History Main / ManualMisprint

29th May '17 11:16:35 AM Miracle@StOlaf
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* The instruction manual for ''VideoGame/ZeldaIITheAdventureOfLink'' helpfully warns you that some experience-giving "P" bags are hiding enemies inside them. The opposite is often true, in that vanquished enemies can drop the bags, and some Ironknuckle statues may disgorge a real one when struck, but there are no "P" bags in any version of the game that behave this way.
16th May '17 6:38:33 PM Saurubiker
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* ''Traysia'' - The English manual has the icons for battle commands (e.g. fight, defense, escape) and exploration (e.g. status, equipment, trade) switched. Likewise, the "how to start" page refers to the game's title as ''Ys III'' (another game published by Renovation).
29th Apr '17 11:55:23 AM Saurubiker
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* ''VideoGame/DoubleDragon'' on the Genesis was a port of the arcade version. However, the author of the manual used the story for the NES version for reference, resulting in a complete misinterpretation of the arcade version's story and its characters. Whereas the arcade version had [[SiblingTeam Billy and Jimmy Lee]] joining forces to fight against [[BigBad Machine Gun Willy]] and his Black Warriors gang, the NES version changed the plot so that Billy fought the gang by himself and [[AdaptationalVillainy Jimmy shows up at the end]] as the [[TheManBehindTheMan Shadow Boss]] after Willy is defeated. Unfortunately, the author ended up mistakenly identifying Machine Gun Willy as Jimmy (despite Jimmy being clearly established to Billy's ''twin brother'' and Willy looking nothing like either of the two player characters), whereas the actual Player 2 character (the guy who is clearly supposed to be Player 1's twin brother) ended up being described as an unrelated ally named Jake instead.

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* ''VideoGame/DoubleDragon'' on the Genesis was a port of the arcade version. However, the author of the manual used the story for the NES version for reference, resulting in a complete misinterpretation of the arcade version's story and its characters. Whereas the arcade version had [[SiblingTeam Billy and Jimmy Lee]] joining forces to fight against [[BigBad Machine Gun Willy]] and his Black Warriors gang, the NES version changed the plot so that Billy fought the gang by himself and [[AdaptationalVillainy Jimmy shows up at the end]] as the [[TheManBehindTheMan Shadow Boss]] after Willy is defeated. Unfortunately, the author ended up mistakenly identifying Machine Gun Willy as Jimmy (despite Jimmy being clearly established to Billy's ''twin brother'' and Willy looking nothing like either of the two player characters), whereas the actual Player 2 character (the guy who is clearly supposed to be Player 1's twin brother) ended up being described as an unrelated a non-related ally named Jake instead.



* Because some of ''[[VideoGame/Sonic3AndKnuckles Sonic the Hedgehog 3]]'''s content was removed [[OneGameForThePriceOfTwo and added to]] ''Sonic & Knuckles'' to meet [[ChristmasRushed Christmas demands]], some enemies from ''Sonic & Knuckles'' are listed in the ''Sonic 3'' manual.

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* Because some of ''[[VideoGame/Sonic3AndKnuckles Sonic the Hedgehog 3]]'''s content was removed [[OneGameForThePriceOfTwo and added to]] ''Sonic & Knuckles'' to meet [[ChristmasRushed Christmas demands]], some of the enemies from ''Sonic & Knuckles'' are listed in the ''Sonic 3'' manual.manual don't show up until ''Sonic & Knuckles''.
29th Apr '17 11:44:17 AM Saurubiker
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* ''VideoGame/DoubleDragon'''s manual gives the wrong commands for the elbow punch and spin kick, claiming that you need to press the d-pad twice towards the player's opposite direction for the elbow punch and twice towards the front direction for the spin kick. In reality the elbow punch is performed simply by pressing A when an enemy is approaching from behind, while the spin kick is performed by finishing a combo with the B button. Neither technique can be performed until the player's skill level has reached Level 6 and 7 respectively, something that the manual neglects to mention as well (since most of the player's move set are locked away at the start of the game). It also claims that Abobo "likes to throw bombs", despite the fact that the only bomb-throwing enemies in the game are the dynamite-wielding Williams. This is actually a mistranslated reference to the atomic suplex move he uses in the arcade version in which he grabs and tosses the player (the move was cut from the NES version, but animation frames are still present in the game's data). And lastly it spells a certain enemy character's name as "Lopar", when it's [[SpellMyNameWithAnS spelled]] "Rowper" in-game.

