History Main / NoBackwardsCompatibilityInTheFuture

27th Mar '16 8:55:16 AM bwburke94
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* Buy a new computer? Make sure all of your peripherals have drivers that are compatible with the computer's OS, or be willing to upgrade them as well. Some printers, scanners, etc. from as recently as two years ago do not have drivers that are usable by 64-bit processors (which eliminates the 64-bit versions of Windows Vista and Windows 7).

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* Buy a new computer? Make sure all of your peripherals have drivers that are compatible with the computer's OS, or be willing to upgrade them as well. Some printers, scanners, etc. from as recently as two years ago 2010 do not have drivers that are usable by 64-bit processors (which eliminates the 64-bit versions of Windows Vista and Windows 7).processors.



** In addition to rejecting UsefulNotes/BluRay, Apple appears to be phasing out removable disc drives altogether, for example the current generation iMac and Mac Mini lack internal optical drives. [=MacBook Pro=] with Retina Display lacks them as will the 2013 [=MacPro=]. This even harkens back to the original iMac in 1998 with the rejection of the floppy drive, which was still an essential media in the business and education world at the time. [[note]]For security reasons many IT departments were deathly afraid of the USB port and many workplaces and computer labs at universities and colleges had the ports on the computers disabled. [[/note]]

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** In addition to rejecting UsefulNotes/BluRay, Apple appears to be phasing out removable disc drives altogether, for example the current generation iMac and Mac Mini lack internal optical drives. [=MacBook Pro=] with Retina Display lacks them as will the 2013 [=MacPro=].few if any of their modern devices use them.. This even harkens back to the original iMac in 1998 with the rejection of the floppy drive, which was still an essential media in the business and education world at the time. [[note]]For security reasons many IT departments were deathly afraid of the USB port and many workplaces and computer labs at universities and colleges had the ports on the computers disabled. [[/note]]



* iTunes has issues with Windows XP X64; both the 32 and 64 bit versions require editing the MSI files via Orca to install and may not fully function, and the "64 64" version doesn't work with certain older video cards.

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* iTunes has issues with Windows XP X64; x64; both the 32 and 64 bit versions require editing the MSI files via Orca to install and may not fully function, and the "64 64" version doesn't work with certain older video cards.



** It's not just software and hardware that falls victim to NoBackwardsCompatibilityInTheFuture; it applies to physical materials too. Case in point, FOGBANK, which was an unbelievably-classified plastic used in Trident missile warheads. FOGBANK production ended in 1989. When the Navy wanted to refurbish its existing warheads, they had to build a brand-new factory to produce FOGBANK again -- and discovered that the documented procedures didn't work. It turns out FOGBANK relied on an ''impurity'' included in the original batch, and this delayed the refurbishment by nearly ten years.

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** It's not just software and hardware that falls victim to NoBackwardsCompatibilityInTheFuture; this trope; it applies to physical materials too. Case in point, FOGBANK, which was an unbelievably-classified plastic used in Trident missile warheads. FOGBANK production ended in 1989. When the Navy wanted to refurbish its existing warheads, they had to build a brand-new factory to produce FOGBANK again -- and discovered that the documented procedures didn't work. It turns out FOGBANK relied on an ''impurity'' included in the original batch, and this delayed the refurbishment by nearly ten years.
13th Mar '16 5:00:53 PM roothorick
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Added DiffLines:

* Console and hardware emulators are fully software reimplementations of the precise behavior of old hardware, with the express purpose of allowing games and software only compatible with those old machines to be run and used on modern and relatively arbitrary hardware.
4th Mar '16 11:58:14 PM SammyDragon92
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** Windows in general has great backwards compatibility provided the program only relied on Windows provided libraries. It was found programs that came with Windows 2.0 still work in Windows 7.

