History Main / MurderisTheBestSolution

21st Jan '17 9:29:39 PM Clockwork_Lemon
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* In ''Manga/SamonTheSummoner'', while going bowling Samon tries to cheat in order to win, but when Neberios won't let him, he arrives at the conclusion that murder is the ONLY solution.
-->'''Samon:''' That's right... the main problem is Neberios... as long as he's here I can't win!
5th Jan '17 3:54:01 AM SteveMB
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** The Comedian certainly isn't above deadly force, but he really crosses the MoralEventHorizon when he murders [[spoiler:a Vietnamese woman who is pregnant with his child. The confrontation starts with him callously telling her he's leaving and not taking her back to America with him; in fact, he intends to forget all about her and her country. So, to make sure he ''remembers'' forever, she slashes his face with a broken bottle, but he didn't shoot her while she was coming at him. He shot her after he'd been slashed, and after she'd put the bottle down in response to him pulling a gun. She was practically begging him not to shoot for a solid 15 seconds before he pulled the trigger. It wasn't an instinctive, defensive response, it was murder]]. Afterwards, he points out to a shocked Doctor Manhattan (who was standing there the whole time), that he's just as responsible for the outcome, really; with his RealityWarper powers, Manhattan could have created any number of solutions by doing literally ''anything'' to prevent one or both acts of violence, but he just stood there and let it all happen.

to:

** The Comedian certainly isn't above deadly force, but he really crosses the MoralEventHorizon when he murders [[spoiler:a Vietnamese woman who is pregnant with his child. The confrontation starts with him callously telling her he's leaving and not taking her back to America with him; in fact, he intends to forget all about her and her country. So, to make sure he ''remembers'' forever, she slashes his face with a broken bottle, but he didn't shoot her while she was coming at him. He shot her after he'd been slashed, and after she'd put the bottle down in response to him pulling a gun. She was practically begging him not to shoot for a solid 15 seconds before he pulled the trigger. It wasn't an instinctive, defensive response, it was murder]]. Afterwards, he points out to a shocked Doctor Manhattan (who was standing there the whole time), that [[AccompliceByInaction he's just as responsible for the outcome, outcome]], really; with his RealityWarper powers, Manhattan could have created any number of solutions by doing literally ''anything'' to prevent one or both acts of violence, but he just stood there and let it all happen.
30th Dec '16 8:30:38 PM ImperialMajestyXO
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* ComicBook/TheQuestion decides that he must kill ComicBook/LexLuthor to prevent an Armageddon-level war from breaking out between the WesternAnimation/JusticeLeague and the United States government, reasoning that the League's reputation could survive the actions of a crackpot like him, but would be crushed if Superman were the one to kill Luthor (since the Superman of another timeline did so and the Question believes the same thing will happen here if he doesn't do it first). Unfortunately for him, Luthor had recently [[EmpoweredBadassNormal got super powers]].

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* ComicBook/TheQuestion decides that he must kill ComicBook/LexLuthor to prevent an Armageddon-level war from breaking out between the WesternAnimation/JusticeLeague and the United States government, reasoning that the League's reputation could survive the actions of a crackpot like him, but would be crushed if Superman Franchise/{{Superman}} were the one to kill Luthor (since the Superman of another timeline did so and the Question believes the same thing will happen here if he doesn't do it first). Unfortunately for him, Luthor had recently [[EmpoweredBadassNormal got super powers]].
10th Dec '16 8:25:25 AM Pseudoname
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[[caption-width-right:270: Hear me out... what about [[LoopholeAbuse manslaughter?]]]]
9th Dec '16 6:57:37 PM CurledUpWithDakka
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* In the third book in the ''Series/TheHitchhikersGuideToTheGalaxy'' series, ''Literature/LifeTheUniverseAndEverything,'' the Krikkit people, up until recently living on a planet entirely separated from the universe through a thick layer of SpaceClouds, send a small ship to discover where a recently-crashed spaceship comes from. When they break through the barrier and gaze out at the wonders of the infinite universe, they immediately matter-of-factly decide they have to [[OmnicidalManiac destroy it all.]] Thus did the devastating Krikkit Wars begin, causing the destruction of much of the universe (and birthing on a mostly harmless InsignificantLittleBluePlanet inhabited by among the [[HumansAreMorons stupidest species in the universe]] [[UsefulNotes/{{Cricket}} a game]] [[HumansThroughAlienEyes most civilized species]] find incredibly offensive.

