History Main / KnightInShiningArmor

7th Feb '16 10:23:13 AM nombretomado
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* Frank Yerby's ''The Saracen Blade'' describes the hero's friend Gautier of Montrose as "a true knight" and specifically states he was "one of the few" who lived up to the best ideals of knighthood and did a bit to redeem [[TheCrusades the period]] from savagery.
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* Frank Yerby's ''The Saracen Blade'' describes the hero's friend Gautier of Montrose as "a true knight" and specifically states he was "one of the few" who lived up to the best ideals of knighthood and did a bit to redeem [[TheCrusades [[UsefulNotes/TheCrusades the period]] from savagery.
5th Feb '16 6:54:17 AM isoycrazy
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*** Michael Carpenter fits this trope to a T. Complete with kevlar-lined shining armour. He even met his wife by saving her from a fire-breathing dragon. While he is an idealist, he isn't dumb. He can work many things out in time and plan accordingly. Even though it pains him, when he gets a call, he will [[LovedINotHonoredMore depart from his family]], trusting Him to keep them safe.
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*** Michael Carpenter fits this trope to a T. Complete with kevlar-lined shining armour. He even met meets his wife by saving her from a fire-breathing dragon. While he is an idealist, he isn't dumb. He can work many things out in time and plan accordingly. Even though it pains him, when he gets a call, he will [[LovedINotHonoredMore [[LovedINotHonorMore depart from his family]], trusting Him to keep them safe.
5th Feb '16 6:47:18 AM isoycrazy
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Correcting the entry and adding some.
* ''Literature/TheDresdenFiles'': Michael Carpenter, the noble Knight of the Cross, fits this trope to a T. Complete with kevlar-lined shining armour. He even met his wife by saving her from a fire-breathing dragon. ** All Knights of the Cross are this; it's part of their job description. (Every Knight wields glowing, divinely empowered [[AncestralWeapon swords]]- if one ever lies or does anything sinful, his sword ceases to work, and has a chance of breaking.) The way they recruit new Knights is to go out and find someone who is this.
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* ''Literature/TheDresdenFiles'': ''Literature/TheDresdenFiles'': ** Harry Dresden, despite his continual disbelief at the concept, is a Wizard version of this. He isn't a firm believer in God, but holds to the "Tao of Peter Parker." He has great power and with it comes great responsibility. He will fight the monsters of the dark with all he has. While he will work with evil at times, he will never submit to it. He endures [[spoiler:a shadow of a Fallen Angel whispering in his ear for ''years'' when no shadow has taken at most days, or weeks to make the person fall]]. His good heart and stubborn determination [[spoiler:changes the shadow herself into something new, and should Harry had taken the coin at that point, would have been killed by the Fallen]]. ** The [[ThePaladin three Knights of the Cross]] are this too. Bearers of holy blades, each blade has one of the Nails that pierced Jesus Christ, and reflect one particular virtue, Hope, Faith, and Love, respectively. The Knights, male or female, are bound by His codes. Their jobs are not to kill the hosts of the Fallen Angels, but offer them redemption. Should they violate this, or break their word, harm an innocent, or other corruptible act, it threatens the very nature of the Sword and risks depowering it at best, or breaking it at worst. [[spoiler:That said, nothing is lost forever and there is always hope the Sword can be reforged at the right place and at the Right time]]. They do not recruit people, nor do they force them to serve for their lives. Many Knights have taken up the Sword to help with one Crisis and set them down, no consequences upon them. *** Michael Carpenter, the noble Knight of the Cross, Carpenter fits this trope to a T. Complete with kevlar-lined shining armour. He even met his wife by saving her from a fire-breathing dragon. ** All Knights dragon. While he is an idealist, he isn't dumb. He can work many things out in time and plan accordingly. Even though it pains him, when he gets a call, he will [[LovedINotHonoredMore depart from his family]], trusting Him to keep them safe. *** Sanya is the Atoning Knight in Shining Armor as he was once host to one of the Cross are this; it's part of their job description. (Every Knight Fallen, but a moral epiphany freed him from the demon's clutches. He wields glowing, divinely empowered [[AncestralWeapon swords]]- if one ever lies or does anything sinful, his sword ceases the Sword of Hope, bringing it to work, the world and has a chance of breaking.) The way they recruit new Knights is to go out and find someone who is this. helping save many people.
