History Main / NotHisSled

19th Jan '16 8:34:10 AM narm00
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* As with the Comicbook/CrisisOnInfiniteEarths, the new continuity created by Comicbook/{{Flashpoint}} went out of it's way to change things up in the DCU. * A sort of double-subversion occurs with the new version of the [[MirrorUniverse Crime Syndicate]]. In previous continuity, most of the evil counterparts of the Justice League had radically different backstories than their main counterparts. For instance, Ultraman (the evil Superman) was an astronaut who was experimented on by aliens, and Jhonny Quick (the evil Flash) gets his powers from drugs. In the ''ComicBook/{{New 52}}, the crime syndicate member's backstories are dark, twisted parodies of the main heroes of the DCU. Not only is this a subversion, but it's also an inversion since their backstories are now much closer to the pre-crisis CSA.
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* As with the Comicbook/CrisisOnInfiniteEarths, the new continuity created by Comicbook/{{Flashpoint}} went out of it's its way to change things up in the DCU. * A sort of double-subversion occurs with the new version of the [[MirrorUniverse Crime Syndicate]]. In previous continuity, most of the evil counterparts of the Justice League had radically different backstories than their main counterparts. For instance, Ultraman (the evil Superman) was an astronaut who was experimented on by aliens, and Jhonny Quick (the evil Flash) gets his powers from drugs. In the ''ComicBook/{{New 52}}, the crime syndicate member's Crime Syndicate members' backstories are dark, twisted parodies of the main heroes of the DCU. Not only is this a subversion, but it's also an inversion since their backstories are now much closer to the pre-crisis pre-Crisis CSA.

** An even larger one at the end of Season Five: [[spoiler: The appearance of the [[EvilOverlord Night's King,]] who most definitely has not appeared in the books and who the author has all but said is not going to.]]]]
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** An even larger one at the end of Season Five: [[spoiler: The appearance of the [[EvilOverlord Night's King,]] who most definitely has not appeared in the books and who the author has all but said is not going to.]]]]]]

** For instance, in his debut in ''WesternAnimation/BatmanTheAnimatedSeries'', Bane tries to break Batman's back in the same manner as in the comics, but Batman manages to disable him first[[note]]In fairness, it probably helped a lot that unlike his comic counterpart, the DCAU Batman wasn't being plagued by a nasty case of fatigue at the time.[[/note]]
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** For instance, in his debut in ''WesternAnimation/BatmanTheAnimatedSeries'', Bane tries to break Batman's back in the same manner as in the comics, but Batman manages to disable him first[[note]]In first (in fairness, it probably helped a lot that unlike his comic counterpart, the DCAU Batman wasn't being plagued by a nasty case of fatigue at the time.[[/note]]time).

** Likewise, the first time Doomsday (the creature that "killed" Superman in the comics) shows up in the Franchise/{{DCAU}}, he faces an alternate-universe Superman [[KnightTemplar who has few scruples]], and wastes no time whatsoever lobotomizing Doomsday with his heat vision. Besides, his first appearance is the same as in the comics (he simply gets out from a meteorite, and begins a senseless rampage of destruction), but it is later revealed that Doomsday origin is far more complex than that, the thing we had saw was just the peak of the iceberg.
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** Likewise, the first time Doomsday (the creature that "killed" Superman in the comics) shows up in the Franchise/{{DCAU}}, he faces an alternate-universe Superman [[KnightTemplar who has few scruples]], and wastes no time whatsoever lobotomizing Doomsday with his heat vision. Besides, his first appearance is the same as in the comics (he simply gets out from a meteorite, and begins a senseless rampage of destruction), but it is later revealed that Doomsday Doomsday's origin is far more complex than that, the thing we had saw seen was just the peak of the iceberg.

** Likewise, * In the first time Doomsday (the creature that "killed" Superman in the comics) shows up in the Franchise/{{DCAU}}, he faces an alternate-universe Superman [[KnightTemplar who has few scruples]], and wastes no time whatsoever lobotomizing Doomsday ''WesternAnimation/PhineasAndFerb'' episode "Wizard of Odd" Candace tries to melt Doofenwitch with water, but all it does is make his heat vision. Besides, his first appearance is the same as in the comics (he simply gets out from a meteorite, and begins a senseless rampage of destruction), but it is later revealed that Doomsday origin is far more complex than that, the thing we had saw was just the peak of the iceberg.robe shrink.