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* In the third book in the ''Series/TheHitchhikersGuideToTheGalaxy'' series, ''Literature/LifeTheUniverseAndEverything,'' the Krikkit people, up until recently living on a planet entirely separated from the universe through a thick layer of SpaceClouds, send a small ship to discover where a recently-crashed spaceship comes from. When they break through the barrier and gaze out at the wonders of the infinite universe, they immediately matter-of-factly decide they have to [[OmnicidalManiac destroy it all.]] Thus did the devastating Krikkit Wars begin, causing the destruction of much of the universe (and birthing on a mostly harmless InsignificantLittleBluePlanet inhabited by among the [[HumansAreMorons stupidest species in the universe]] [[UsefulNotes/{{Cricket}} a game]] [[HumansThroughAlienEyes most civilized species]] find incredibly offensive.offensive).
18th Nov '16 9:20:41 AM crazysamaritan
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* In ''Film/BenAndArthur'', antagonist Victor believes he must [[spoiler:kill his gay brother Arthur]] in order for his church to readmit him after his expulsion. Far from dissuading Victor, the priest (who kicked him out on account that Arthur being gay will somehow send the rest of the congregants to Hell) [[spoiler:gives Victor a phone number for an assassin that can do the job. The assassin [[YesExceptNo succeeds in killing Ben... except that he actually doesn't kill him]], but missed out on killing Arthur, who ran out to buy groceries. On the second attempt, Victor takes the assassin with him, only to dispense with his services when both of them are already in the building. Victor then enters Ben and Arthur's apartment alone to (permanently) kill Ben and, later, baptize and kill Arthur]].

to:

* In ''Film/BenAndArthur'', antagonist Victor believes he must [[spoiler:kill his gay brother Arthur]] in order for his church to readmit him after his expulsion. Far from dissuading Victor, the priest (who kicked him out on account that Arthur being gay will somehow send the rest of the congregants to Hell) [[spoiler:gives Victor a phone number for an assassin that can do the job. The assassin [[YesExceptNo succeeds in killing Ben... except that he actually doesn't kill him]], him, but missed out on killing Arthur, who ran out to buy groceries. On the second attempt, Victor takes the assassin with him, only to dispense with his services when both of them are already in the building. Victor then enters Ben and Arthur's apartment alone to (permanently) kill Ben and, later, baptize and kill Arthur]].
24th Oct '16 8:09:35 AM merotoker
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* In ''Anime/ValvraveTheLiberator'', this is usually L-Elf's plan in most situations. [[TheHero Haruto]] calls him out on it by saying that violence is always the answer with him. In the episode where this is really shown [[spoiler:when L-Elf shoots Marie in the head for trying to get the secret of the Valvraves from Haruto and distracting him from a battle he was late for]], it's also Justified, as we see his backstory being trained as a ChildSoldier from a very young age. He mentions they were taught to be pragmatically cold and violent. "We were told to kill anyone suspicious. Kill any informants. Kill any deserters. Kill any witnesses. Kill. Kill."

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* In ''Anime/ValvraveTheLiberator'', this is usually L-Elf's plan in most situations. [[TheHero Haruto]] calls him out on it by saying that violence is always the answer with him. In the episode where this is really shown [[spoiler:when L-Elf shoots Marie in the head for trying to get the secret of the Valvraves from Haruto and distracting him from a battle he was late for]], it's also Justified, as we see his backstory being trained as a ChildSoldier {{Child Soldier|s}} from a very young age. He mentions they were taught to be pragmatically cold and violent. "We were told to kill anyone suspicious. Kill any informants. Kill any deserters. Kill any witnesses. Kill. Kill."



* Done on a massive scale in ''Anime/{{Gravion}}'''s backstory: [[spoiler:In a land dispute between two planets, the rulers of one side reject Sandman's plan to use his {{Super Robot|Genre}} to build a new habitable world (or fix their old one) out of hand, and go with Hugi's plans to send an army of {{Robeast}}s and MechaMooks to exterminate the people of the other planet.]]

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* Done on a massive scale in ''Anime/{{Gravion}}'''s backstory: [[spoiler:In a land dispute between two planets, the rulers of one side reject Sandman's plan to use his {{Super Robot|Genre}} to build a new habitable world (or fix their old one) out of hand, and go with Hugi's plans to send an army of {{Robeast}}s and MechaMooks to exterminate the people of the other planet.]]planet]].



** This seems to be a recurring theme for the show, as [[spoiler:Rena kills Rina and Teppei in Tsumihoroboshi-hen to protect her dad from their scam]], [[spoiler:Shion kills all the people she thought put Satoshi away (and tries to stab Keiichi, and no, she was never at the hospital) in Watanagashi-hen and Meakashi-hen]], and the overall theme of the show itself, since [[spoiler:Takano wants Rika dead by her own hands so she can enact her plan to raze the village, before 'everybody goes crazy']]. When you consider that [[spoiler:all of these people have Hinamizawa syndrome, a disease that causes people to go AxCrazy, [[ItMakesSenseInContext it makes more sense]].]]
** Shion also [[spoiler:''really'' wants to kill Teppei in ''Minagoroshi'', but is stopped by [[TheAtoner Keiichi]]. In a sound novel only arc, Shion, Rena, ''and'' Keiichi team up to kill Teppei. It [[HatePlague doesn't go so well.]]]]

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** This seems to be a recurring theme for the show, as [[spoiler:Rena kills Rina and Teppei in Tsumihoroboshi-hen to protect her dad from their scam]], [[spoiler:Shion kills all the people she thought put Satoshi away (and tries to stab Keiichi, and no, she was never at the hospital) in Watanagashi-hen and Meakashi-hen]], and the overall theme of the show itself, since [[spoiler:Takano wants Rika dead by her own hands so she can enact her plan to raze the village, before 'everybody goes crazy']]. When you consider that [[spoiler:all of these people have Hinamizawa syndrome, a disease that causes people to go AxCrazy, [[ItMakesSenseInContext it makes more sense]].]]
sense]]]].
** Shion also [[spoiler:''really'' wants to kill Teppei in ''Minagoroshi'', but is stopped by [[TheAtoner Keiichi]]. In a sound novel only arc, Shion, Rena, ''and'' Keiichi team up to kill Teppei. It [[HatePlague doesn't go so well.]]]]well]]]].



