History Main / MysteryMagnet

19th May '16 5:08:18 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Series/{{Monk}}'' has taken over ''MurderSheWrote'' recently for the fact that Monk clearly is a walking Grim Reaper.

to:

* ''Series/{{Monk}}'' has taken over ''MurderSheWrote'' ''Series/MurderSheWrote'' recently for the fact that Monk clearly is a walking Grim Reaper.
14th May '16 11:58:36 AM RobFRules
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** [[TheLateLateShow]] parodied this in a series of sketches from 2008-2010, with Craig Ferguson (in drag) portraying Jessica as extremely eager to stumble upon murders and solve them, even if it takes killing the person ''herself'' to make the crime happen, and not with any serious attempt to cover her tracks. Jessica shouting "HAS THERE BEEN A MURDER?" multiple times was to be expected, whether there as a murder or not, and whether it was plainly obvious to everyone else or not.

to:

** [[TheLateLateShow]] ''Series/TheLateLateShow'' parodied this in a series of sketches from 2008-2010, with Craig Ferguson (in drag) portraying Jessica as extremely eager to stumble upon murders and solve them, even if it takes killing the person ''herself'' to make the crime happen, and not with any serious attempt to cover her tracks. Jessica shouting "HAS THERE BEEN A MURDER?" multiple times was to be expected, whether there as a murder or not, and whether it was plainly obvious to everyone else or not.
14th May '16 11:57:42 AM RobFRules
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** [[TheLateLateShow]] parodied this in a series of sketches from 2008-2010, with Craig Ferguson (in drag) portraying Jessica as extremely eager to stumble upon murders and solve them, even if it takes killing the person ''herself'' to make the crime happen, and not with any serious attempt to cover her tracks. Jessica shouting "HAS THERE BEEN A MURDER?" multiple times was to be expected, whether there as a murder or not, and whether it was plainly obvious to everyone else or not.
21st Apr '16 1:46:07 PM TinyTedDanson
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* {{Inverted|Trope}} and PlayedForLaughs in ''ComicBook/TalesDesignedToThrizzle'', where [[Series/MurderSheWrote Jessica Fletcher]] sees the postman suddenly die and tumble off his bike through her living room window, and already begins wildly speculating whom he clashed with and how it could have happened. The postman then gets up and dusts himself off, causing Jessica to realize she jumped the gun, [[AlternativeCharacterInterpretation at which point she declares that she's solved another case.]]
21st Apr '16 11:12:04 AM sgamer82
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Occasionally {{lampshade|Hanging}}d, at least in the Manga. The police inspector, Megure-keibu, upon realizing that Detective Moore/Mori just HAPPENED to be near when the crime occurred, has a tendency to raise his eyebrow and vocalize his incredulity. Sadly, he never seems to follow up on this.

to:

** Occasionally {{lampshade|Hanging}}d, at least in the Manga. The police inspector, Megure-keibu, Megure, upon realizing that Detective Moore/Mori just HAPPENED ''happened'' to be near when the crime occurred, has a tendency to raise his eyebrow and vocalize his incredulity. Sadly, he never seems to follow up on this.
20th Apr '16 7:39:18 PM Wyvern76
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Series/MurderSheWrote'' is by far the worst offender of this trope. To such an extent that one suspects that if Jessica hadn't traveled so much, Cabot Cove's population would have been about '''eight'''. There is no better explanation for the sheer number of murders the lead character encounters throughout the long run of the series than [[TheKillerInMe her involvement in all of them]]. Indeed, if Cabot Cove alone existed in real life and suffered that many murders, it would top the [=FBI's=] national crime statistics by several orders of magnitude, in fact, '''86 times''' that of the most murderous real city. [[note]]People have calculated that Cabot Cove has a murder rate of 86 per 1000; by comparison, the most murderous city in the world, Caracas, has a murder rate of 1.1 per 1000.[[/note]]

to:

