History Main / MiscarriageOfJustice

21st Aug '17 5:03:03 PM Bootlebat
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* Schapelle Corby. [[BrokenBase Possibly]]
18th Aug '17 7:58:12 AM CombativeBoil
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** [[spoiler:Furthermore, all but one of the bad endings have the Protagonist taking the fall for a crime or tragedy he wasn't responsible for. The most notable instance occurs near the end of the game, where playing your cards wrong can result in the main character being framed for a series of psychotic breakdown incidents by the ''real'' perpetrator, who then assassinates him inside an interrogation room in a staged murder-suicide.]]

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** [[spoiler:Furthermore, all but one of the bad endings have the Protagonist taking the fall for a crime or tragedy he wasn't responsible for. The most notable instance occurs near the end of late in the game, where playing your cards wrong can result in the main character being framed for a series of psychotic breakdown incidents by the ''real'' perpetrator, who then assassinates him inside an interrogation room in a staged murder-suicide.]]
18th Aug '17 7:57:27 AM CombativeBoil
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* The Protagonist of ''VideoGame/Persona5'' was sentenced with a criminal record for assaulting a man. What really happened is that while he was walking home, he noticed a drunk man harassing a woman and stepped in to help her. The drunk guy suddenly slipped and fell, injuring his own face, after which he threatens the woman with imprisonment if she doesn't claim he was attacked. The police then show up, where the woman says Joker attacked the man, leading to his arrest.

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* The Protagonist of ''VideoGame/Persona5'' was sentenced with a criminal record for assaulting a man. What really happened is that while he was walking home, he noticed a drunk man harassing a woman and stepped in to help her. The drunk guy suddenly slipped and fell, injuring his own face, after which he threatens the woman with imprisonment if she doesn't claim he was attacked. The police then show up, where the woman says Joker attacked the man, leading to his arrest.arrest.
** [[spoiler:Furthermore, all but one of the bad endings have the Protagonist taking the fall for a crime or tragedy he wasn't responsible for. The most notable instance occurs near the end of the game, where playing your cards wrong can result in the main character being framed for a series of psychotic breakdown incidents by the ''real'' perpetrator, who then assassinates him inside an interrogation room in a staged murder-suicide.]]
5th Aug '17 12:18:17 PM 64SuperNintendo
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* In 1983, Henry McCollum and Leon Brown (two mentally handicapped half brothers) were accused of raping and murdering an 11 year old girl. There was no physical evidence, the confessions were inconsistent, and what little did match up was already known by the police. They were sentenced to death (though Leon later had his sentence commuted to life in prison) in 1984. It wasn't until 2014, when DNA implicated a sex predator named Roscoe Artis (who lived 100 feet from where the little girl's body had been found, had been implicated in a similar murder a county over, and was convicted of murdering another young girl a month after the Brothers had been arrested in the same neighborhood) that the two were released. By this time, their mother had died just a year before. Both were ultimately pardoned in June 2015.

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* In 1983, Henry McCollum and Leon Brown (two mentally handicapped half brothers) half-brothers) were accused of raping and murdering an 11 year old girl. There was no physical evidence, the confessions were inconsistent, and what little did match up was already known by the police. They were sentenced to death (though Leon later had his sentence commuted to life in prison) in 1984. It wasn't until 2014, when DNA implicated a sex predator named Roscoe Artis (who lived 100 feet from where the little girl's body had been found, had been implicated in a similar murder a county over, and was convicted of murdering another young girl a month after the Brothers had been arrested in the same neighborhood) that the two were released. By this time, their mother had died just a year before. Both were ultimately pardoned in June 2015.
22nd Jul '17 3:26:00 PM cybertoy0
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* This happens a ''lot'' in ''Manga/OnePiece''; In order to have [[LovableRogue sympathetic pirate protagonists]], there have to be not just evil pirates, but also corrupt law officials or nobility in order to justify the heroes' law-breaking.
** In the backstory for the Skypiea Arc, historical explorer Montblanc Noland reportedly found a city of gold on one of his voyages. His king was ''very'' eager to see it for himself, and insisted Noland lead a second expedition consisting of the king's personal army. By the time they got there, the city, and the piece of island it was on, was gone. Rather than accept the rational explanation that there might have been a disaster that destroyed the city, the king held a KangarooCourt and had Noland imprisoned for fraud. The result was that Noland became the figure of a CryingWolf fable, and his descendants would be ridiculed through the ages. [[spoiler: The city was gold was actually blasted into Skypiea by a powerful geyser. Luffy proves its existence by ringing the city's ceremonial bell while defeating the BigBad.]]
** In Franky's backstory, Franky's teacher Tom was framed for a terrorist attack by espionage agents so they could interrogate him over the blueprints for an ancient superweapon he possessed. Tom had the last laugh, however- he saw the treachery coming and passed the blueprints on to his students, and they eventually destroyed them.
21st Jul '17 6:22:14 AM Mullon
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** The death of the Silver Agent "To Our Eternal Shame"

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** The death of the Silver Agent Agent, "To Our Eternal Shame"Shame". [[spoiler: He was framed for the murder of supervillain by that supervillain faking his own death, arrested, and executed by the government to show they had some control over the superhero population.]]
4th Jul '17 7:59:02 PM YourMomma
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* ''VisualNovel/NewDanganRonpaV3'': [[spoiler: Kaede Akamatsu is initially thought to be the one who murdered Rantaro Amami in Chapter 1, but the final trial reveals she didn't. The shot put she used missed Rantaro, and Tsumugi (who wanted to get rid of Kaede and Rantaro to preserve the show's ratings) murdered Rantaro herself and made it look like Kaede's trap had worked, thus framing her for the crime and successfully executing her.]]
24th Jun '17 5:47:54 PM Luigifan
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* ''Film/TheLifeOfEmileZola'' actually isn't strictly about the life of Emile Zola, but rather about one of the most notorious RealLife examples of this trope--the Dreyfus Affair--and Emile Zola's campaign on behalf of the unjustly imprisoned Alfred Dreyfus.
* A unique example in ''Film/BeyondAReasonableDoubt.'' A newspaper publisher decides to test the system by having himself framed for the murder of a woman. He intends to wait for the trial to nearly find him guilty before having a friend bring up the evidence to exonerate him. However, the friend is killed on his way to the court house and the evidence lost so the man is found guilty. His girlfriend is able to prove his innocence only [[spoiler: for his wife to discover that he did indeed murder the woman, who was his first wife, and his execution is set to go on.]]
** The 2009 remake plays it mostly the same as reporter C.J. frames himself to prove a D.A. is corrupt and willing to put innocent people behind bars to pad his record. Again, the evidence is lost and C.J. is put in jail but his girlfriend Crystal proves his innocence and the case is a mistrial. But then [[spoiler: Crystal realizes the murder victim was going to give away she was the "drug addict" from C.J.'s award-winning documentary, proving his career was a fraud. Crystal tells C.J. it was a good plan as he couldn't be tried again...except it was a mistrial, not an acquittal which means the police can arrest him all over again.]]
* ''Film/SinCity'': Marv from "The Hard Goodbye" is put on death row and ultimately executed for murdering all the women Kevin and Cardinal Roark killed and ate. Though, to be fair, the list of victims also included all the people that Marv ''did'' kill, including the two villains in question. John Hartigan from "That Yellow Bastard" is wrongly imprisoned for eight years on false charges of raping Nancy Callahan, the 11-year-old girl who he saved from pedophile rapist and SerialKiller Junior Roark, whose father is a powerful and corrupt U.S. Senator. Both cases were due to extreme corruption, forged evidence and confessions acquired by threats - Marv confessed after his mother's life was threatened, and Hartigan when he thought that Nancy's life was in danger, and he was able to get out on parole if he did.

