History Main / MaliciousSlander

14th Aug '16 7:09:08 PM billybobfred
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* Used as the main plot device in ''Theatre/TheChildrensHour''. At a 1930s all-girls school, a bratty girl mad at her teachers conquers up a lie about them being lesbian lovers. Considering one of them was engaged, and this was the early thirties, it single-handedly ruined their lives.

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* Used as the main plot device in ''Theatre/TheChildrensHour''. At a 1930s all-girls school, a bratty girl mad at her teachers conquers conjures up a lie about them being lesbian lovers. Considering one of them was engaged, and this was the early thirties, it single-handedly ruined their lives.
11th Aug '16 8:54:26 PM PaulA
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* In Creator/LoisMcMasterBujold's ''[[Literature/VorkosiganSaga A Civil Campaign]]'', Miles is surrounded by rumors that he killed Ekaterin's husband in order to woo her.
** It backfires in a scene that is blended CrowningMomentOfAwesome and CrowningMomentOfFunny, courtesy of Miles' father and Ekaterin herself.
---> "It seems if you are Vorkosigan enough, you can get away with Murder!"
---> "If you truly believe that, ''[[RefugeInAudacity why are you standing in my way?]]''"

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* In Creator/LoisMcMasterBujold's ''[[Literature/VorkosiganSaga A Civil Campaign]]'', ''Literature/ACivilCampaign'', Miles is surrounded by rumors that he killed Ekaterin's husband in order to woo her.
** It backfires in a scene that is blended CrowningMomentOfAwesome and CrowningMomentOfFunny, courtesy of Miles' father and Ekaterin herself.
---> "It seems if you are Vorkosigan enough, you can get away with Murder!"
---> "If you truly believe that, ''[[RefugeInAudacity why are you standing in my way?]]''"
her.
10th Aug '16 9:00:26 PM nombretomado
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* In ''[[{{Deryni}} Deryni Rising]]'', Charissa spreads lies and scary gossip about Alaric Morgan as part of her plan to undermine him. She's assisted by her lover, [[spoiler: the traitorous Lord Ian Howell]], who tells her, "I'd assumed it was an exercise in maliceónot that you need the practice." Since Morgan is already a known Deryni, her efforts merely add to [[HeroWithBadPublicity his bad reputation]].

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* In ''[[{{Deryni}} ''[[Literature/{{Deryni}} Deryni Rising]]'', Charissa spreads lies and scary gossip about Alaric Morgan as part of her plan to undermine him. She's assisted by her lover, [[spoiler: the traitorous Lord Ian Howell]], who tells her, "I'd assumed it was an exercise in maliceónot that you need the practice." Since Morgan is already a known Deryni, her efforts merely add to [[HeroWithBadPublicity his bad reputation]].
10th Aug '16 7:29:50 PM eowynjedi
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* ''Literature/WolfHall'' portrays Lady Jane Rochford as a malicious gossip who is prone to creating rumors wholesale out of spite, since she's trapped in a horrible marriage with George Boleyn and that's how she chooses to deal with it. Thomas Cromwell doesn't necessarily believe her, but her stories are handy when it comes time to break Henry's marriage with Anne.



* In ''Series/WolfHall'', this is how Anne Boleyn gets disgraced.

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* In ''Series/WolfHall'', this is how Anne Boleyn gets disgraced.disgraced, mainly at the hands of her sister-in-law Lady Jane Rochford--she accuses her husband of having an incestuous affair with Anne, and Thomas Cromwell works up a rationalization to make it plausible for the court.
21st Jul '16 4:52:31 AM Adept
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Added DiffLines:

* ''Literature/TheBodyInTheLibrary'': a young girl was found dead in the library of Mr. and Mrs. Bantry. Soon after this discovery, rumours began to spread that the victim was Mr. Bantry's mistress, and that he probably had murdered her too. Poor old guy was [[AllOfTheOtherReindeer cold-shouldered by most of the other villagers]] and became a recluse until the real murderer was found.
17th Jul '16 10:25:26 PM DastardlyDemolition
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* In ''Theatre/{{Hamlet}}'', Hamlet says the page quote to Ophelia. And Hamlet tests the ghost's words; he appears to fear that the ghost slandered his uncle and mother.
** RuleOfSymbolism: The older king Hamlet was poisoned by Claudius ''Through the ear''! That could very well symbolize the power of malicious slander. In that respect, the trope guides the entire play, because each character is taught to mistrust oneanother (apart from Horatio, that is).

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* In ''Theatre/{{Hamlet}}'', Hamlet says the page quote to Ophelia. Ophelia "Be thou as chaste as ice, as pure as snow, thou shalt not escape calumny." And Hamlet tests the ghost's words; he appears to fear that the ghost slandered his uncle and mother.
** RuleOfSymbolism: The older king Hamlet was poisoned by Claudius ''Through the ear''! That could very well symbolize the power of malicious slander. In that respect, the trope guides the entire play, because each character is taught to mistrust oneanother one another (apart from Horatio, that is).
17th Jul '16 5:48:17 AM Eilevgmyhren
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** RuleOfSymbolism: The older king Hamlet was poisoned bu Claudius ''Through the ear''! That could very well symbolize the power of malicious slander. In that respect, the trope guides the entire play, because each character is taught to mistrust oneanother (apart from Horatio, that is).