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** Windows in general has great backwards compatibility provided the program only relied on Windows provided libraries. It was found programs that came with Windows 2.0 still work in the 32-Bit editions of Windows 7.
27th Feb '16 8:41:44 AM superslinger2007
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* At the time of this writing (November 2014), the Python programming language currently has two 'newest' versions: 2.7 and 3.3. The reason for having updates for both Python 2 and Python 3 are because many people have enormous numbers of module libraries for Python 2...that won't work on the non-backwards compatible Python 3.

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* At the time of this writing (November 2014), (February 2016), the Python programming language currently has two 'newest' versions: 2.7 and 3.3.5. The reason for having updates for both Python 2 and Python 3 are because many people have enormous numbers of module libraries for Python 2...that won't work on the non-backwards compatible Python 3.
1st Feb '16 5:58:53 PM RAMChYLD
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** And what about Jaz and Zip Disks? (Okay, so Jaz never caught on in the first place.)
*** They were quite popular in their time because they were still relatively cheaper than a CD writer drive even though they have only one sixth the storage capacity (a Zip drive as of 1997 costs US$50. A CD writer costs somewhere around US$1000, and also required that the owner buy a SCSI card (unless your sound card already has one, or you use a Mac, Amiga or Atari ST), because even though there were already IDE CD-ROM drives, CD writers still belonged to the domain of the professional and thus only SCSI interface writers were produced). And that's before you even factor in the cost of the burning software. However, by 2003, IDE CD writers were already available, burning software prices have fallen tramendously to the point that there are free burner software if you know where to look, and their media's costs has fallen enough to be affordable and thus displace Zip drives. It should be noted, however, that even then Zip disks and drives were still being manufactured until at least the late 2000s- mostly to cater to musicians and certain organizations who require them for backwards compatibility or ''security by obsolesce''. Generation 3 zip drives, the final generation of the medium, has a storage capacity of 750MB, rivaling the capacity of a CD-RW, and the external drives do have a USB 2.0 interface. However, the third generation drives have a quirk of not being able to ''write'' to first generation disks, only read them.

to:

** And what about Jaz and Zip Disks? (Okay, so Jaz never caught on in the first place.)
***
). They were quite popular in their time because they were still relatively cheaper than a CD writer drive even though they have only one sixth the storage capacity (a Zip drive as of 1997 costs US$50. A CD writer costs somewhere around US$1000, and also required that the owner buy a SCSI card (unless your sound card already has one, or you use a Mac, Amiga or Atari ST), because even though there were already IDE CD-ROM drives, CD writers still belonged to the domain of the professional and thus only SCSI interface writers were produced). And that's before you even factor in the cost of the burning software. However, by 2003, IDE CD writers were already available, burning software prices have fallen tramendously to the point that there are free burner software if you know where to look, and their media's costs has fallen enough to be affordable and thus displace Zip drives. It should be noted, however, that even then Zip disks and drives were still being manufactured until at least the late 2000s- mostly to cater to musicians and certain organizations who require them for backwards compatibility or ''security by obsolesce''. Generation 3 zip drives, the final generation of the medium, has a storage capacity of 750MB, rivaling the capacity of a CD-RW, and the external drives do have a USB 2.0 interface. However, the third generation drives have a quirk of not being able to ''write'' to first generation disks, only read them.



*** Windows usually provides a generic MIDI software synthesizer, and practically all sound cards have their own.
**** The former is true- Windows ships with a software synthesizer that fully emulates a Roland MT-32. The latter however is becoming false as time moves on- few cards now come with a hardware synthesizer - even Creative's more recent consumer-oriented cards lack them, preferring software-based synthesizers; and they're absent from onboard sound solutions. You'll only find hardware synthesizers on prosumer-oriented cards like the E-MU series now.

