History Main / InstantExpert

9th Nov '17 3:36:26 PM FordPrefect
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* Justified in ''Film/TheMatrix'', where all humans spend most of their lives plugged into a computer network through which they receive simulated experiences ''anyway'' -- their {{Unusual User Interface}}s can also act as {{Upgrade Artifact}}s, making it a trivial matter to have a full training regimen for anything from martial arts to piloting written directly into your brain in a matter of seconds. Whether this carries over to the real world is up in the air, though the series' only real-world fight scene ''is'' considerably less flashy than all of the other action scenes.

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* Justified in ''Film/TheMatrix'', where all humans spend most of their lives plugged into a computer network through which they receive simulated experiences ''anyway'' -- their {{Unusual User Interface}}s can also act as {{Upgrade Artifact}}s, making it a trivial matter to have a full training regimen for anything from martial arts to piloting written directly into your brain in a matter of seconds. Whether this carries over to the real world is up in the air, though the series' only real-world hand-to-hand fight scene ''is'' considerably less flashy than all of the other action scenes.
8th Oct '17 10:26:33 AM nombretomado
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* The 1980s show ''TheGreatestAmericanHero'' is a funny aversion to this trope. The main character receives a super-powered suit as a gift from aliens -then immediately loses the manual, so he must resort to trial and error to learn what powers he has and how to use them.

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* The 1980s show ''TheGreatestAmericanHero'' ''Series/TheGreatestAmericanHero'' is a funny aversion to this trope. The main character receives a super-powered suit as a gift from aliens -then immediately loses the manual, so he must resort to trial and error to learn what powers he has and how to use them.
2nd Oct '17 3:01:59 AM Robbyn
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* ''WesternAnimation/KimPossible''.
** Say that to the [[WomenDrivers poor car]]...[[note]] Her trouble with the driving test didn't completely make sense, since we'd seen her driving/flying/riding machines already.[[/note]]
** And the [[FeminineWomenCanCook poor]] [[LethalChef kitchen]]. But besides that...
--->'''Ron''': Since when do you know how to fly a spacecraft?
--->'''Kim''': Oh, I watched him on the way up. No big.

to:

* ''WesternAnimation/KimPossible''.
** Say that
Similar to the [[WomenDrivers poor car]]...[[note]] Her trouble with the driving test didn't completely make sense, since we'd seen her driving/flying/riding machines already.[[/note]]
** And the [[FeminineWomenCanCook poor]] [[LethalChef kitchen]]. But besides that...
--->'''Ron''': Since when do you know how to fly a spacecraft?
--->'''Kim''': Oh, I watched him on the way up. No big.
above example, ''WesternAnimation/{{Arthur}}'' has an occasionally recurring gag where Arthur's little sister DW becomes an instant expert at something. Usually something Arthur is failing at.



* Averted by Korra in ''WesternAnimation/TheLegendOfKorra''. While she can bend multiple elements years long before she's supposed to be able to, it still takes her fourteen years of intense training to master three of them. That amounts to a little over four and a half years per element (assuming that she spent all that time learning, which, since she was stuck in the White Lotus compound, is likely). Once the series starts and she begins her [[BlowYouAway airbending training]], her progress is slow due to Air not being suited to her non-spiritual personality and confrontational attitude.
** Averted once again with Asami and mecha-tanks, but played completely straight with General Iroh and airplanes.
** Zaheer, one of the villains of Book 3, Change, manages to airbend like a master despite only being able to do so for all of two weeks after [[MassEmpoweringEvent Harmonic Convergence]] (though it's partly due to his knowledge of the culture, and partly due to picking up firebending forms from his girlfriend P'Li). This backfires on him when he tries to infiltrate as a new airbending recruit and he inadvertently displays how good he is, which arouses suspicion. It is deconstructed when he fights Tenzin, a real airbending master, who easily beats him.
** Korra picks up metalbending pretty quickly in Book 3, but she still has a ways to go in that regard.
** Also subverted with Bolin, when he learns [[spoiler: lavabending.]] He's capable enough at it to protect himself, but in a one on one fight against the other practitioner of the art, [[spoiler: Ghazan]], who's been using it for far more than a few days, he could barely keep up and needed Mako to help turn the tide.

to:

* Averted by Korra in ''WesternAnimation/TheLegendOfKorra''. While she can bend multiple elements years long before In the non-canon ''WesternAnimation/Ben10'' episode "Gwen 10" Gwen gains the Omnitrix instead of Ben and, while she's supposed to be able to, it still takes her fourteen years of intense training to master three of them. That amounts to not a little over four and a half years per element (assuming that she spent all that time learning, which, since she perfect Omnitrix user, she's miles better than Ben was stuck in the White Lotus compound, is likely). Once the series starts and she begins her [[BlowYouAway airbending training]], her progress is slow due to Air not being suited to her non-spiritual personality and confrontational attitude.
** Averted once again with Asami and mecha-tanks, but played completely straight with General Iroh and airplanes.
** Zaheer, one of the villains of Book 3, Change, manages to airbend like a master despite only being able to do so for all of two weeks after [[MassEmpoweringEvent Harmonic Convergence]] (though it's partly due to his knowledge of the culture, and partly due to picking up firebending forms from his girlfriend P'Li). This backfires on him
when he tries to infiltrate as a new airbending recruit and he inadvertently displays how good he is, which arouses suspicion. It is deconstructed when he fights Tenzin, a real airbending master, who easily beats him.
** Korra picks up metalbending pretty quickly in Book 3, but she still has a ways to go in that regard.
** Also subverted with Bolin, when he
first got it.
* In the ''WesternAnimation/ChipNDaleRescueRangers'' episode "Prehysterical Pet", an alien dinosaur
learns [[spoiler: lavabending.]] He's capable enough at it to protect himself, but English in a one on one fight against the other practitioner of the art, [[spoiler: Ghazan]], who's been using it for far more than just a few days, he could barely keep up and needed Mako to help turn the tide. hours by reading Dale's comic books.



* In a ''WesternAnimation/TomAndJerry'' cartoon, Tom teaches himself how to play the piano by doing five ''very'' easy keyboard exercises in a book. He's then able to play beautifully.
* This is lampooned by Bugs in the ''WesternAnimation/LoonyTunes'' short "The Unmentionables", when he uses a cereal factory packing machine to catch Rocky and Mugsy. "The way I'm usin' this, you'd think I know something about it!" quips Bugs.
* Toyed with in ''WesternAnimation/MegasXLR''. The main character, Coop, is (usually) an expert at piloting his enormous mecha, Megas. However, this is only because he had specifically modified it to control just like the video games he'd been [[IKnowMortalKombat playing his whole life]]. When Kiva (an experienced pilot who was designated to pilot Megas before Coop modified it) attempted to pilot it, she could barely get it to go in the right direction.
* Averted in ''WesternAnimation/TheRealGhostbusters'' when Janine tries using a proton pack for the first time.
* In the ''WesternAnimation/ChipNDaleRescueRangers'' episode "Prehysterical Pet", an alien dinosaur learns English in just a few hours by reading Dale's comic books.
* Starfire of ''WesternAnimation/TeenTitans'' can learn languages instantly just by kissing the speaker on the lips.
** That's straight from the comics. Like in the show, she does this with Robin when she first arrives on Earth.

to:

* In a ''WesternAnimation/TomAndJerry'' cartoon, Tom teaches himself how to play If the piano by doing five ''very'' easy keyboard exercises in a book. He's then able to play beautifully.
* This
opening intro of ''WesternAnimation/DungeonsAndDragons'' is lampooned by Bugs accurate, those kids got the hang of the weapons that Dungeon Master gave them within seconds; Presto even uses the hat far better in the ''WesternAnimation/LoonyTunes'' short "The Unmentionables", when intro than he uses a cereal factory packing machine to catch Rocky and Mugsy. "The way I'm usin' this, you'd think I know something about it!" quips Bugs.
* Toyed with in ''WesternAnimation/MegasXLR''. The main character, Coop, is (usually) an expert at piloting his enormous mecha, Megas. However, this is only because he had specifically modified it to control just like the video games he'd been [[IKnowMortalKombat playing his whole life]]. When Kiva (an experienced pilot who was designated to pilot Megas before Coop modified it) attempted to pilot it, she could barely get it to go
does in the right direction.
actual episodes.
* Averted Used in ''WesternAnimation/TheRealGhostbusters'' ''WesternAnimation/{{Futurama}}'' when Janine tries using a proton pack for Bender temporarily becomes captain of the Planet Express, much to Fry's annoyance. When Fry lambastes him and accuses him of not knowing the first time.
* In the ''WesternAnimation/ChipNDaleRescueRangers'' episode "Prehysterical Pet", an alien dinosaur learns English in just
thing about being a few hours by reading Dale's comic books.
* Starfire of ''WesternAnimation/TeenTitans'' can learn languages
captain, Bender instantly just by kissing reads the speaker on entire manual and then uses the lips.
** That's straight from the comics. Like
info to chastise Fry. Justified in the show, she does this with Robin when she case as Bender is a robot.
-->'''Fry''': Have you even ''read'' the captain's handbook?\\
'''Bender''': ''(flips through entire manual)'' I have now. And what's Peter Parrot's
first arrives on Earth.rule of captaining?\\
'''Fry''': ''(defeated)'' Always respect the chain-o-command...captain.