* ''Series/MurderSheWrote'' is by far the worst offender of this trope. To such an extent that one suspects that if Jessica hadn't traveled so much, Cabot Cove's population would have been about '''eight'''. There is no better explanation for the sheer number of murders the lead character encounters throughout the long run of the series than [[TheKillerInMe her involvement in all of them]]. Indeed, if Cabot Cove alone existed in real life and suffered that many murders, it would top the [=FBI's=] national crime statistics by several orders of magnitude, in fact, '''86 '''78 times''' that of the most murderous real city. [[note]]People have calculated that Cabot Cove has a murder rate of 86 per 1000; by comparison, the most murderous city in the world, Caracas, has a murder rate of 1.1 per 1000.[[/note]]
29th Feb '16 9:57:18 PM PatBerry
Is there an issue? Send a Message


A MysteryMagnet attracts mysteries, usually murders, with the occasional case of kidnapping, extortion and fraud for variety. Whereever they go, people drop dead at their feet, often with a cryptic dying message. This behaviour isn't planned by anyone -- there is no killer stalking the magnet, nor is the magnet responsible for the deaths -- it's just pure coincidence.

to:

A MysteryMagnet attracts mysteries, usually murders, with the occasional case of kidnapping, extortion and fraud for variety. Whereever Wherever they go, people drop dead at their feet, often with a cryptic dying message. This behaviour isn't planned by anyone -- there is no killer stalking the magnet, nor is the magnet responsible for the deaths -- it's just pure coincidence.
29th Feb '16 9:56:50 PM PatBerry
Is there an issue? Send a Message


A MysteryMagnet attracts mysteries, usually murders, with the occasional case of kidnapping, extortion and fraud for variety. Where ever they go, people drop dead at their feet, often with a cryptic dying message. This behaviour isn't planned by anyone -- there is no killer stalking the magnet, nor is the magnet responsible for the deaths -- it's just pure coincidence.

Of course, this is all arranged by the show's creators so that the Magnet always has something interesting to do.

to:

A MysteryMagnet attracts mysteries, usually murders, with the occasional case of kidnapping, extortion and fraud for variety. Where ever Whereever they go, people drop dead at their feet, often with a cryptic dying message. This behaviour isn't planned by anyone -- there is no killer stalking the magnet, nor is the magnet responsible for the deaths -- it's just pure coincidence.

Of course, this is all arranged by the show's creators so that the Magnet magnet always has something interesting to do.
21st Feb '16 1:05:26 AM karategal
Is there an issue? Send a Message


%% Image selected per Image Pickin' thread: http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/posts.php?discussion=1368137384020720100
%% Please do not replace or remove without starting a new thread.



%%
%%
%%
%%
%% This list of examples has been alphabetized. Please add your example in the proper place. Thanks!
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%
%%

%% Image selected per Image Pickin' thread: http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/posts.php?discussion=1368137384020720100
%% Please do not replace or remove without starting a new thread.
%%






















* Old Literature/MissMarple? For an old lady who lived in a relatively small town, a lot of people seemed to be murdered near her. Hell, even when she went on vacation someone was murdered.
** "I hope you never realize just how wicked small villages can be." - Miss Marple
* In ''Ship Of Fools'', a ''Series/DoctorWho'' [[ExpandedUniverse tie-in]], there is a sweet little old lady who goes around solving the murders that happen all around her. It turns out she's actually a telepath subconsciously sending out "kill people in elaborate ways" signals to everyone around her, accidentally causing the very murders she solves.

to:

\n* Old Literature/MissMarple? For an old lady who lived in BernieRhodenbarr can't go anywhere or [[GentlemanThief steal anything]] without stumbling across a relatively small town, a lot of people seemed murder. Sometimes this is justified by Bernie trying to be murdered near her. Hell, even when she went on vacation someone was murdered.
** "I hope you never realize just how wicked small villages can be." - Miss Marple
* In ''Ship Of Fools'', a ''Series/DoctorWho'' [[ExpandedUniverse tie-in]], there is a sweet little old lady who goes around solving
steal the murders that happen all around her. It turns out she's actually a telepath subconsciously sending out "kill people in elaborate ways" signals to everyone around her, accidentally causing the very murders she solves.{{MacGuffin}} other characters are killing each other over. Other times, there's no reason at all.



