History Main / JidaiGeki

17th May '18 3:42:50 PM MCanter89
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These works are set before (or around the beginning of) the UsefulNotes/MeijiRestoration when the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shogun Shogunate]] was deposed. The time subdivisions most often found in Japanese media include the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sengoku_period Sengoku Period]] (or "Warring States", an era of civil war from about 1467-1573), the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edo_period Edo Period]] (after Japan was united under the Tokugawa shogunate, 1603-1868),[[note]]For the curious, the 30 years in between those two is called the Azuchi-Momoyama Period; important in history, not so much in media.[[/note]] and the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Late_Tokugawa_shogunate Bakumatsu/early Meiji Period]] (1853-1868, the part of the Edo Period leading into the Meiji Period, 1868-1912).

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These works are set before (or around the beginning of) the UsefulNotes/MeijiRestoration when the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shogun Shogunate]] was deposed. The time subdivisions most often found in Japanese media include the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sengoku_period Sengoku Period]] (or "Warring States", an era of civil war from about 1467-1573), 1467 to 1573), the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edo_period Edo Period]] (after Japan was united under the Tokugawa shogunate, 1603-1868),[[note]]For 1603–1868),[[note]]For the curious, the 30 years in between those two is called the Azuchi-Momoyama Period; important in history, not so much in media.[[/note]] and the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Late_Tokugawa_shogunate Bakumatsu/early Meiji Period]] (1853-1868, (1853–1868, the part of the Edo Period leading into the Meiji Period, 1868-1912).1868–1912).



Also, while it may seem American and European directors have been borrowing (or, depending on your [=POV=], appropriating) these conventions -- sometimes whole ''plots'' -- for years, Jidai Geki pieces have long borrowed in equal measure from {{Western}}s and FilmNoir. Creator/AkiraKurosawa himself was known to be a fan of director Creator/JohnFord. Creator/GeorgeLucas took some inspiration from this cross-pollination while writing ''Franchise/StarWars'' -- guess where he got the word "Jedi". Even before that, jidaigeki borrowed and took inspiration from American films, like ''Film/StellaDallas'' (a popular melodrama in Japan), and also from European drama such as Creator/HenrikIbsen and Creator/LeoTolstoy. Kurosawa likewise also won fame for his transpositions of Creator/WilliamShakespeare to feudal Japan.

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Also, while it may seem American and European directors have been borrowing (or, depending on your [=POV=], POV, appropriating) these conventions -- sometimes whole ''plots'' -- for years, Jidai Geki pieces have long borrowed in equal measure from {{Western}}s and FilmNoir. Creator/AkiraKurosawa himself was known to be a fan of director Creator/JohnFord. Creator/GeorgeLucas took some inspiration from this cross-pollination while writing ''Franchise/StarWars'' -- guess where he got the word "Jedi". Even before that, jidaigeki borrowed and took inspiration from American films, like ''Film/StellaDallas'' (a popular melodrama in Japan), and also from European drama such as Creator/HenrikIbsen and Creator/LeoTolstoy. Kurosawa likewise also won fame for his transpositions of Creator/WilliamShakespeare to feudal Japan.



* '''Heian Period (794-1185)'''[[note]]court nobles writing poetry, crying at the slightest pull of the heartstrings, and scheming to get into the beds of other court nobles' wives; noblewomen *also* writing poetry (or the earliest novels) and wearing GorgeousPeriodDress consisting of twelve-layered kimono; and the random peasant, such as your typical [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Tale_of_the_Bamboo_Cutter humble woodcutter]][[/note]]

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* '''Heian Period (794-1185)'''[[note]]court (794–1185)'''[[note]]court nobles writing poetry, crying at the slightest pull of the heartstrings, and scheming to get into the beds of other court nobles' wives; noblewomen *also* writing poetry (or the earliest novels) and wearing GorgeousPeriodDress consisting of twelve-layered kimono; and the random peasant, such as your typical [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Tale_of_the_Bamboo_Cutter humble woodcutter]][[/note]]