30th Jan '16 4:11:09 PM TheBigBopper
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That bit about the ransom is values dissonance, since back then it could be seen as both honorable AND reasonable. His reputation for honesty was the reason they paroled him in the first place, since a guy with a reputation for not paying his ransoms would be kept to rot in captivity.
* Geoffroi de Charny, who wrote the ''literal'' [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Book_of_Chivalry manual on chivalry]] was widely regarded in his day as a ''True and Perfect Knight''. Such was his valour and his belief in Chivalry, that he died at the [[UsefulNotes/TheHundredYearsWar Battle of Poitiers]] defending the Oriflamme to his [[LastStand last]]. ** Once he was captured by the English and in order to collect his ransom, the English ''let Charny go to collect it himself'', what did Charny do? Run away never paying the English a single coin? [[HonorBeforeReason No, he found someone and had them pay the Ransom in full]]!
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* Geoffroi de Charny, who literally wrote the ''literal'' [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Book_of_Chivalry manual on chivalry]] was widely regarded in his day as a ''True and Perfect Knight''. Such His reputation for honesty was his valour and his belief in Chivalry, such that when captured by the English, he was released on parole to collect his ransom and he found someone to pay it, true to his word. He died at in the 1356 [[UsefulNotes/TheHundredYearsWar Battle of Poitiers]] defending the sacred Oriflamme banner of France to his [[LastStand last]]. ** Once he last breath]]. * Enguerrand VII de Coucy had much the same stature as Charny in the later half of the 14th century. He was captured by given to the English as a hostage to secure the release of King Jean II, who had been captured in the battle of Poitiers, but King Edward III of England was so impressed with his courtesy and in order to collect character that he let him marry his ransom, the daughter Isabella. He later returned all his English ''let Charny go to collect it himself'', what did Charny do? Run away never paying lands and titles upon the English accession of Richard II. Coucy became the role model for a single coin? [[HonorBeforeReason No, he found someone whole generation of young French knights as an experienced campaigner and had them pay paragon of virtue. Finally in 1397, he was wounded and captured in the Ransom in full]]!Battle of Nicopolis against Ottoman Sultan Bayezid I, and died before he could be ransomed.
30th Jan '16 3:50:25 PM TheBigBopper
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using this content for analysis page
Evaluating the real life historical behavior of knights in comparison to this ideal is problematic and complicated to say the least. While there were many Medieval and Renaissance knights who were considered to be paragons of chivalry by their country or even internationally, very often AHeroToHisHometown would be in effect and opinions would depend on who you asked. To take some examples from UsefulNotes/TheHundredYearsWar, Theatre/HenryV of England is often held up as a patriotic hero for his bravery at Agincourt, but the fact that he ordered the execution of French prisoners in the middle of the battle and subsequently committed what might be called atrocities during the [[TheSiege siege of Rouen]] casts a darker light on him. You also might find that some French knights would have considered [[UsefulNotes/TheHouseOfPlantagenet Edward III and Edward the Black Prince]] to be [[WorthyOpponent worthy opponents]], but the French peasants whose lands they [[RapePillageAndBurn ravaged]] would have had a less charitable opinion of them. When such characters are cast as the good guys in a modern work they will often get a HistoricalHeroUpgrade that removes these morally grey aspects of their deeds. There is also a certain amount of ValuesDissonance because the modern popular understanding of chivalry prevalent since Victorian times is to some extent a distortion of what it meant in medieval times to the knights who practiced it. Today the word is usually associated with courtly manners, mercy and fair play in warfare, and protection of women and the weak, but we must not forget that first and foremost it was an ideal of behavior for aristocratic warriors meant to encourage military prowess. CourtlyLove for example, while genuinely important, was often described more as an incentive for a knight to try to distinguish himself in tournaments and warfare than as an end in and of itself. Modern readers of chivalric literature are often surprised at its sheer emphasis on the ability to kick ass and perform awesome feats, as opposed to the finer points of etiquette. In terms of warfare it was mainly concerned with relations between social equals, such as the rules for knights ransoming each other, and did not apply equally to common footmen or enemy noncombatants. Indeed, it was by no means as expansive as UsefulNotes/TheLawsAndCustomsOfWar, and in comparison was a loose set of guidelines for the warrior elite's martial ethic as opposed to some kind of law agreed to by international treaty. Therefore, the French felt justified in flying the ''Oriflamme'' banner signifying no quarter when the nation was threatened, and it was also considered more or less within the norms of warfare to [[LeaveNoSurvivors butcher the defenders]] of a town or castle who had refused a chance to surrender. Even within these surprisingly broad guidelines, there were many knights who were essentially unscrupulous [[PrivateMilitaryContractors mercenaries]] or criminals dignified by horse, armor, and a noble title. All this should not be taken to mean that there were no knights who even today could be seen as examples of good behavior or at least honor in battle, as the RealLife section hopes to show. Perhaps it is best to describe Chivlary as an ideal to which most knights aspired, at least publicly, and conformed to in varying degrees.
