History Main / LanguageEqualsThought

14th Mar '17 12:11:02 PM CaptainCrawdad
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* In ''TheOffice'', Michael claims that the Jamaicans don't have a word "impossible." Jim promptly points out that they do. (Jamaicans speak English and/or the English-based Jamaican Patois, so their word for impossible is simply "impossible.")
** They don't ''always'' [[spoiler:speak English, although their alternative gets most of its vocabulary from English]]óbut even in pure Jamaican Creole, you can say "impossible", just with multiple words (it's something along the lines of "no can do").

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* In ''TheOffice'', Michael claims that the Jamaicans don't have a word "impossible." Jim promptly points out that they do. (Jamaicans speak English and/or the English-based Jamaican Patois, so their word for impossible is simply "impossible.")
** They don't ''always'' [[spoiler:speak English, although their alternative gets most of its vocabulary from English]]óbut even in pure Jamaican Creole, you can say "impossible", just with multiple words (it's something along the lines of "no can do").
")



*** [[http://www.oocities.org/ripvanwormer/infernal.html Some website]] that may not base this on official sources has an interesting version of the LawfulEvil Infernal language(s) of the Baatezu (devils), presenting a fourfold hierarchy: ''Hellhound'' is mainly useful for barking orders. ''Baatezu'' or ''Infernal'' is deceptive and beguiling and it's impossible to tell the truth in it. It also contains a legal jargon that is, somehow, simultaneously binding and meaningless. (So good luck trying to come out ahead in that DealWithTheDevil.) ''Greater Baatezu'' or ''Malbaogni'' is even more exquisite and is used by lower Baatezu nobles, who probably use it with great skill but don't actually understand what they're saying, because that's only possible with knowledge of ''Mabrahoring'', the language of the highest Baatezu elite.
** There used to be a fan-made explanation on the web of the language of the Slaadi, the toad-like creatures embodying pure chaos. According to it, no-one had been able to study the language until a linguist got to study a human who had been raised by Slaadi and spoke the language. For a start, it was hard to even get this human to understand the concept of a common noun that applied to several different objects instead of just one. When communication was finally established, it turned out one of the reasons the Slaadi language was so weird was because Slaadi "individuals" didn't even exist in integer quantities other than when they interacted with other beings. [[MindScrew Obviously it's hard to even imagine what this would mean,]] but the most extreme creatures in the ''Planescape'' setting have always had a bit of an air of [[EldritchAbomination complete otherness]]. (By official sources, or at least 2nd edition ''Planewalker's Handbook'', Slaadi is just another no doubt weird language you can learn, but the language of the extremely orderly Modrons costs extra to learn for "being based on unique concepts".)
14th Mar '17 12:08:31 PM CaptainCrawdad
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* In ''TheOffice'', Michael claims that the Jamaicans don't have a word "impossible." Jim promptly points out that they do: [[spoiler: "impossible." [[DontExplainTheJoke Jamaicans speak English]].]]

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* In ''TheOffice'', Michael claims that the Jamaicans don't have a word "impossible." Jim promptly points out that they do: [[spoiler: do. (Jamaicans speak English and/or the English-based Jamaican Patois, so their word for impossible is simply "impossible." [[DontExplainTheJoke Jamaicans speak English]].]]")
14th Mar '17 11:59:02 AM CaptainCrawdad
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* Lampshaded in Creator/JohnWoo's ''Film/{{Broken Arrow|1996}}''. "I don't know what's scarier, losing nuclear weapons, or that it happens so often there's actually a ''term'' for it." This is TruthInTelevision, albeit a cheap joke relying upon [[OutsideJoke the logical fallacy]] that only things that exist have terms for them. We have words covering everything from an erroneous transportation of a nuclear weapon (Bent Spear), the loss in transit or damage incurred to a nuclear weapon (Broken Arrow), the confirmed theft of a nuclear weapon (EmptyQuiver), and incidents involving other nuclear power systems than weapons (Faded Giant). On the other hand we also have the term "nuclear winter" which happily we haven't yet experienced.
** The real danger that the absence of the term invokes is of the WhatCouldPossiblyGoWrong variety, that nobody thought up the term because no one [[DidntSeeThatComing anticipated]] it or planned for it, not necessarily that the concept is unthinkable.