* In the ''WesternAnimation/HeyArnold'' episode "Mugged", Arnold's grandmother teaches him karate after a bully stole his bus pass. While he's a little slow to get started, he essentially becomes a mini ''Creator/BruceLee'' within a short period of time.
* The [[http://bluray.highdefdigest.com/2568/ironmanarmoredadventures.html Highdefdigest review]] for ''WesternAnimation/IronManArmoredAdventures'' likes how in the first episode Tony's still (realistically) getting the hang of the suit, but gripes about how by the second episode he's already an (almost-)instant expert at it: "It's unfortunate he's already a pro by the second episode, but it's still nice to have some bit of believability, if even brief."



* The [[http://bluray.highdefdigest.com/2568/ironmanarmoredadventures.html Highdefdigest review]] for ''WesternAnimation/IronManArmoredAdventures'' likes how in the first episode Tony's still (realistically) getting the hang of the suit, but gripes about how by the second episode he's already an (almost-)instant expert at it: "It's unfortunate he's already a pro by the second episode, but it's still nice to have some bit of believability, if even brief."
* Used in ''WesternAnimation/{{Futurama}}'' when Bender temporarily becomes captain of the Planet Express, much to Fry's annoyance. When Fry lambastes him and accuses him of not knowing the first thing about being a captain, Bender instantly reads the entire manual and then uses the info to chastise Fry. Justified in this case as Bender is a robot.
-->'''Fry''': Have you even ''read'' the captain's handbook?\\
'''Bender''': ''(flips through entire manual)'' I have now. And what's Peter Parrot's first rule of captaining?\\
'''Fry''': ''(defeated)'' Always respect the chain-o-command...captain.

to:

* The [[http://bluray.highdefdigest.com/2568/ironmanarmoredadventures.html Highdefdigest review]] for ''WesternAnimation/IronManArmoredAdventures'' likes how in the first ''WesternAnimation/JusticeLeagueUnlimited'' episode Tony's "The Great Brain Robbery" has Lex Luthor and The Flash accidentally [[FreakyFridayFlip have their minds switched to each other's body]]. Lex is immediately able to use Flash's powers without difficulty. He also thinks to several new and destructive uses for Flash's powers.
* ''WesternAnimation/TheLegendOfKorra'':
** Averted by Korra. While she can bend multiple elements years long before she's supposed to be able to, it
still (realistically) getting takes her fourteen years of intense training to master three of them. That amounts to a little over four and a half years per element (assuming that she spent all that time learning, which, since she was stuck in the hang White Lotus compound, is likely). Once the series starts and she begins her [[BlowYouAway airbending training]], her progress is slow due to Air not being suited to her non-spiritual personality and confrontational attitude.
** Averted once again with Asami and mecha-tanks, but played completely straight with General Iroh and airplanes.
** Zaheer, one
of the suit, villains of Book 3, Change, manages to airbend like a master despite only being able to do so for all of two weeks after [[MassEmpoweringEvent Harmonic Convergence]] (though it's partly due to his knowledge of the culture, and partly due to picking up firebending forms from his girlfriend P'Li). This backfires on him when he tries to infiltrate as a new airbending recruit and he inadvertently displays how good he is, which arouses suspicion. It is deconstructed when he fights Tenzin, a real airbending master, who easily beats him.
** Korra picks up metalbending pretty quickly in Book 3,
but gripes she still has a ways to go in that regard.
** Also subverted with Bolin, when he learns [[spoiler: lavabending.]] He's capable enough at it to protect himself, but in a one on one fight against the other practitioner of the art, [[spoiler: Ghazan]], who's been using it for far more than a few days, he could barely keep up and needed Mako to help turn the tide.
* This is lampooned by Bugs in the ''WesternAnimation/LoonyTunes'' short "The Unmentionables", when he uses a cereal factory packing machine to catch Rocky and Mugsy. "The way I'm usin' this, you'd think I know something
about how by the second episode he's already it!" quips Bugs.
* Toyed with in ''WesternAnimation/MegasXLR''. The main character, Coop, is (usually)
an (almost-)instant expert at it: "It's unfortunate he's already a pro by piloting his enormous mecha, Megas. However, this is only because he had specifically modified it to control just like the second episode, but it's still nice to have some bit of believability, if even brief."
* Used in ''WesternAnimation/{{Futurama}}'' when Bender temporarily becomes captain of the Planet Express, much to Fry's annoyance.
video games he'd been [[IKnowMortalKombat playing his whole life]]. When Fry lambastes him and accuses him of not knowing Kiva (an experienced pilot who was designated to pilot Megas before Coop modified it) attempted to pilot it, she could barely get it to go in the first thing about being a captain, Bender instantly reads the entire manual and then uses the info to chastise Fry. Justified in this case as Bender is a robot.
-->'''Fry''': Have you even ''read'' the captain's handbook?\\
'''Bender''': ''(flips through entire manual)'' I have now. And what's Peter Parrot's first rule of captaining?\\
'''Fry''': ''(defeated)'' Always respect the chain-o-command...captain.
right direction.