* Yuno of ''Manga/MiraiNikki'' subscribes to this trope. In her own words, "Everyone who comes between me and Yukki can just die!"

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* ''Manga/MiraiNikki''
**
Yuno of ''Manga/MiraiNikki'' subscribes to this trope. In her own words, "Everyone who comes between me and Yukki can just die!"



*** Miliardo's case is actually a [[SubvertedTrope subversion,]] as he never actually intended to destroy all life on Earth. His goal was to end war by perpetrating a war so horrible that everyone would realize [[WarIsHell how awful it is.]] To do that, he needed to present a credible threat of such a scale that Earth would be forced to respond with armed resistance.

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*** Miliardo's case is actually a [[SubvertedTrope subversion,]] {{subver|tedTrope}}sion, as he never actually intended to destroy all life on Earth. His goal was to end war by perpetrating a war so horrible that everyone would realize [[WarIsHell how awful it is.]] To do that, he needed to present a credible threat of such a scale that Earth would be forced to respond with armed resistance.



** The Comedian certainly isn't above deadly force, but he really crosses the MoralEventHorizon when he murders [[spoiler:a Vietnamese woman who is pregnant with his child. The confrontation starts with him callously telling her he's leaving and not taking her back to America with him; in fact, he intends to forget all about her and her country. So, to make sure he ''remembers'' forever, she slashes his face with a broken bottle, but he didn't shoot her while she was coming at him. He shot her after he'd been slashed, and after she'd put the bottle down in response to him pulling a gun. She was practically begging him not to shoot for a solid 15 seconds before he pulled the trigger. It wasn't an instinctive, defensive response, it was murder.]] Afterwards, he points out to a shocked Doctor Manhattan (who was standing there the whole time), that he's just as responsible for the outcome, really; with his RealityWarper powers, Manhattan could have created any number of solutions by doing literally ''anything'' to prevent one or both acts of violence, but he just stood there and let it all happen.

to:

** The Comedian certainly isn't above deadly force, but he really crosses the MoralEventHorizon when he murders [[spoiler:a Vietnamese woman who is pregnant with his child. The confrontation starts with him callously telling her he's leaving and not taking her back to America with him; in fact, he intends to forget all about her and her country. So, to make sure he ''remembers'' forever, she slashes his face with a broken bottle, but he didn't shoot her while she was coming at him. He shot her after he'd been slashed, and after she'd put the bottle down in response to him pulling a gun. She was practically begging him not to shoot for a solid 15 seconds before he pulled the trigger. It wasn't an instinctive, defensive response, it was murder.]] murder]]. Afterwards, he points out to a shocked Doctor Manhattan (who was standing there the whole time), that he's just as responsible for the outcome, really; with his RealityWarper powers, Manhattan could have created any number of solutions by doing literally ''anything'' to prevent one or both acts of violence, but he just stood there and let it all happen.



* ''Comicbook/{{X-Men}}''
** {{Wolverine}} is known for suggesting this during X-Men strategy meetings.
*** If anything, this is becoming even more pronounced. In ''Comicbook/AvengersVsXMen'', teenager Hope Summer is acting as a lure for a cosmic entity destroying everything in its path. The Avengers' solution: get her off Earth. Wolverine's solution: kill her (though he doesn't go through with it). The big story after that, ''ComicBook/AgeOfUltron'', has Wolverine trying to undo evil robot Ultron's taking over the world by going back in time and murdering Hank Pym, the Avenger who built it. When this fails to make things any better, he fixes this by going back again and murdering his own past self.
*** In ''ComicBook/TheChildrensCrusade'', this is his opinion of the best way to deal with Wanda (ComicBook/ScarletWitch) and her sixteen-year-old [[TangledFamilyTree reincarnated son]], Billy Kaplan ([[ComicBook/YoungAvengers Wiccan]]). While wanting to kill Wanda is [[ComicBook/AvengersDisassembled at least]] [[ComicBook/HouseOfM justifiable]] to an extent, Wolverine is [[BloodKnight outright gleeful]] about the idea of killing Billy as well -- and not only has Billy done ''nothing wrong'', no one's even sure if he ''has'' his mother's powers or strength. At that point, the biggest display of his power was accidentally putting a bunch of terrorists into temporary magical comas, which stopped a ''nuke'' from going off in the middle of New York. And while that display made the Avengers nervous, it wasn't proof of Billy being able to [[RealityWarper warp reality]] at all, let alone to [[PhysicalGod Wanda's level]]. Wolverine is determined to murder Billy regardless, ''just in case''. He outright ''tries'' to kill Billy twice, nearly running Billy through with his claws on both occasions, but is luckily stopped first by ComicBook/{{Magneto}} and then by [[ConquerorFromTheFuture Iron]] [[FutureMeScaresMe Lad]]. On the Avengers side of things, no one outright agrees with Wolverine's plan of "murder Wanda and her innocent son", but no one says anything ''against'' it, either.