* In the ''WesternAnimation/PhineasAndFerb'' episode "Wizard of Odd" Candace tries to melt Doofenwitch with water, but all it does is make his robe shrink.
26th Dec '15 7:32:58 PM ading
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* ''Theatre/AVeryPotterMusical'': ** In the first instalment, it's revealed after Harry's pseudo-death that Dumbledore somehow survived Snape's Killing Curse and is now FakingTheDead. ** The final scene reveals that Voldemort is still alive, and it's implied that [[LoveRedeems he lost his duel with Harry on purpose so that he could be with Quirrell]]. ** In "Sequel", we're led to believe that Ron's pet rat Scabbers is Peter Pettigrew as in canon. It turns out that Scabbers died years ago, and Pettigrew was somehow hiding in a poster of Taylor Lautner.
25th Dec '15 9:21:14 AM Anicomicgeek
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** For instance, in his debut in ''WesternAnimation/BatmanTheAnimatedSeries'', Bane tries to break Batman's back in the same manner as in the comics, but Batman manages to disable him first[[note]]In fairness, it probably helped a lot that unlike his comic counterpart, the DCAU Batman wasn't being plagued by a nasty case of fatigue at the time.[[/note]].
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** For instance, in his debut in ''WesternAnimation/BatmanTheAnimatedSeries'', Bane tries to break Batman's back in the same manner as in the comics, but Batman manages to disable him first[[note]]In fairness, it probably helped a lot that unlike his comic counterpart, the DCAU Batman wasn't being plagued by a nasty case of fatigue at the time.[[/note]].[[/note]]
22nd Dec '15 4:24:12 PM Will
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[[SomeAnvilsNeedToBeDropped And half the youth of Europe, one by one]].''
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[[SomeAnvilsNeedToBeDropped And half the youth seed of Europe, one by one]].''
18th Dec '15 8:33:36 AM 8BrickMario
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** Another good example is the episode "The Hounds of Baskerville". The plot is similar, with Henry thinking he's been pursued by a hellish hound. [[spoiler: However, the character of Dr. Stapleton, originally the villain, is a decoy here, and the real villain is Dr. Frankland. While the fog was an environmental hindrance in the original story, here, it is a hallucinogenic gas. The image of the hound derives from the name of Frankland's illegal project H.O.U.N.D. on his uniform, and led to Henry's InsistentTerminology (which was carried over from the book).]]
15th Dec '15 9:28:54 AM JoeMerl
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Took out some of the "Harry Potter" examples because, while they were changes from the books, they weren't actually TWISTS, just details.
* Creator/RogerEbert joked about this trope in his review of the last ''Film/HarryPotter'' film: "I dare not reveal a single crucial detail about the story itself, lest I offend the Spoiler Police, who have been on my case lately. Besides, you never know. Maybe they've completely rewritten Creator/JKRowling[='s=] final book in the series. Maybe Harry dies, Voldemort is triumphant, and evil reigns." The film series didn't go that far, though they did flirt with this: ** The final act of ''Film/HarryPotterAndThePhilosophersStone'': *** At first, it seems the way Devil's Snare is thwarted has been changed: In the book, it was [[KillItWithFire susceptible to fire]]; in the movie, it was made up so that you have to relax to get pulled through to the other side. However, Ron is unable to relax, so Hermione ends up thwarting it the same way she did in the book, [[WeakenedByTheLight by targeting light at it]]. *** The confrontation with Voldemort: [[spoiler:In the book, Harry spends the whole scene adamantly refusing to give Voldemort the Stone. In the movie, Voldemort tempts Harry with the possibility of bringing his parents back to life and, for a moment, it looks like Harry might actually hand over the Stone, but then [[SubvertedTrope he doesn't]].]] ** ''Film/HarryPotterAndTheDeathlyHallows'': In the book, Voldemort tries to kill Neville via flaming Sorting Hat; then [[GondorCallsForAid the cavalry arrives]] and Neville pulls the Sword of Gryffindor out of the Hat and [[CrowningMomentOfAwesome kills Voldemort's snake with it]]. In the movie, he pulls the Sword, swings at the snake - and gets promptly thrown aside and knocked out. Then follows a lengthy sequence of Ron and Hermione chasing [[SoulJar the snake]] around with the audience sitting at the edge of their seats ready to froth at the mouth if Steve Kloves didn't let Neville kill Nagini. [[spoiler: He did.]]