* If the opening intro of ''WesternAnimation/DungeonsAndDragons'' is accurate, those kids got the hang of the weapons that Dungeon Master gave them within seconds; Presto even uses the hat far better in the intro than he does in the actual episodes.
* ComicBook/{{Rogue}} of the ''WesternAnimation/XMenEvolution'' universe lacks the FlyingBrick powerset of her mainstream counterpart; so while in combat, she have to rely just on her natural PowerCopying. So she either borrows an ability from a teammate, or, well, "borrows" it from a nearest hostile mutant -- and then wipes her opponents with these newly learned powers like a pro.
* In the ''WesternAnimation/HeyArnold'' episode "Mugged", Arnold's grandmother teaches him karate after a bully stole his bus pass. While he's a little slow to get started, he essentially becomes a mini ''Creator/BruceLee'' within a short period of time.



* Similar to the above example, ''WesternAnimation/{{Arthur}}'' has an occasionally recurring gag where Arthur's little sister DW becomes an instant expert at something. Usually something Arthur is failing at.
* In the non-canon ''WesternAnimation/Ben10'' episode "Gwen 10" Gwen gains the Omnitrix instead of Ben and, while she's not a perfect Omnitrix user, she's miles better than Ben was when he first got it.

to:

* Similar to Averted in ''WesternAnimation/TheRealGhostbusters'' when Janine tries using a proton pack for the above example, ''WesternAnimation/{{Arthur}}'' has an occasionally recurring gag where Arthur's little sister DW becomes an instant expert at something. Usually something Arthur is failing at.
first time.
* Starfire of ''WesternAnimation/TeenTitans'' can learn languages instantly just by kissing the speaker on the lips. That's straight from the comics. Like in the show, she does this with Robin when she first arrives on Earth.
* In a ''WesternAnimation/TomAndJerry'' cartoon, Tom teaches himself how to play the non-canon ''WesternAnimation/Ben10'' episode "Gwen 10" Gwen gains piano by doing five ''very'' easy keyboard exercises in a book. He's then able to play beautifully.
* ComicBook/{{Rogue}} of
the Omnitrix instead ''WesternAnimation/XMenEvolution'' universe lacks the FlyingBrick powerset of Ben and, her mainstream counterpart; so while she's not in combat, she have to rely just on her natural PowerCopying. So she either borrows an ability from a perfect Omnitrix user, she's miles better than Ben was when he first got it.teammate, or, well, "borrows" it from a nearest hostile mutant -- and then wipes her opponents with these newly learned powers like a pro.
25th Sep '17 3:07:53 AM Freezer
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[[folder:Comic Strips]]
* ''ComicStrip/{{Luann}}'': Luann, usually portrayed as aimless and goalless, wanders into her boyfriend's drama class, offhandedly makes suggestions on how to stage a large-scale musical -- that the class had been performing for over a decade -- and the teacher praises her for her brilliance. At this point her middle name should be MarySue.
[[/folder]]
19th Sep '17 5:22:54 PM FoxBluereaver
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Added DiffLines:

* ''Fanfic/PokemonResetBloodlines'' either averts this trope or plays with it. For example:
** Ash's trainer skills ''look'' like this to a common observer, [[PeggySue but he actually has a lot of knowledge and experience from his memories of his past life]].
** Zigzagged with the use of [[SuperMode Mega Evolution]]. Inexperienced trainers and Pokémon can have difficulties in pulling them off or controlling their power, even causing the Pokémon to go berserk, [[ThePowerOfFriendship but it's possible to pull through if they have a strong bond of trust and friendship with their Pokémon.]] On the other hand, experienced trainers are sometimes able to pull them off without trouble on their first try.
2nd Sep '17 11:18:51 AM Discar
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** When Rory is [[spoiler:quasi-resurrected through a Nestene duplicate]] as a Roman soldier in the first century, he mentions that he just woke up one day in Rome, his head full of "Roman stuff." He spends the episode fitting in with the Romans without any difficulty at all, and displays the some weapons training that they do.

to:

** When Rory is [[spoiler:quasi-resurrected through a Nestene duplicate]] as a Roman soldier in the first century, he mentions that he just woke up one day in Rome, his head full of "Roman stuff." He spends the episode fitting in with the Romans without any difficulty at all, and displays the some same weapons training that they do.
24th Aug '17 2:18:52 AM jormis29
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* TabletopGame/{{GURPS}} has the advantage ''Wild Talent'' which is an odd version of this trope. A few times per game you can try absolutely any skill at better than default (a Medieval ascetic can try to program a superscience computer from ten thousand years in the future). For a few points extra this event provides enough experience to gain a level of skill.

to:

* TabletopGame/{{GURPS}} ''TabletopGame/{{GURPS}}'' has the advantage ''Wild Talent'' which is an odd version of this trope. A few times per game you can try absolutely any skill at better than default (a Medieval ascetic can try to program a superscience computer from ten thousand years in the future). For a few points extra this event provides enough experience to gain a level of skill.



* In {{Exalted}}, training in favoured or caste abilities takes no time. Spend the XP, and presto - instant competence.

to:

* In {{Exalted}}, ''TabletopGame/{{Exalted}}'', training in favoured or caste abilities takes no time. Spend the XP, and presto - instant competence.



** ''KnightsOfTheOldRepublicIITheSithLords'' actually makes this a plot point. You spend much of the game seeking out Jedi masters who teach you new force forms or lightsabers techniques, afterwards remarking in amazement that you're able to learn highly advanced techniques that should take you years to perfect in a matter of minutes. If you choose to attack the Jedi you find instead of gathering them, you go one better and can actually learn their techniques by ''watching their technique as you're in the process of killing them'', which horrifies them. This is because [[spoiler: Your real power is actually making connections with others and using their skills and powers for yourself. In fact, you never regained your Jedi abilities after they were stripped of you. You're instead using the sometimes latent Jedi talents and powers of your companions.]] Played straight with one sidequest if you choose to save up skill points, however; when Kreia tasks you to train your worst skill up, you can grab the Class Skill feat for that one (or use an actual class skill you hadn't put points into), drop all the stockpiled points into that skill, and suddenly have 19 ranks in it ex nihilo.

to:

** ''KnightsOfTheOldRepublicIITheSithLords'' ''VideoGame/KnightsOfTheOldRepublicIITheSithLords'' actually makes this a plot point. You spend much of the game seeking out Jedi masters who teach you new force forms or lightsabers techniques, afterwards remarking in amazement that you're able to learn highly advanced techniques that should take you years to perfect in a matter of minutes. If you choose to attack the Jedi you find instead of gathering them, you go one better and can actually learn their techniques by ''watching their technique as you're in the process of killing them'', which horrifies them. This is because [[spoiler: Your real power is actually making connections with others and using their skills and powers for yourself. In fact, you never regained your Jedi abilities after they were stripped of you. You're instead using the sometimes latent Jedi talents and powers of your companions.]] Played straight with one sidequest if you choose to save up skill points, however; when Kreia tasks you to train your worst skill up, you can grab the Class Skill feat for that one (or use an actual class skill you hadn't put points into), drop all the stockpiled points into that skill, and suddenly have 19 ranks in it ex nihilo.



