History Main / KnightInShiningArmor

12th Sep '16 3:20:12 PM margdean56
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* [[UsefulNotes/PatronSaints Joan]] [[UsefulNotes/JoanOfArc of Arc]]. Although she was never technically a knight, she ''did'' wear knight armor into battle, and lived with a honor worthy of a the title.

to:

* [[UsefulNotes/PatronSaints Joan]] [[UsefulNotes/JoanOfArc of Arc]]. Although she was never technically a knight, she ''did'' wear knight armor into battle, and lived with a an honor worthy of a the title.
12th Sep '16 3:16:43 PM margdean56
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Sir Mandorallen from David Eddings's ''[[Literature/TheBelgariad Belgariad]]'' saga (and its sequel, the ''Malloreon'' saga) is a textbook example of the Knight in Shining Armor; he embodies this trope, both outwardly and inwardly. Complete with a tragic chivalric love-from-afar affair. Eddings lampshaded the heck out of the trope, though: Mandorallen is heroic, brave and fearless, unbeaten in combat, honorable, truthful, and so on and so on. The first time in his life that he suddenly felt real fear (when he faced a magical opponent that he couldn't defeat) let to a kind of nervous breakdown, a self-doubt of epic proportions during which Mandorallen developed phobophobia, a paralyzing fear of being afraid. He eventually got over it, with the help of his friends. The other characters routinely tended to poke gentle fun of Mandorallen's utter dedication to chivalry. People who met him for the first time kept asking "Is this guy for real?" and "Did he really just charge the enemy? He's going to die!" - "No he isn't. He's Mandorallen." Everything you need to know about Mandorallen is summed up in this exchange from ''Castle of Wizardry'', wherein Mandorallen is escorting the Rivan Queen out to the center of a field to address over fifty thousand heavily-armed, potentially hostile soldiers during a ''very'' tense diplomatic stand-off. It's important to note that Mandorallen is speaking here with ''absolutely no irony whatsoever'':

to:

* Sir Mandorallen from David Eddings's ''[[Literature/TheBelgariad Belgariad]]'' saga (and its sequel, the ''Malloreon'' saga) is a textbook example of the Knight in Shining Armor; he embodies this trope, both outwardly and inwardly. Complete with a tragic chivalric love-from-afar affair. Eddings lampshaded the heck out of the trope, though: Mandorallen is heroic, brave and fearless, unbeaten in combat, honorable, truthful, and so on and so on. The first time in his life that he suddenly felt real fear (when he faced a magical opponent that he couldn't defeat) let to a kind of nervous breakdown, a self-doubt of epic proportions during which Mandorallen developed phobophobia, a paralyzing fear of being afraid. He eventually got over it, with the help of his friends. The other characters routinely tended to poke gentle fun of Mandorallen's utter dedication to chivalry. People who met him for the first time kept asking "Is this guy for real?" and "Did he really just charge the enemy? He's going to die!" - -- "No he isn't. He's Mandorallen." Everything you need to know about Mandorallen is summed up in this exchange from ''Castle of Wizardry'', wherein Mandorallen is escorting the Rivan Queen out to the center of a field to address over fifty thousand heavily-armed, potentially hostile soldiers during a ''very'' tense diplomatic stand-off. It's important to note that Mandorallen is speaking here with ''absolutely no irony whatsoever'':



* ''Literature/AConnecticutYankeeInKingArthursCourt'': was written as a scathing TakeThat at this trope (among other things), portraying the knights as little more than wandering bullies who picked fights with each other for no reason. The tales of their heroic deeds are entirely fabricated (and absurd on their faces, leading the main character to marvel at how nobody picks up on the Antarctica-level FridgeLogic), and the story features a lengthy description of how uncomfortable the main character is when he is put in his own shiny armor to go on his own quest. And still, in some of the final chapters, in which Camelot falls apart all around, the admirable knighly Lancelot of the origial Arthurian canon several times visibly breakes through Twain's cynicism.

to:

* ''Literature/AConnecticutYankeeInKingArthursCourt'': was written as a scathing TakeThat at this trope (among other things), portraying the knights as little more than wandering bullies who picked fights with each other for no reason. The tales of their heroic deeds are entirely fabricated (and absurd on their faces, leading the main character to marvel at how nobody picks up on the Antarctica-level FridgeLogic), and the story features a lengthy description of how uncomfortable the main character is when he is put in his own shiny armor to go on his own quest. And still, in some of the final chapters, in which Camelot falls apart all around, the admirable knighly knightly Lancelot of the origial Arthurian canon several times visibly breakes breaks through Twain's cynicism.



