History Main / NotCheatingUnlessYouGetCaught

13th Jul '16 1:03:25 PM Geoduck
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* A flare in the original version of CosmicEncounter gives its owner a similar power: if you have the filch card in your hand, you can filch cards from the draw deck or discard pile, and reclaim your own destroyed ships, as long as nobody sees you do it. If you're caught, however, you have to put what you stole back, and an extra ship of yours is destroyed. The most recent remake includes this card as an optional variant.

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* A flare in the original version of CosmicEncounter ''TabletopGame/CosmicEncounter'' gives its owner a similar power: if you have the filch card in your hand, you can filch cards from the draw deck or discard pile, and reclaim your own destroyed ships, as long as nobody sees you do it. If you're caught, however, you have to put what you stole back, and an extra ship of yours is destroyed. The most recent remake includes this card as an optional variant.
23rd Jun '16 6:41:34 AM Doug86
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* The [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Washington_Naval_Conference Washington Naval Conference]] laid down strict limitations on the construction of warships, with the idea of preventing an out-and-out, ruinously expensive battleship arms race (similar to the one Britain and Germany engaged in prior to WorldWarI; the war had barely ended and Britain, the US and Japan were already in the opening stages of a new three-way arms race, with massive battleship programs planned out that none of them could actually afford[[note]]Japan's program in particular would've had a cost exceeding the entire economic output of the nation[[/note]]). Of course, the nations that didn't [[LoopholeAbuse wiggle through the loopholes]] (it's 10,000 tons and it carries 15 fast-firing main guns, but it's still classified as an innocent-sounding and unrestricted "light cruiser" just because the guns are six-inchers) decided "screw tonnage limitations!" and started laying down ships that exceeded the tonnage limitations by 25 to 40%. Special mention goes to the Japanese, who categorically denied Western rumors that they [[ExactWords were building forty- to fifty-thousand ton battleships]] (when the limit was 35,000 tons). The battleships in question turned out to be the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yamato_class_battleship ''Yamato'' class]], which weighed in at ''65,000 tons''. Nobody outside Japan knew their exact weight until ''after'' WorldWarII.

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* The [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Washington_Naval_Conference Washington Naval Conference]] laid down strict limitations on the construction of warships, with the idea of preventing an out-and-out, ruinously expensive battleship arms race (similar to the one Britain and Germany engaged in prior to WorldWarI; UsefulNotes/WorldWarI; the war had barely ended and Britain, the US and Japan were already in the opening stages of a new three-way arms race, with massive battleship programs planned out that none of them could actually afford[[note]]Japan's program in particular would've had a cost exceeding the entire economic output of the nation[[/note]]). Of course, the nations that didn't [[LoopholeAbuse wiggle through the loopholes]] (it's 10,000 tons and it carries 15 fast-firing main guns, but it's still classified as an innocent-sounding and unrestricted "light cruiser" just because the guns are six-inchers) decided "screw tonnage limitations!" and started laying down ships that exceeded the tonnage limitations by 25 to 40%. Special mention goes to the Japanese, who categorically denied Western rumors that they [[ExactWords were building forty- to fifty-thousand ton battleships]] (when the limit was 35,000 tons). The battleships in question turned out to be the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yamato_class_battleship ''Yamato'' class]], which weighed in at ''65,000 tons''. Nobody outside Japan knew their exact weight until ''after'' WorldWarII.UsefulNotes/WorldWarII.