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* Creator/RogerEbert joked about this trope in his review of the last ''Film/HarryPotter'' film: "I dare not reveal a single crucial detail about the story itself, lest I offend the Spoiler Police, who have been on my case lately. Besides, you never know. Maybe they've completely rewritten Creator/JKRowling[='s=] final book in the series. Maybe Harry dies, Voldemort is triumphant, and evil reigns." The film series didn't go that far, though they did flirt with this: ** The final act of ''Film/HarryPotterAndThePhilosophersStone'': *** At first, it seems the way Devil's Snare is thwarted has been changed: In the book, it was [[KillItWithFire susceptible to fire]]; in the movie, it was made up so that you have to relax to get pulled through to the other side. However, Ron is unable to relax, so Hermione ends up thwarting it the same way she did in the book, [[WeakenedByTheLight by targeting light at it]]. *** The confrontation with Voldemort: [[spoiler:In the book, Harry spends the whole scene adamantly refusing to give Voldemort the Stone. In the movie, Voldemort tempts Harry with the possibility a lot of bringing his parents back to life and, for a moment, it looks changes, but nothing like Harry might actually hand over the Stone, but then [[SubvertedTrope he doesn't]].]] this. ** Subverted in ''Film/HarryPotterAndTheDeathlyHallows'': In the book, Voldemort tries [[TheUnchosenOne Neville]] manages to kill Neville via flaming decapitate [[ReptilesAreAbhorrent Nagini]] right after he pulls Gryffindor's sword from the Sorting Hat; then [[GondorCallsForAid the cavalry arrives]] and Neville pulls the Sword of Gryffindor out of the Hat and [[CrowningMomentOfAwesome kills Voldemort's snake with it]]. In in the movie, he pulls the Sword, swings at the snake - and gets promptly he's thrown aside aside, and knocked out. Then follows a lengthy sequence of Ron Nagini begins to fight [[ClassicalAntiHero Ron]] and Hermione chasing [[SoulJar the snake]] around with the audience [[TheSmartGuy Hermione]]. Just when you're sitting at on the edge of their seats ready to froth at the mouth your seat and wondering if Steve Kloves didn't let Neville would have the audacity to take away Neville's CrowningMomentOfAwesome, he manages to kill Nagini. [[spoiler: He did.]]the snake anyway.
15th Dec '15 9:04:13 AM JoeMerl
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** A much bigger example of this from Supergirl: [[spoiler:Hank Henshaw is revealed to be Martian Manhunter rather than the Cyborg Superman from the comics.]]
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** A much bigger example of this from Supergirl: [[spoiler:Hank Supergirl works for a man named Hank Henshaw. That name belongs to a supervillain in the comics, and his duplicity seems confirmed by his [[RedEyesTakeWarning glowing red eyes]] and hints that he killed Supergirl's adoptive father. However, it turns out that, while the ''real'' Hank Henshaw is revealed to be Martian Manhunter rather than was a nasty piece of work, he apparently died years ago, and the Cyborg Superman from the comics.]]one we've met is [[spoiler:a certain shapeshifting alien named [[MartianManhunter J'onn J'onzz]]]].
7th Dec '15 7:12:47 PM MythrilMothV3
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** A much bigger example of this from Supergirl: [[spoiler:Hank Henshaw is revealed to be Martian Manhunter rather than the Cyborg Superman from the comics.]]
29th Nov '15 3:23:59 PM thatother1dude
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** Rei Ayanami [[spoiler:NOT dying]] in This one is twisted ''back again'' between 2.22 and 3.33, although [[spoiler: However, since it's Ayanami, she still appears in 3.33 as a clone.]]
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** Rei Ayanami [[spoiler:NOT dying]] in dying]]. This one is twisted ''back again'' between 2.22 and 3.33, although [[spoiler: However, since it's Ayanami, she still appears in 3.33 as a clone.]]
18th Nov '15 8:02:31 AM masterofthehouse
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** Barbara Kean (Jim's first wife and mother of Batgirl) initially appears as his fiancée early on in the series. Several episodes in, however, [[spoiler:she ends up leaving him for Renee Montoya (which, in turn, leads him to start a relationship with Leslie Thompkins)]]. Then, by the season one finale, [[spoiler:she becomes a full blown psychopathic villain and is subsequently incarcerated in Arkham Asylum]].
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** Barbara Kean (Jim's first wife and mother of Batgirl) initially appears as his fiancée early on in the series. Several episodes in, however, [[spoiler:she ends up leaving him for Renee Montoya (which, in turn, leads him to start a relationship with Leslie Thompkins)]]. Then, by the season one finale, [[spoiler:she [[spoiler:[[AdaptationalVillainy she becomes a full blown psychopathic villain and is subsequently incarcerated in Arkham Asylum]].Asylum]]]].
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