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* ''Film/TheLifeOfEmileZola'' actually isn't strictly about the life of Emile Zola, but rather about one of the most notorious RealLife examples of this trope--the trope -- the Dreyfus Affair--and Affair -- and Emile Zola's campaign on behalf of the unjustly imprisoned Alfred Dreyfus.
* A unique example in ''Film/BeyondAReasonableDoubt.'' A newspaper publisher decides to test the system by [[FrameUp having himself framed framed]] for the murder of a woman. He intends to wait for the trial to nearly find him guilty before having a friend bring up the evidence to exonerate him. However, the friend is killed on his way to the court house and the evidence lost so the man is found guilty. His girlfriend is able to prove his innocence innocence, only [[spoiler: for [[spoiler:for his wife to discover that he did indeed murder the woman, who was his first wife, and his execution is set to go on.]]
on]].
** The 2009 remake plays it mostly the same same, as reporter C.J. frames himself to prove a D.A. is corrupt and willing to put innocent people behind bars to pad his record. Again, the evidence is lost and C.J. is put in jail jail, but his girlfriend Crystal proves his innocence and the case is a mistrial. But then [[spoiler: Crystal [[spoiler:Crystal realizes the murder victim was going to give away she was the "drug addict" from C.J.'s award-winning documentary, proving his career was a fraud. Crystal tells C.J. it was a good plan plan, as he couldn't be tried again...except it was a mistrial, not an acquittal acquittal, which means the police can arrest him all over again.]]
* ''Film/SinCity'': Marv from "The Hard Goodbye" is put on death row and ultimately executed for murdering all the women Kevin and Cardinal Roark killed and ate. Though, to be fair, the list of victims also included all the people that Marv ''did'' kill, including the two villains in question. John Hartigan from "That Yellow Bastard" is wrongly imprisoned for eight years on false charges of raping Nancy Callahan, the 11-year-old girl who he saved from pedophile rapist and SerialKiller Junior Roark, whose father is a powerful and corrupt U.S. Senator. Both cases were due to extreme corruption, forged evidence evidence, and confessions acquired by threats - -- Marv confessed after his mother's life was threatened, and Hartigan when he thought that Nancy's life was in danger, and he was able to get out on parole if he did.



** Parodied in Creator/LeslieNielsen's ''Film/WrongfullyAccused''

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** Parodied in Creator/LeslieNielsen's ''Film/WrongfullyAccused''''Film/WrongfullyAccused''.



* ''Film/TheShawshankRedemption'': The driving force of the plot is that Andy Dufresne is wrongly convicted of the murder of his wife and her lover in the [[TheCorpseStopsHere misleading circumstantial evidence]] variant. It then becomes much worse when exculpatory evidence emerges, and is destroyed by corrupt officials, because Andy has been acting as the warden's accountant during his prison time and now [[HeKnowsTooMuch knows too much]] about his shady finances to be allowed to go free. [[spoiler: They ''murder'' a witness willing to testify that someone else committed the crime. He eventually escapes to Mexico rather than be legally exonerated.]]

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* ''Film/TheShawshankRedemption'': The driving force of the plot is that Andy Dufresne is wrongly convicted of the murder of his wife and her lover in the [[TheCorpseStopsHere misleading circumstantial evidence]] variant. It then becomes much worse when exculpatory evidence emerges, and is destroyed by corrupt officials, because Andy has been acting as the warden's accountant during his prison time and now [[HeKnowsTooMuch knows too much]] about his shady finances to be allowed to go free. [[spoiler: They [[spoiler:They ''murder'' a witness willing to testify that someone else committed the crime. He eventually escapes to Mexico rather than be legally exonerated.]]



* In ''Film/{{Inception}}'', Dom Cobb is on the run for apparently having murdered his wife Mal. [[spoiler: It turns out that Mal was insane and convinced that after having spent fifty years in a dreamworld, she was still dreaming and needed to wake up - and the only way to "wake up" is to kill yourself. She tried to make Dom kill himself along with her by deliberately having herself declared sane by multiple psychiatrists, filing a letter stating she was afraid for her life with her attorney, and setting up a hotel room to look like a violent struggle had taken place in it before luring Dom into the room and killing herself.]] Dom didn't follow through with it, and the setup was convincing enough that he was forced to flee the country.

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* In ''Film/{{Inception}}'', Dom Cobb is on the run for apparently having murdered his wife Mal. [[spoiler: It [[spoiler:It turns out that Mal was insane and convinced that after having spent fifty years in a dreamworld, she was still dreaming and needed to wake up - -- and the only way to "wake up" is to kill yourself. She tried to make Dom kill himself along with her by deliberately having herself declared sane by multiple psychiatrists, filing a letter stating she was afraid for her life with her attorney, and setting up a hotel room to look like a violent struggle had taken place in it before luring Dom into the room and killing herself.]] Dom didn't follow through with it, and the setup was convincing enough that he was forced to flee the country.



* In ''Film/AndJusticeForAll'' Jeff was arrested due to mistaken identity (he had the same name as a suspect) then framed by other inmates for a prison guard's stabbing. Kirkland can't get him out due to the evidence clearing him coming in too late. [[spoiler: This leads Jeff to snap, taking hostages after being [[PrisonRape gang-raped by fellow prisoners]] and is then [[{{Tearjerker}} shot dead by a police sniper.]]]]
* In the loosely-based film adaption of the book with the same name, ''Film/TheRunningMan'', this happens: it kicks the plot off when the police officer protagonist Ben Richards gets wrongly accused of having committed a massacre among innocent civilians and as punishment for the crime is selected as a combatant for the titular BloodSport TV show. However, Richards tried to ''prevent'' the massacre and part of the plot is finding the evidence of this to give the real story to the public as well as bringing the corrupt officials behind it to justice.

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* In ''Film/AndJusticeForAll'' Jeff was arrested due to mistaken identity (he had the same name as a suspect) suspect), then [[FrameUp framed by other inmates inmates]] for a prison guard's stabbing. Kirkland can't get him out due to the evidence clearing him [[AcquittedTooLate coming in too late. [[spoiler: This late]]. [[spoiler:This leads Jeff to snap, [[RageAgainstTheLegalSystem snap]], [[HostageSituation taking hostages hostages]] after being [[PrisonRape gang-raped by fellow prisoners]] and is then [[{{Tearjerker}} shot dead by a police sniper.]]]]
* In the loosely-based film adaption of the book with the same name, ''Film/TheRunningMan'', this happens: it kicks the plot off when the police officer protagonist Ben Richards gets wrongly accused of having committed a massacre among innocent civilians civilians, and as punishment for the crime crime, is selected as a combatant for the titular BloodSport TV show. However, Richards tried to ''prevent'' the massacre and part of the plot is finding the evidence of this to give the real story to the public as well as bringing the corrupt officials behind it to justice.