** Similarly, the Italians relied heavily on outright cheating to bypass the treaty, but turned out to just not be as good at it as the Japanese. Prior to WorldWarII, other nations' naval officials were astonished at how Italy managed to built cruisers that were a good 50% faster than comparable ships of other nations. It turned out, the way Italy managed that was to send the ships on their shakedown cruises without carrying such minor items as gun turrets, thus making them come in (barely) below the 10,000 ton limit. In actual combat conditions, the added weight from actually carrying weapons meant that Italy's ships, far from the speed demons they seemed to be pre-war, were actually ''slower'' than their British and American counterparts.
** While not subject to the Washington Naval Treaty, Germany initially was under similar restrictions via the Treaty of Versailles. At the end of WorldWarI Germany was stripped of nearly their entire navy, and allowed to keep only 6 light cruisers and 6 archaic pre-Dreadnought battleships. The battleships could be replaced once they were at least 20 years old, but the replacements were restricted to 10,000 tons displacement. The intention was that Germany would be limited to coastal defense battleship like those of the Scandinavian navies, and definitely ''not'' commerce-raiders. Instead, Germany designed the so-called "pocket battleships", designed specifically for commerce raiding, which were basically heavy cruisers except with 11-inch guns (akin to a small battleship, but with only six guns). Oh, and their actual weight was almost 15,000 tons.

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** Similarly, the Italians relied heavily on outright cheating to bypass the treaty, but turned out to just not be as good at it as the Japanese. Prior to WorldWarII, UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, other nations' naval officials were astonished at how Italy managed to built cruisers that were a good 50% faster than comparable ships of other nations. It turned out, the way Italy managed that was to send the ships on their shakedown cruises without carrying such minor items as gun turrets, thus making them come in (barely) below the 10,000 ton limit. In actual combat conditions, the added weight from actually carrying weapons meant that Italy's ships, far from the speed demons they seemed to be pre-war, were actually ''slower'' than their British and American counterparts.
** While not subject to the Washington Naval Treaty, Germany initially was under similar restrictions via the Treaty of Versailles. At the end of WorldWarI UsefulNotes/WorldWarI Germany was stripped of nearly their entire navy, and allowed to keep only 6 light cruisers and 6 archaic pre-Dreadnought battleships. The battleships could be replaced once they were at least 20 years old, but the replacements were restricted to 10,000 tons displacement. The intention was that Germany would be limited to coastal defense battleship like those of the Scandinavian navies, and definitely ''not'' commerce-raiders. Instead, Germany designed the so-called "pocket battleships", designed specifically for commerce raiding, which were basically heavy cruisers except with 11-inch guns (akin to a small battleship, but with only six guns). Oh, and their actual weight was almost 15,000 tons.
19th Apr '16 2:09:35 PM Willbyr
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* ''TheLegendOfKoizumi''. It's practically understood that cheating is part of the game as long as you don't get caught. And sometimes, it's still not considered cheating even if you ''do'' get caught if you do it in an audacious enough manner, like when [[TheHero Koizumi's]] effort in cheating [[spoiler:[[IncendiaryExponent caused his entire body to be set ablaze]]]]. Getting caught, however, can be fatal [[spoiler:As Otto Skorzony finds out when Dubya catches his tileswapping trick.]]
* {{Toriko}}'s Gourmet Casino arc lives and dies on this trope. Coco's future-seeing abilities allow him to effortlessly win practically all of the casino's games. Livebearer, the arc's BigBad, on the other hand, runs a game that is designed to give him every advantage he can think of.

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* ''TheLegendOfKoizumi''.''Manga/TheLegendOfKoizumi''. It's practically understood that cheating is part of the game as long as you don't get caught. And sometimes, it's still not considered cheating even if you ''do'' get caught if you do it in an audacious enough manner, like when [[TheHero Koizumi's]] effort in cheating [[spoiler:[[IncendiaryExponent caused his entire body to be set ablaze]]]]. Getting caught, however, can be fatal [[spoiler:As Otto Skorzony finds out when Dubya catches his tileswapping trick.]]
* {{Toriko}}'s Manga/{{Toriko}}'s Gourmet Casino arc lives and dies on this trope. Coco's future-seeing abilities allow him to effortlessly win practically all of the casino's games. Livebearer, the arc's BigBad, on the other hand, runs a game that is designed to give him every advantage he can think of.
4th Feb '16 10:43:27 AM LadyJafaria
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* ''Series/HorribleHistories'' talks about the (supposed) RealLife example of [[TrainingFromHell the Spartans]] in "Spartan School Musical". Stealing is okay, what's wrong is getting caught!
23rd Jan '16 8:32:35 PM erttheking
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** Daniel J. D'Arby, user of the Osiris Stand, has this as his motto. For example, it's not ''his'' fault that Polnareff didn't know that, when they were betting on what meat a cat would eat first, the cat belonged to D'Arby (and thus D'Arby could choose which piece would be eaten). Jotaro later uses this mantra against Daniel's brother, Terrence.