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* ''VideoGame/DoubleDragon'''s manual gives the wrong commands for the elbow punch and spin kick, claiming that you need to press the d-pad twice towards the player's your character's opposite direction for the elbow punch and twice towards the front his current direction for the spin kick. In reality the elbow punch is performed simply by pressing A when an enemy is approaching from behind, while the spin kick is performed by finishing a combo with the B button. Neither The manual also neglects to mention that neither technique can be performed until the player's skill level has reached Level 6 and 7 respectively, something that as all the manual neglects to mention as well (since most of moves in the player's move set are locked away at game other than the start of basic punch and kick (and the game).headbutt) require experience points to unlock. It also claims that Abobo "likes to throw bombs", despite the fact that the only bomb-throwing enemies in the game are the dynamite-wielding Williams. This is actually a mistranslated reference to the atomic suplex move he uses in the arcade version in which he grabs and tosses the player (the move was cut from the NES version, but animation frames are still present in the game's data). And lastly it spells a certain enemy character's name as "Lopar", when it's the actual game [[SpellMyNameWithAnS spelled]] "Rowper" in-game.spells his name "Rowper"]].



* ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaI'''s manual claims that Pol Voices hate "loud noises." This was intended to be a clue to their weakness in the Famicom version, where they can only be killed by yelling on the microphone on the second controller. But because the NES doesn't have any microphone functionality like the Famicom (due to the NES using detachable controllers instead of having them hardwired), they can only be killed by firing arrows at them in the export version. However, the clue to killing them was not changed to reflect this regional difference and many players mistakenly assumed that Pol Voices could be weakened by playing the flute (or "recorder" to use the in-game term), which actually has no effect against them.

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* ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaI'''s The manual for ''VideoGame/{{The Legend of Zelda|I}}'' claims that Pol Voices hate "loud noises." This was intended to be a clue to their weakness in the Famicom version, where they can only be killed by yelling on the microphone on the second controller. But because the NES doesn't have any microphone functionality like the Famicom (due to the NES using detachable controllers instead of having them hardwired), they can only be killed by firing arrows at them in the export version. However, the clue to killing them was not changed to reflect this regional difference and many players mistakenly assumed that Pol Voices could be weakened by playing the flute (or "recorder" to use the in-game term), which actually has no effect against them.
26th Apr '17 5:43:33 PM Saurubiker
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* ''VideoGame/DoubleDragon'' on the Genesis was a port of the arcade version. However, the author of the manual used the story for the NES version for reference, resulting in a complete misinterpretation of the arcade version's story and its characters. Whereas the arcade version had [[SiblingTeam Billy and Jimmy Lee]] joining forces to fight against [[BigBad Machine Gun Willy]] and his Black Warriors gang, the NES version changed the plot so that Billy fought the gang by himself and [[AdaptationalVillainy Jimmy shows up at the end]] as the [[TheManBehindTheMan Shadow Boss]] after Willy is defeated. Unfortunately, the author ended up mistakenly identifying Machine Gun Willy as Jimmy (despite Jimmy being clearly established to Billy's ''twin brother'' and Willy looking nothing like either of the two player characters), whereas the actual Player 2 character (the guy who is clearly supposed to be Player 1's twin brother) ended up being named Jake instead.

to:

* ''VideoGame/DoubleDragon'' on the Genesis was a port of the arcade version. However, the author of the manual used the story for the NES version for reference, resulting in a complete misinterpretation of the arcade version's story and its characters. Whereas the arcade version had [[SiblingTeam Billy and Jimmy Lee]] joining forces to fight against [[BigBad Machine Gun Willy]] and his Black Warriors gang, the NES version changed the plot so that Billy fought the gang by himself and [[AdaptationalVillainy Jimmy shows up at the end]] as the [[TheManBehindTheMan Shadow Boss]] after Willy is defeated. Unfortunately, the author ended up mistakenly identifying Machine Gun Willy as Jimmy (despite Jimmy being clearly established to Billy's ''twin brother'' and Willy looking nothing like either of the two player characters), whereas the actual Player 2 character (the guy who is clearly supposed to be Player 1's twin brother) ended up being described as an unrelated ally named Jake instead.
26th Apr '17 5:41:35 PM Saurubiker
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* ''VideoGame/DoubleDragon'' on the Genesis was a port of the arcade version. However, the author of the manual used the story for the NES version for reference, resulting in a complete misinterpretation of the arcade version's story and its characters. Whereas the arcade version had [[SiblingTeam Billy and Jimmy Lee]] joining forces to fight against [[BigBad Machine Gun Willy]] and his Black Warriors gang, the NES version changed the plot so that Billy fought the gang by himself and [[AdaptationalVillainy Jimmy shows up at the end]] as the [[TheManBehindTheMan Shadow Boss]]. Unfortunately, the author thought Machine Gun Willy was Jimmy himself (despite looking nothing like either of the two player characters) and the Player 2 character, who is actually supposed to be Jimmy, ended up being named Jake instead.

to:

* ''VideoGame/DoubleDragon'' on the Genesis was a port of the arcade version. However, the author of the manual used the story for the NES version for reference, resulting in a complete misinterpretation of the arcade version's story and its characters. Whereas the arcade version had [[SiblingTeam Billy and Jimmy Lee]] joining forces to fight against [[BigBad Machine Gun Willy]] and his Black Warriors gang, the NES version changed the plot so that Billy fought the gang by himself and [[AdaptationalVillainy Jimmy shows up at the end]] as the [[TheManBehindTheMan Shadow Boss]]. Boss]] after Willy is defeated. Unfortunately, the author thought ended up mistakenly identifying Machine Gun Willy was as Jimmy himself (despite Jimmy being clearly established to Billy's ''twin brother'' and Willy looking nothing like either of the two player characters) and characters), whereas the actual Player 2 character, character (the guy who is actually clearly supposed to be Jimmy, Player 1's twin brother) ended up being named Jake instead.
21st Apr '17 11:48:44 AM Saurubiker
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* ''VideoGame/DoubleDragon'''s manual is pretty notorious for how the author completely misinterpreted the backstory of the game. To be precise, the Genesis version is based on the original arcade version, but the manual uses the plot of the NES version for reference. Whereas in the arcade game Billy and Jimmy Lee fought against the Black Warriors together, in the NES version Billy fights the gang on his own and Jimmy shows up as the final boss, revealing himself to be the true leader of the Black Warriors. Apparently the fact that the final boss looks nothing like the game's protagonist in the Genesis version, whereas Player 2 is a palette swapped twin wasn't enough to clue in on the manual's author that something was not right. As a result, the manual misidentifies Machine Gun Willy as Jimmy Lee and the Player 2 character is referred by the name of Jake.

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* ''VideoGame/DoubleDragon'''s manual is pretty notorious for how the author completely misinterpreted the backstory of the game. To be precise, ''VideoGame/DoubleDragon'' on the Genesis version is based on was a port of the original arcade version, but version. However, the author of the manual uses used the plot of story for the NES version for reference. Whereas reference, resulting in a complete misinterpretation of the arcade game version's story and its characters. Whereas the arcade version had [[SiblingTeam Billy and Jimmy Lee fought Lee]] joining forces to fight against the [[BigBad Machine Gun Willy]] and his Black Warriors together, in gang, the NES version changed the plot so that Billy fights fought the gang on his own by himself and [[AdaptationalVillainy Jimmy shows up at the end]] as the final boss, revealing himself to be [[TheManBehindTheMan Shadow Boss]]. Unfortunately, the true leader of the Black Warriors. Apparently the fact that the final boss looks nothing like the game's protagonist in the Genesis version, whereas Player 2 is a palette swapped twin wasn't enough to clue in on the manual's author that something was not right. As a result, the manual misidentifies thought Machine Gun Willy as was Jimmy Lee himself (despite looking nothing like either of the two player characters) and the Player 2 character character, who is referred by the name of Jake. actually supposed to be Jimmy, ended up being named Jake instead.
15th Apr '17 7:10:53 AM Saurubiker
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* ''VideoGame/{{Contra}}'''s manual claims that the player must destroy a "diamond-shaped sensor" to clear the Waterfall stage, which would've been true... if this was the arcade version. In the NES version, the Waterfall boss is a giant alien statue whose weak points are the tips of its two tentacles and its mouth whenever its open. The stage descriptions were actually written with multiple versions in mind (the other versions of ''Contra'' released in the U.S. at the time were the DOS and [=C64=] version), but the NES version takes a few liberties from the arcade original rather than being a straight port.