* In ''Literature/TheGuardians'', Hugh was a medieval knight sincerely striving towards honor and chivalry when he met Lilith. She taunts his naivete by nicknaming him "Sir Pup". He was rewarded for his life of honesty with the [[PersonalityPowers Gift]] of lie detection.

to:

* In ''Literature/TheGuardians'', Hugh was a medieval knight sincerely striving towards honor and chivalry when he met Lilith. She taunts his naivete naiveté by nicknaming him "Sir Pup". He was rewarded for his life of honesty with the [[PersonalityPowers Gift]] of lie detection.



* ''The Knight in Rusty Armor'': The Knight is this twenty four hours a day. [[spoiler: [[SubvertedTrope Subverted]] as he only does this because he'll be appreciated by others for it. Indeed, the armor is also a metaphor for hiding one's TrueSelf, and when he sheds it, so he does this trope]].

to:

* ''The Knight in Rusty Armor'': The Knight is this twenty four twenty-four hours a day. [[spoiler: [[SubvertedTrope Subverted]] as he only does this because he'll be appreciated by others for it. Indeed, the armor is also a metaphor for hiding one's TrueSelf, and when he sheds it, so he does this trope]].



* Despite what many would think, [[KingArthur King Arthur and his Knights of the Round Table]] weren't perfect examples of knighthood. In ''Literature/LeMorteDarthur'', written by Thomas Mallory (who may have been this trope's complete opposite), they all had glaring flaws: Arthur had an early NiceJobBreakingItHerod moment and later [[spoiler: is struck down by Mordred]] because he was too enraged to heed a prophetic dream; the wise mentor Merlin was a DirtyOldMan and met his doom because of it; Gawain, while on the Quest for the Sangreal (Holy Grail), refused to do penance and was rebuked by hermits and disembodied voices alike for his homicidal ways; the great Lancelot was an adulterer and failed in the Sangreal Quest due to his unstable virtue. Indeed, the Sangreal Quest itself shows, and was meant to show, how all these noble knights, great in the world, fell short spiritually. The only knight allowed to achieve the Sangreal was [[IncorruptiblePurePureness Galahad]], who exemplified the knightly ideal.

to:

* Despite what many would think, [[KingArthur King Arthur and his Knights of the Round Table]] weren't perfect examples of knighthood. In ''Literature/LeMorteDarthur'', written by Thomas Mallory Malory (who may have been this trope's complete opposite), they all had glaring flaws: Arthur had an early NiceJobBreakingItHerod moment and later [[spoiler: is struck down by Mordred]] because he was too enraged to heed a prophetic dream; the wise mentor Merlin was a DirtyOldMan and met his doom because of it; Gawain, while on the Quest for the Sangreal (Holy Grail), refused to do penance and was rebuked by hermits and disembodied voices alike for his homicidal ways; the great Lancelot was an adulterer and failed in the Sangreal Quest due to his unstable virtue. Indeed, the Sangreal Quest itself shows, and was meant to show, how all these noble knights, great in the world, fell short spiritually. The only knight allowed to achieve the Sangreal was [[IncorruptiblePurePureness Galahad]], who exemplified the knightly ideal.



* In ''The Last Hero'', one of the earlier novels (1931) of Literature/TheSaint, Simon Templar takes backstage to his gallant and tragic associate Norman Kent, who falls in love hopelessly with Templar's girlfriend Patricia Holm (who hardly notices him) and at the end of the book sacrifices his life to let Templar and his other comrades-in-arms escape the current villain and fight again another day. A book called "Knights Errant of the Nineeteenth and Early Twentieth Centuries" by Caroline Whitehead and George [=McLeod=] says it all: "Norman Kent is an archetypal knight-errant. Though formally a man of 20th Century England, he lives (and dies) by the Code of Chivalry. He loves totally his Lady, Patricia Holm - who, like Don Quixote's Dulcinea, is not aware of that love. He is totally loyal to his Liege Lord, Simon Templar. Like Sir Gawain in "Sir Gawain and the Green Knight", Norman Kent takes on the threats to his Lord. Not only physicial threats to life and limb, but also the sometimes inavoidable need to take dishourable acts which would have reflected badly on the reputation of King Arthur/Simon Templar is taken on, wholly and without reservation, by Sir Gawain/Norman Kent."

