History Main / MarketBasedTitle

25th May '16 3:09:43 PM LucaEarlgrey
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* There's no end to this for the ''VideoGame/MonsterHunter'' series. Just to name some more popular examples: ''Monster Hunter Portable'' became ''Monster Hunter Freedom'' in the West, ''Monster Hunter Portable 2G'' became ''Monster Hunter Freedom Unite'', ''Monster Hunter 3G'' and ''4G'' became ''Monster Hunter 3 Ultimate'' and ''4 Ultimate'', respectively, and ''Monster Hunter X (Cross)'' became ''Monster Hunter Generations''.
25th May '16 3:02:22 PM LucaEarlgrey
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* ''VideoGame/RaySeries'':
** ''[=RayForce=]'' is infamous for having been renamed no less than three times: ''Gunlock'' for the European arcade release, ''Layer Section'' for the Japanese Saturn port, and ''Galactic Attack'' for the North American Saturn port.
** ''[=RayStorm=]'' is known as ''Layer Section II'' for the Japanese Saturn port, but was left as is otherwise, even for the Japanese [=PS1=] port.
** ''[=RayCrisis=]'' is the least affected, with the only change being the inclusion of the "Series Termination" subtitle for the North American [=PS1=] release.
25th May '16 3:02:06 PM LucaEarlgrey
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Added DiffLines:

* ''VideoGame/RaySeries'':
** ''[=RayForce=]'' is infamous for having been renamed no less than three times: ''Gunlock'' for the European arcade release, ''Layer Section'' for the Japanese Saturn port, and ''Galactic Attack'' for the North American Saturn port.
** ''[=RayStorm=]'' is known as ''Layer Section II'' for the Japanese Saturn port, but was left as is otherwise, even for the Japanese [=PS1=] port.
** ''[=RayCrisis=]'' is the least affected, with the only change being the inclusion of the "Series Termination" subtitle for the North American [=PS1=] release.
24th May '16 8:37:22 AM MyFinalEdits
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** The Honda NSX was sold in the US as the Acura NSX. IIRC, the idea was that Americans would not buy a $60k+ Honda, but would pay that for an Acura. (Nope, Acura dates to the Honda/Acura Legend about 5 years before, and the related Sterling).

to:

** * The Honda NSX was sold in the US as the Acura NSX. IIRC, the idea was that Americans would not buy a $60k+ Honda, but would pay that for an Acura. (Nope, Acura dates to the Honda/Acura Legend about 5 years before, and the related Sterling).



** The first-generation of the Dodge Viper was in Europe through Chrysler dealerships as the "Chrysler Viper".

to:

** * The first-generation of the Dodge Viper was in Europe through Chrysler dealerships as the "Chrysler Viper".



** The first-gen Sprinter had to be renamed ''Transporter [=T1N=]'' for sale in Japan, because at the time, Toyota was still selling the [[Manga/InitialD Toyota Sprinter]].

to:

** * The first-gen Sprinter had to be renamed ''Transporter [=T1N=]'' for sale in Japan, because at the time, Toyota was still selling the [[Manga/InitialD Toyota Sprinter]].



** Both inversions and straight instances of this trope are very common in the car market, made even more confusing when combined with name reuse and revivals, international product range divergences, and so on. For example EU vs. US Ford Escort, JDM vs. International Toyota Corolla, etc.
24th May '16 8:36:52 AM MyFinalEdits
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* Toyota's (discontinued) [=MR2=] (1985-1998) was known simply as the Toyota ''MR'' in France. "[=MR2=]" in French can sound like "est merdeux", which roughly translates to "is shitty".

to:

* Toyota's Toyota:
** Their
(discontinued) [=MR2=] (1985-1998) was known simply as the Toyota ''MR'' in France. "[=MR2=]" in French can sound like "est merdeux", which roughly translates to "is shitty".
24th May '16 7:44:28 AM Willbyr
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* When Viz translated ''GashBell'', the main character was renamed ''Zatch Bell'' for one of two reasons: 1) The translator thought the censors would object to "Gash," as a "gash" in American English means either a really nasty wound or obscure slang for the vulva, or 2) [[RuleOfCool They figured "Zatch" has more zing than "Gash"]].

to:

* When Viz translated ''GashBell'', ''Manga/ZatchBell'', the main character was renamed ''Zatch Bell'' for one of two reasons: 1) The translator thought the censors would object to "Gash," as a "gash" in American English means either a really nasty wound or obscure slang for the vulva, or 2) [[RuleOfCool They figured "Zatch" has more zing than "Gash"]].
16th May '16 9:04:07 AM VVK
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** For [[Literature/HarryPotterAndTheDeathlyHallows the seventh book]], Rowling herself suggested that translations could be based on the phrase "Deathly Relics", as many languages didn't have an appropriate equivalent for "Hallows".