27th Jan '16 5:54:53 AM Gamermaster
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* ''Anime/MagicalGirlLyricalNanoha'': Female Example: [[LadyOfWar Signum]].
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* ''Anime/MagicalGirlLyricalNanoha'': ''Franchise/MagicalGirlLyricalNanoha'': Female Example: [[LadyOfWar Signum]].
24th Jan '16 6:15:02 PM Zennistrad
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The thirteenth Royal Knight has been revealed since this line was written.
* ''Franchise/{{Digimon}}'': There is a large group of Digimon called the "Royal Knights". As the name would suggest, they are a group of thirteen (not all of them have been revealed yet, but WordOfGod states that there are thirteen members) [[PowerLevels Mega-level]] Digimon who all resemble a cross between a classic Knight and a [[HumongousMecha mecha]]. They are supposedly a group of "good guys" who work for the [[WorldTree God of the Digital World]], but every one of their appearances so far has introduced them as antagonists of the KnightTemplar or [[BrainwashedAndCrazy brainwashed]] variety. They're not all-exclusive to the group, though. A few of them have been partners to human characters in the series: Tai and Matt's Omnimon, and Takato/Guilmon as Gallantmon are two good examples. These ones weren't actual members of the Royal Knights, though-- they were just the same "species".
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* ''Franchise/{{Digimon}}'': There is a large group of Digimon called the "Royal Knights". As the name would suggest, they are a group of thirteen (not all of them have been revealed yet, but WordOfGod states that there are thirteen members) [[PowerLevels Mega-level]] Digimon who all resemble a cross between a classic Knight and a [[HumongousMecha mecha]]. They are supposedly a group of "good guys" who work for the [[WorldTree God of the Digital World]], but every one of their appearances so far has introduced them as antagonists of the KnightTemplar or [[BrainwashedAndCrazy brainwashed]] variety. They're not all-exclusive to the group, though. A few of them have been partners to human characters in the series: Tai and Matt's Omnimon, and Takato/Guilmon as Gallantmon are two good examples. These ones weren't actual members of the Royal Knights, though-- they were just the same "species".
9th Jan '16 1:28:13 PM Vios
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Added DiffLines:
* In ''VideoGame/GemsOfWar'', the Whitehelm region has a piety-and-honour theme to it, meaning that its units tend to fit this archetype (i.e. being good-aligned religious crusaders).
7th Jan '16 10:30:46 AM TheBigBopper
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Added DiffLines:
'''Before adding examples, remember that--despite the name--this trope doesn't necessarily have anything to do with a character's armor or its color. A well-behaved knight in black armor or even no armor could still qualify, and a character who just wears shiny armor without behaving in a heroic manner is not an example.'''
6th Jan '16 9:29:00 PM nombretomado
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ZCE
* ''SoulSeries'':
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* ''SoulSeries'': %%* ''VideoGame/SoulSeries'':
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