History Main / NotQuiteTheRightThing

13th Jan '17 3:29:06 PM infernape612
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* In "Videogame/LifeIsStrange" telling a character that she is going to be a victim of a crime leads her to become the victim.

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* In "Videogame/LifeIsStrange" ''Videogame/LifeIsStrange'' telling a character that she is going to be a victim of a crime leads her to become the victim.


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* In ''VideoGame/DeusExMankindDivided'', this is downplayed. A midgame SadisticChoice requires you to choose between robbing an enemy-controlled bank for important intel or preventing their bomb-maker from committing suicide. [[ToBeLawfulOrGood If you're the kind of person who puts saving lives above stopping the bad guy]], it would seem like the right call is to stop the bomb-maker. However, doing so prevents you from acquiring [[spoiler:an antidote to the Orchid weapon]] at the bank, which is required to save [[spoiler:Director Miller]] come endgame.
27th Dec '16 9:50:28 AM Tinandel_1
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** In the sequel, the player can learn from party member Gan that he was abandoned as a child and never knew his parents. Expressing sympathy might seem like the natural course of action.... except that Gan is both still not over it, and an intensely proud man. Saying that you are sorry immediately prompts him to invoke a DontYouDarePityMe and announce he's better off this way.
10th Nov '16 6:55:42 AM Tinandel_1
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* Directly invoked in ''Literature/ToKillAMockingbird''. After Boo Radley kills a drunken, murderous Bob Ewell in defense of Atticus's children, LawfulGood Atticus Finch is all set to get the authorities involved and begin processing the matter by-the-book. The [[MoralPragmatist local sheriff]], however, warns him that it's an open-and-shut case of self defense, Bob Ewell is [[AssholeVictim widely known and hated,]] and Boo Radley's extreme social phobias would make the resulting trial [[NoGoodDeedGoesUnpunished absolute hell for him,]] however pure and innocent Atticus's intentions might be. The sheriff therefore 'officially concludes' that Bob Ewell [[CutHimselfShaving got drunk, slipped, and fell on his own knife.]]
27th Oct '16 10:24:38 AM Valiona
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* In ''Manga/AttackOnTitan'', the heroes face a typical "Which life do we save?" situation, when both [[spoiler:Erwin, commander of the Survey Corps]], and [[Armin, who's Mikasa and Eren's childhood friend]] are dying and only one of them can be saved. [[spoiler:Eren and Mikasa]] forcefully argue in favor of the latter, and while they are biased, they also point out some valid contributions that this person has made, although it is also argued that the former individual's contributions are greater. Ultimately, the choice is made to save the latter individual, in part because [[spoiler:Levi realizes that Erwin was actually relieved at the prospect of facing death]], and it is successful, but the individual questions whether it was worth the sacrifice, and no one present can say anything much more encouraging than that he'll have to prove it was.

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* In ''Manga/AttackOnTitan'', the heroes face a typical "Which life do we save?" situation, when both [[spoiler:Erwin, commander of the Survey Corps]], and [[Armin, [[spoiler:Armin, who's Mikasa and Eren's childhood friend]] are dying and only one of them can be saved. [[spoiler:Eren and Mikasa]] forcefully argue in favor of the latter, and while they are biased, they also point out some valid contributions that this person has made, although it is also argued that the former individual's contributions are greater. Ultimately, the choice is made to save the latter individual, in part because [[spoiler:Levi realizes that Erwin was actually relieved at the prospect of facing death]], and it is successful, but the individual questions whether it was worth the sacrifice, and no one present can say anything much more encouraging than that he'll have to prove it was.
27th Oct '16 10:21:59 AM Valiona
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to:

* In ''Manga/AttackOnTitan'', the heroes face a typical "Which life do we save?" situation, when both [[spoiler:Erwin, commander of the Survey Corps]], and [[Armin, who's Mikasa and Eren's childhood friend]] are dying and only one of them can be saved. [[spoiler:Eren and Mikasa]] forcefully argue in favor of the latter, and while they are biased, they also point out some valid contributions that this person has made, although it is also argued that the former individual's contributions are greater. Ultimately, the choice is made to save the latter individual, in part because [[spoiler:Levi realizes that Erwin was actually relieved at the prospect of facing death]], and it is successful, but the individual questions whether it was worth the sacrifice, and no one present can say anything much more encouraging than that he'll have to prove it was.