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** Daniel J. D'Arby, user of the Osiris Stand, has this as his motto. For example, it's not ''his'' fault that Polnareff didn't know that, when they were betting on what meat a cat would eat first, the cat belonged to D'Arby (and thus D'Arby could choose which piece would be eaten). Jotaro later uses this mantra against Daniel's brother, Terrence. Though an interesting thing about Daniel is that he equally applies this to both himself and the person he plays against. To him, cheating is simply part of the game.
10th Jan '16 10:10:39 PM phoenix
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* A legendary example in [[TheBeautifulGame the 1986 World Cup quarterfinals]] was the Hand of God goal. Six minutes into the second half, with the game so far scoreless, the ball had gotten loose in the penalty area and both the English goalie and Argentine player Diego Maradona were rushing at it. Diego Maradona reached the ball first and swept it into the goal ''with his hand'' before the goalie could stop him, and the ref didn't catch it. England is still bitter about this, while Maradona is worshipped in Argentina (NotHyperbole) as a national hero.

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* A legendary example in [[TheBeautifulGame [[UsefulNotes/AssociationFootball the 1986 World Cup quarterfinals]] was the Hand of God goal. Six minutes into the second half, with the game so far scoreless, the ball had gotten loose in the penalty area and both the English goalie and Argentine player Diego Maradona were rushing at it. Diego Maradona reached the ball first and swept it into the goal ''with his hand'' before the goalie could stop him, and the ref didn't catch it. England is still bitter about this, while Maradona is worshipped in Argentina (NotHyperbole) as a national hero.
3rd Jan '16 4:51:24 PM AndyLA
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** D'arby the Gambler, user of the Osiris Stand, has this as his motto. For example, it's not ''his'' fault that Polnareff didn't know that, when they were betting on what meat a cat would eat first, the cat belonged to D'arby (and thus D'arby could choose which piece would be eaten). Jotaro later uses this mantra against D'arby's brother, Terrence.

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** D'arby the Gambler, Daniel J. D'Arby, user of the Osiris Stand, has this as his motto. For example, it's not ''his'' fault that Polnareff didn't know that, when they were betting on what meat a cat would eat first, the cat belonged to D'arby D'Arby (and thus D'arby D'Arby could choose which piece would be eaten). Jotaro later uses this mantra against D'arby's Daniel's brother, Terrence.
1st Jan '16 1:11:03 AM TARINunit9
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* The developers of ''VideoGame/DawnOfWar 2'' have a philosophy that a good A.I. opponent [[TheComputerIsACheatingBastard can cheat]] (otherwise they're too easy), but a ''great'' A.I. opponent can cheat without the player noticing.
1st Dec '15 2:16:00 AM Morgenthaler
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* ''Franchise/PiratesOfTheCaribbean'': The Pirate Code is really more a set of "guidelines", or "suggestions". At least they are on the open seas; not so much when [[Music/KeithRichards Captain Teague]], Keeper of the Code is in the room with a loaded gun. Still some room for...liberal interpretation, of course.

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* ''Franchise/PiratesOfTheCaribbean'': The Pirate Code is really more a set of "guidelines", or "suggestions". At least they are on the open seas; not so much when [[Music/KeithRichards Captain Teague]], Teague, Keeper of the Code is in the room with a loaded gun. Still some room for...liberal interpretation, of course.
17th Nov '15 4:30:23 PM Taskmaster123
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* Most players and experts agree that a football that has been deflated to a PSI that is slightly below the pressure required by the NFL rules gives an advantage to the offense. It makes the ball easier to grip, which makes it easier for the quarterback to throw, easier for the receiver to catch, and less likely to be fumbled as the ball handler can grip the ball more tightly. That's all we're going to say about that...
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