* ''Film/TrueBeliever'': Shu Kai Kim was convicted of a murder he didn't commit [[spoiler: due to false evidence presented by the police and prosecutor]].
* In ''Film/TheLastSeduction'': [[spoiler: [[ManipulativeBitch Bridget Gregory]] frames her lover for murdering her abusive husband, as well raping her as part of a rape fantasy role-play. She destroys the last piece of evidence that could possibly get him acquitted, and his lawyer tells him that nothing seems to be in his favor]].

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* ''Film/TrueBeliever'': Shu Kai Kim was convicted of a murder he didn't commit [[spoiler: due [[spoiler:due to false evidence presented by the police and prosecutor]].
* In ''Film/TheLastSeduction'': [[spoiler: [[ManipulativeBitch [[spoiler:[[ManipulativeBitch Bridget Gregory]] frames her lover for murdering her abusive husband, as well as raping her as part of a rape fantasy role-play. She destroys the last piece of evidence that could possibly get him acquitted, and his lawyer tells him that nothing seems to be in his favor]].



** ''Literature/HarryPotterAndTheChamberOfSecrets'' - Cornelius Fudge, the Minister of Magic, even told Dumbledore and Hagrid that he was only sending Hagrid to [[TheAlcatraz Azkaban]] because people had to see him doing something in response to attacks on Hogwarts students.
** ''Literature/HarryPotterAndThePrisonerOfAzkaban'' - Sirius Black was imprisoned without trial in Azkaban, accused of murdering fellow wizard Peter Pettigrew and 12 Muggles. Minister Fudge ignored the witnesses that claimed Pettigrew was alive and had framed Sirius because he believed they were more loyal to Dumbledore than to the Ministry.
** ''Literature/HarryPotterAndTheGobletOfFire'' - Several Death Eaters or suspected Death Eaters were imprisoned after Voldemort's fall, regardless of whether they were truly guilty. It's implied that the head of the Department of Magical Law Enforcement, [[HangingJudge Barty Crouch, Sr.]], wanted quick and convincing trials (or sometimes no trial at all) because he was in line for the Minister's job. He even sent his own son to Azkaban, although in that case his son actually ''was'' a Death Eater (and in the film version made no attempt to deny it).
** ''Literature/HarryPotterAndTheOrderOfThePhoenix'' - The Ministry puts Harry on trial in order to keep from "inciting panic" over Harry's claim of Voldemort's return, and to weaken Dumbledore's popularity as Fudge sees him as a threat to his position. Dolores Umbridge herself takes matters into her own hands by forcing Harry to cut his skin every time he decided to speak out against the Ministry or alert others of Voldemort's return.
** ''Literature/HarryPotterAndTheHalfBloodPrince'' - The Ministry has finally admitted that Voldemort has indeed returned, but they immediately revert to how they acted during the first war, with many instances of unjustifiable arrests. This includes the arrest of Stan Shunpike, who gets sent straight to Azkaban.
*** Shunpike is an interesting case; in the following novel, he's revealed to be one of the Death Eaters attacking Harry above Little Whinging. His physical state indicates Imperius Curse enthrallment, though. Scrimgeour wasn't acting senselessly when he arrested Stan (though, disproportionately, yes). Who knows how long he had been cursed. Harry's main defense is that he knows Stan, but the Death Eaters have ways of making people act against their natural inclination (since, however, Stan was sent to Azkaban for boasting he knew Voldemort's secret plans in a pub - hardly behavior an Imperiused person would engage in - this may be a case of HadToComeToPrisonToBeACrook).
* ''Literature/TheCountOfMonteCristo'' - Edmond Dantes is framed for treason and sent to the Chateau d'If without a trial by the cousin of the woman he loved, Mercedes, who wanted her for himself, with the help of a corrupt prosecutor.

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** ''Literature/HarryPotterAndTheChamberOfSecrets'' - -- Cornelius Fudge, the Minister of Magic, even told Dumbledore and Hagrid that he was only sending Hagrid to [[TheAlcatraz Azkaban]] because people had to see him doing something in response to attacks on Hogwarts students.
** ''Literature/HarryPotterAndThePrisonerOfAzkaban'' - -- Sirius Black was imprisoned without trial in Azkaban, accused of murdering fellow wizard Peter Pettigrew and 12 Muggles. Minister Fudge ignored the witnesses that claimed Pettigrew was alive and had framed Sirius because he believed they were more loyal to Dumbledore than to the Ministry.
** ''Literature/HarryPotterAndTheGobletOfFire'' - -- Several Death Eaters or suspected Death Eaters were imprisoned after Voldemort's fall, regardless of whether they were truly guilty. It's implied that the head of the Department of Magical Law Enforcement, [[HangingJudge Barty Crouch, Sr.]], wanted quick and convincing trials (or sometimes no trial at all) because he was in line for the Minister's job. He even sent his own son to Azkaban, although in that case his son actually ''was'' a Death Eater (and in the film version made no attempt to deny it).
** ''Literature/HarryPotterAndTheOrderOfThePhoenix'' - -- The Ministry puts Harry on trial in order to keep from "inciting panic" over Harry's claim of Voldemort's return, and to weaken Dumbledore's popularity as Fudge sees him as a threat to his position. Dolores Umbridge herself takes matters into her own hands by forcing Harry to cut his skin every time he decided to speak out against the Ministry or alert others of Voldemort's return.
** ''Literature/HarryPotterAndTheHalfBloodPrince'' - -- The Ministry has finally admitted that Voldemort has indeed returned, but they immediately revert to how they acted during the first war, with many instances of unjustifiable arrests. This includes the arrest of Stan Shunpike, who gets sent straight to Azkaban.
*** Shunpike is an interesting case; in the following novel, he's revealed to be one of the Death Eaters attacking Harry above Little Whinging. His physical state indicates Imperius Curse enthrallment, though. Scrimgeour wasn't acting senselessly when he arrested Stan (though, disproportionately, yes). Who knows how long he had been cursed. Harry's main defense is that he knows Stan, but the Death Eaters have ways of making people act against their natural inclination (since, however, Stan was sent to Azkaban for boasting he knew Voldemort's secret plans in a pub - -- hardly behavior an Imperiused person would engage in - -- this may be a case of HadToComeToPrisonToBeACrook).
* ''Literature/TheCountOfMonteCristo'' - -- Edmond Dantes is framed for treason and sent to the Chateau d'If without a trial by the cousin of the woman he loved, Mercedes, who wanted her for himself, with the help of a corrupt prosecutor.