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* ''Comicbook/{{X-Men}}''
''Comicbook/XMen''
** {{Wolverine}} Comicbook/{{Wolverine}} is known for suggesting this during X-Men strategy meetings.
meetings.
*** If anything, this is becoming even more pronounced. In ''Comicbook/AvengersVsXMen'', teenager Hope Summer ComicBook/HopeSummers is acting as a lure for a cosmic entity destroying everything in its path. The Avengers' solution: get her off Earth. Wolverine's solution: kill her (though he doesn't go through with it). The big story after that, ''ComicBook/AgeOfUltron'', has Wolverine trying to undo evil robot Ultron's Comicbook/{{Ultron}}'s taking over the world by going back in time and murdering [[Comicbook/AntMan Hank Pym, Pym]], the Avenger who built it. When this fails to make things any better, he fixes this by going back again and murdering his own past self.
*** In ''ComicBook/TheChildrensCrusade'', this is his opinion of the best way to deal with Wanda (ComicBook/ScarletWitch) and her sixteen-year-old [[TangledFamilyTree reincarnated son]], Billy Kaplan ([[ComicBook/YoungAvengers Wiccan]]). While wanting to kill Wanda is [[ComicBook/AvengersDisassembled at least]] [[ComicBook/HouseOfM justifiable]] to an extent, Wolverine is [[BloodKnight outright gleeful]] about the idea of killing Billy as well -- and not only has Billy done ''nothing wrong'', no one's even sure if he ''has'' his mother's powers or strength. At that point, the biggest display of his power was accidentally putting a bunch of terrorists into temporary magical comas, which stopped a ''nuke'' from going off in the middle of New York. And while that display made the Avengers nervous, it wasn't proof of Billy being able to [[RealityWarper warp reality]] at all, let alone to [[PhysicalGod Wanda's level]]. Wolverine is determined to murder Billy regardless, ''just in case''. He outright ''tries'' to kill Billy twice, nearly running Billy through with his claws on both occasions, but is luckily stopped first by ComicBook/{{Magneto}} SelfDemonstrating/{{Magneto}} and then by [[ConquerorFromTheFuture Iron]] [[FutureMeScaresMe Lad]]. On the Avengers side of things, no one outright agrees with Wolverine's plan of "murder Wanda and her innocent son", but no one says anything ''against'' it, either.



** This Trope is pretty much the reason Frank doesn't has much of a recurring RoguesGallery (except for Jigsaw and The Kingpin). It takes a ''severe'' implementation of the JokerImmunity (normally through interfering superheroes) for a villain to walk away from Frank.

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** This Trope trope is pretty much the reason Frank doesn't has much of a recurring RoguesGallery (except for Jigsaw and The Kingpin). It takes a ''severe'' implementation of the JokerImmunity (normally through interfering superheroes) for a villain to walk away from Frank.



* In ''Film/TwoThousandOneASpaceOdyssey'', the [[AIIsACrapshoot HAL 9000 computer]], faced with an [[LogicBomb irreconcilable programming conflict]], decides that the only way to ensure the mission's success is to kill the crew of the ''Discovery'' and complete the mission by himself.
** This one makes [[JustifiedTrope slightly more sense]], in that the programming conflict is from two equal and opposite commands to "tell crew vital information" and "keep vital information secret until reaching orbit". If there is no crew, the problem goes away... On top of this, he was actually ''trying'' to find a less lethal solution, but after incorrectly equating temporary shutdown with death, as HAL was unable to grasp the concept of sleep, decided he had no choice but to take the simple solution of killing the crew and cutting off communications with Earth if he's going to survive.
* In ''Film/BenAndArthur'', antagonist Victor believes he must [[spoiler:kill his gay brother Arthur]] in order for his church to readmit him after his expulsion. Far from dissuading Victor, the priest (who kicked him out on account that Arthur being gay will somehow send the rest of the congregants to Hell) [[spoiler:gives Victor a phone number for an assassin that can do the job. The assassin [[YesExceptNo succeeds in killing Ben... except that he actually doesn't kill him]], but missed out on killing Arthur, who ran out to buy groceries. On the second attempt, Victor takes the assassin with him, only to dispense with his services when both of them are already in the building. Victor then enters Ben and Arthur's apartment alone to (permanently) kill Ben and, later, baptize and kill Arthur.]]

to:

* In ''Film/TwoThousandOneASpaceOdyssey'', the [[AIIsACrapshoot HAL 9000 computer]], faced with an [[LogicBomb irreconcilable programming conflict]], decides that the only way to ensure the mission's success is to kill the crew of the ''Discovery'' and complete the mission by himself.
**
himself. This one makes [[JustifiedTrope slightly more sense]], in that the programming conflict is from two equal and opposite commands to "tell crew vital information" and "keep vital information secret until reaching orbit". If there is no crew, the problem goes away... On top of this, he was actually ''trying'' to find a less lethal solution, but after incorrectly equating temporary shutdown with death, as HAL was unable to grasp the concept of sleep, decided he had no choice but to take the simple solution of killing the crew and cutting off communications with Earth if he's going to survive.
* In ''Film/BenAndArthur'', antagonist Victor believes he must [[spoiler:kill his gay brother Arthur]] in order for his church to readmit him after his expulsion. Far from dissuading Victor, the priest (who kicked him out on account that Arthur being gay will somehow send the rest of the congregants to Hell) [[spoiler:gives Victor a phone number for an assassin that can do the job. The assassin [[YesExceptNo succeeds in killing Ben... except that he actually doesn't kill him]], but missed out on killing Arthur, who ran out to buy groceries. On the second attempt, Victor takes the assassin with him, only to dispense with his services when both of them are already in the building. Victor then enters Ben and Arthur's apartment alone to (permanently) kill Ben and, later, baptize and kill Arthur.]]Arthur]].



