History Main / NotThatKindofDoctor

5th Feb '16 9:57:17 AM Morgenthaler
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** Much like the ''Film/CitySlickers'' example above, he would still have enough basic medical training to assist in an emergency.
5th Feb '16 9:56:56 AM Morgenthaler
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Added namespaces.
* ''TheAbominableDrPhibes'' has two doctorates. One is in theology, and the other in acoustics.
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* ''TheAbominableDrPhibes'' ''Film/TheAbominableDrPhibes'' has two doctorates. One is in theology, and the other in acoustics.

* ''CitySlickers'' has a scene with two doctors needing to attend to an injured man because they're the only people in the group with first-aid training. The problem is that first-aid is all they can provide for him -- he needs a surgeon, but they're ''dentists''.
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* ''CitySlickers'' ''Film/CitySlickers'' has a scene with two doctors needing to attend to an injured man because they're the only people in the group with first-aid training. The problem is that first-aid is all they can provide for him -- he needs a surgeon, but they're ''dentists''.

* {{Inverted}} in ''TheSantaClause:'' When people refer to Neil as a doctor, Scott sarcastically replies "He's not a doctor, he's a ''psychiatrist.''" Psychiatrists actually ''are'' medical doctors, but most people seem to not know that.
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* {{Inverted}} in ''TheSantaClause:'' ''Film/TheSantaClause:'' When people refer to Neil as a doctor, Scott sarcastically replies "He's not a doctor, he's a ''psychiatrist.''" Psychiatrists actually ''are'' medical doctors, but most people seem to not know that.
3rd Feb '16 6:50:02 AM Morgenthaler
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* Buck Laughlin uses this for some WittyBanter in ''BestInShow'' while talking to Dr. Millbank, president of the Mayflower Kennel Club.
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* Buck Laughlin uses this for some WittyBanter in ''BestInShow'' ''Film/BestInShow'' while talking to Dr. Millbank, president of the Mayflower Kennel Club.

* Inverted with [[Film/TheIncredibleHulk Dr. Bruce Banner]] in Franchise/MarvelCinematicUniverse, as while he's a physicist, he is seen practicing medicine in the slums of Calcutta at the start of ''Film/TheAvengers''. However, TheStinger for ''Film/IronMan3'' has [[spoiler:Bruce say the line verbatim to Tony Stark, who has been telling the entire story of the movie to him as if Bruce were his psychotherapist.]]
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* Inverted with [[Film/TheIncredibleHulk Dr. Bruce Banner]] in Franchise/MarvelCinematicUniverse, as while he's a physicist, he is seen practicing medicine in the slums of Calcutta at the start of ''Film/TheAvengers''.''Film/TheAvengers2012''. However, TheStinger for ''Film/IronMan3'' has [[spoiler:Bruce say the line verbatim to Tony Stark, who has been telling the entire story of the movie to him as if Bruce were his psychotherapist.]]
21st Jan '16 9:52:33 AM narm00
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This trope stems from a modern convention: in the past, "Doctor" had a purely academic connotation -- the word itself derives from the Latin ''doctor'', meaning "teacher", meaning that scholar is liscenced to lecture at a university. Later, the meaning of the word ''Doctor'' narrowed down to mean that the holder has a doctorate degree: M.D. = ''Medicinę Doctor'' (Doctor of Medicine), or [=Ph.D.=] = ''Philosophię Doctor'' (Doctor of Philosophy) At some point, the word (in English, at least) began to shift from being the title of a learned person/a person with a doctorate to meaning the same as "physician". Originally, the M.D. was a doctorate in medicine, but in some places, like the US and Canada, it became the first professional degree. (In the UK and Ireland an MB [=ChB=] -- bachelor of medicine & surgery -- are the first ''undergraduate'' degrees; holders are addressed as "Doctor" regardless. While Surgeons -- which require a graduate degree, equivalent to a North American MD in length of education -- are only addressed as Mr, Mrs, Miss, or Ms in a form of reverse snobbery.)[[note]]Historically, being a doctor (the equivalent to GP today) was considered a more upper-class and gentlemanly career than surgery, as they do not have to get their hands dirty. Most surgeons were simply working-class barbers. This was in fact the origin of the iconic barber's pole, which [[OlderThanTheyThink dates back to medieval times]]; the red stripe represents bloody bandages, with the blue stripe being a much more recent addition that began in the United States (due to the national colors) and has spread from there. However when the modern era rolled around and surgery become a more specialized and prestigious line of work than ''mere'' doctoring, the surgeons refused the title of Doctor as a sort of passive-aggressive middle-finger to the snobs who denied them the title 300-ish years previously.[[/note]] It is easy to see how the term "doctor" was slowly divorced from its academic roots. This has gone so far that it is common for it to be thought that "real" doctors are physicians... which brings us to this trope. And MDEnvy to boot.