* In Creator/KimNewman's "Literature/TomorrowTown", a murder has been committed in a 1970s futurist community. When the investigating detectives get there, they learn that the townspeople have already imprisoned a suspect, who they insist must be the killer, citing that he never really fitted in to the community and that the murder weapon was found in his house. Later that night, one of the townspeople promoting this theory himself tries to kill the detectives, but accidentally manages to kill himself instead. One of the detectives then notes [[DeadpanSnarker rather dryly]] that if one of the most enthusiastic proponents of "the first guy did it!" theory later tries to kill the investigating detectives, it's a fairly safe bet [[WronglyAccused that there's an injustice going on]].

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* In Creator/KimNewman's "Literature/TomorrowTown", a murder has been committed in a 1970s futurist community. When the investigating detectives get there, they learn that the townspeople have already imprisoned a suspect, who they insist must be the killer, [[AllOfTheOtherReindeer citing that he never really fitted fit in to the community community]] and that the murder weapon was found in his house. Later that night, one of the townspeople promoting this theory himself tries to kill the detectives, but [[EpicFail accidentally manages to kill himself instead.instead]]. One of the detectives then notes [[DeadpanSnarker rather dryly]] that if one of the most enthusiastic proponents of "the first guy did it!" theory later tries to kill the investigating detectives, it's a fairly safe bet [[WronglyAccused that there's an injustice going on]].



* In Creator/KevinJAnderson's ''Literature/{{Blindfold}}'', a loading dock worker is falsely accused of murdering his boss. Subverted in that the accusation came not from a trial but from a [[PsychicPowers mind scan]] by a young Truthsayer, who is implicitly trusted to always be right. When the mistake is realized, the head Truthsayer realizes they can't admit it to the people, as their entire justice system will crumble. Interestingly, the guy who actually ordered the murder is just as shocked as anyone else by the verdict, even though [[spoiler:his manipulations with the Veritas drug caused the mistake]]. In the end, [[spoiler:the truth is revealed, causing the Truthsayers to be disbanded and the society to return to a more traditional justice system]].
* ''Literature/ToKillAMockingbird'' [[spoiler: sadly ends in this for Tom Robinson. Also crosses with AcquittedTooLate.]]

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* In Creator/KevinJAnderson's ''Literature/{{Blindfold}}'', a loading dock worker is falsely accused of murdering his boss. Subverted in that the accusation came not from a trial trial, but from a [[PsychicPowers mind scan]] by a young Truthsayer, who is implicitly trusted to always be right. When the mistake is realized, the head Truthsayer realizes they can't admit it to the people, as their entire justice system will crumble. Interestingly, the guy who actually ordered the murder is just as shocked as anyone else by the verdict, even though [[spoiler:his manipulations with the Veritas drug caused the mistake]]. In the end, [[spoiler:the truth is revealed, causing the Truthsayers to be disbanded and the society to return to a more traditional justice system]].
* ''Literature/ToKillAMockingbird'' [[spoiler: sadly [[spoiler:sadly ends in this for Tom Robinson.Robinson (thanks largely to blatant racism, as the guy pressing the charges was not very well-liked himself). Also crosses with AcquittedTooLate.]]



* ''Literature/TheConfession'' has this be a conga-line of reasons for Donté Drumm getting convicted of Nicole's murder. He gets arrested based on an anonymous call that places him at her last seen location - a call placed by the girl's jealous boyfriend; gets bullied into confessing to the crime after being held for questioning for over 15 hours; his trial has him be sentenced to death based on no factual evidence beyond a video of the (forced) confession, by a judge who was sleeping with the trial's prosecutor. [[spoiler:He eventually gets executed, despite clear evidence being presented ''on TV'' that Travis Boyette is the real murderer.]]

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* ''Literature/TheConfession'' has this be a conga-line of reasons for Donté Drumm getting convicted of Nicole's murder. He gets arrested based on an anonymous call that places him at her last seen location - -- a call placed by the girl's jealous boyfriend; gets bullied into confessing to the crime after being held for questioning for over 15 hours; his trial has him be sentenced to death based on no factual evidence beyond a video of the (forced) confession, by a judge who was sleeping with the trial's prosecutor. [[spoiler:He eventually gets executed, despite clear evidence being presented ''on TV'' that Travis Boyette is the real murderer.]]



* The Literature/SisterhoodSeries by Creator/FernMichaels: Isabelle Flanders and Alexis Thorne were victimized in this. Both of them were framed by very bad people. Isabelle had her reputation ruined, and she was lucky that she didn't end up in prison. Alexis ended up in prison, and when she got out, she could only apply for a job as a personal shopper. The book ''Sweet Revenge'' has Isabelle strike back against bitchy Rosemary Hershey, and the book ''Lethal Justice'' has Alexis strike back against conscienceless Arden Gillespie and weepy Roland Sullivan.
* ''Literature/TheWayTheCrowFlies'', by Canadian author Ann-Marie [=MacDonald=] is a fictional version of the Stephen Truscott case. A teenage boy is convicted of the murder of a child, based on circumstantial evidence.

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* The Literature/SisterhoodSeries by Creator/FernMichaels: Isabelle Flanders and Alexis Thorne were victimized in this. Both of them were framed [[FrameUp framed]] by very bad people. Isabelle had her reputation ruined, and she was lucky that she didn't end up in prison. Alexis ended up in prison, and when she got out, she could only apply for a job as a personal shopper. The book ''Sweet Revenge'' has Isabelle strike back against bitchy Rosemary Hershey, and the book ''Lethal Justice'' has Alexis strike back against conscienceless Arden Gillespie and weepy Roland Sullivan.
* ''Literature/TheWayTheCrowFlies'', by Canadian author Ann-Marie [=MacDonald=] [=MacDonald=], is a fictional version of the Stephen Truscott case. A teenage boy is convicted of the murder of a child, based on circumstantial evidence.



* ''Series/ColdCase'' has several cases where people are wrongfully imprisoned and spend years in jail before the detectives uncover the truth. ([[AcquittedTooLate One guy is sadly executed]], but the corrupt DA who withheld evidence is fired and disbarred, another is exonerated AFTER the other inmates murder him). In quite a few of these cases the guys got railroaded thanks to prejudice of some kind while the real murderer seemed perfectly respectable (the most prominent being "Frank's Best", "Death Penalty Final Appeal" and "Thrill Kill. The real killer in "Frank's Best" was the victim's son, who had anger issues. In "Thrill Kill" it was the mentally disturbed father of one of the victims. In "Death Penalty Final Appeal" it's the boss of the victim (who's also a rapist). The guys they framed where (respectively) an illegal immigrant, two punks and outcasts who had bullied the victims, and an ex-convict.)
** One episode had someone confess to cover for someone else he cared about. The detectives knew this, but didn't have enough evidence to prove it.