to:

* In ''The Last Hero'', one of the earlier novels (1931) of Literature/TheSaint, Simon Templar takes backstage a back seat to his gallant and tragic associate Norman Kent, who falls in love hopelessly with Templar's girlfriend Patricia Holm (who hardly notices him) and at the end of the book sacrifices his life to let Templar and his other comrades-in-arms escape the current villain and fight again another day. A book called "Knights Errant of the Nineeteenth Nineteenth and Early Twentieth Centuries" by Caroline Whitehead and George [=McLeod=] says it all: "Norman Kent is an archetypal knight-errant. Though formally a man of 20th Century England, he lives (and dies) by the Code of Chivalry. He loves totally his Lady, Patricia Holm - -- who, like Don Quixote's Dulcinea, is not aware of that love. He is totally loyal to his Liege Lord, Simon Templar. Like Sir Gawain in "Sir Gawain and the Green Knight", Norman Kent takes on the threats to his Lord. Not only physicial threats to life and limb, but also the sometimes inavoidable need to take dishourable on dishonourable acts which would have reflected badly on the reputation of King Arthur/Simon Templar is taken on, wholly and without reservation, by Sir Gawain/Norman Kent."



* There are occasional references to upstanding men as this trope in the ''Literature/AuntDimity'' series, especially when they demonstrate their goodness openly. Also, among Lori and Bill's wedding gifts is a portrait of Bill on horseback and wearing armour—and his glasses.

to:

* There are occasional references to upstanding men as this trope in the ''Literature/AuntDimity'' series, especially when they demonstrate their goodness openly. Also, among Lori and Bill's wedding gifts is a portrait of Bill on horseback and wearing armour—and armour--and his glasses.



* In Creator/JohnCWright's ''[[Literature/CountToTheEschaton The Hermetic Millennia]]'', Knights Hospitalliar are frozen to wake when the Tombs need protection.

to:

* In Creator/JohnCWright's ''[[Literature/CountToTheEschaton The Hermetic Millennia]]'', Knights Hospitalliar Hospitallar are frozen to wake when the Tombs need protection.



* In Creator/RobertAHeinlein's ''Literature/HaveSpaceSuitWillTravel'', Kip has a dream featuring knights in shining space armor (and dragons and Arcutarian maidens among its tamer elements). Afterward, he insists on preceding Peewee out of the cell like a proper knight, and after a failure regards himself as not a knight but a soda jerk.

to:

* In Creator/RobertAHeinlein's ''Literature/HaveSpaceSuitWillTravel'', Kip has a dream featuring knights in shining space armor (and dragons and Arcutarian Arcturian maidens among its tamer elements). Afterward, he insists on preceding Peewee out of the cell like a proper knight, and after a failure regards himself as not a knight but a soda jerk.
12th Sep '16 2:55:46 PM margdean56
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Historical knights were first and foremost professional soldiers. They usually were of BlueBlood - or, if commoner-born, founders of a new noble family. Their ''modus operandi'' was lance-armed heavy cavalry, which [[AttackAttackAttack charged the enemy in full gallop on closed ranks]]. They often were used dismounted as well, when they fought as heavy infantry, usually armed with [[BladeOnAStick enormous can-openers]] such as pollaxes or [[UsefulNotes/EuropeanSwordsmanship two-handed swords]].

to:

Historical knights were first and foremost professional soldiers. They usually were of BlueBlood - -- or, if commoner-born, founders of a new noble family. Their ''modus operandi'' was lance-armed heavy cavalry, which [[AttackAttackAttack charged the enemy in full gallop on closed ranks]]. They often were used dismounted as well, when they fought as heavy infantry, usually armed with [[BladeOnAStick enormous can-openers]] such as pollaxes poleaxes or [[UsefulNotes/EuropeanSwordsmanship two-handed swords]].