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*** Windows usually provides a generic MIDI software synthesizer, and practically all sound cards have their own.
**** The former is true-
** Additionally, while Windows ships with a software synthesizer that fully emulates a Roland MT-32. The latter however is becoming false as time moves on- MT-32, few sound cards now come with a hardware synthesizer - even Creative's more recent consumer-oriented cards lack them, preferring software-based synthesizers; and they're absent from onboard sound solutions. You'll only find hardware synthesizers on prosumer-oriented cards like the E-MU series now.
1st Feb '16 5:55:32 PM RAMChYLD
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** For the consumers, have an old PATA interface drive? Good luck finding a brand new motherboard that has one of those anymore. However, some companies have wised up and started offering IDE-to-SATA converters, although whether or not it will allowed DRM-imbued media to play is another question.
** Works the opposite way as well. Have a motherboard with a PATA interface and want to put it to good use (so you can free up that one SATA port to put in one more hard drive when all the other ports are fully occupied and there's no more free PCI or [=PCIe=] slots available)? Good luck finding a PATA optical drive. Sure, converters for PATA-to-SATA are still being made, but it's only a matter of time before they vanish, and let's not start on the stupid DRM that may potentially block these devices.

to:

** For the consumers, have an old PATA interface drive? Good luck finding a brand new motherboard that has one of those anymore. However, some companies have wised up and started offering IDE-to-SATA converters, although whether or not it will allowed still allow DRM-imbued media to play is another question.
** Works the opposite way as well. Have a motherboard with a PATA interface and want to put it to good use (so you can free up that one SATA port to put in one more hard drive when all the other ports are fully occupied and there's no more free PCI or [=PCIe=] slots available)? Good luck finding a PATA optical drive. Sure, converters for PATA-to-SATA are still being made, but it's only a matter of time before they vanish, and let's not start on the stupid DRM that may potentially block drives that go through these devices.devices from playing protected media.
1st Feb '16 5:52:14 PM RAMChYLD
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*** Many motherboards still ship with a serial connector on the board. However the needed port is on a bracket that is sold separately. Ditto for parallel ports- there is a connector onboard, but the port and bracket is sold separately.

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*** ** Many motherboards still ship with a serial connector on the board. However the needed port is on a bracket that is sold separately. Ditto for parallel ports- there is a connector onboard, but the port and bracket is sold separately.



** For the consumers, have an old PATA interface drive? Good luck finding a brand new motherboard that has one of those anymore.
*** Works the opposite way as well. Have a motherboard with a PATA interface and want to put it to good use (so you can free up that one SATA port to put in one more hard drive when all the other ports are fully occupied and there's no more free PCI or [=PCIe=] slots available)? Good luck finding a PATA optical drive. Sure, converters for PATA-to-SATA are still being made, but it's only a matter of time before they vanish, and let's not start on the stupid DRM that may potentially block these devices.

to:

** For the consumers, have an old PATA interface drive? Good luck finding a brand new motherboard that has one of those anymore.
***
anymore. However, some companies have wised up and started offering IDE-to-SATA converters, although whether or not it will allowed DRM-imbued media to play is another question.
**
Works the opposite way as well. Have a motherboard with a PATA interface and want to put it to good use (so you can free up that one SATA port to put in one more hard drive when all the other ports are fully occupied and there's no more free PCI or [=PCIe=] slots available)? Good luck finding a PATA optical drive. Sure, converters for PATA-to-SATA are still being made, but it's only a matter of time before they vanish, and let's not start on the stupid DRM that may potentially block these devices.
1st Feb '16 1:58:46 AM RAMChYLD
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*** They were quite popular in their time because they were still relatively cheaper than a CD writer drive even though they have only one sixth the storage capacity (a Zip drive as of 1997 costs US$50. A CD writer costs somewhere around US$1000, and also required that the owner buy a SCSI card (unless your sound card already has one, or you use a Mac, Amiga or Atari ST), because even though there were already IDE CD-ROM drives, CD writers still belonged to the domain of the professional and thus only SCSI interface writers were produced). However, by 2003, IDE CD writers were already available and their media's costs has fallen enough to be affordable and thus displace Zip drives. It should be noted, however, that even then Zip disks and drives were still being manufactured until at least the late 2000s- mostly to cater to musicians and certain organizations who require them for backwards compatibility or ''security by obsolesce''. Generation 3 zip drives, the final generation of the medium, has a storage capacity of 750MB, rivaling the capacity of a CD-RW, and the external drives do have a USB 2.0 interface. However, the third generation drives have a quirk of not being able to ''write'' to first generation disks, only read them.