* [[Literature/HarryPotter Lord Voldemort]] falls afoul of this trope in ''[[Literature/HarryPotterAndTheDeathlyHallows Deathly Hallows]]''. Despite knowing full well that the Elder Wand can be taken without killing its previous owner -- in fact, he's met and interrogated two people who lost it and lived -- he thinks the sensible solution is to kill his trusted lieutenant.

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* [[Literature/HarryPotter Lord Voldemort]] Voldemort in ''Literature/HarryPotter''
** He
falls afoul of this trope in ''[[Literature/HarryPotterAndTheDeathlyHallows Deathly Hallows]]''. Despite knowing full well that the Elder Wand can be taken without killing its previous owner -- in fact, he's met and interrogated two people who lost it and lived -- he thinks the sensible solution is to kill his trusted lieutenant.



* This trope is deconstructed in the climax of ''War and Democide Never Again'' [[IndecisiveDeconstruction after being played painfully straight for the whole book up to that point]]. The mission of the two main characters is to travel back in time [[SetRightWhatOnceWentWrong to kill dictators before they end up in power]], and for the most part, they succeed without too much trouble. However, after they have killed most of the dictators, [[spoiler:Joy snaps and tries to kill a certain politician she doesn't like]], even though he has shown no dictatorial ambitions. John has no choice but [[spoiler:to kill her before she can kill her new target]]. Thus leading to the somewhat-{{Clueless Aesop}} that you really shouldn't kill anybody, [[PayEvilUntoEvil even if they deserve it]], [[ItGetsEasier lest you come to think]] that MurderIsTheBestSolution and [[JumpingOffTheSlipperySlope try to kill everyone you disagree with]].
* Played straight in the ''Literature/TheHouseOfNight'', since [[spoiler:most of Kalona's problems wouldn't exist if, say, he had just wiped Heath's memory instead of killing him.]]

to:

* This trope is deconstructed in the climax of ''War and Democide Never Again'' [[IndecisiveDeconstruction after being played painfully straight for the whole book up to that point]]. The mission of the two main characters is to travel back in time [[SetRightWhatOnceWentWrong to kill dictators before they end up in power]], and for the most part, they succeed without too much trouble. However, after they have killed most of the dictators, [[spoiler:Joy snaps and tries to kill a certain politician she doesn't like]], even though he has shown no dictatorial ambitions. John has no choice but [[spoiler:to kill her before she can kill her new target]]. Thus leading to the somewhat-{{Clueless Aesop}} that you really shouldn't kill anybody, [[PayEvilUntoEvil even if they deserve it]], [[ItGetsEasier lest you come to think]] that MurderIsTheBestSolution murder is the best solution and [[JumpingOffTheSlipperySlope try to kill everyone you disagree with]].
* Played straight in the ''Literature/TheHouseOfNight'', since [[spoiler:most of Kalona's problems wouldn't exist if, say, he had just wiped Heath's memory instead of killing him.]]him]].



* Joe Goldberg from ''Literature/{{You2015}}'' uses murder to keep Beck with him.

to:

* Joe Goldberg from ''Literature/{{You2015}}'' ''Literature/{{You|2015}}'' uses murder to keep Beck with him.



* In an episode of ''Series/CSIMiami'', [[spoiler:a groom-to-be is worried that the stripper he's been seeing will blackmail him and tells his best man to talk to her. The best man's response is to ''put a remote-controlled gun to the bottom of the groom's limo and shoot her.'' Sadly, his MurderTheHypotenuse plot murdered the wrong hypotenuse...]]

to:

* In an episode of ''Series/CSIMiami'', [[spoiler:a groom-to-be is worried that the stripper he's been seeing will blackmail him and tells his best man to talk to her. The best man's response is to ''put a remote-controlled gun to the bottom of the groom's limo and shoot her.'' Sadly, his MurderTheHypotenuse plot murdered the wrong hypotenuse...]]hypotenuse..]].



* In ''Series/TerminatorTheSarahConnorChronicles'', [[RobotGirl Cameron]] commonly advocates murdering witnesses or other threats, which is usually objected to by Sarah and John. And often enough, Cameron's recommendations turn out to be ''right.''

to:

* In ''Series/TerminatorTheSarahConnorChronicles'', ''Series/TerminatorTheSarahConnorChronicles''
**
[[RobotGirl Cameron]] commonly advocates murdering witnesses or other threats, which is usually objected to by Sarah and John. And often enough, Cameron's recommendations turn out to be ''right.''