* In RealLife, changing from one aircraft type to another requires at least some cross-training. In ''VideoGame/AceCombat'', ''VideoGame/AirForceDelta'', ''Tom Clancy's HAWX'' and other flight sim-shooters, the player characters can jump between aircraft from any country in the world and have no problem [[strike:controlling it]] flying it to its maximum capability and leaving a trail of smoking aircraft wreckage. Of course, this is partly excusable by RuleOfFun; Anyone remember [[ThatOneLevel flying school]] from ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAuto [[VideoGame/GrandTheftAutoSanAndreas San Andreas]]''?

to:

* In RealLife, changing from one aircraft type to another requires at least some cross-training. In ''VideoGame/AceCombat'', ''VideoGame/AirForceDelta'', ''Tom Clancy's HAWX'' ''VideoGame/{{HAWX}}'' and other flight sim-shooters, the player characters can jump between aircraft from any country in the world and have no problem [[strike:controlling it]] flying it to its maximum capability and leaving a trail of smoking aircraft wreckage. Of course, this is partly excusable by RuleOfFun; Anyone remember [[ThatOneLevel flying school]] from ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAuto [[VideoGame/GrandTheftAutoSanAndreas San Andreas]]''?
22nd Aug '17 3:43:11 PM Andyxdr
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* In RealLife, changing from one aircraft type to another requires at least some cross-training. In ''VideoGame/AceCombat'', ''AirForceDelta'', ''Tom Clancy's HAWX'' and other flight sim-shooters, the player characters can jump between aircraft from any country in the world and have no problem [[strike:controlling it]] flying it to its maximum capability and leaving a trail of smoking aircraft wreckage. Of course, this is partly excusable by RuleOfFun; Anyone remember [[ThatOneLevel flying school]] from ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAuto [[VideoGame/GrandTheftAutoSanAndreas San Andreas]]''?

to:

* In RealLife, changing from one aircraft type to another requires at least some cross-training. In ''VideoGame/AceCombat'', ''AirForceDelta'', ''VideoGame/AirForceDelta'', ''Tom Clancy's HAWX'' and other flight sim-shooters, the player characters can jump between aircraft from any country in the world and have no problem [[strike:controlling it]] flying it to its maximum capability and leaving a trail of smoking aircraft wreckage. Of course, this is partly excusable by RuleOfFun; Anyone remember [[ThatOneLevel flying school]] from ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAuto [[VideoGame/GrandTheftAutoSanAndreas San Andreas]]''?
11th Aug '17 8:48:51 PM WaxingName
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TropesAreNotBad. Characters in [=RPG=] games, for instance, often learn their new weapon skill or super attack the instant they hit Level 43, and not a moment before. However, there will usually still be a semblance of progression - weak fireball at Level 10, medium fireball at Level 21, huge fireball at Level 45 -, thus still leaving a sense of improving the skill even if each stage comes in its own instant update. Evidently, skill is a quantum effect [[UsefulNotes/QuantumPhysics like particle energy]].

to:

TropesAreNotBad. In video games in particular, it would be far too resource-intensive and time-consuming to fully animate different levels of proficiency at different character levels. Characters in [=RPG=] games, for instance, often learn their new weapon skill or super attack the instant they hit Level 43, and not a moment before. However, there will usually still be a semblance of progression - weak fireball at Level 10, medium fireball at Level 21, huge fireball at Level 45 -, thus still leaving a sense of improving the skill even if each stage comes in its own instant update. Evidently, skill is a quantum effect [[UsefulNotes/QuantumPhysics like particle energy]].
10th Aug '17 4:28:06 PM Discar
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* ''Series/DoctorWho'': Clara gains super hacking powers instantly courtesy of BrainUploading shenanigans in ''The Bells of Saint John''.

to:

* ''Series/DoctorWho'': ''Series/DoctorWho'':
** When Rory is [[spoiler:quasi-resurrected through a Nestene duplicate]] as a Roman soldier in the first century, he mentions that he just woke up one day in Rome, his head full of "Roman stuff." He spends the episode fitting in with the Romans without any difficulty at all, and displays the some weapons training that they do.
**
Clara gains super hacking powers instantly courtesy of BrainUploading shenanigans in ''The Bells of Saint John''.
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