to:

*** They were quite popular in their time because they were still relatively cheaper than a CD writer drive even though they have only one sixth the storage capacity (a Zip drive as of 1997 costs US$50. A CD writer costs somewhere around US$1000, and also required that the owner buy a SCSI card (unless your sound card already has one, or you use a Mac, Amiga or Atari ST), because even though there were already IDE CD-ROM drives, CD writers still belonged to the domain of the professional and thus only SCSI interface writers were produced). And that's before you even factor in the cost of the burning software. However, by 2003, IDE CD writers were already available available, burning software prices have fallen tramendously to the point that there are free burner software if you know where to look, and their media's costs has fallen enough to be affordable and thus displace Zip drives. It should be noted, however, that even then Zip disks and drives were still being manufactured until at least the late 2000s- mostly to cater to musicians and certain organizations who require them for backwards compatibility or ''security by obsolesce''. Generation 3 zip drives, the final generation of the medium, has a storage capacity of 750MB, rivaling the capacity of a CD-RW, and the external drives do have a USB 2.0 interface. However, the third generation drives have a quirk of not being able to ''write'' to first generation disks, only read them.
1st Feb '16 1:49:55 AM RAMChYLD
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** ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 3}}'' also makes use of GFWL as a secondary copy-protection system. Thankfully, the game will still run without it. It's just that you can no longer use cloud save to synchronize the game across multiple [=PCs=]. There is, however, a more serious issue under Windows 10- installing GFWL has the potential of bricking Windows 10's networking stack, and the game will always install GFWL as part of it's installation routine. Luckily, uninstalling the copy of GFWL will solve the issue.

to:

** ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 3}}'' also makes use of GFWL as a secondary copy-protection system. Thankfully, the game will still run without it. It's just that you can no longer use cloud save to synchronize the game across multiple [=PCs=]. There is, however, a more serious issue under Windows 10- installing GFWL has the potential of bricking Windows 10's networking stack, and the game will always install GFWL as part of it's installation routine. Luckily, uninstalling the copy of GFWL will solve the issue. Fallout 3 also has a problem with it's radio music on Windows Vista and newer, but it can be fixed with mods.
1st Feb '16 1:47:00 AM RAMChYLD
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** ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 3}}'' also makes use of GFWL as a secondary copy-protection system. Thankfully, the game will still run without it. It's just that you can no longer use cloud save to synchronize the game across multiple [=PCs=]. There is, however, a more serious issue under Windows 10- installing GFWL has the potential of bricking a Windows 10's networking stack, and the game's will always install GFWL as part of it's installation routine. Luckily, uninstalling the copy of GFWL will solve the issue.
** ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAutoIV'' is a more egregious example of GFWL abuse - without GFWL, you can't save games, period. Thankfully, there are third party mods to fix that annoying issue.

to:

** ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 3}}'' also makes use of GFWL as a secondary copy-protection system. Thankfully, the game will still run without it. It's just that you can no longer use cloud save to synchronize the game across multiple [=PCs=]. There is, however, a more serious issue under Windows 10- installing GFWL has the potential of bricking a Windows 10's networking stack, and the game's game will always install GFWL as part of it's installation routine. Luckily, uninstalling the copy of GFWL will solve the issue.
** ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAutoIV'' is a more egregious example of GFWL abuse - without GFWL, you can't save games, period. Thankfully, there are third party mods to fix that annoying issue. Aside from that, as like Fallout 3, the game's installer will install GFWL, which will brick the networking stack of a Windows 10 PC. Again, uninstalling GFWL immediately after installing the game fixes the issue.
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