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* In ''Fanfic/TheStalkingZukoSeries'', the author is [[AuthorTract not at all shy about showing that she believes that Aang sparing Ozai is this]], casting it as an impractical decision that was done for the sake of keeping with his Air Nomad teachings, and eventually has him come to regret it. That said, while the protagonists consider killing Ozai to rectify this mistake and thwart a possible coup, it's also believed that doing so would undermine Zuko's legitimacy as Fire Lord, which largely comes from not being like his father.
25th Oct '16 3:37:49 PM nombretomado
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* This trope is often played around with in the ''Gensokyo20XX'' series, especially with Yukari's choices, namely being the warden's lover (20XXII), leaving Reimu to find Ran, Chen, and Flandre (20XXI), and, locking Reimu in a room when her mind goes south (20XXV). However, she did note that to do the alternative would be worst and that in the 20XXII and 20XXV cases that she wouldn't have done them if she really had a choice.

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* This trope is often played around with in the ''Gensokyo20XX'' ''Fanfic/Gensokyo20XX'' series, especially with Yukari's choices, namely being the warden's lover (20XXII), leaving Reimu to find Ran, Chen, and Flandre (20XXI), and, locking Reimu in a room when her mind goes south (20XXV). However, she did note that to do the alternative would be worst and that in the 20XXII and 20XXV cases that she wouldn't have done them if she really had a choice.
18th Oct '16 6:27:58 AM ruthlesstyrant
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* ''VideoGame/MassEffect3'': Since this is the game where all your choices come together, it's natural that there are some cases of this. Usually it's the "heroic" (i.e. Paragon) decisions that pay off, but there are some exceptions. [[spoiler: Some players wanted to avoid genocide against geth by rewriting the heretic geth in Mass Effect 2, but that actually makes peace between quarians and geth ''harder'' as the rewritten geth join the forces fighting the quarians. Also, if you destroyed the Collector Base instead of saving it, you get a weaker War Asset from the Cerberus base than you would have if you'd preserved the base (although doing so also makes destroying the Reapers instead of controlling them easier). Finally, as the Extended Cut ending DLC reveals in one of its slides, if you cured the genophage with Wreav as the leader instead of Wrex, Wreav gathers a huge krogan army to make war on the galaxy, a point Shepard can touch on if convincing Mordin to fake curing the genophage if Wrex and Eve are dead.]]

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* ''VideoGame/MassEffect3'': Since this is the game where all your choices come together, it's natural that there are some cases of this. Usually it's the "heroic" (i.e. Paragon) decisions that pay off, but there are some exceptions. [[spoiler: exceptions.
**[[spoiler:
Some players wanted to avoid genocide against geth by rewriting the heretic geth in Mass Effect 2, but that actually makes peace between quarians and geth ''harder'' as the rewritten geth join the forces fighting the quarians. quarians.]]
**[[spoiler:
Also, if you destroyed the Collector Base instead of saving it, you get a weaker War Asset from the Cerberus base than you would have if you'd preserved the base (although doing so also makes destroying the Reapers instead of controlling them easier). Finally, as easier).]]
**[[spoiler: As
the Extended Cut ending DLC reveals in one of its slides, if you cured the genophage with Wreav as the leader instead of Wrex, Wreav gathers a huge krogan army to make war on the galaxy, a point Shepard can touch on if convincing Mordin to fake curing the genophage if Wrex and Eve are dead.]]
** [[spoiler: The only way to get both Salarian as well as Krogan support is by killing Wrex in ME1 and letting Eve die in ME2 - that way, the Krogan are led by the warlike Wreav without the tempering influence of the wise woman; which in turn enables you to convince the salarian scientist (Mordin or his replacement) in ME3 to fake curing the genophage. If you provided the Krogans with a competent leadership, the scientist won't play along and rat you out to the Krogans should you decide to sabotage the genophage cure , esulting in them withdrawing their support to the war effort, if you did cure the genophage, the Salarians will withdraw theirs.
]]
17th Oct '16 6:26:48 PM Valiona
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* In ''Manga/FairyTail'', Loke, also known as Leo, does this at one point. He, one of the Celestial Spirits, along with his fellow spirit Aries, are under contract with the cruel Karen Lilica, who treats them like property. When Karen plans on punishing Aries for (supposedly) tattling on her to her guild master, Leo forcibly swaps places with Aries and gives Karen an ultimatum- cancel both their contracts or he'll stay in the real world, since Karen can't summon more than one spirit at a time. While Karen initially thinks Loke's bluffing (since spirits can't stay in the human world for extended periods of time), as time goes on and she can't work due to not being able to summon a spirit, she tries to fool him into thinking she's turned over a new leaf, but he doesn't believe her. Karen then [[TooDumbToLive goes out on a job despite not being able to summon her spirits]], getting herself killed. This causes Loke to be exiled from the spirit world until Lucy pleads his case with the Celestial Spirit King, and results in Aries' key falling into the hands of Angel, who not only is a villain, but is no less cruel than Karen.