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* ''VideoGame/{{Contra}}'''s manual claims that the player must destroy a "diamond-shaped sensor" to clear the Waterfall stage, which would've been true... if this was the arcade version. In On the NES version, NES, the Waterfall boss is a giant alien statue whose weak points are the tips of its two tentacles and its mouth whenever its open. The stage descriptions were actually written with multiple versions in mind (the other versions of (as ''Contra'' was also released on Commodore 64 and DOS at the same time in the U.S. at and Konami used the time were same stage descriptions for the DOS and [=C64=] version), PC versions), but the NES version takes a few liberties differs significantly from the arcade original rather than being a straight port.compared to the other versions.
15th Apr '17 7:06:59 AM Saurubiker
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* ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaI'''s manual claims that Pol Voices hate "loud noises." This was intended to be a clue to their weakness in the Famicom version, where they can only be killed by yelling on the microphone on the second controller. But because the NES doesn't have any microphone functionality like the Famicom (due to the NES using detachable controllers instead of having them hardwired), they are instead weak against arrows inthe export versions of the game. However, the clue to killing them was not changed to reflect this regional difference and many players mistakenly assumed that Pol Voices could be weakened by playing the flute (or "recorder" to use the in-game term), which actually has no effect against them.

to:

* ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaI'''s manual claims that Pol Voices hate "loud noises." This was intended to be a clue to their weakness in the Famicom version, where they can only be killed by yelling on the microphone on the second controller. But because the NES doesn't have any microphone functionality like the Famicom (due to the NES using detachable controllers instead of having them hardwired), they are instead weak against can only be killed by firing arrows inthe at them in the export versions of the game.version. However, the clue to killing them was not changed to reflect this regional difference and many players mistakenly assumed that Pol Voices could be weakened by playing the flute (or "recorder" to use the in-game term), which actually has no effect against them.
15th Apr '17 7:05:19 AM Saurubiker
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* ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaI'''s manual claims that a Pol Voice hates "loud noises." This was intended to be a clue to their weakness in the Famicom version, where they can only be killed by yelling on the microphone on the second controller. However, the NES version has no microphone functionality (due to the export version of the console using detachable controllers instead of hardwired ones) and as a result, many players mistakenly interpreted this clue as Pol Voices being vulnerable to the "recorder" (or flute). In reality, Pol Voices can only be killed by shooting arrows at them, something the game nor manual never tells the player.

to:

* ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaI'''s manual claims that a Pol Voice hates Voices hate "loud noises." This was intended to be a clue to their weakness in the Famicom version, where they can only be killed by yelling on the microphone on the second controller. However, But because the NES version has no doesn't have any microphone functionality like the Famicom (due to the export version of the console NES using detachable controllers instead of hardwired ones) having them hardwired), they are instead weak against arrows inthe export versions of the game. However, the clue to killing them was not changed to reflect this regional difference and as a result, many players mistakenly interpreted this clue as assumed that Pol Voices being vulnerable to could be weakened by playing the flute (or "recorder" (or flute). In reality, Pol Voices can only be killed by shooting arrows at them, something to use the game nor manual never tells the player.in-game term), which actually has no effect against them.
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