to:
This trope stems from a modern convention: in the past, "Doctor" had a purely academic connotation -- the word itself derives from the Latin ''doctor'', meaning "teacher", meaning that scholar is liscenced licenced to lecture at a university. Later, the meaning of the word ''Doctor'' narrowed down to mean that the holder has a doctorate degree: M.D. = ''Medicinę Doctor'' (Doctor of Medicine), or [=Ph.D.=] = ''Philosophię Doctor'' (Doctor of Philosophy) At some point, the word (in English, at least) began to shift from being the title of a learned person/a person with a doctorate to meaning the same as "physician". Originally, the M.D. was a doctorate in medicine, but in some places, like the US and Canada, it became the first professional degree. (In the UK and Ireland an MB [=ChB=] -- bachelor of medicine & surgery -- primarily abbreviated as MB [=ChB=], though it can vary depending on university -- are the first ''undergraduate'' degrees; holders are addressed as "Doctor" regardless. While Surgeons Meanwhile, surgeons -- which require a graduate degree, equivalent to a North American MD in length of education -- are only addressed as Mr, Mrs, Miss, or Ms in a form of reverse snobbery.)[[note]]Historically, being a doctor (the equivalent to GP today) was considered a more upper-class and gentlemanly career than surgery, as they do not have to get their hands dirty. Most surgeons were simply working-class barbers. This was in fact the origin of the iconic barber's pole, which [[OlderThanTheyThink dates back to medieval times]]; the red stripe represents bloody bandages, with the blue stripe being a much more recent addition that began in the United States (due to the national colors) and has spread from there. However when the modern era rolled around and surgery become a more specialized and prestigious line of work than ''mere'' doctoring, the surgeons refused the title of Doctor as a sort of passive-aggressive middle-finger to the snobs who denied them the title 300-ish years previously.[[/note]] It is easy to see how the term "doctor" was slowly divorced from its academic roots. This has gone so far that it is common for it to be thought that "real" doctors are physicians... which brings us to this trope. And MDEnvy to boot.

* Dr. Shiouji from ''Manga/ExcelSaga'' specifically states that out of his many doctorates ''none'' are in medicine, but it doesn't matter that much in the end as he's also an Main/OmnidisciplinaryScientist who knows all the medical terminology and has previously dissected Iwata's dead body to translocate his brain into a mechanical vessel.
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* Dr. Shiouji from ''Manga/ExcelSaga'' specifically states that out of his many doctorates ''none'' are in medicine, but it doesn't matter that much in the end as he's also an Main/OmnidisciplinaryScientist OmnidisciplinaryScientist who knows all the medical terminology and has previously dissected Iwata's dead body to translocate his brain into a mechanical vessel.

* [[WhosOnFirst Reversed]] in ''SayonaraZetsubouSensei'', when Kafuka Fuura walks into the Itoshiki Clinic for a check-up and initially sees Dr. Mikoto Itoshiki, whom she initially confuses for his younger brother/her teacher Nozomu.
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* [[WhosOnFirst Reversed]] in ''SayonaraZetsubouSensei'', ''Manga/SayonaraZetsubouSensei'', when Kafuka Fuura walks into the Itoshiki Clinic for a check-up and initially sees Dr. Mikoto Itoshiki, whom she initially confuses for his younger brother/her teacher Nozomu.