to:

** For [[Literature/HarryPotterAndTheDeathlyHallows the seventh book]], Rowling herself suggested that translations could be based on the phrase "Deathly Relics", as many languages didn't have an appropriate equivalent for "Hallows". Apparently that wasn't enough, since reportedly she had to tell the different translators what the phrase referred to before the book was out so that they could tell their audiences what the translated title would be.
13th May '16 3:10:39 PM Digifiend
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* ''[[VideoGame/DonaldDuckGoinQuackers Donald Duck: Goin' Quackers]]'' is ''Donald Duck: Quack Attack'' in Europe. [[Main/LuckyCharmsTitle With ampersands]]: ''Donald Duck: Goin' Qu@ckers'' is ''Donald Duck: Qu@ck Att@ck'' in Europe.

to:

* ''[[VideoGame/DonaldDuckGoinQuackers Donald Duck: Goin' Quackers]]'' is ''Donald Duck: Quack Attack'' in Europe. [[Main/LuckyCharmsTitle With ampersands]]: at signs]]: ''Donald Duck: Goin' Qu@ckers'' is ''Donald Duck: Qu@ck Att@ck'' in Europe.
9th May '16 1:17:52 PM Zabeus
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[[folder:Automobiles]]
* Subverted in a popular urban legend says Chevrolet had to call the car Americans know as "Nova" something else in Spanish-speaking locales, because no va in Spanish means, "[It] doesn't go." The phrase actually does mean "it doesn't go" but there was no effect on the car's sales because the word nova means the same thing in Spanish as in English. [[http://www.snopes.com/business/misxlate/nova.asp Snopes.com link]]
* Unlike the [[http://chameleon-translations.com/Index-Companies-pajero.shtml Mitsubishi Pajero]], which is known as Montero in most Spanish-speaking countries and Shogun in the UK. "Pajero," you see, roughly means "wanker" in [[SeparatedByACommonLanguage several dialects]] of Spanish. The Montero nameplate can also refer to a related but separate model marketed in some areas as the Challenger or Pajero Sport.
* [=GM=] has marketed the Astra with the same ''model'' name and several different ''marques''; Saturn Astra in North America and Japan, Holden Astra in Australia, Vauxhall Astra in the UK, Opel Astra in the rest of Europe....same car.
** In the case of Vauxhall and Opel, Vauxhall is nowadays (barring the odd Australian V8) just the British equivalent to the rest of Europe's Opel, and all their model names match. The Astra name was originally from the Vauxhall Astra, in the case of Opel it replaces the Kadett name (in most other cases the Opel name replaces the Vauxhall one, like the Cavalier being replaced by a Vectra).
** Same thing occured with Lotus's Opel Speedster, it was called the Vauxhall [=VX220=] in the UK while it was called the Speedster in the rest of Europe.
** In TheTwenties, Ford expanded overseas by opening branch plants. GM expanded by buying smaller companies, which kept their names.
** Australian GM subsidiary Holden's small-to-midsize car line was switched from Opel-based to Korean-designed models marketed elsewhere as Chevrolet around 2010, with the Opel brand launched in Australia two years later.
* Toyota's (discontinued) [=MR2=] (1985-1998) was known simply as the Toyota ''MR'' in France. "[=MR2=]" in French can sound like "est merdeux", which roughly translates to "is shitty".
** Their 3rd Generation MR-S (1999-2007) was called the ''[=MR2=] Spyder'' in North America, and the ''MR Roadster'' in Europe.
* Toyota sold some of their cars in North America and Europe under their Lexus nameplate. Examples include the Aristo (GS), Windom (ES), Altezza (IS), Soarer (SC), and Harrier (RX). The Lexus LS is a special case, as that came first, with the Toyota Celsior being introduced back to Japan following the un-expected success that the LS had in North America. When the Altezza's successor was unveiled, the Lexus brand was introduced back to Japan, and all the aforementioned models are now sold under the Lexus brand there as well.
* The Mazda MX-5 / Miata (US, old) / MX-5 Miata (US, current) / Roadster (JP). The Mazda Roadster used to be Eunos Roadster (one of Mazda's three short-lived marques in the '80s) as well...
* The Nissan "Z" series of sportscars have always carried the name "Fairlady" (or Fairlady Z) in their home country. Nissan's US market director didn't want to sell a sportscar with such a name and used the company internal code instead (''240Z'') back in 1969 and the pattern stuck.
** Similarly, the Silvia is sold in the various overseas markets it appears in as the 200SX (or with a different engine as the 240SX in the US at one point, but the less said about those the better).
** The 200SX name was also used in North America on a variant of the 90s Sentra.
* Also from Nissan, Mexico saw quite a bit of their cars badged with a Japanese name just to hype out their exotic Japanese appeal. Examples are the Nissan Sentra / Hikari / Tsuru / Tsubame, and the Nissan Silvia / Sakura.
* Honda hasn't bothered with their Acura brand in Europe at all; they're just badged as Hondas. Nissan had a similar approach with their Infiniti brand until launching a European division in 2008.
** The Honda NSX was sold in the US as the Acura NSX. IIRC, the idea was that Americans would not buy a $60k+ Honda, but would pay that for an Acura. (Nope, Acura dates to the Honda/Acura Legend about 5 years before, and the related Sterling).
* The 2003- Dodge Viper ''SRT-10'' is sold under the name of ''SRT-10'' in the United Kingdom, since someone else owns the Viper name.
** The first-generation of the Dodge Viper was in Europe through Chrysler dealerships as the "Chrysler Viper".
* When it was initially introduced in North America, Mercedes-Benz Sprinter van was sold via Dodge dealerships, as the Dodge Sprinter. It is now sold via North American Mercedes-Benz dealerships after Dodge lost their contract to import the vans.
** The first-gen Sprinter had to be renamed ''Transporter [=T1N=]'' for sale in Japan, because at the time, Toyota was still selling the [[Manga/InitialD Toyota Sprinter]].
* Honda was going to release a car called "Fitta". Which caused great controversy in Sweden, where fitta is our answer to Britain's "cunt". So instead they called it "Fit" and "Jazz".
* Inverted by the Ford Fusion: Same name, two ''different'' cars: a Fiesta-based tall wagon in Europe and a biggish sedan in the Americas. Done at the last minute because the latter was meant to have been called "Futura" but they had lost rights to the name.
** Both inversions and straight instances of this trope are very common in the car market, made even more confusing when combined with name reuse and revivals, international product range divergences, and so on. For example EU vs. US Ford Escort, JDM vs. International Toyota Corolla, etc.
* The Renault 5 was sold in the US as the Renault Le Car. ("Le car" means "the motor coach", or maybe even "the because")
* In the latter half of the 1980s, Ford used the brand name "Merkur" in North America for two car models, the Merkur [=XR4Ti=] and the Merkur Scorpio. These were localized versions of the European-originated Ford Sierra [=XR4i=] and Ford Scorpio (which itself was called "Ford Granada Scorpio" in the UK). (Incidentally, in ''GunsmithCats'', Roy's car is a Sierra [=XR4i=], and it's called by that name and visibly has a "Ford" badge on the front, despite the story being set in the US.)
[[/folder]]