An OfficerAndAGentleman is the modern verion of this trope - ''very'' often even their direct genetic descendants as old [[BlueBlood noble families]] are ''grossly'' over-represented in all military academies around the world. With the notable exception of United States, of course.

to:

An OfficerAndAGentleman is the modern verion of this trope - -- ''very'' often even their direct genetic descendants as old [[BlueBlood noble families]] are ''grossly'' over-represented in all military academies around the world. With the notable exception of United States, of course.
9th Sep '16 2:52:47 PM Greenygal
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Other more literal knights include the second Magna Defender of ''Series/PowerRangersLostGalaxy'' (the original was a BlackKnight) and Sentinel Knight of ''Series/PowerRangersOperationOverdrive.'' Robo Knight of ''Series/PowerRangersMegaforce'' was intended to be one, but programming flaws lead him to focus strictly on eliminating threats and not consider things like civilian safety, though he's getting better.

to:

** Other more literal knights include the second Magna Defender of ''Series/PowerRangersLostGalaxy'' (the original was a BlackKnight) and BlackKnight), Sentinel Knight of ''Series/PowerRangersOperationOverdrive.'' ''Series/PowerRangersOperationOverdrive'', and Sir Ivan of ''Series/PowerRangersDinoCharge''. Robo Knight of ''Series/PowerRangersMegaforce'' was intended to be one, but programming flaws lead him to focus strictly on eliminating threats and not consider things like civilian safety, though he's getting better.
21st Aug '16 5:56:50 PM thatmadork
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** {{Averted|Trope}} and {{Deconstructed|Trope}} by practically every other knight you'll encounter in the series. Most knights in Westeros are just heavily armoured thugs who got to where they are because of politics, and even the "good" knights like the ones listed are quite morally dubious.
20th Aug '16 5:24:15 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Sturm Brightblade of the ''{{Dragonlance}}'' D&D saga is the epitome of this trope played straight [[spoiler:except for not actually being a knight until shortly before his death]]. His fellow Knights of Solamnia are not quite so ideal but, with a couple of (important) exceptions, are generally good.

to:

** Sturm Brightblade of the ''{{Dragonlance}}'' ''Literature/{{Dragonlance}}'' D&D saga is the epitome of this trope played straight [[spoiler:except for not actually being a knight until shortly before his death]]. His fellow Knights of Solamnia are not quite so ideal but, with a couple of (important) exceptions, are generally good.
15th Jul '16 4:44:37 AM AtaulfVII
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* [[UsefulNotes/PatronSaints Joan]] [[UsefulNotes/JoanOfArc of Arc]]. Although she was never technically a knight, she ''did'' were knight armor into battle, and lived with a honor worthy of a the title.

to:

* [[UsefulNotes/PatronSaints Joan]] [[UsefulNotes/JoanOfArc of Arc]]. Although she was never technically a knight, she ''did'' were wear knight armor into battle, and lived with a honor worthy of a the title.
14th Jul '16 8:30:48 PM kithas
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* [[UsefulNotes/PatronSaints Joan]] [[UsefulNotes/JoanOfArc of Arc]]. Although she was never technically a knight, she ''did'' where knight armor into battle, and lived with a honor worthy of a the title.

to:

* [[UsefulNotes/PatronSaints Joan]] [[UsefulNotes/JoanOfArc of Arc]]. Although she was never technically a knight, she ''did'' where were knight armor into battle, and lived with a honor worthy of a the title.
13th Jul '16 8:45:10 PM Warmachine3974
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Played Straight with Ser Barristan Selmy, the last of the old guard Kingsguard, who is essentially everything a knight is supposed to be.

to:

** Played Straight with Ser Barristan Selmy, the last of the old guard Kingsguard, who is essentially everything a knight is supposed to be. Also played straight with Ser Addam Marbrand, who's an extremely capable warrior and commander, and thouroughly honorable. Somehow, he manages to pull off this trope ''[[TokenGoodTeammate despite]]'' being an officer in service to the ''Lannisters''.
7th Jul '16 10:30:08 AM Willbyr
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''RecordOfLodossWar'', Due to its ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' roots, plays this archetype straight.

to:

* ''RecordOfLodossWar'', ''Roleplay/RecordOfLodossWar'', Due to its ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' roots, plays this archetype straight.
This list shows the last 10 events of 177. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.KnightInShiningArmor