* There's a more merciful example of this trope than usual in ''VisualNovel/PhoenixWrightAceAttorney''. In the first game in the series in the DS-only additional case, Phoenix Wright recovers a piece of cloth cut from a murder victim's chest, which appears to be crucial evidence Phoenix Wright needs. Then Damon Gant, the police chief whose safe you took this evidence from, says he knows you have a piece of evidence, wouldn't you like to show it to the court? But he phrases his request as a taunt, as if he ''wants'' you to present the evidence; this should raise the player's suspicions which is why this example of this trope is more merciful than usual. [[spoiler:If you present the evidence the first time Damon Gant asks you for it, the fingerprints on the cloth belong to ''Ema Skye'', which gives Lana Skye a reasonable motive both to cover up the supposed Joe Darke murder and to kill Bruce Goodman who was asked to review evidence of that case. That causes you to instantly lose. The correct response is to hide the cloth, then present it ''later'' when you're later capable of proving that while the prints on the cloth belong to Ema, the ''condition'' of the cloth proves that Damon Gant was the murderer.]]

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* There's a more merciful example of this trope than usual in ''VisualNovel/PhoenixWrightAceAttorney''. In the first game in the series in the DS-only additional case, Phoenix Wright recovers a piece of cloth cut from a murder victim's chest, which appears to be crucial evidence Phoenix Wright needs. Then Damon Gant, the police chief whose safe you took this evidence from, says he knows you have a piece of evidence, wouldn't you like to show it to the court? But he phrases his request as a taunt, as if he ''wants'' you to present the evidence; this should raise the player's suspicions which is why this example of this trope is more merciful than usual. [[spoiler:If you present the evidence the first time Damon Gant asks you for it, the fingerprints on the cloth belong to ''Ema Skye'', which gives Lana Skye a reasonable motive both to cover up the supposed Joe Darke murder and to kill Bruce Goodman who was asked to review evidence of that case. That causes you to instantly lose. The correct response is to hide the cloth, then present it ''later'' when you're later capable of proving that while the prints on the cloth belong to Ema, the ''condition'' of the cloth proves that Damon Gant was the murderer. Damon Gant will try to call you out on withholding evidence, but you can then point out that [[NiceJobFixingItVillain it wasn't relevant until he proved it was]], thereby defeating him once and for all.]]
10th Oct '16 1:05:40 PM WanderingBrowser
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* In ''Videogame/{{Fallout 4}}'s'' Nuka-World DLC, you at one point have to fight a former magician turned Glowing Ghoul named Oswald the Magnificent. He's rigged up his lair's sprinklers to disperse irradiated water, which he originally did to provide an extra "power up" for himself and the then-sentient ghouls who lived there with him. Unfortunately, as experienced players know, an overabundance of radiation is one of the theories about ''why'' ghouls turn feral. [[spoiler: And this is brought up InUniverse in the suicide note you can find on the body of Oswald's dead girlfriend. Confronting him with the possibility that he might have been the one who inadvertently turned his friends into incurably insane mindless monsters will cause him to break down and abandon the place, allowing you to clear him out without having to kill him.]]
3rd Sep '16 10:32:57 PM eroock
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** "Jurassic Bark": Fry changes his mind about resurrecting his dog when he found out Seymour lived far longer without Fry than he did with him, so Fry figured that meant he had a long fulfilling life. Long? Yes. Fulfilling? No -- he never got over Fry's disappearance, and [[UsefulNotes/{{Hachiko}} spent the rest of his life waiting in front of Fry's old workplace.]] [[DramaticIrony Fry never finds out about this.]] We call that a DownerEnding.

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** "Jurassic Bark": "[[Recap/FuturamaS4E7JurassicBark Jurassic Bark]]": Fry changes his mind about resurrecting his dog when he found out Seymour lived far longer without Fry than he did with him, so Fry figured that meant he had a long fulfilling life. Long? Yes. Fulfilling? No -- he never got over Fry's disappearance, and [[UsefulNotes/{{Hachiko}} spent the rest of his life waiting in front of Fry's old workplace.]] [[DramaticIrony Fry never finds out about this.]] We call that a DownerEnding.
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