*** Loosely plausible as July and August are probably the best times to carry out the usually outdoor crimes (one- smuggling I think- involves a nefarious man swimming long distances at night, which in England is probably only sane in August)
* The ''Literature/TrixieBelden'' mystery series. She stumbles across mysterious happenings wherever she goes and always solves the case.
* Inspector [[Series/{{Wallander}} Kurt Wallander]] in the novels of Swedish writer Henning Mankell lives in the small town of Ystad (population 17,286). The murders just keep happening...
* ''Literature/SamJones'', sculptor turned reluctant sleuth from Lauren Henderson's murder mystery books. In one book she is encountered by her policeman lover, stumbling home at 6 in the afternoon blind drunk, and it takes him mere moments to realise someone must be dead to start her drinking so early in the day. Her response?
--> '''Sam Jones''': I am the bastard lovechild of Mulder and Schkully and I'm going to pash out now.

to:

*** Loosely plausible as July and August are probably the best times to carry out the usually outdoor crimes (one- smuggling I think- involves a nefarious man swimming long distances at night, which in England is probably only sane in August)
* The ''Literature/TrixieBelden'' mystery series. She stumbles across mysterious happenings wherever she goes and always solves the case.
* Inspector [[Series/{{Wallander}} Kurt Wallander]] in the novels of Swedish writer Henning Mankell lives in the small town of Ystad (population 17,286). The murders just keep happening...
* ''Literature/SamJones'', sculptor turned reluctant sleuth from Lauren Henderson's murder mystery books. In one book she is encountered by her policeman lover, stumbling home at 6 in the afternoon blind drunk, and it takes him mere moments to realise someone must be dead to start her drinking so early in the day. Her response?
--> '''Sam Jones''': I am the bastard lovechild of Mulder and Schkully and I'm going to pash out now.
August).



* Literature/HerculePoirot ironically lampshades the improbability: "Never, never does it occur that someone says confidentially: 'Well, as a matter of fact, I've actually known five murderers'!". [[spoiler: This refers to a villain who deliberately provokes other people into committing murders]]. Poirot has known far more than that.
** Lampshaded in a Two Ronnies sketch where it turned out that Poirot was, in fact, committing all the murders and blaming them on other people using fabricated evidence.

to:

* Literature/HerculePoirot ironically lampshades the improbability: "Never, never does it occur that someone says confidentially: 'Well, as a matter of fact, I've actually known five murderers'!". [[spoiler: This refers to a villain who deliberately provokes other people into committing murders]]. Poirot has known far more than that.
**
Lampshaded heavily in a Two Ronnies sketch where it turned out Sharan Newman's ''Catherine Le Vendeur'' series; she frequently complains that Poirot was, in fact, committing all the murders and blaming them she can't go anywhere without a dead body falling on other people using fabricated evidence.her. Often literally, which is a RunningGag.