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* ''Series/ColdCase'' has several cases where people are wrongfully imprisoned and spend years in jail before the detectives uncover the truth. ([[AcquittedTooLate One guy is sadly executed]], but the corrupt DA who withheld evidence is fired and disbarred, disbarred; another is exonerated AFTER ''after'' the other inmates murder him). In quite a few of these cases cases, the guys got railroaded thanks to prejudice of some kind while the real murderer seemed perfectly respectable (the most prominent being "Frank's Best", "Death Penalty Final Appeal" Appeal", and "Thrill Kill.Kill". The real killer in "Frank's Best" was the victim's son, who had anger issues. In "Thrill Kill" Kill", it was the mentally disturbed father of one of the victims. In "Death Penalty Final Appeal" Appeal", it's the boss of the victim (who's also a rapist). The guys they framed where were (respectively) an illegal immigrant, two punks and outcasts who had bullied the victims, and an ex-convict.)
** One episode had someone confess [[TakingTheHeat to cover for someone else he cared about.about]]. The detectives knew this, but didn't have enough evidence to prove it.



** In the fifth season premiere, they were cleared ''that'' crime when [[spoiler:a former Vietnamese colonel testified in their court-martial that their commanding officer sent them to rob a bank in order for them to be captured by the North Vietnamese.]] Of course, by that time [[spoiler:they were being tried for the murder of their commanding officer, and the series ended before that could be resolved.]]
* Crops up occasionally on ''Franchise/LawAndOrder''. Usually partially subverted in that the wrongly convicted is either wholly unsympathetic (a white supremacist convicted of child murders that were actually committed by a mentally-ill black man) or turned out be connected after all-a man convicted of killing his wife turned out to have hired someone else to do it. He was convicted of murdering that man to cover this up. At least once, however, prosecutors ''did'' accidentally convict an innocent man, and found that their attempts to exonerate him were frustrated by their own successful prosecution which, lacking any intentional impropriety or error, couldn't simply be reversed because they weren't sure the right man was convicted. A judge on appeal even tells them in effect "12 people looked at your evidence and said he was guilty, who am I to disagree?"
* ''Series/LawAndOrderSpecialVictimsUnit'' had an episode where it is revealed that Olivia unintentionally set a man up to be convicted of a crime he did not commit. The man was the prime suspect in a brutal rape and after hours of interrogation Olivia caught him in a INeverSaidItWasPoison statement. This and other circumstantial evidence is used to convict the man. Years later she realizes that the man was innocent and that she must have provided him with the incriminating information earlier during the interrogation and forgotten about it. The man is freed but lost years of his life and the real rapist was free to rape many more women in the meantime.

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** In the fifth season premiere, they were cleared of ''that'' crime when [[spoiler:a former Vietnamese colonel testified in their court-martial that their commanding officer sent them to rob a bank in order for them to be captured by the North Vietnamese.]] Vietnamese]]. Of course, by that time [[spoiler:they were being tried for the murder of their commanding officer, and the series ended before that could be resolved.]]
resolved]].
* Crops up occasionally on ''Franchise/LawAndOrder''. Usually partially subverted in that the wrongly convicted is either wholly unsympathetic (a white supremacist convicted of child murders that were actually committed by a mentally-ill black man) or turned out be connected after all-a all (a man convicted of killing his wife turned out to have hired someone else to do it. He it -- he was convicted of murdering that man to cover this up. up). At least once, however, prosecutors ''did'' accidentally convict an innocent man, and found that their attempts to exonerate him were frustrated by their own successful prosecution prosecution, which, lacking any intentional impropriety or error, couldn't simply be reversed because they weren't sure the right man was convicted. A judge on appeal even tells them in effect "12 people looked at your evidence and said he was guilty, who am I to disagree?"
* ''Series/LawAndOrderSpecialVictimsUnit'' had an episode where it is revealed that Olivia unintentionally set a man up to be convicted of a crime he did not commit. The man was the prime suspect in a brutal rape rape, and after hours of interrogation interrogation, Olivia caught him in a INeverSaidItWasPoison statement. This and other circumstantial evidence is used to convict the man. Years later later, she realizes that the man was innocent and that she must have provided him with the incriminating information earlier during the interrogation and forgotten about it. The man is freed freed, but lost years of his life life, and the real rapist was free to rape many more women in the meantime.



* The episode "Riding the Lightning" of ''Series/CriminalMinds'' has the team suspect that a woman who was supposedly the accomplice of her serial killer husband and nearing execution is innocent of her son's murder (the only crime which she was actually charged with)...but she doesn't seem very enthusiastic about the possibility of being cleared. [[spoiler: It turns out that she is indeed innocent, but she doesn't want to be acquitted, because the only way to achieve that would be revealing that her son is alive and has a new identity. She believes that if that happened, the boy's knowledge of what a monster his biological father was would taint his whole life. Therefore, she lets herself die as well.]]

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* The episode "Riding the Lightning" of ''Series/CriminalMinds'' has the team suspect that a woman who was supposedly the accomplice of her serial killer husband and nearing execution is innocent of her son's murder (the only crime which she was actually charged with)...but she doesn't seem very enthusiastic about the possibility of being cleared. [[spoiler: It [[spoiler:It turns out that she is indeed innocent, but she doesn't want to be acquitted, because the only way to achieve that would be revealing that her son is alive and has a new identity. She believes that if that happened, the boy's knowledge of what a monster his biological father was would taint his whole life. Therefore, she lets herself die as well.]]



* ''Series/{{Smallville}}'': Several years ago, back when Jonathan Kent's mother was pregnant with him, a man was wrongfully convicted for the murder of Lana Lang's Grandaunt. It was eventually revealed [[spoiler:Sheriff Billy Tate, who later became Mayor William Tate, had asked Lachlan Luthor to kill a "drifter" (Jor-El) who was Tate's rival for her affections but Luthor missed and killed her instead. Since Jor-El left no traces of his presence in Smallville, Tate needed another patsy. Clark dressed in clothes Jor-El left behind to pose as the drifter's ghost and scare a confession from Tate]].

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* ''Series/{{Smallville}}'': Several years ago, back when Jonathan Kent's mother was pregnant with him, a man was wrongfully convicted for the murder of Lana Lang's Grandaunt. It was eventually revealed [[spoiler:Sheriff Billy Tate, who later became Mayor William Tate, had asked Lachlan Luthor to kill a "drifter" (Jor-El) who was Tate's rival for her affections affections, but Luthor missed and killed her instead. Since Jor-El left no traces of his presence in Smallville, Tate needed another patsy. Clark dressed in clothes Jor-El left behind to pose as the drifter's ghost and scare a confession from Tate]].



** In a later episode, police pick up two drifters in the wrong place at the wrong time for a cop shooting. Under WarOnTerror-era expanded powers, they're able to torture a confession out of one of them. On top of that the guy they didn't charge backs out of testifying for his friend when Eugene lets him know he could be considered a suspect himself.

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** In a later episode, police pick up two drifters in the wrong place at the wrong time for a cop shooting. Under WarOnTerror-era expanded powers, they're able to torture a confession out of one of them. On top of that that, the guy they didn't charge backs out of testifying for his friend when Eugene lets him know he could be considered a suspect himself.