* '''Genpei War (1180-1185)''':[[note]]This is a pretty peculiar setting, because while most Jidai Geki media are set in Sengoku and Tokugawa eras (with a large and influential minority being set in late Edo/early Meiji Periods), when the Samurai class and its influence and customs were long established, Genpei War took place in the 12th century late-Heian era, that is, the High Middle Ages, when samurai were only a nascent community, widely derided as coarse and uncouth by the [[UpperClassTwit sophisticated court aristocrats]]. Works set in this period are usually to describe a rise to power by the samurai class and the societal change it brought.[[/note]]

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* '''Genpei War (1180-1185)''':[[note]]This (1180–1185)''':[[note]]This is a pretty peculiar setting, because while most Jidai Geki media are set in Sengoku and Tokugawa eras (with a large and influential minority being set in late Edo/early Meiji Periods), when the Samurai class and its influence and customs were long established, Genpei War took place in the 12th century late-Heian era, that is, the High Middle Ages, when samurai were only a nascent community, widely derided as coarse and uncouth by the [[UpperClassTwit sophisticated court aristocrats]]. Works set in this period are usually to describe a rise to power by the samurai class and the societal change it brought.[[/note]]



* '''Kamakura and Muromachi Periods (1185-1573)''':

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* '''Kamakura and Muromachi Periods (1185-1573)''':(1185–1573)''':



* '''Edo Period (1603-1868)''':

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* '''Edo Period (1603-1868)''':(1603–1868)''':



* '''Bakumatsu Period (1853-1868)''':

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* '''Bakumatsu Period (1853-1868)''':(1853–1868)''':



[[folder:Kamakura and Muromachi Periods (1185-1573)]]

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[[folder:Kamakura and Muromachi Periods (1185-1573)]](1185–1573)]]



* ''Franchise/{{Zatoichi}}''. [[Film/{{Zatoichi2003}} The 2003 version]], in particular, is set at the tail end of the period (if the presence of a civil-war era revolver is any indication).

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* ''Franchise/{{Zatoichi}}''. [[Film/{{Zatoichi2003}} The 2003 version]], in particular, is set at the tail end of the period (if the presence of a civil-war era civil war–era revolver is any indication).






26th Apr '18 4:41:41 AM AerialQueen
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** Abe no Seimei

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** Abe no SeimeiUsefulNotes/AbeNoSeimei
22nd Apr '18 5:58:06 AM Anduryen
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* ''Anime/MissHokusai'': Follows the life of Hokusai's daughter.


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* ''Anime/MissHokusai'': Follows the life of Hokusai's daughter.
20th Jan '18 6:27:50 AM UmbrellasWereAwesome
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* ''Anime/PrincessMononoke''
12th Jan '18 9:51:57 AM Winter
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* ''VideoGame/{{Toukiden}}‎'' has "Ages" loosely corresponding to periods of Japanese history.

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* ''VideoGame/{{Toukiden}}‎'' has "Ages" loosely corresponding to periods of Japanese history.history from its legendary beginnings to the Meiji era. ''Toukiden 2'' explicitly establishes the Awakening takes place in the Meiji period, with Western-style houses and ships in Yokohama before it's destroyed in the game's opening sequence.
29th Dec '17 2:33:49 AM TheBigBopper
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Jidai Geki can be idealized or realistic, operate as rigorous HistoricalFiction that [[ShownTheirWork show their work]]. It can also be like the American [[TheWestern Western]], [[SoapOpera soapy drama]] or hardass action, and feature a rich cast of [[CharactersAsDevice character tropes]]. Jidai Geki that emphasize swordplay are often referred to as ''chanbara'', especially the live-action movies, and counted on for lots of hot {{Samurai}} action ({{Ninja}}, {{Ronin}}, and {{Yakuza}} are also frequent players)[[note]]Although it's also been said that if a critic likes a particular film, it's ''jidai geki'', and if they don't, it's ''chanbara''.[[/note]]. Given the fact that there are plenty of Edo-era buildings in Japan still standing, and that Edo-era costumes are dime-a-dozen, [[PropRecycling that period appeals a lot to Japanese TV producers]]. Compare and contrast the sheer amount of BBC costume dramas set in the Victorian age, or the innumerable Chinese films and series set in the Qing dynasty.

