version of the game, as noted on [[https://tcrf.net/The_Legend_of_Zelda:_The_Minish_Cap The Cutting Room Floor]]. For example, there are bugs that don't exist in the Japanese or North American versions (such as one Kinstone Fusion becoming unintentionally LostForever), features missing (such as the shop's Bomb Bag upgrade), and even a reference to the Fire Rod, an item that only exists in DummiedOut form (the figurine for Ice Wizzrobes says to use the Fire Rod on them in that version). The North American version, which came out after the European and Japanese releases, seems to be based directly on the final Japanese release (for example, the text saying to use the Fire Rod on Ice Wizzrobes now simply says to use fire in general).

to:

* The European version of ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaTheMinishCap'' appears to be based on an earlier, less polished build than every other version of the game, as noted on [[https://tcrf.net/The_Legend_of_Zelda:_The_Minish_Cap The Cutting Room Floor]]. For example, there are bugs that don't exist in the Japanese or North American versions (such as one Kinstone Fusion becoming unintentionally LostForever), features missing (such as the shop's Bomb Bag upgrade), and even a reference to the Fire Rod, an item that only exists in DummiedOut form (the figurine for Ice Wizzrobes says to use the Fire Rod on them in that version). The North American version, which came out after the European and Japanese releases, seems to be based directly on the final Japanese release (for example, the text saying to use the Fire Rod on Ice Wizzrobes now simply says to use fire in general).general, and Link does have access to a lantern in this game).
4th Jul '16 6:01:31 PM GastonRabbit
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** [[VideoGame/PokemonRedAndBlue The original games]], especially the original ''Red'' and ''Green'', released only in Japan (after five years of development!), were notorious for this. The updated ''Blue'' engine (which was used for the games released outside of Japan), despite fixing some of the more painful bugs, was still a mess, with the infamous Mew glitch, Glitch City, the old man exploit, as well as [[TheMissingno Missingno.]], due to being a beta and because of some of the shortcuts taken to fit the game on the cartridge. In addition, several moves did not work as intended (''e.g.'' Focus Energy, which ''lowered'' your crit chance instead of increasing it, and and [[GameBreaker Psychic-types]] were immune to Ghost-type attacks by mistake. Even the UpdatedRerelease ''Yellow'' didn't fix much. By Generation II, which uses an upgraded engine, most of the bugs were fixed, but exploits involving the PC boxes that had a similar effect to the Mew glitch (''i.e.'' manipulating cloning and PC boxes to get any Pokémon) remained. Note that this isn't always a bad thing -- the games were indeed playable (and many glitches you had to actually go ''out of your way'' to exploit) but it was one of those rare instances where they released a late beta and it actually ''worked''.
** There were a couple glitches that did affect normal gameplay. Several moves did not work as intended[[labelnote:Example]]Focus Energy, for example ''lowered'' your crit chance instead of increasing it.[[/labelnote]], and [[GameBreaker Psychic-types]] were immune to Ghost-type attacks [[FakeBalance (not that it mattered anyway since the only damaging Ghost attack had one of the lowest Base Damages in the game)]].

to:

** [[VideoGame/PokemonRedAndBlue The original games]], especially the original ''Red'' and ''Green'', released only in Japan (after five years of development!), were notorious for this. The updated ''Blue'' engine (which was used for the games released outside international releases of Japan), ''Red'' and ''Green'', with ''Green'''s name being [[MarketBasedTitle changed]] to that of ''Blue''), despite fixing some of the more painful bugs, was still a mess, with the infamous Mew glitch, Glitch City, the old man exploit, as well as and [[TheMissingno Missingno.]], ]] (which is generally accessed via the aforementioned old man exploit), due to being a beta and because of some of the shortcuts taken to fit the game on the cartridge. In addition, several moves did not work as intended (''e.(e.g.'' , Focus Energy, which ''lowered'' your crit chance instead of increasing it, and and [[GameBreaker Psychic-types]] were immune to Ghost-type attacks by mistake.mistake). Even the UpdatedRerelease ''Yellow'' didn't fix much. By Generation II, which uses an upgraded engine, most of the bugs were fixed, but exploits involving the PC boxes that had a similar effect to the Mew glitch (''i.e.'' (e.g., manipulating cloning and PC boxes to get any Pokémon) remained. Note that this isn't always a bad thing -- the games were indeed playable (and many glitches you had to actually go ''out of your way'' to exploit) but it was one of those rare instances where they released a late beta and it actually ''worked''.
** There were a couple glitches that did affect normal gameplay. Several moves did not work as intended[[labelnote:Example]]Focus Energy, for example ''lowered'' your crit chance instead of increasing it.[[/labelnote]], and [[GameBreaker Psychic-types]] were immune to Ghost-type attacks [[FakeBalance (not that it mattered anyway since the only damaging Ghost attack had one of the lowest Base Damages in the game)]].
''worked''.