* The Literature/DiamondBrothers always get involve into some mystery either by accident or by choice.
* Brought up a few times in the ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'' series -- every time Vimes goes somewhere, a crime is committed. Sybill is especially exasperated with this tendency in ''Snuff''. The trope is also played with a little; Vimes might find a crime wherever he goes, but when he's somewhere else, ''less'' crime is being committed ''in'' Ankh-Morpork because of how frightened everyone is of what will happen when Vimes gets back. So he's a Mystery Magnet that actually takes the mysteries ''with'' him...
* In ''Ship Of Fools'', a ''Series/DoctorWho'' [[ExpandedUniverse tie-in]], there is a sweet little old lady who goes around solving the murders that happen all around her. It turns out she's actually a telepath subconsciously sending out "kill people in elaborate ways" signals to everyone around her, accidentally causing the very murders she solves.
* ''Creator/ElleryQueen''. This even gets {{lampshaded}} in the novella "Mum is the Word" when the chief of police comments that Ellery can't visit Wrightsville without a major crime taking place.
* LordPeterWimsey thinks this has happened to him at one point in ''Gaudy Night''. He is rowing down the river with the female lead, Harriet Vane, when noxious smells bubble up out of the water. "Honestly, Harriet, it's indecent, the way corpses follow me about!" Fortunately, it happens to be just a local spot of water pollution.
* [=Heather Wells=], titular character of the ''Literature/TheHeatherWellsMysteries'' by author Meg Cabot, is a constant magnet for death and crime as an assistant residence hall director in what becomes colloquially known as "Death Dorm."
* Literature/HerculePoirot ironically lampshades the improbability: "Never, never does it occur that someone says confidentially: 'Well, as a matter of fact, I've actually known five murderers'!". [[spoiler: This refers to a villain who deliberately provokes other people into committing murders]]. Poirot has known far more than that.
** Lampshaded in a Two Ronnies sketch where it turned out that Poirot was, in fact, committing all the murders and blaming them on other people using fabricated evidence.
* Rhys Bowen's ''Her Royal Spyness'' Series, Lady Georgiana, whether she's invited to a party or doing a favor for The Queen, "Georgie" will end up entangled in mystery, usually with a Dead Body or two.
* Fisk and Michael from the ''Literature/KnightAndRogueSeries'' are subject to this, though while Michael is usually excited to have a chance to do good Fisk usually wants to have as little association with the mysteries as possible.
* Pointed out by Joan Coggin in her [[http://www.ruemorguepress.com/catalog/coggin_penelope.html Lady Lupin]] mysteries. ''"There must be something queer about me," she says, "like those people in Greek tragedies. The minute I arrive upon the scene everyone cries, ‘Let’s have a murder.’"''



* Pointed out by Joan Coggin in her [[http://www.ruemorguepress.com/catalog/coggin_penelope.html Lady Lupin]] mysteries. ''"There must be something queer about me," she says, "like those people in Greek tragedies. The minute I arrive upon the scene everyone cries, ‘Let’s have a murder.’"''
* Both Literature/NancyDrew and Literature/TheHardyBoys were frequently lamenting that they never got to have normal vacations.
* Fisk and Michael from the ''Literature/KnightAndRogueSeries'' are subject to this, though while Michael is usually excited to have a chance to do good Fisk usually wants to have as little association with the mysteries as possible.
* Brought up a few times in the ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'' series - every time Vimes goes somewhere, a crime is committed. Sybill is especially exasperated with this tendency in ''Snuff''. The trope is also played with a little; Vimes might find a crime wherever he goes, but when he's somewhere else, ''less'' crime is being committed ''in'' Ankh-Morpork because of how frightened everyone is of what will happen when Vimes gets back. So he's a Mystery Magnet that actually takes the mysteries ''with'' him...
* Lampshaded heavily in Sharan Newman's ''Catherine Le Vendeur'' series; she frequently complains that she can't go anywhere without a dead body falling on her. Often literally, which is a RunningGag.
* BernieRhodenbarr can't go anywhere or [[GentlemanThief steal anything]] without stumbling across a murder. Sometimes this is justified by Bernie trying to steal the {{MacGuffin}} other characters are killing each other over. Other times, there's no reason at all.
* LordPeterWimsey thinks this has happened to him at one point in ''Gaudy Night''. He is rowing down the river with the female lead, Harriet Vane, when noxious smells bubble up out of the water. "Honestly, Harriet, it's indecent, the way corpses follow me about!" Fortunately, it happens to be just a local spot of water pollution.

to:

* Pointed out by [=McBeen=], county coroner from Joan Coggin in her [[http://www.ruemorguepress.com/catalog/coggin_penelope.html Lady Lupin]] mysteries. ''"There Hess's ''Maggod''y mystery series, has accused police chief Arly Hanks of being this trope. She snarkily replied that [[LampshadeHanging it must be something queer about me," she says, "like all those classified ads she places in newspapers, inviting murderers to come practice their hobby in town]].
* Old Literature/MissMarple? For an old lady who lived in a relatively small town, a lot of
people in Greek tragedies. The minute I arrive upon the scene everyone cries, ‘Let’s have a murder.’"''
* Both Literature/NancyDrew and Literature/TheHardyBoys were frequently lamenting that they
seemed to be murdered near her. Hell, even when she went on vacation someone was murdered.
** "I hope you
never got to have normal vacations.
* Fisk and Michael from the ''Literature/KnightAndRogueSeries'' are subject to this, though while Michael is usually excited to have a chance to do good Fisk usually wants to have as little association with the mysteries as possible.
* Brought up a few times in the ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'' series - every time Vimes goes somewhere, a crime is committed. Sybill is especially exasperated with this tendency in ''Snuff''. The trope is also played with a little; Vimes might find a crime wherever he goes, but when he's somewhere else, ''less'' crime is being committed ''in'' Ankh-Morpork because of how frightened everyone is of what will happen when Vimes gets back. So he's a Mystery Magnet that actually takes the mysteries ''with'' him...
* Lampshaded heavily in Sharan Newman's ''Catherine Le Vendeur'' series; she frequently complains that she can't go anywhere without a dead body falling on her. Often literally, which is a RunningGag.
* BernieRhodenbarr can't go anywhere or [[GentlemanThief steal anything]] without stumbling across a murder. Sometimes this is justified by Bernie trying to steal the {{MacGuffin}} other characters are killing each other over. Other times, there's no reason at all.
* LordPeterWimsey thinks this has happened to him at one point in ''Gaudy Night''. He is rowing down the river with the female lead, Harriet Vane, when noxious smells bubble up out of the water. "Honestly, Harriet, it's indecent, the way corpses follow me about!" Fortunately, it happens to be
realize just a local spot of water pollution.how wicked small villages can be." -- Miss Marple



* Both Literature/NancyDrew and Literature/TheHardyBoys were frequently lamenting that they never got to have normal vacations.
* ''Literature/SamJones'', sculptor turned reluctant sleuth from Lauren Henderson's murder mystery books. In one book she is encountered by her policeman lover, stumbling home at 6 in the afternoon blind drunk, and it takes him mere moments to realise someone must be dead to start her drinking so early in the day. Her response?
--> '''Sam Jones''': I am the bastard lovechild of Mulder and Schkully and I'm going to pass out now.
* A stranger example than others, each ''Literature/SammyKeyes mystery usually takes place within a month. Other MysteryMagnet stories aren't as regulated.



* Rhys Bowen's Her Royal Spyness Series, Lady Georgiana, whether she's invited to a party or doing a favor for The Queen, "Georgie" will end up entangled in mystery, usually with a Dead Body or two.
* A stranger example than others, each ''Literature/SammyKeyes mystery usually takes place within a month. Other MysteryMagnet stories aren't as regulated.
* [=McBeen=], county coroner from Joan Hess's Maggody mystery series, has accused police chief Arly Hanks of being this trope. She snarkily replied that [[LampshadeHanging it must be all those classified ads she places in newspapers, inviting murderers to come practice their hobby in town]].
* ''Creator/ElleryQueen''. This even gets {{lampshaded}} in the novella "Mum is the Word" when the chief of police comments that Ellery can't visit Wrightsville without a major crime taking place.
* [=Heather Wells=], titular character of the ''Literature/TheHeatherWellsMysteries'' by author Meg Cabot, is a constant magnet for death and crime as an assistant residence hall director in what becomes colloquially known as "Death Dorm."

to:

* Rhys Bowen's Her Royal Spyness Series, Lady Georgiana, whether she's invited to a party or doing a favor for The Queen, "Georgie" will end up entangled in mystery, usually with a Dead Body or two.
* A stranger example than others, each ''Literature/SammyKeyes
''Literature/TrixieBelden'' mystery usually takes place within a month. Other MysteryMagnet stories aren't as regulated.
* [=McBeen=], county coroner from Joan Hess's Maggody mystery series, has accused police chief Arly Hanks of being this trope.
series. She snarkily replied that [[LampshadeHanging it must be all those classified ads stumbles across mysterious happenings wherever she places in newspapers, inviting murderers to come practice their hobby in town]].
goes and always solves the case.
* ''Creator/ElleryQueen''. This even gets {{lampshaded}} Inspector [[Series/{{Wallander}} Kurt Wallander]] in the novella "Mum is novels of Swedish writer Henning Mankell lives in the Word" when the chief small town of police comments that Ellery can't visit Wrightsville without a major crime taking place.
* [=Heather Wells=], titular character of the ''Literature/TheHeatherWellsMysteries'' by author Meg Cabot, is a constant magnet for death and crime as an assistant residence hall director in what becomes colloquially known as "Death Dorm."
Ystad (population 17,286). The murders just keep happening...