Among western audiences, the most notable jidaigeki tend to feature Samurai, and from this some have hypothesized that jidaigeki films refer to Samurai films in particular. This is an exaggeration. Jidaigeki basically means historical settings or something set in the past, and does not by itself concern samurai or ronin by default. A number of jidaigeki exist that focus on women, on painters, actors, and even burakamin (the lower-caste Japanese underbelly who are the ancestors to TheYakuza). In the classical era of Japanese cinema, jidaigeki was the most prestigious and serious genre.

Likewise, while it may seem American and European directors have been borrowing (or, depending on your [=POV=], appropriating) these conventions -- sometimes whole ''plots'' -- for years, Jidai Geki pieces have long borrowed in equal measure from {{Western}}s and FilmNoir. Creator/AkiraKurosawa himself was known to be a fan of director Creator/JohnFord. Creator/GeorgeLucas took some inspiration from this cross-pollination while writing ''Franchise/StarWars'' -- guess where he got the word "Jedi". Even before that, jidaigeki borrowed and took inspiration from American films, like ''Film/StellaDallas'' (a popular melodrama in Japan), and also from European drama such as Creator/HenrikIbsen and Creator/LeoTolstoy. Kurosawa likewise also won fame for his transpositions of Creator/WilliamShakespeare to feudal Japan.

to:

Jidai Geki can be idealized or realistic, operate as rigorous HistoricalFiction that [[ShownTheirWork show their work]]. It can also be like the American [[TheWestern Western]], [[SoapOpera soapy drama]] or hardass action, and feature a rich cast of [[CharactersAsDevice character tropes]]. Jidai Geki that emphasize swordplay are often referred to as ''chanbara'', especially the live-action movies, and counted on for lots of hot {{Samurai}} action ({{Ninja}}, {{Ronin}}, and {{Yakuza}} are also frequent players)[[note]]Although it's also been said that if a critic likes a particular film, it's ''jidai geki'', and if they don't, it's ''chanbara''.[[/note]]. Given the fact that there are plenty of Edo-era buildings in Japan still standing, and that Edo-era costumes are dime-a-dozen, [[PropRecycling that period appeals a lot to Japanese TV producers]]. Compare and contrast the sheer amount number of BBC costume dramas set in the Victorian age, era, or the innumerable Chinese films and series set in during the Qing dynasty.

Among western audiences, the The jidaigeki films considered most notable jidaigeki by Western audiences tend to feature Samurai, and from this some have hypothesized they tend to assume that the term jidaigeki films refer refers to Samurai films in particular. This is an exaggeration. Jidaigeki basically means historical settings or something set in the past, and does not by itself concern samurai or ronin by default. A number of jidaigeki exist that focus on women, on painters, actors, and even burakamin (the lower-caste Japanese underbelly who are the ancestors to TheYakuza). In the classical era of Japanese cinema, jidaigeki was the most prestigious and serious genre.

Likewise, Also, while it may seem American and European directors have been borrowing (or, depending on your [=POV=], appropriating) these conventions -- sometimes whole ''plots'' -- for years, Jidai Geki pieces have long borrowed in equal measure from {{Western}}s and FilmNoir. Creator/AkiraKurosawa himself was known to be a fan of director Creator/JohnFord. Creator/GeorgeLucas took some inspiration from this cross-pollination while writing ''Franchise/StarWars'' -- guess where he got the word "Jedi". Even before that, jidaigeki borrowed and took inspiration from American films, like ''Film/StellaDallas'' (a popular melodrama in Japan), and also from European drama such as Creator/HenrikIbsen and Creator/LeoTolstoy. Kurosawa likewise also won fame for his transpositions of Creator/WilliamShakespeare to feudal Japan.
15th Oct '17 1:21:01 PM jamespolk
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15th Oct '17 7:30:01 AM jamespolk
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* ''Film/TheGhostOfYotsuya'' -- based on a famous kabuki play written in 1825, during the Edo period
5th Oct '17 9:33:29 AM Fuyumoto
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* ''[[VideoGame/{{Onmyoji}} Onmyōji]]'' is an interesting case. Considering it is a Sino-Japanese game, it is guilty of both this ''and'' HollywoodMedievalJapan.