to:

** RuleOfSymbolism: The older king Hamlet was poisoned bu by Claudius ''Through the ear''! That could very well symbolize the power of malicious slander. In that respect, the trope guides the entire play, because each character is taught to mistrust oneanother (apart from Horatio, that is).
17th Jul '16 5:48:00 AM Eilevgmyhren
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Added DiffLines:

** RuleOfSymbolism: The older king Hamlet was poisoned bu Claudius ''Through the ear''! That could very well symbolize the power of malicious slander. In that respect, the trope guides the entire play, because each character is taught to mistrust oneanother (apart from Horatio, that is).
11th Jul '16 8:00:04 PM karstovich2
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No RealLife examples--suffice to say that ''all'' propaganda contains elements of this, but to what extent is highly debatable. Too much chance of FlameBait--besides which, we don't want ''this'' to be a SelfDemonstratingArticle. We should note that this trope is not exactly the same as malicious slander/libel/defamation in strict legal terms; in the law of defamation, "malice" means (in most jurisdictions, including, most importantly,[[note]]In legal terms: besides being the law applying most directly to ThisVeryWiki, American law is the one that gets the most mileage out of the concept of "malice"[[/note]] the United States) publishing/disseminating false information about another either ''knowing'' that the information is false (i.e., saying things you know are not true), or ''recklessly disregarding the possibility'' that it is false (i.e. saying things that might or might not be true but which you have no basis for saying, and if they happen to be true, it's an accident). Simply repeating something you heard doesn't generally count.[[note]]This can be important, as it can govern liability (depending on where you are and who is suing who, someone suing someone else for defamation/libel/slander may need to prove malice, and, generally speaking, punitive damages, if they are available at all, would only be available if the defamer spoke/wrote with malice).[[/note]] However, mere gossip can be enough to be this trope.

to:

No RealLife examples--suffice to say that ''all'' propaganda contains elements of this, but to what extent is highly debatable. Too much chance of FlameBait--besides which, we don't want ''this'' to be a SelfDemonstratingArticle. We should note that this trope is not exactly the same as malicious slander/libel/defamation in strict legal terms; in the law of defamation, "malice" means (in most jurisdictions, including, most importantly,[[note]]In legal terms: besides being the law applying most directly to ThisVeryWiki, American law is the one that gets the most mileage out of the concept of "malice"[[/note]] the United States) publishing/disseminating false information about another either ''knowing'' that the information is false (i.e., saying things you know are not true), or ''recklessly disregarding the possibility'' that it is false (i.e. saying things that might or might not be true but which you have no basis for saying, and if they happen to be true, it's an accident). Simply repeating something you heard doesn't generally count.count, so in general terms ordinary town gossip isn't going to get you very far in a slander/libel/defamation suit.[[note]]This can be important, as it can govern liability (depending on where you are and who is suing who, someone suing someone else for defamation/libel/slander may need to prove malice, and, generally speaking, punitive damages, if they are available at all, would only be available if the defamer spoke/wrote with malice).[[/note]] However, mere gossip can be enough to be this trope.
11th Jul '16 7:57:19 PM karstovich2
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No RealLife examples--suffice to say that ''all'' propaganda contains elements of this, but to what extent is highly debatable. Too much chance of FlameBait--besides which, we don't want ''this'' to be a SelfDemonstratingArticle. We should note that this trope is not exactly the same as malicious slander/libel/defamation in strict legal terms; in the law of defamation, "malice" means (in most jurisdictions, including, most importantly, the United States) publishing/disseminating false information about another either ''knowing'' that the information is false (i.e., saying things you know are not true), or ''recklessly disregarding the possibility'' that it is false (i.e. saying things that might or might not be true but which you have no basis for saying, and if they happen to be true, it's an accident). Simply repeating something you heard doesn't generally count.[[note]]This can be important, as it can govern liability (depending on where you are and who is suing who, someone suing someone else for defamation/libel/slander may need to prove malice, and, generally speaking, punitive damages, if they are available at all, would only be available if the defamer spoke/wrote with malice).[[/note]] However, mere gossip can be enough to be this trope.

to:

No RealLife examples--suffice to say that ''all'' propaganda contains elements of this, but to what extent is highly debatable. Too much chance of FlameBait--besides which, we don't want ''this'' to be a SelfDemonstratingArticle. We should note that this trope is not exactly the same as malicious slander/libel/defamation in strict legal terms; in the law of defamation, "malice" means (in most jurisdictions, including, most importantly, importantly,[[note]]In legal terms: besides being the law applying most directly to ThisVeryWiki, American law is the one that gets the most mileage out of the concept of "malice"[[/note]] the United States) publishing/disseminating false information about another either ''knowing'' that the information is false (i.e., saying things you know are not true), or ''recklessly disregarding the possibility'' that it is false (i.e. saying things that might or might not be true but which you have no basis for saying, and if they happen to be true, it's an accident). Simply repeating something you heard doesn't generally count.[[note]]This can be important, as it can govern liability (depending on where you are and who is suing who, someone suing someone else for defamation/libel/slander may need to prove malice, and, generally speaking, punitive damages, if they are available at all, would only be available if the defamer spoke/wrote with malice).[[/note]] However, mere gossip can be enough to be this trope.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.MaliciousSlander