** ''VideoGame/PokemonDiamondAndPearl'', while largely free of such glitches, are infamous for their sluggish frame rate. The sister version ''Platinum'' ends up feeling like the finished product.

to:

** ''VideoGame/PokemonDiamondAndPearl'', while largely free of such glitches, are infamous for their sluggish frame rate. The Their sister version ''Platinum'' version, ''Platinum'', ends up feeling like the finished product.



* ''VideoGame/The3rdBirthday'' is stable and plays alright, but the story is gibberish with virtually no internal consistency and a tendency to drop plot threads for no reason. Some of the material - particularly early in the game - is a final draft; but after the HalfwayPlotSwitch we end up cutting back and forth from an earlier draft of the script where Kyle was the lead villain and Cray has been visited by Isabella rather than Eve and turned into a Twisted, amongst several other inconsistencies.

to:

* ''VideoGame/The3rdBirthday'' is stable and plays alright, all right, but the story is gibberish with virtually no internal consistency and a tendency to drop plot threads for no reason. Some of the material - -- particularly early in the game - -- is a final draft; but after the HalfwayPlotSwitch we end up cutting back and forth from an earlier draft of the script where Kyle was the lead villain and Cray has been visited by Isabella rather than Eve and turned into a Twisted, amongst several other inconsistencies.inconsistencies.
* The European version of ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaTheMinishCap'' appears to be based on an earlier, less polished build than every other version of the game, as noted on [[https://tcrf.net/The_Legend_of_Zelda:_The_Minish_Cap The Cutting Room Floor]]. For example, there are bugs that don't exist in the Japanese or North American versions (such as one Kinstone Fusion becoming unintentionally LostForever), features missing (such as the shop's Bomb Bag upgrade), and even a reference to the Fire Rod, an item that only exists in DummiedOut form (the figurine for Ice Wizzrobes says to use the Fire Rod on them in that version). The North American version, which came out after the European and Japanese releases, seems to be based directly on the final Japanese release (for example, the text saying to use the Fire Rod on Ice Wizzrobes now simply says to use fire in general).



* The European version of ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaTheMinishCap'' appears to be based on an earlier, less polished build than every other version of the game, as noted on [[https://tcrf.net/The_Legend_of_Zelda:_The_Minish_Cap The Cutting Room Floor]]. For example, there are bugs that don't exist in the Japanese or North American versions (such as one Kinstone Fusion becoming unintentionally LostForever), features missing (such as the shop's Bomb Bag upgrade), and even a reference to the Fire Rod, an item that only exists in DummiedOut form (the figurine for Ice Wizzrobes says to use the Fire Rod on them in that version). The North American version, which came out after the European and Japanese releases, seems to be based directly on the final Japanese release (for example, the text saying to use the Fire Rod on Ice Wizzrobes now simply says to use fire).
1st Jul '16 12:12:49 PM Anddrix
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* ''VideoGame/{{Disciples}} III: Renaissance'' was a BaseBreaker for many reasons, but its glitchiness was universally reviled. Lowlights include long load times, bad triggers, and an overly aggressive AI that is content to ambush the player from offscreen and destroy his essential party. For an added bonus, due to the way the game's autosave works, such an ambush requires loading from a manually created save, as the autosave triggers at the end of the player's turn--meaning they have no resources to prevent it, even if they know it's coming.