* In an episode of ''Series/TheSarahJaneAdventures'', Sarah Jane has gone missing and another woman, Andrea, has taken her place. [[spoiler:Turns out she was childhood friends with Sarah Jane, up until her death.]] After a DealWithTheDevil, she [[spoiler:switches places with Sarah Jane and Sarah Jane instead dies. When Maria figures it out, Andrea makes another deal that rewrites Maria out of history. Then she tried to do it to Maria's father.]]

to:

* In an episode of ''Series/TheSarahJaneAdventures'', Sarah Jane has gone missing and another woman, Andrea, has taken her place. [[spoiler:Turns out she was childhood friends with Sarah Jane, up until her death.]] After a DealWithTheDevil, she [[spoiler:switches places with Sarah Jane and Sarah Jane instead dies. When Maria figures it out, Andrea makes another deal that rewrites Maria out of history. Then she tried to do it to Maria's father.]]father]].



* Many of the killers on ''Series/{{Monk}}'' have this mindset, but here's a stand-out example: In "Mr. Monk Takes Manhattan", [[spoiler:Steven Leight has killed his wife (we never really learn why) and stolen her jewels to make it look like a mugging. Then, thanks to a coat-check mix-up, another man (the Latvian ambassador) accidentally walks away wearing Leight's coat, with the stolen jewels in the pocket. Leight chases the ambassador back to his hotel, but instead of simply asking for his coat back, he ''shoots down the ambassador and his three bodyguards''.]]
** [[spoiler:Monk didn't liked it ''at all'' when he found out (on the GrandFinale) that his wife had been a victim of this trope, courtesy of a SleazyPolitician (it's "sleazy" instead of "corrupt" because the reason for the murder (covering up an affair that she discovered) wasn't even ''that'' serious in hindsight).]]
* In ''Series/{{OnceUponATime}}'', this is how [[spoiler:Rumplestiltskin/Gold convinces Snow/Mary Margaret to deal with Cora. However, committing the deed results in a serious case of [[MyGodWhatHaveIDone guilt and remorse]] for Snow.]]

to:

* ''Series/{{Monk}}''
**
Many of the killers on ''Series/{{Monk}}'' have this mindset, but here's a stand-out example: In "Mr. Monk Takes Manhattan", [[spoiler:Steven Leight has killed his wife (we never really learn why) and stolen her jewels to make it look like a mugging. Then, thanks to a coat-check mix-up, another man (the Latvian ambassador) accidentally walks away wearing Leight's coat, with the stolen jewels in the pocket. Leight chases the ambassador back to his hotel, but instead of simply asking for his coat back, he ''shoots down the ambassador and his three bodyguards''.bodyguards'']].
** [[spoiler:Monk didn't like it ''at all'' when he found out (on the GrandFinale) that his wife had been a victim of this trope, courtesy of a SleazyPolitician (it's "sleazy" instead of "corrupt" because the reason for the murder (covering up an affair that she discovered) wasn't even ''that'' serious in hindsight).
]]
** [[spoiler:Monk didn't liked it ''at all'' when he found out (on the GrandFinale) that his wife had been a victim of this trope, courtesy of a SleazyPolitician (it's "sleazy" instead of "corrupt" because the reason for the murder (covering up an affair that she discovered) wasn't even ''that'' serious in hindsight).]]
* In ''Series/{{OnceUponATime}}'', ''Series/OnceUponATime'', this is how [[spoiler:Rumplestiltskin/Gold convinces Snow/Mary Margaret to deal with Cora. However, committing the deed results in a serious case of [[MyGodWhatHaveIDone guilt and remorse]] for Snow.]]Snow]].



** [[spoiler:Samaritan, in contrast to the Machine, comes up with long lists of "deviants" to be executed at a moment's notice. Their crimes range from actual terrorism to merely holding anti-government views]].

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** [[spoiler:Samaritan, in contrast to the Machine, comes up with long lists of "deviants" to be executed at a moment's notice. Their crimes range from actual terrorism to merely holding anti-government views]].views.]]



* Common in {{VideoGame/Borderlands 2}}, especially in the Campaign of Carnage DLC. Is often lampshaded in dialogue or mission briefings.
** A prime example: ''"Mister Torgue has informed you that much of the beer in Pyro Pete's Bar has been poisoned. He needs you to kill some of the bandits and take their beer so they won't die of poison. As you will be killing the bandits anyway, this plan makes approximately zero sense."''

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* Common in {{VideoGame/Borderlands 2}}, ''{{VideoGame/Borderlands 2}}'', especially in the Campaign of Carnage DLC. Is often lampshaded in dialogue or mission briefings.
**
briefings. A prime example: ''"Mister Torgue has informed you that much of the beer in Pyro Pete's Bar has been poisoned. He needs you to kill some of the bandits and take their beer so they won't die of poison. As you will be killing the bandits anyway, this plan makes approximately zero sense."''



* In ''VideoGame/KingdomHeartsBirthBySleep'', Aqua concludes that the only way to protect the [[Disney/{{Cinderella}} Castle of Dreams]] is to assassinate [[DarkIsEvil Lady Tremaine and her two daughters]], because of Master Eraqus' teachings that darkness must be destroyed. The FairyGodmother stops her from committing the triple murder, and suggests that she instead help Cinderella. [[spoiler:The evil stepfamily are eventually killed from crossing the MoralEventHorizon, anyway]].