to:

* Jake and Jennifer Eagle, the protagonists of the ''VideoGame/EagleEyeMysteries'' series, seem to be this. It's [[LampshadeHanging noted]] during the second game's JustifiedTutorial.
--> '''Jake/Jennifer:''' It looks like mysteries just seem to pop up wherever we go!
* Madison, from ''VideoGame/HeavyRain''. Not only did she run into a serial killer taxidermist even before the game starts (via DLC), during the actual plot she runs into a guy who's after another serial killer (ironically the one she was looking for in the DLC). In the course of investigating that, she gets captured by ''still another'' serial killer, almost gets raped by a psychotic nightclub owner too, and trapped in a burning building by the real killer. Then, in one of the endings, ''yet another'' serial killer threatens her during a book signing, saying he's a true WorthyOpponent for her. Poor girl can't catch a break. No wonder she has nightmares.
* Not only has Literature/NancyDrew been a [[KidDetective Teen Detective]] MysteryMagnet for decades, but the PC game-series Lampshades that fact in the denoument of ''The Final Scene'', where a tabloid newspaper article ponders the odds that her endless cases are just a coincidence. Luckily for River Heights' population-figures, most of them aren't murders.
* Lampshaded in ''VideoGame/Persona4Arena''. [[TheLancer Yosuke]] thinks that he's going to have to start calling [[TheHero Yu]] "the mystery maker", since trouble seems to follow every time Yu shows up in Inaba. Weather this was really a coincidence or not is [[WildMassGuessing up for debate]].



* Not only has Literature/NancyDrew been a [[KidDetective Teen Detective]] MysteryMagnet for decades, but the PC game-series Lampshades that fact in the denoument of ''The Final Scene'', where a tabloid newspaper article ponders the odds that her endless cases are just a coincidence. Luckily for River Heights' population-figures, most of them aren't murders.
* Madison, from ''VideoGame/HeavyRain''. Not only did she run into a serial killer taxidermist even before the game starts (via DLC), during the actual plot she runs into a guy who's after another serial killer (ironically the one she was looking for in the DLC). In the course of investigating that, she gets captured by ''still another'' serial killer, almost gets raped by a psychotic nightclub owner too, and trapped in a burning building by the real killer. Then, in one of the endings, ''yet another'' serial killer threatens her during a book signing, saying he's a true WorthyOpponent for her. Poor girl can't catch a break. No wonder she has nightmares.
* Lampshaded in ''VideoGame/Persona4Arena''. [[TheLancer Yosuke]] thinks that he's going to have to start calling [[TheHero Yu]] "the mystery maker", since trouble seems to follow every time Yu shows up in Inaba. Weather this was really a coincidence or not is [[WildMassGuessing up for debate]].
* Jake and Jennifer Eagle, the protagonists of the ''VideoGame/EagleEyeMysteries'' series, seem to be this. It's [[LampshadeHanging noted]] during the second game's JustifiedTutorial.
--> '''Jake/Jennifer:''' It looks like mysteries just seem to pop up wherever we go!
* The Literature/DiamondBrothers always get involve into some mystery either by accident or by choice.












18th Dec '15 1:58:56 PM galaxyeyes
Is there an issue? Send a Message



to:

* Harry Vanderspeigle, protagonist of the sci-fi/mystery comic ''ComicBook/ResidentAlien'', is one. Somewhat justified in that he seeks out mysteries since he likes to solve them.
This list shows the last 10 events of 136. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.MysteryMagnet