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* ''VideoGame/{{Disciples}} III: Renaissance'' was a BaseBreaker for many reasons, but its Renaissance''. Its glitchiness was universally reviled. Lowlights include long load times, bad triggers, and an overly aggressive AI that is content to ambush the player from offscreen and destroy his essential party. For an added bonus, due to the way the game's autosave works, such an ambush requires loading from a manually created save, as the autosave triggers at the end of the player's turn--meaning they have no resources to prevent it, even if they know it's coming.
29th Jun '16 8:24:21 AM pinkdalek
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Added DiffLines:

* ''VideoGame/The3rdBirthday'' is stable and plays alright, but the story is gibberish with virtually no internal consistency and a tendency to drop plot threads for no reason. Some of the material - particularly early in the game - is a final draft; but after the HalfwayPlotSwitch we end up cutting back and forth from an earlier draft of the script where Kyle was the lead villain and Cray has been visited by Isabella rather than Eve and turned into a Twisted, amongst several other inconsistencies.
11th Jun '16 12:11:15 PM SolidSonicTH
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* ''Air Control'' was a game released on Steam that has errors apparant right from the beginning of gameplay. The player character's head moves around while selecting menu options, several debug buttons appear at times, the gameplay chaotically switches from one style and storyline to another, and giant green blocks presumably indicating something is clickable appears. It was eventually pulled from Steam, and there is still some debate as to if this was all [[StylisticSuck an intentional attempt at making a bad game]] to show how gullible people are to buying anything without getting review info, or if it really was rushed.

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* ''Air Control'' ''VideoGame/AirControl'' was a game released on Steam that has errors apparant right from the beginning of gameplay. The player character's head moves around while selecting menu options, several debug buttons appear at times, the gameplay chaotically switches from one style and storyline to another, and giant green blocks presumably indicating something is clickable appears. It was eventually pulled from Steam, and there is still some debate as to if this was all [[StylisticSuck an intentional attempt at making a bad game]] to show how gullible people are to buying anything without getting review info, or if it really was rushed.



* ''VideoGame/AirControl'' is more like an Obvious Pre-Alpha, because of the numerous bugs, the simultaneous mouselook and mouse cursor, and the fact that the menu and restart buttons don't work properly.
9th Jun '16 6:28:10 PM SolidSonicTH
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* ''VideoGame/GoatSimulator'' uses this trope as part of its charm (really virtually all of it). The game was made during a game jam that was designed to help the staffers at Coffee Stain Studios master working with the Unreal Engine 3 and was never meant for a full release. When MemeticMutation took hold and the game was highly desired by those who got to see it in action, the team decided to take the game into a full release but only fix the bugs that would cause the game to completely break operation, leaving all the other bugs and unrefined development work intact so as to retain the feel that gave the game its popularity. The result is the game is ''highly'' unpolished (for instance, going up the elevator to the coaster can cause the goat to phase through the floor and fall out if you ragdoll on the way up). The Steam store page even proclaims "MILLIONS OF BUGS" as a selling point for the game. RuleOfFunny in compiled code form, basically.

to:

* ''VideoGame/GoatSimulator'' uses this trope as part of its charm (really virtually all of it). The game was made during a game jam that was designed to help the staffers at Coffee Stain Studios master working with the Unreal Engine 3 and was never meant for a full release. When MemeticMutation took hold and the game was highly desired by those who got to see it in action, the team decided to take the game into a full release but only fix the bugs that would cause the game to completely break operation, leaving all the other bugs and unrefined development work intact so as to retain the feel that gave the game its popularity. The result is the game is ''highly'' unpolished (for instance, going up the elevator to the coaster can cause the goat to phase through the floor and fall out if you ragdoll on the way up). The Steam store page even proclaims "MILLIONS OF BUGS" as a selling point for the game. RuleOfFunny in compiled code form, basically. The game has been ported, faulty code and all, to other platforms and has also received new expansions (such as a zombie-themed or MMO-themed add-on packs). The short development time (roughly a month) and the cheap assets used for the game also allowed Coffee Stain Studios to make back what they spent to make the game in about ten minutes of putting it on sale.
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