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* In ''VideoGame/KingdomHeartsBirthBySleep'', Aqua concludes that the only way to protect the [[Disney/{{Cinderella}} Castle of Dreams]] is to assassinate [[DarkIsEvil Lady Tremaine and her two daughters]], because of Master Eraqus' teachings that darkness must be destroyed. The FairyGodmother stops her from committing the triple murder, and suggests that she instead help Cinderella. [[spoiler:The evil stepfamily are eventually killed from crossing the MoralEventHorizon, anyway]].anyway.]]



* In ''Webcomic/{{Freefall}}'', Florence usually does ''not'' follow this trope, on account of being an organic A.I. and having something similar to the ThreeLawsOfRobotics. This doesn't technically apply to robots, but Florence happens to believe (with lots of very good evidence on her side) that AndroidsArePeopleToo. But [[http://freefall.purrsia.com/ff2500/fc02446.htm when it comes up]] that [[spoiler:Mr. Kornada's plan to lobotomize every robot on Jean for the sole purpose of stealing their money was to be carried out ''entirely'' by his robot Clippy]], she is unable to ignore [[CuttingTheKnot the "distressingly easy and horrible solution"]] this scenario presents.

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* In ''Webcomic/{{Freefall}}'', Florence usually does ''not'' follow this trope, on account of being an organic A.I. and having something similar to the ThreeLawsOfRobotics.[[ThreeLawsCompliant Three Laws of Robotics]]. This doesn't technically apply to robots, but Florence happens to believe (with lots of very good evidence on her side) that AndroidsArePeopleToo. But [[http://freefall.purrsia.com/ff2500/fc02446.htm when it comes up]] that [[spoiler:Mr. Kornada's plan to lobotomize every robot on Jean for the sole purpose of stealing their money was to be carried out ''entirely'' by his robot Clippy]], she is unable to ignore [[CuttingTheKnot the "distressingly easy and horrible solution"]] this scenario presents.



** The Foundation also has an aversion-to-subversion in that they generally avoid at any cost the deaths of living SCP's, the only exceptions being those that are so exceptionally dangerous, such as uncontrolled [[RealityWarper reality warpers]], that killing them is the only safe option. The Foundation's rival organization, the Global Occult Coalition, on the other hand, ''do'' believe that destroying anomalous objects is the best way to contain them. Objects like [[http://www.scp-wiki.net/scp-1522 SCP-1522]] and [[http://www.scp-wiki.net/scp-1609 SCP-1609]] show that this policy is not necessarily the best solution.

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** The Foundation also has an aversion-to-subversion in that they generally avoid at any cost the deaths of living SCP's, the only exceptions being those that are so exceptionally dangerous, such as uncontrolled [[RealityWarper reality warpers]], {{reality warper}}s, that killing them is the only safe option. The Foundation's rival organization, the Global Occult Coalition, on the other hand, ''do'' believe that destroying anomalous objects is the best way to contain them. Objects like [[http://www.scp-wiki.net/scp-1522 SCP-1522]] and [[http://www.scp-wiki.net/scp-1609 SCP-1609]] show that this policy is not necessarily the best solution.



* In Fanfic/TheWizardInTheShadows, Harry is somewhat prone to this. Since he's been fighting a vicious war for the last four/five years, he's not particularly prone to mercy. Threatening his enemies with obscene violence tends to be his preferred method of getting people to do what he wants.

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* In Fanfic/TheWizardInTheShadows, ''Fanfic/TheWizardInTheShadows'', Harry is somewhat prone to this. Since he's been fighting a vicious war for the last four/five years, he's not particularly prone to mercy. Threatening his enemies with obscene violence tends to be his preferred method of getting people to do what he wants.



* In ''Literature/{{Belgariad}}'' and ''Literature/TheMalloreon'', this trope is constantly {{lampshade|Hanging}}d and made fun of in the tendencies of a number of cultures to solve their problems with extreme violence. It gets to the point where certain characters among the TrueCompanions have to be actively restrained from killing anyone who gets in their way -- or even mildly annoys them. For additional hilarity, which particular characters are advocating for and against killing tends to rotate among the cast, and their choice of ''methods'' is often a source of debate. For example, Silk favors assassination, Hettar and Barak are for brutal slaughter, Mandorallen will gleefully take on entire armies by himself, and Sadi (in ''The Malloreon'') prefers poison.

to:

* In ''Literature/{{Belgariad}}'' ''Literature/TheBelgariad'' and ''Literature/TheMalloreon'', this trope is constantly {{lampshade|Hanging}}d and made fun of in the tendencies of a number of cultures to solve their problems with extreme violence. It gets to the point where certain characters among the TrueCompanions have to be actively restrained from killing anyone who gets in their way -- or even mildly annoys them. For additional hilarity, which particular characters are advocating for and against killing tends to rotate among the cast, and their choice of ''methods'' is often a source of debate. For example, Silk favors assassination, Hettar and Barak are for brutal slaughter, Mandorallen will gleefully take on entire armies by himself, and Sadi (in ''The Malloreon'') prefers poison.