* In ''Bangkok Hilton'', Kat is arrested in Bangkok on drug trafficking charges, and despite the efforts of her father to track down her ex-boyfriend and expose him as a smuggler, she is found guilty and sentenced to death by machine gun. Thankfully, she manages to escape the prison before her execution.
* The show ''In Justice'' revolved around clearing wrongfully convicted people. In episode 8 they fail to save a mentally handicapped man from being executed because the judge feels that they don't have enough proof. It's sort of up in the air, since the episode ended with the detective confronting the real murderer (as well as the fact that the rest of the team knows who the killer actually is and persuaded the guy's wife to retract her alibi, meaning that they could have gathered enough evidence to nail him to a wall off screen.)

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* In ''Bangkok Hilton'', Kat is arrested in Bangkok on drug trafficking charges, and despite the efforts of her father to track down her ex-boyfriend and expose him as a smuggler, she is found guilty and sentenced to [[ShotAtDawn death by machine gun.gun]]. Thankfully, she manages to escape the prison before her execution.
* The show ''In Justice'' revolved around clearing wrongfully convicted people. In episode 8 8, they fail to save a mentally handicapped man from being executed because the judge feels that they don't have enough proof. It's sort of up in the air, since the episode ended with the detective confronting the real murderer (as well as the fact that the rest of the team knows who the killer actually is and persuaded the guy's wife to retract her alibi, meaning that they could have gathered enough evidence to nail him to a wall off screen.)offscreen).



* Music/{{Disturbed}} has "3", a B-side off of the Asylum album, is written about the West Memphis Three, as seen below in the Real Life section, told from their perspective. Draiman had expressed a desire to donate it somehow on their behalf rather than release it conventionally, [[http://www.disturbed1.com/splash/ which the band did eventually over their website]], asking for dollar donations to get the song. The proceeds go towards the defense fund of Damien Echols.
* RebaMcEntire's ''The Night the Lights Went Out in Georgia'' has the singer's brother arrested, tried, convicted and ''executed'' all in a single evening [[spoiler: for a murder the singer committed.]]

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* Music/{{Disturbed}} has "3", a B-side off of the Asylum album, which is written about the West Memphis Three, as seen below in the Real Life section, told from their perspective. Draiman had expressed a desire to donate it somehow on their behalf rather than release it conventionally, [[http://www.disturbed1.com/splash/ which the band did eventually over their website]], asking for dollar donations to get the song. The proceeds go towards the defense fund of Damien Echols.
* RebaMcEntire's ''The Night the Lights Went Out in Georgia'' has the singer's brother arrested, tried, convicted and ''executed'' all in a single evening [[spoiler: for [[spoiler:for a murder the singer committed.]]committed]].



* The third case of ''VisualNovel/PhoenixWrightAceAttorneyTrialsAndTribulations'' begins with [[TheWoobie Maggey Byrde]] being convicted of murder. Not only was she framed, but [[spoiler: the murderer actually disguised himself as Phoenix Wright so he could be her lawyer and make sure she lost. Fortunately, this means a mistrial is declared and the real Phoenix can uncover the truth in another trial.]]
** And the fourth case revolves around Terry Fawles, who had already been falsely convicted of murder 5 years ago, and now has to be saved from getting convicted a second time after escaping from prison and allegedly murdering the cop who arrested him in the original case. [[spoiler:Sadly, he's manipulated into committing suicide on the stand even as you reveal he's innocent. Your only satisfaction is that, as this is a flashback, you've already seen the conviction of the monster who drove him to it.]]
** The third case of ''VisualNovel/AceAttorneyInvestigations 2'' (''Gyakuten Kenji 2'') is about a man who was found guilty [[spoiler:as an accomplice]] to a murder 18 years prior. The defending attorney, [[spoiler:Gregory Edgeworth]], tried his hardest to get an acquittal but [[spoiler:the lack of a body didn't give him enough evidence to work with and eventually, due to overzealous pressure for a confession, the defendant eventually cracked and confessed a crime he never committed]]. The best he was able to do was give the prosecution a black mark for their conduct during the interrogations (which itself leads [[spoiler:to the famed "DL-6 Incident" that was basically the ignition for the rest of the franchise]]). The conclusion [[spoiler:remedies the injustice, freeing the defendant by uncovering the true culprit]].

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* The third case of ''VisualNovel/PhoenixWrightAceAttorneyTrialsAndTribulations'' begins with [[TheWoobie Maggey Byrde]] being convicted of murder. Not only was she framed, but [[spoiler: the [[spoiler:the murderer actually disguised himself as Phoenix Wright so he could be her lawyer and make sure she lost. Fortunately, this means a mistrial is declared and the real Phoenix can uncover the truth in another trial.]]
** And the fourth case revolves around Terry Fawles, who had already been falsely convicted of murder 5 years ago, and now has to be saved from getting convicted a second time after escaping from prison and allegedly murdering the cop who arrested him in the original case. [[spoiler:Sadly, [[DrivenToSuicide he's manipulated into committing suicide on the stand stand]] even as you reveal he's innocent. Your only satisfaction is that, as this is a flashback, you've already seen the conviction of the monster who drove him to it.]]
** The third case of ''VisualNovel/AceAttorneyInvestigations 2'' (''Gyakuten Kenji 2'') is about a man who was found guilty [[spoiler:as an accomplice]] to a murder 18 years prior. The defending attorney, [[spoiler:Gregory Edgeworth]], tried his hardest to get an acquittal acquittal, but [[spoiler:the lack of a body didn't give him enough evidence to work with and eventually, due to overzealous pressure for a confession, the defendant eventually cracked and confessed to a crime he never committed]]. The best he was able to do was give the prosecution a black mark for their conduct during the interrogations (which itself leads [[spoiler:to the famed "DL-6 Incident" that was basically the ignition for the rest of the franchise]]). The conclusion [[spoiler:remedies the injustice, freeing the defendant by uncovering the true culprit]].



** From there, you have to make a big decision: [[spoiler:Murder an honorable but bloodthirsty leader to escape and let a crime lord and his entire operation go free, or work with the leader to kill the crimelord but lose control of the mob, killing a dozen innocents along the way]]. You can also kill both factions but then you've just massacred two entire factions for each others' leader's crimes and stolen decades of potential social reforms from the people of Markarth.

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** From there, you have to make a big decision: [[spoiler:Murder an honorable but bloodthirsty leader to escape and let a crime lord and his entire operation go free, or work with the leader to kill the crimelord but lose control of the mob, killing a dozen innocents along the way]]. [[TakeAThirdOption You can also also]] [[KillEmAll kill both factions factions]], but then you've just massacred two entire factions for each others' leader's crimes and stolen decades of potential social reforms from the people of Markarth.



* This is the Executioner's end goal in ''VideoGame/TownOfSalem'': get a randomly selected town member falsely accused of being evil and getting him lynched. If the town member dies before he can be lynched the Executioner turns into the DeathSeeker Jester.

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* This is the Executioner's end goal in ''VideoGame/TownOfSalem'': get a randomly selected town member falsely accused of being evil and getting him lynched. If the town member dies before he can be lynched lynched, the Executioner turns into the DeathSeeker Jester.