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* Lampshaded in Creator/JohnWoo's ''Film/{{Broken Arrow|1996}}''. "I don't know what's scarier, losing nuclear weapons, or that it happens so often there's actually a ''term'' for it." This is TruthInTelevision, albeit a cheap joke relying upon [[OutsideJoke though the logical fallacy]] that only things that exist have terms for them. We have military has words covering everything from an erroneous transportation for lots of a nuclear weapon (Bent Spear), the loss in transit or damage incurred to a nuclear weapon (Broken Arrow), the confirmed theft of a nuclear weapon (EmptyQuiver), and incidents involving other nuclear power systems than weapons (Faded Giant). On the other hand we also have the term "nuclear winter" which happily we eventualities that haven't yet experienced.
** The real danger that the absence of the term invokes is of the WhatCouldPossiblyGoWrong variety, that nobody thought up the term because no one [[DidntSeeThatComing anticipated]] it or planned for it, not necessarily that the concept is unthinkable.
happened.
4th Feb '17 1:02:27 PM Scorntex
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Added DiffLines:

* ''Fanfic/RainbowDoubledashesLunaverse:'' Discussed in a story focusing on the dragons, who have problems here. Since dragon society is based mainly around greed and being the strongest, the dragon speaking to Cheerilee and Raindrops explains there are some terms he has to use Equestrian for, because the dragons just don't have the words.
4th Feb '17 1:28:45 AM Malachi108
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* Inverted in ''Series/DoctorWho'': in "A Good Man Goes to War", it is revealed that the Doctor has influenced many worlds indirectly throughout his travels. River Song claims that many languages, including Earth-based languages like English, have the word 'Doctor', meaning 'wise man' or 'healer', while some other worlds use the word 'Doctor' to mean 'warrior' or 'conqueror'. "We got that from you!" she proclaims at one point.

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* ''Series/DoctorWho'':
**
Inverted in ''Series/DoctorWho'': in "A Good Man Goes to War", where it is revealed that the Doctor has influenced many worlds indirectly throughout his travels. River Song claims that many languages, including Earth-based languages like English, have the word 'Doctor', meaning 'wise man' or 'healer', while some other worlds use the word 'Doctor' to mean 'warrior' or 'conqueror'. "We got that from you!" she proclaims at one point.point.
** In the same episode TheReveal is that the people of the Gamma Forest have no word for "pond", because the only water in their forest is the river.
7th Jan '17 9:00:22 AM nombretomado
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* Lampshaded in JohnWoo's ''[[Film/BrokenArrow1996 Broken Arrow]]''. "I don't know what's scarier, losing nuclear weapons, or that it happens so often there's actually a ''term'' for it." This is TruthInTelevision, albeit a cheap joke relying upon [[OutsideJoke the logical fallacy]] that only things that exist have terms for them. We have words covering everything from an erroneous transportation of a nuclear weapon (Bent Spear), the loss in transit or damage incurred to a nuclear weapon (Broken Arrow), the confirmed theft of a nuclear weapon (EmptyQuiver), and incidents involving other nuclear power systems than weapons (Faded Giant). On the other hand we also have the term "nuclear winter" which happily we haven't yet experienced.

to:

* Lampshaded in JohnWoo's ''[[Film/BrokenArrow1996 Broken Arrow]]''.Creator/JohnWoo's ''Film/{{Broken Arrow|1996}}''. "I don't know what's scarier, losing nuclear weapons, or that it happens so often there's actually a ''term'' for it." This is TruthInTelevision, albeit a cheap joke relying upon [[OutsideJoke the logical fallacy]] that only things that exist have terms for them. We have words covering everything from an erroneous transportation of a nuclear weapon (Bent Spear), the loss in transit or damage incurred to a nuclear weapon (Broken Arrow), the confirmed theft of a nuclear weapon (EmptyQuiver), and incidents involving other nuclear power systems than weapons (Faded Giant). On the other hand we also have the term "nuclear winter" which happily we haven't yet experienced.
28th Dec '16 9:47:37 AM StarSword
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** In the ''Series/StarTrekEnterprise'' pilot, Hoshi informs Captain Archer that the Klingons have no word for "Thank you", and that he "didn't want to know" the actual phrase he had taken for gratitude. ([[AsLongAsItSoundsForum This is a mistake by the episode's writers]]: ''The Klingon Dictionary'' actually does include a verb for "to thank", ''[=tlho'=]''.)