* Subverted in a popular urban legend says Chevrolet had to call the car Americans know as "Nova" something else in Spanish-speaking locales, because no va in Spanish means, "[It] doesn't go." The phrase actually does mean "it doesn't go" but there was no effect on the car's sales because the word nova means the same thing in Spanish as in English. [[http://www.snopes.com/business/misxlate/nova.asp Snopes.com link]]
* Unlike the [[http://chameleon-translations.com/Index-Companies-pajero.shtml Mitsubishi Pajero]], which is known as Montero in most Spanish-speaking countries and Shogun in the UK. "Pajero," you see, roughly means "wanker" in [[SeparatedByACommonLanguage several dialects]] of Spanish. The Montero nameplate can also refer to a related but separate model marketed in some areas as the Challenger or Pajero Sport.
* [=GM=] has marketed the Astra with the same ''model'' name and several different ''marques''; Saturn Astra in North America and Japan, Holden Astra in Australia, Vauxhall Astra in the UK, Opel Astra in the rest of Europe....same car.
** In the case of Vauxhall and Opel, Vauxhall is nowadays (barring the odd Australian V8) just the British equivalent to the rest of Europe's Opel, and all their model names match. The Astra name was originally from the Vauxhall Astra, in the case of Opel it replaces the Kadett name (in most other cases the Opel name replaces the Vauxhall one, like the Cavalier being replaced by a Vectra).
** Same thing occured with Lotus's Opel Speedster, it was called the Vauxhall [=VX220=] in the UK while it was called the Speedster in the rest of Europe.
** In TheTwenties, Ford expanded overseas by opening branch plants. GM expanded by buying smaller companies, which kept their names.
** Australian GM subsidiary Holden's small-to-midsize car line was switched from Opel-based to Korean-designed models marketed elsewhere as Chevrolet around 2010, with the Opel brand launched in Australia two years later.