* Canary's trial in ''Literature/{{Worm}}'' has shades of this. Despite being normal aside from her CompellingVoice, she's fitted with a restraint system used for superpowered Brutes which no doubt hurts her impression to the jury. Speaking of the voice she's literally gagged and denied the right to speak in her own defense. When convicted the judge uses her to set a precedent by immediately sentencing her to [[TheAlcatraz the Birdcage]] despite having no prior convictions.

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* Canary's trial in ''Literature/{{Worm}}'' has shades of this. Despite being normal aside from her CompellingVoice, she's fitted with a restraint system used for superpowered Brutes which no doubt hurts her impression to the jury. Speaking of the voice voice, she's literally gagged and denied the right to speak in her own defense. When convicted convicted, the judge uses her to set a precedent by immediately sentencing her to [[TheAlcatraz the Birdcage]] despite having no prior convictions.



** [[spoiler: Although Baby Bear, who wasn't that comfortable living in a modern home, didn't complain about the change]].

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** [[spoiler: Although [[spoiler:Although Baby Bear, who wasn't that comfortable living in a modern home, didn't complain about the change]].change.]]



*** Recently the three were released with the understanding that they plead guilty[[note]]Technically what's called an Alford plea, which basically amounts to "I didn't do it but I know I'll be convicted anyway"[[/note]] while still allowed to assert their innocence. Obviously, the fight for a real exoneration will continue.
*** A certain kind of real life {{Fridge Horror}} kicks in when you realize another miscarriage of justice. If we take for granted that the boys were innocent (general consensus is that the evidence shows this, and the state of Arkansas offering the Alford Plea deal to convicted first-degree murderers was taken as tacit acknowledgement that the prosecution messed up and convicted the wrong people) then . . . what happened to the real killer? Presumably he (or she) is still out there somewhere, if not dead. One of the boys' fathers was implicated by the defense at trial, but there's no hard evidence against him. Years later, DNA seemed to implicate Terry Hobbs, the stepfather of one of the victims, and further investigation revealed he lacked an alibi and had a history of violence against women and children (including attempting to rape a neighbor who reported him for beating his family from a previous marriage).
** ''A Murder In the Park'' has a disturbing twist on this. Anthony Porter was released in 1999 after a team of university students claimed to have found exculpatory evidence, including the confession of the real murderer. However, the film says, not only was Porter almost certainly guilty but the man who confessed did so under coercion and manipulation from their private investigator. The man who confessed, Alstory Simon, was pressured to plead guilty by his lawyer to avoid a life sentence. His lawyer just so happened to be a friend of the same investigator who procured his confession. Simon got 37 years, though he was freed in 2014. So, if the film is correct, we have a killer wrongly set free and another man wrongly sent to prison later in his place, then himself exonerated. What is most damning is that per its allegations, the investigators seeking to exonerate Porter used many of the same tactics found in miscarriages of justice by the government: getting witnesses to change their stories with bribery or threats, coercing a false confession, and ignoring evidence implicating him in a double murder. Not only that but since Porter has been pardoned and the statute of limitations has run out on the investigators' crimes, [[KarmaHoudini no one can be prosecuted]]. However, Simon is suing them and the university.

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*** Recently Recently, the three were released with the understanding that they plead guilty[[note]]Technically what's called an Alford plea, which basically amounts to "I didn't do it but I know I'll be convicted anyway"[[/note]] while still allowed to assert their innocence. Obviously, the fight for a real exoneration will continue.
*** A certain kind of real life {{Fridge Horror}} kicks in when you realize another miscarriage of justice. If we take for granted that the boys were innocent (general consensus is that the evidence shows this, and the state of Arkansas offering the Alford Plea deal to convicted first-degree murderers was taken as tacit acknowledgement that the prosecution messed up and convicted the wrong people) then . . .then... what happened to the real killer? Presumably he (or she) is still out there somewhere, if not dead. One of the boys' fathers was implicated by the defense at trial, but there's no hard evidence against him. Years later, DNA seemed to implicate Terry Hobbs, the stepfather of one of the victims, and further investigation revealed he lacked an alibi and had a history of violence against women and children (including attempting to rape a neighbor who reported him for beating his family from a previous marriage).
** ''A Murder In the Park'' has a disturbing twist on this. Anthony Porter was released in 1999 after a team of university students claimed to have found exculpatory evidence, including the confession of the real murderer. However, the film says, not only was Porter almost certainly guilty guilty, but the man who confessed did so under coercion and manipulation from their private investigator. The man who confessed, Alstory Simon, was pressured to plead guilty by his lawyer to avoid a life sentence. His lawyer just so happened to be a friend of the same investigator who procured his confession. Simon got 37 years, though he was freed in 2014. So, if the film is correct, we have a killer wrongly set free and another man wrongly sent to prison later in his place, then himself exonerated. What is most damning is that per its allegations, the investigators seeking to exonerate Porter used many of the same tactics found in miscarriages of justice by the government: getting witnesses to change their stories with bribery or threats, coercing a false confession, and ignoring evidence implicating him in a double murder. Not only that that, but since Porter has been pardoned and the statute of limitations has run out on the investigators' crimes, [[KarmaHoudini no one can be prosecuted]]. However, Simon is suing them and the university.



* The "Central Park Jogger" case. On April 19, 1989, a young woman was savagely attacked in New York City's Central Park--beaten, raped, and left for dead. Within days, five young men -- known as the Central Park 5 -- who had been terrorizing people in the park were arrested. Despite no DNA evidence, no identification by the jogger (she survived, but could not remember the attack), and a time frame that showed that the boys could NOT have assaulted the woman-ironically because they were attacking someone else at the time-all were convicted and sent to prison. A decade later, a man serving time for another crime came forward and confessed that he, and he alone, was the real perpetrator. There was nothing the DA's office could do but overturn the convictions of the others-who had all served their undeserved time. Meanwhile, the statute of limitations had run out, meaning that the man could not be prosecuted for the attack. So, 5 innocent young men spent a decade in prison for something they didn't do, a guilty man remained-and STILL remains-unpunished for something he did, and the woman herself, Tricia Meili, will never see proper justice done. A thoroughly gross miscarriage of justice all around.

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* The "Central Park Jogger" case. On April 19, 1989, a young woman was savagely attacked in New York City's Central Park--beaten, Park -- beaten, raped, and left for dead. Within days, five young men -- known as the Central Park 5 -- who had been terrorizing people in the park were arrested. Despite no DNA evidence, no identification by the jogger (she survived, but could not remember the attack), and a time frame that showed that the boys could NOT have assaulted the woman-ironically woman -- ironically because they were attacking someone else at the time-all time -- all were convicted and sent to prison. A decade later, a man serving time for another crime came forward and confessed that he, and he alone, was the real perpetrator. There was nothing the DA's office could do but overturn the convictions of the others-who others -- who had all served their undeserved time. Meanwhile, the statute of limitations had run out, meaning that the man could not be prosecuted for the attack. So, 5 innocent young men spent a decade in prison for something they didn't do, a guilty man remained-and remained -- and STILL remains-unpunished remains -- unpunished for something he did, and the woman herself, Tricia Meili, will never see proper justice done. A thoroughly gross miscarriage of justice all around.