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** In the ''Series/StarTrekEnterprise'' pilot, Hoshi informs Captain Archer that the Klingons have no word for "Thank you", and that he "didn't want to know" the actual phrase he had taken for gratitude. ([[AsLongAsItSoundsForum ([[AsLongAsItSoundsForeign This is a mistake by the episode's writers]]: ''The Klingon Dictionary'' actually does include a verb for "to thank", ''[=tlho'=]''.)
28th Dec '16 9:46:51 AM StarSword
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** In the ''Series/StarTrekEnterprise'' pilot, Hoshi informs Captain Archer that the Klingons have no word for "Thank you", and that he "didn't want to know" the actual phrase he had taken for gratitude.

to:

** In the ''Series/StarTrekEnterprise'' pilot, Hoshi informs Captain Archer that the Klingons have no word for "Thank you", and that he "didn't want to know" the actual phrase he had taken for gratitude. ([[AsLongAsItSoundsForum This is a mistake by the episode's writers]]: ''The Klingon Dictionary'' actually does include a verb for "to thank", ''[=tlho'=]''.)
28th Dec '16 9:28:07 AM StarSword
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* Played with in ''Literature/{{Animorphs}}''. The Andalites use the same word for PlatonicLifePartners[=/=]HeterosexualLifePartners as for the [[NaturalWeapon lethally sharp bone blades on the end of their tails]]. It's not because they equate friends to weapons; rather, they regard a very good friend as one whom they would trust to put a tail-blade against their throat and not worry them.

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* Played with in ''Literature/{{Animorphs}}''. The Andalites use the same word word, ''shorm'', for PlatonicLifePartners[=/=]HeterosexualLifePartners as and for the [[NaturalWeapon lethally sharp bone blades on the end of their tails]]. It's not because they equate friends to weapons; rather, they regard a very good friend as one whom they would trust to put a tail-blade against their throat and not worry them.
28th Dec '16 9:19:05 AM StarSword
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** In ''Literature/OutboundFlight'', Commander Mitth'raw'nuruodo tells Jorj Car'das that he's known among his people, the Chiss, for ...[[MilitaryMaverick unusual tactics]]. The Chiss are {{Martial Pacifist}}s and isolationists; they ''never'' strike first. Thrawn does strike first, against peoples that he thinks are a great enough future danger to the Chiss, and against peoples who might never threaten the Chiss but who ''are'' threatening the weaker cultures just outside of Chiss space. Thrawn seems mildly surprised when Car'das tells him that he's talking about making preemptive strikes, which is a new phrase to him, and tells the human that it's good to know that he's not the only one to consider the morality of striking first.

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** In ''Literature/OutboundFlight'', Commander Mitth'raw'nuruodo tells Jorj Car'das that he's known among his people, the Chiss, for ...[[MilitaryMaverick unusual tactics]]. The Chiss are {{Martial Pacifist}}s and isolationists; they ''never'' strike first. Thrawn does strike first, against peoples that he thinks are a great enough future danger to the Chiss, and against peoples who might never threaten the Chiss but who ''are'' threatening the weaker cultures just outside of Chiss space. Thrawn seems mildly surprised when Car'das tells him that he's talking about making preemptive strikes, which is a new phrase to him, and tells the human that it's good to know that he's not the only one to consider the morality of striking first. (In ''Outbound Flight'''s sequel ''Survivor's Quest'', we learn that despite this, the Chiss military actually makes a veritable art form out of [[OutGambitted tricking the other guy into striking first]], suggesting Thrawn simply wanted to cut a lot of BS out of the process.)
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