* Doctor Nanjo from UminekoNoNakuKoroNi practices medicine, but he's ''still'' not that kind of doctor, since the characters need to determine a cause of death, but Nanjo is a general practitioner and thus not qualified to examine corpses. The first death scene in the VN even [[DiscussedTrope mentions this]].
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* Doctor Nanjo from UminekoNoNakuKoroNi VisualNovel/UminekoNoNakuKoroNi practices medicine, but he's ''still'' not that kind of doctor, since the characters need to determine a cause of death, but Nanjo is a general practitioner and thus not qualified to examine corpses. The first death scene in the VN even [[DiscussedTrope mentions this]].

** Being a doctor of 'everything' has in fact been his traditional response to the question of what kind of doctor he is from at least the era of the Second Doctor. (Of course, the more snarky and acerbic Twelfth Doctor said his specialty was intestinal parasites when ''he'' was asked that.) However, whenever one of his companions knows medicine, matters medical will be left to the one who ''is'' that kind of doctor. ''However'' however, you'll ''never'' see him held back by a lack of knowledge of medicine when [[FreemaAgyeman Martha Jones]] or [[ArthurDarvill Rory Williams]] ''isn't'' in the room.
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** Being a doctor of 'everything' has in fact been his traditional response to the question of what kind of doctor he is from at least the era of the Second Doctor. (Of course, the more snarky and acerbic Twelfth Doctor said his specialty was intestinal parasites when ''he'' was asked that.) However, whenever one of his companions knows medicine, matters medical will be left to the one who ''is'' that kind of doctor. ''However'' however, you'll ''never'' see him held back by a lack of knowledge of medicine when [[FreemaAgyeman [[Creator/FreemaAgyeman Martha Jones]] or [[ArthurDarvill [[Creator/ArthurDarvill Rory Williams]] ''isn't'' in the room.
4th Jan '16 8:28:53 PM Berrenta
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Sinkhole
* Parodied regularly in ''Series/TheColbertReport'': after getting his honorary Doctorate of Fine Arts from Knox College, Stephen immediately started assuming that he could perform operations. He even started a recurring segment called "[[YesButWhatDoesZataproximetacineDO Cheating Death]], with Dr. Stephen T Colbert, ''DFA''".
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* Parodied regularly in ''Series/TheColbertReport'': after getting his honorary Doctorate of Fine Arts from Knox College, Stephen immediately started assuming that he could perform operations. He even started a recurring segment called "[[YesButWhatDoesZataproximetacineDO Cheating Death]], "Cheating Death, with Dr. Stephen T Colbert, ''DFA''".
28th Dec '15 12:58:51 PM Anddrix
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* DoctorDoom dropped out of school after his FreakLabAccident and then proceeded to learn magic and take over a country. He never actually finished his Doctorate. No one would argue that he doesn't deserve one, but he simply never finished the coursework. Ordering the [[{{Ruritania}} University of Latveria]] to give him a degree (what the fanon suggests he did) doesn't count, even though the thesis defense would have been...interesting.
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* DoctorDoom Doctor Doom dropped out of school after his FreakLabAccident and then proceeded to learn magic and take over a country. He never actually finished his Doctorate. No one would argue that he doesn't deserve one, but he simply never finished the coursework. Ordering the [[{{Ruritania}} University of Latveria]] to give him a degree (what the fanon suggests he did) doesn't count, even though the thesis defense would have been...interesting.