* In 1983, Henry McCollum and Leon Brown (two mentally handicapped half brothers) were accused of raping and murdering an 11 year old girl. There was no physical evidence, the confessions were inconsistent, and what little did match up was already known by the police. They were sentenced to death (though Leon later had his sentence commuted to life in prison) in 1984. It wasn't until 2014, when DNA implicated a sex predator named Roscoe Artis (who lived 100 feet from where the little girl's body had been found, had been implicated in a similar murder a county over, and was convicted of murdering another young girl a month after the Brothers had been arrested in the same neighborhood) that the two were released. By this time their mother had died just a year before. Both were ultimately pardoned in June 2015.

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* In 1983, Henry McCollum and Leon Brown (two mentally handicapped half brothers) were accused of raping and murdering an 11 year old girl. There was no physical evidence, the confessions were inconsistent, and what little did match up was already known by the police. They were sentenced to death (though Leon later had his sentence commuted to life in prison) in 1984. It wasn't until 2014, when DNA implicated a sex predator named Roscoe Artis (who lived 100 feet from where the little girl's body had been found, had been implicated in a similar murder a county over, and was convicted of murdering another young girl a month after the Brothers had been arrested in the same neighborhood) that the two were released. By this time time, their mother had died just a year before. Both were ultimately pardoned in June 2015.



* A more recent example is ''Making A Murderer'', featuring Steven Avery. He was exonerated for rape and then convicted of murder. The documentary raises the possibility that the murder was another false conviction and that he and his nephew are innocent. Notably even people who believe that Avery is guilty have come to concede that a lot of the evidence against him was probably planted, or at the very least that Branden (the nephew) is innocent.

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* A more recent example is ''Making A Murderer'', featuring Steven Avery. He was exonerated for rape and then convicted of murder. The documentary raises the possibility that the murder was another false conviction and that he and his nephew are innocent. Notably Notably, even people who believe that Avery is guilty have come to concede that a lot of the evidence against him was probably planted, or at the very least that Branden (the nephew) is innocent.



*** At the same time, the police used contradictory theories to convict Brandon and his confession was dubious. What's more, there WERE other people on that property (notably Earl and Charles, Steven's brothers, who had a similarly violent history.) More importantly the state DID have a lot to lose (if Avery had won the reputation of the department would have been damaged.)
* Roger Keith Coleman once seemed like the poster child for this trope. On March 10, 1981, Wanda [=McCoy=] was found raped, stabbed, and nearly beheaded in her own home, for which Coleman was convicted. The only real evidence that there was to go on were spots of blood on Coleman's pants and two male pubic hairs found on [=McCoy's=] body that were consistent with his own. Several witness accounts also placed Coleman as being other places at the time the crime occurred (also the next door neighbor was a serial rapist). While on death row, Coleman maintained that he was innocent and managed to gain numerous supporters, including Pope John Paul II. Shortly before his execution in 1992, he stated that "an innocent man is going to be murdered tonight." His supporters and anti-death penalty activists petitioned and lobbied for many years to have the evidence from the crime tested. Finally, in 2006, DNA testing finally confirmed that Coleman [[{{SubvertedTrope}} really was responsible for the crime.]]
* The very first man exonerated by DNA testing in the US, was found guilty of rape and murder due to being mistakenly identified by eyewitnesses as the man they had noticed around the area (he resembled the real culprit). He was freed after eight years, while having unknowingly been in a cell above the actual rapist and murderer (who was serving his sentence for another rape). The man wished him luck on his release (no, you can't make this stuff up) and was later convicted on the same charges himself.
* Kevin Cooper is an unusual case in that DNA seems to condemn him but there are compelling arguments that the DNA tests were sabotaged (a criminalist who had been caught lying on the stand had checked out an envelope containing one of the tested pieces of evidence and opened it three years before the testing was done, the cigarettes had changed size shape and color from the last time, and when a prosecution lab found results that seemed to confirm that blood had been planted on the shirt they withdrew it on grounds of contamination but refused to submit the lab notes that could allow that claim to be verified.) Whether he's this or not is up in the air, but there is still strong proof that some funny business was going on.

to:

*** At the same time, the police used contradictory theories to convict Brandon and his confession was dubious. What's more, there WERE other people on that property (notably Earl and Charles, Steven's brothers, who had a similarly violent history.) history). More importantly importantly, the state DID have a lot to lose (if Avery had won won, the reputation of the department would have been damaged.)
damaged).
* Roger Keith Coleman once seemed like the poster child for this trope. On March 10, 1981, Wanda [=McCoy=] was found raped, stabbed, and nearly beheaded in her own home, for which Coleman was convicted. The only real evidence that there was to go on were spots of blood on Coleman's pants and two male pubic hairs found on [=McCoy's=] body that were consistent with his own. Several witness accounts also placed Coleman as being other places at the time the crime occurred (also (also, the next door neighbor was a serial rapist). While on death row, Coleman maintained that he was innocent and managed to gain numerous supporters, including Pope John Paul II. Shortly before his execution in 1992, he stated that "an innocent man is going to be murdered tonight." His supporters and anti-death penalty activists petitioned and lobbied for many years to have the evidence from the crime tested. Finally, in 2006, DNA testing finally confirmed that Coleman [[{{SubvertedTrope}} [[SubvertedTrope really was responsible for the crime.]]
* The very first man exonerated by DNA testing in the US, US was found guilty of rape and murder due to being mistakenly identified by eyewitnesses as the man they had noticed around the area (he resembled the real culprit). He was freed after eight years, while having unknowingly been in a cell above the actual rapist and murderer (who was serving his sentence for another rape). The man wished him luck on his release (no, ([[NotMakingThisUpDisclaimer no, you can't make this stuff up) up]]) and was later convicted on the same charges himself.
* Kevin Cooper is an unusual case in that DNA seems to condemn him but there are compelling arguments that the DNA tests were sabotaged (a criminalist who had been caught lying on the stand had checked out an envelope containing one of the tested pieces of evidence and opened it three years before the testing was done, the cigarettes had changed size shape and color from the last time, and when a prosecution lab found results that seemed to confirm that blood had been planted on the shirt shirt, they withdrew it on grounds of contamination but refused to submit the lab notes that could allow that claim to be verified.) Whether he's this or not is up in the air, but there is still strong proof that some funny business was going on.
26th May '17 10:49:40 PM TheTropper
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* The Protagonist of ''VideoGame/Persona5'' was sentenced with a criminal record for assaulting a man. What really happened is that while he was walking home, he noticed a drunk man harassing a woman and stepped in to help her. The drunk guy suddenly slipped and fell, injuring his own face, after which he threatens the woman with imprisonment if she doesn't claim he was attacked. The police then show up, where the woman says Joker attacked the man, leading to his arrest.
21st May '17 12:31:47 PM Eddy1215
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* In ''Fanfic/AGemOfADay'', [[spoiler:Rarity and Applejack get arrested when they try to steal back the former's dress design from Suri Polomare. When asked how they can arrest them when Suri was the one real thief, the arresting officer replied it was because Suri didn't pull a breaking and entering]].
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.MiscarriageOfJustice