** Lilarcor in ''VideoGame/BaldursGate 2''. To be fair, he ''is'' a talking sword. [[WhenAllYouHaveIsAHammer How else is he going to solve problems?]]

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** Lilarcor in ''VideoGame/BaldursGate 2''.''VideoGame/BaldursGateII''. To be fair, he ''is'' a talking sword. [[WhenAllYouHaveIsAHammer How else is he going to solve problems?]]



** And in the second game, [[spoiler:she subverts it. Killing Chell is actually [[{{Determinator}} pretty hard,]] so she ends up letting her go.]]

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** And in the second game, [[spoiler:she subverts it. Killing Chell is actually [[{{Determinator}} pretty hard,]] so she ends up letting her go.]]go]].



* ''Anime/MagicalFunTimeNow'' has the MagicalGirl protagonists [[spoiler:killing a prison guard who overheard their plan to escape.]]

to:

* ''Anime/MagicalFunTimeNow'' has the MagicalGirl protagonists [[spoiler:killing a prison guard who overheard their plan to escape.]] escape]].



* ''WesternAnimation/TheVentureBrothers'' does this a lot. In one episode, Dr. Venture orders Brock to kill people so he can create more Venturesteins. Brock refuses. In another episode, Brock goes to the Moppets to get them to hurt a kid who disrespected him, but they only seem interested in killing the kid (with a knife!). Brock earlier admitted that he usually kills people who disrespect him, but the kid was underage so he couldn't touch him. And when told to downsize his command staff, the Monarch executes his minions rather than transferring them. Another episode had Hank (who accidentally injected a hallucinogenic drug into himself) convinced that the only way to be with Brock's russian ex-girlfriend is to kill his father.

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* ''WesternAnimation/TheVentureBrothers'' does this a lot. In one episode, Dr. Venture orders Brock to kill people so he can create more Venturesteins. Brock refuses. In another episode, Brock goes to the Moppets to get them to hurt a kid who disrespected him, but they only seem interested in killing the kid (with a knife!). Brock earlier admitted that he usually kills people who disrespect him, but the kid was underage so he couldn't touch him. And when told to downsize his command staff, the Monarch executes his minions rather than transferring them. Another episode had Hank (who accidentally injected a hallucinogenic drug into himself) convinced that the only way to be with Brock's russian Russian ex-girlfriend is to kill his father.



* This exchange in ''WesternAnimation/DarkwingDuck'' when J. Gander and Dr. Bellum are confronted by two Darkwing Duck (one is Negaduck posing as Darkwing).

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* This exchange in ''WesternAnimation/DarkwingDuck'' when J. Gander and Dr. Bellum are confronted by two Darkwing Duck Ducks (one is Negaduck posing as Darkwing).
22nd Sep '16 11:38:27 PM TheAmazingBlachman
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** This one makes [[JustifiedTrope slightly more sense]], in that the programming conflict is from two equal and opposite commands to "tell crew vital information" and "keep vital information secret until reaching orbit". If there is no crew, the problem goes away... On top of this, he was actually ''trying'' to find a less lethal solution, but after incorrectly equating temporary shutdown with death, as HAL is unable to grasp the concept of sleep, decided he had no choice but to take the simple solution of killing the crew and cutting off communications with Earth if he's going to survive.

to:

** This one makes [[JustifiedTrope slightly more sense]], in that the programming conflict is from two equal and opposite commands to "tell crew vital information" and "keep vital information secret until reaching orbit". If there is no crew, the problem goes away... On top of this, he was actually ''trying'' to find a less lethal solution, but after incorrectly equating temporary shutdown with death, as HAL is was unable to grasp the concept of sleep, decided he had no choice but to take the simple solution of killing the crew and cutting off communications with Earth if he's going to survive.
22nd Sep '16 11:38:09 PM TheAmazingBlachman
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''[everyone attacks each other]''

to:

''[everyone ''(everyone attacks each other]''other)''



** This one makes [[JustifiedTrope slightly more sense]], in that the programming conflict is from two equal and opposite commands to "tell crew vital information" and "keep vital information secret until reaching orbit". If there is no crew, the problem goes away... On top of this, he was actually ''trying'' to find a less lethal solution, but after incorrectly equating temporary shutdown with death, decided he had no choice but to take the simple solution of killing the crew and cutting off communications with Earth if he's going to survive.

to:

** This one makes [[JustifiedTrope slightly more sense]], in that the programming conflict is from two equal and opposite commands to "tell crew vital information" and "keep vital information secret until reaching orbit". If there is no crew, the problem goes away... On top of this, he was actually ''trying'' to find a less lethal solution, but after incorrectly equating temporary shutdown with death, as HAL is unable to grasp the concept of sleep, decided he had no choice but to take the simple solution of killing the crew and cutting off communications with Earth if he's going to survive.
31st Aug '16 7:43:01 PM TheTropper
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* In ''WesternAnimation/AquaTeenHungarForce'' episode "Super Trivia", this Shake's idea to win a trivia game by suggesting they kill Wayne.

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* In ''WesternAnimation/AquaTeenHungarForce'' ''WesternAnimation/AquaTeenHungerForce'' episode "Super Trivia", this Shake's idea to win a trivia game by suggesting they kill their opponent Wayne.
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