* Toyota's (discontinued) [=MR2=] (1985-1998) was known simply as the Toyota ''MR'' in France. "[=MR2=]" in French can sound like "est merdeux", which roughly translates to "is shitty".
** Their 3rd Generation MR-S (1999-2007) was called the ''[=MR2=] Spyder'' in North America, and the ''MR Roadster'' in Europe.
* Toyota sold some of their cars in North America and Europe under their Lexus nameplate. Examples include the Aristo (GS), Windom (ES), Altezza (IS), Soarer (SC), and Harrier (RX). The Lexus LS is a special case, as that came first, with the Toyota Celsior being introduced back to Japan following the un-expected success that the LS had in North America. When the Altezza's successor was unveiled, the Lexus brand was introduced back to Japan, and all the aforementioned models are now sold under the Lexus brand there as well.
* The Mazda MX-5 / Miata (US, old) / MX-5 Miata (US, current) / Roadster (JP). The Mazda Roadster used to be Eunos Roadster (one of Mazda's three short-lived marques in the '80s) as well...
* The Nissan "Z" series of sportscars have always carried the name "Fairlady" (or Fairlady Z) in their home country. Nissan's US market director didn't want to sell a sportscar with such a name and used the company internal code instead (''240Z'') back in 1969 and the pattern stuck.
** Similarly, the Silvia is sold in the various overseas markets it appears in as the 200SX (or with a different engine as the 240SX in the US at one point, but the less said about those the better).
** The 200SX name was also used in North America on a variant of the 90s Sentra.
* Also from Nissan, Mexico saw quite a bit of their cars badged with a Japanese name just to hype out their exotic Japanese appeal. Examples are the Nissan Sentra / Hikari / Tsuru / Tsubame, and the Nissan Silvia / Sakura.
* Honda hasn't bothered with their Acura brand in Europe at all; they're just badged as Hondas. Nissan had a similar approach with their Infiniti brand until launching a European division in 2008.
** The Honda NSX was sold in the US as the Acura NSX. IIRC, the idea was that Americans would not buy a $60k+ Honda, but would pay that for an Acura. (Nope, Acura dates to the Honda/Acura Legend about 5 years before, and the related Sterling).
* The 2003- Dodge Viper ''SRT-10'' is sold under the name of ''SRT-10'' in the United Kingdom, since someone else owns the Viper name.
** On a related note, the first-generation of the Dodge Viper was in Europe through Chrysler dealerships as the "Chrysler Viper".
* When it was initially introduced in North America, Mercedes-Benz Sprinter van was sold via Dodge dealerships, as the Dodge Sprinter. It is now sold via North American Mercedes-Benz dealerships after Dodge lost their contract to import the vans.
** On a related note, the first-gen Sprinter had to be renamed ''Transporter [=T1N=]'' for sale in Japan, because at the time, Toyota was still selling the [[Manga/InitialD Toyota Sprinter]].



* Honda was going to release a car called "Fitta". Which caused great controversy in Sweden, where fitta is our answer to Britain's "cunt". So instead they called it "Fit" and "Jazz".



* Inverted by the Ford Fusion: Same name, two ''different'' cars: a Fiesta-based tall wagon in Europe and a biggish sedan in the Americas. Done at the last minute because the latter was meant to have been called "Futura" but they had lost rights to the name.
** Both inversions and straight instances of this trope are very common in the car market, made even more confusing when combined with name reuse and revivals, international product range divergences, and so on. For example EU vs. US Ford Escort, JDM vs. International Toyota Corolla, etc.



* The Renault 5 was sold in the US as the Renault Le Car. ("Le car" means "the motor coach", or maybe even "the because")
* In the latter half of the 1980s, Ford used the brand name "Merkur" in North America for two car models, the Merkur [=XR4Ti=] and the Merkur Scorpio. These were localized versions of the European-originated Ford Sierra [=XR4i=] and Ford Scorpio (which itself was called "Ford Granada Scorpio" in the UK). (Incidentally, in ''GunsmithCats'', Roy's car is a Sierra [=XR4i=], and it's called by that name and visibly has a "Ford" badge on the front, despite the story being set in the US.)
9th May '16 3:24:21 AM Morgenthaler
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* ''WeCanBeHeroes: Finding The Australian Of The Year'' had the subtitle changed to ''The Nominees'' outside of Australia.
* ''MenBehavingBadly'' (the British series) was advertised as ''British Men Behaving Badly'' on BBC America to avoid confusion with an American show [[NamesTheSame of the same name]].
* ''WondersInLetterland'' became ''Troubles With T-Bag'' in Australia to avoid a copyright problem. One of the makers said that whilst neither title satisfied him, at least the second one referenced the character of the show.

to:

* ''WeCanBeHeroes: ''Series/WeCanBeHeroes: Finding The Australian Of The Year'' had the subtitle changed to ''The Nominees'' outside of Australia.
* ''MenBehavingBadly'' ''Series/MenBehavingBadly'' (the British series) was advertised as ''British Men Behaving Badly'' on BBC America to avoid confusion with an American show [[NamesTheSame of the same name]].
* ''WondersInLetterland'' ''Series/WondersInLetterland'' became ''Troubles With T-Bag'' in Australia to avoid a copyright problem. One of the makers said that whilst neither title satisfied him, at least the second one referenced the character of the show.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.MarketBasedTitle