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* ''[[VideoGame/{{Onmyoji}} Onmyōji]]'' is an interesting case. Considering it is Being a Sino-Japanese game, it is guilty of both this ''and'' HollywoodMedievalJapan.
4th Oct '17 11:47:42 AM JulianLapostat
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Jidai Geki is a genre of {{Period Piece}}s found in JapaneseMedia.

to:

Jidai Geki is a genre of HistoricalFiction and {{Period Piece}}s found in JapaneseMedia.



Jidai Geki, like the American [[TheWestern Western]], can be idealized or realistic, [[SoapOpera soapy drama]] or hardass action, and feature a rich cast of [[CharactersAsDevice character tropes]]. Jidai Geki that emphasize swordplay are often referred to as ''chanbara'', especially the live-action movies, and counted on for lots of hot {{Samurai}} action ({{Ninja}}, {{Ronin}}, and {{Yakuza}} are also frequent players)[[note]]Although it's also been said that if a critic likes a particular film, it's ''jidai geki'', and if they don't, it's ''chanbara''.[[/note]]. Given the fact that there are plenty of Edo-era buildings in Japan still standing, and that Edo-era costumes are dime-a-dozen, [[PropRecycling that period appeals a lot to Japanese TV producers]]. Compare and contrast the sheer amount of BBC costume dramas set in the Victorian age, or the innumerable Chinese films and series set in the Qing dynasty.

Though it may seem American and European directors have been borrowing (or, depending on your [=POV=], stealing) these conventions -- sometimes whole ''plots'' -- for years, Jidai Geki pieces have long borrowed in equal measure from {{Western}}s and FilmNoir. Creator/AkiraKurosawa himself was known to be a fan of director Creator/JohnFord. Creator/GeorgeLucas took some inspiration from this cross-pollination while writing ''Franchise/StarWars'' -- guess where he got the word "Jedi".

to:

Jidai Geki, like the American [[TheWestern Western]], Geki can be idealized or realistic, operate as rigorous HistoricalFiction that [[ShownTheirWork show their work]]. It can also be like the American [[TheWestern Western]], [[SoapOpera soapy drama]] or hardass action, and feature a rich cast of [[CharactersAsDevice character tropes]]. Jidai Geki that emphasize swordplay are often referred to as ''chanbara'', especially the live-action movies, and counted on for lots of hot {{Samurai}} action ({{Ninja}}, {{Ronin}}, and {{Yakuza}} are also frequent players)[[note]]Although it's also been said that if a critic likes a particular film, it's ''jidai geki'', and if they don't, it's ''chanbara''.[[/note]]. Given the fact that there are plenty of Edo-era buildings in Japan still standing, and that Edo-era costumes are dime-a-dozen, [[PropRecycling that period appeals a lot to Japanese TV producers]]. Compare and contrast the sheer amount of BBC costume dramas set in the Victorian age, or the innumerable Chinese films and series set in the Qing dynasty.

Though Among western audiences, the most notable jidaigeki tend to feature Samurai, and from this some have hypothesized that jidaigeki films refer to Samurai films in particular. This is an exaggeration. Jidaigeki basically means historical settings or something set in the past, and does not by itself concern samurai or ronin by default. A number of jidaigeki exist that focus on women, on painters, actors, and even burakamin (the lower-caste Japanese underbelly who are the ancestors to TheYakuza). In the classical era of Japanese cinema, jidaigeki was the most prestigious and serious genre.

Likewise, while
it may seem American and European directors have been borrowing (or, depending on your [=POV=], stealing) appropriating) these conventions -- sometimes whole ''plots'' -- for years, Jidai Geki pieces have long borrowed in equal measure from {{Western}}s and FilmNoir. Creator/AkiraKurosawa himself was known to be a fan of director Creator/JohnFord. Creator/GeorgeLucas took some inspiration from this cross-pollination while writing ''Franchise/StarWars'' -- guess where he got the word "Jedi".
"Jedi". Even before that, jidaigeki borrowed and took inspiration from American films, like ''Film/StellaDallas'' (a popular melodrama in Japan), and also from European drama such as Creator/HenrikIbsen and Creator/LeoTolstoy. Kurosawa likewise also won fame for his transpositions of Creator/WilliamShakespeare to feudal Japan.
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