27th Dec '15 11:26:39 AM gemmabeta2
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This trope stems from a modern convention: in the past, "Doctor" had a purely academic connotation -- the word itself derives from the Latin ''doctor'', meaning "teacher", meaning that scholar is liscenced to lecture at a university. Later, the meaning of the word **Doctor** narrowed down to mean that the holder has a doctorate degree: M.D. = **Medicinae Doctor** (Doctor of Medicine), or [=Ph.D.=] = **Philosophię Doctor** (Doctor of Philosophy) At some point, the word (in English, at least) began to shift from being the title of a learned person/a person with a doctorate to meaning the same as "physician". Originally, the M.D. was a doctorate in medicine, but in some places, like the US and Canada, it became the first professional degree. (In the UK and Ireland an MB [=ChB=] -- bachelor of medicine & surgery -- are the first ''undergraduate'' degrees; holders are addressed as "Doctor" regardless. While Surgeons -- which require a graduate degree, equivalent to a North American MD in length of education -- are only addressed as Mr, Mrs, Miss, or Ms in a form of reverse snobbery.)[[note]]Historically, being a doctor (the equivalent to GP today) was considered a more upper-class and gentlemanly career than surgery, as they do not have to get their hands dirty. Most surgeons were simply working-class barbers. This was in fact the origin of the iconic barber's pole, which [[OlderThanTheyThink dates back to medieval times]]; the red stripe represents bloody bandages, with the blue stripe being a much more recent addition that began in the United States (due to the national colors) and has spread from there. However when the modern era rolled around and surgery become a more specialized and prestigious line of work than ''mere'' doctoring, the surgeons refused the title of Doctor as a sort of passive-aggressive middle-finger to the snobs who denied them the title 300-ish years previously.[[/note]] It is easy to see how the term "doctor" was slowly divorced from its academic roots. This has gone so far that it is common for it to be thought that "real" doctors are physicians... which brings us to this trope. And MDEnvy to boot.
to:
This trope stems from a modern convention: in the past, "Doctor" had a purely academic connotation -- the word itself derives from the Latin ''doctor'', meaning "teacher", meaning that scholar is liscenced to lecture at a university. Later, the meaning of the word **Doctor** ''Doctor'' narrowed down to mean that the holder has a doctorate degree: M.D. = **Medicinae Doctor** ''Medicinę Doctor'' (Doctor of Medicine), or [=Ph.D.=] = **Philosophię Doctor** ''Philosophię Doctor'' (Doctor of Philosophy) At some point, the word (in English, at least) began to shift from being the title of a learned person/a person with a doctorate to meaning the same as "physician". Originally, the M.D. was a doctorate in medicine, but in some places, like the US and Canada, it became the first professional degree. (In the UK and Ireland an MB [=ChB=] -- bachelor of medicine & surgery -- are the first ''undergraduate'' degrees; holders are addressed as "Doctor" regardless. While Surgeons -- which require a graduate degree, equivalent to a North American MD in length of education -- are only addressed as Mr, Mrs, Miss, or Ms in a form of reverse snobbery.)[[note]]Historically, being a doctor (the equivalent to GP today) was considered a more upper-class and gentlemanly career than surgery, as they do not have to get their hands dirty. Most surgeons were simply working-class barbers. This was in fact the origin of the iconic barber's pole, which [[OlderThanTheyThink dates back to medieval times]]; the red stripe represents bloody bandages, with the blue stripe being a much more recent addition that began in the United States (due to the national colors) and has spread from there. However when the modern era rolled around and surgery become a more specialized and prestigious line of work than ''mere'' doctoring, the surgeons refused the title of Doctor as a sort of passive-aggressive middle-finger to the snobs who denied them the title 300-ish years previously.[[/note]] It is easy to see how the term "doctor" was slowly divorced from its academic roots. This has gone so far that it is common for it to be thought that "real" doctors are physicians... which brings us to this trope. And MDEnvy to boot.
27th Dec '15 11:25:53 AM gemmabeta2
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This trope stems from a modern convention: in the past, "Doctor" had a purely academic connotation -- the word itself derives from the Latin ''doctor'', meaning "teacher". At some point, the word (in English, at least) began to shift from being the title of a learned person/a person with a doctorate to meaning the same as "physician". Originally, the M.D. was a doctorate in medicine, but in some places, like the US and Canada, it became the first professional degree. (In the UK and Ireland an MB [=ChB=] -- bachelor of medicine & surgery -- are the first ''undergraduate'' degrees; holders are addressed as "Doctor" regardless. While Surgeons -- which require a graduate degree, equivalent to a North American MD in length of education -- are only addressed as Mr, Mrs, or Miss in a form of reverse snobbery.)[[note]]Historically, being a doctor (the equivalent to GP today) was considered a more upper-class and gentlemanly career than surgery, as they do not have to get their hands dirty. Most surgeons were simply working-class barbers. This was in fact the origin of the iconic barber's pole, which [[OlderThanTheyThink dates back to medieval times]]; the red stripe represents bloody bandages, with the blue stripe being a much more recent addition that began in the United States (due to the national colors) and has spread from there. However when the modern era rolled around and surgery become a more specialized and prestigious line of work than ''mere'' doctoring, the surgeons refused the title of Doctor as a sort of passive-aggressive middle-finger to the snobs who denied them the title 300-ish years previously.[[/note]] It is easy to see how the term "doctor" was slowly divorced from its academic roots. This has gone so far that it is common for it to be thought that "real" doctors are physicians... which brings us to this trope. And MDEnvy to boot.
to:
This trope stems from a modern convention: in the past, "Doctor" had a purely academic connotation -- the word itself derives from the Latin ''doctor'', meaning "teacher". "teacher", meaning that scholar is liscenced to lecture at a university. Later, the meaning of the word **Doctor** narrowed down to mean that the holder has a doctorate degree: M.D. = **Medicinae Doctor** (Doctor of Medicine), or [=Ph.D.=] = **Philosophię Doctor** (Doctor of Philosophy) At some point, the word (in English, at least) began to shift from being the title of a learned person/a person with a doctorate to meaning the same as "physician". Originally, the M.D. was a doctorate in medicine, but in some places, like the US and Canada, it became the first professional degree. (In the UK and Ireland an MB [=ChB=] -- bachelor of medicine & surgery -- are the first ''undergraduate'' degrees; holders are addressed as "Doctor" regardless. While Surgeons -- which require a graduate degree, equivalent to a North American MD in length of education -- are only addressed as Mr, Mrs, Miss, or Miss Ms in a form of reverse snobbery.)[[note]]Historically, being a doctor (the equivalent to GP today) was considered a more upper-class and gentlemanly career than surgery, as they do not have to get their hands dirty. Most surgeons were simply working-class barbers. This was in fact the origin of the iconic barber's pole, which [[OlderThanTheyThink dates back to medieval times]]; the red stripe represents bloody bandages, with the blue stripe being a much more recent addition that began in the United States (due to the national colors) and has spread from there. However when the modern era rolled around and surgery become a more specialized and prestigious line of work than ''mere'' doctoring, the surgeons refused the title of Doctor as a sort of passive-aggressive middle-finger to the snobs who denied them the title 300-ish years previously.[[/note]] It is easy to see how the term "doctor" was slowly divorced from its academic roots. This has gone so far that it is common for it to be thought that "real" doctors are physicians... which brings us to this trope. And MDEnvy to boot.
20th Dec '15 6:20:32 PM Katsuhagi
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* BillCosby has a doctorate in education from University of Massachusetts, Amherst. He is listed as William Cosby, Ed. D. in the end credits to several of his shows, including TheCosbyShow. He also has Honorary Doctorates from over a dozen universities, most of them in Humane Letters, but he never uses a title.
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* BillCosby has had a doctorate in education from University of Massachusetts, Amherst. He is listed as William Cosby, Ed. D. in the end credits to several of his shows, including TheCosbyShow. He also has had Honorary Doctorates from over a dozen universities, most of them in Humane Letters, but he never uses a title.title. The "had" [[RoleEndingMisdemeanor is because almost all of them have now been rescinded]] following a large number of accusations of sexual assault.
14th Dec '15 12:51:41 AM Tdarcos
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* In Creator/ArthurHailey's ''Literature/Hotel'' Christine is attempting to find a doctor to treat a sick guest (the hotel's doctor is unavailable), so she has the front desk call every guest who registered as a doctor. The first one she reaches informs her that he's a doctor of music, but he 9humorously) mentions he could always play his violin for the patient if they are unable to reach a physician. She smiles a bit and thanks him, saying she hopes that won't be necessary.
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* In Creator/ArthurHailey's ''Literature/Hotel'' ''Literature/{{Hotel}}'' Christine is attempting to find a doctor to treat a sick guest (the hotel's doctor is unavailable), so she has the front desk call every guest who registered as a doctor. The first one she reaches informs her that he's a doctor of music, but he 9humorously) mentions he could always play his violin for the patient if they are unable to reach a physician. She smiles a bit and thanks him, saying she hopes that won't be necessary.
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