History Main / InspectorJavert

24th Mar '17 12:31:19 AM marcoasalazarm
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%%%* Toshio Wakagi in ''CodenameSailorV''.

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%%%* * Toshio Wakagi in ''CodenameSailorV''.''CodenameSailorV'' wanted the titular MagicalGirl behind bars because she was a vigilante.



%%%* Detective Crumb, ''Series/EarlyEdition''

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%%%* * Detective Crumb, ''Series/EarlyEdition''Crumb from ''Series/EarlyEdition'' wanted Gary Hobbes behind bars because of his constant appearance around various calamities. Understandably telling Crumb that a newspaper predicting the future was the reason he was around said calamities would have been a one-way ticket to a nuthouse.


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* ''Series/CSIMiami'' had InternalAffairs Sergeant Rick Stetler, who constantly popped up the moment he so much as imagined any member of the team was doing something corrupt and had a very personal beef with Horatio Caine (because Caine had made Lieutenant before him, and Stetler decided to believe that Caine had done it through dirty means). [[spoiler: He also had an abusive relationship with his girlfriend (who was Caine's sister-in-law through his dead brother) and was finally PutOnABusToHell when he was discovered to have been stealing impounded vehicles to sell off and had an Assistant District Attorney killed to keep it quiet]].
25th Feb '17 1:25:32 PM nombretomado
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* The FBI agents in the DaleBrown novel ''A Time for Patriots'' are obsessed with putting Patrick [=McLanahan=] away, convinced that he's a RightWingMilitiaFanatic.

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* The FBI agents in the DaleBrown Creator/DaleBrown novel ''A Time for Patriots'' are obsessed with putting Patrick [=McLanahan=] away, convinced that he's a RightWingMilitiaFanatic.
19th Feb '17 7:27:19 AM smalltime
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* Amanda Killman from ''WesternAnimation/{{Bunsen is Beast}}'' is determined to expose Bunsen as evil and dangerous when he's clearly nice.

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* Amanda Killman from ''WesternAnimation/{{Bunsen is a Beast}}'' is determined to expose Bunsen as evil and dangerous when he's clearly nice.
19th Feb '17 7:26:55 AM smalltime
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* Amanda Killman from ''WesternAnimation/BunsenIsABeast'' is determined to expose Bunsen as evil and dangerous when he's clearly nice.

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* Amanda Killman from ''WesternAnimation/BunsenIsABeast'' ''WesternAnimation/{{Bunsen is Beast}}'' is determined to expose Bunsen as evil and dangerous when he's clearly nice.
19th Feb '17 7:26:12 AM smalltime
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* Amanda Killman from ''WesternAnimation/BunsenIsABeast'' is determined to expose Bunsen as evil and dangerous when he's clearly nice.
16th Feb '17 11:40:04 AM EDP
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** Detective Spader, from Duckburg's police department, tries to arrest Paperinik because, even if his contributions in keeping the crime down are undeniable (and will use his help to deal with other criminals), he still remains a vigilante who breaks the law all the time.

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** *** Detective Spader, from Duckburg's police department, tries to arrest Paperinik because, even if his contributions in keeping the crime down are undeniable (and will use his help to deal with other criminals), he still remains a vigilante who breaks the law all the time.
16th Feb '17 11:38:16 AM EDP
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* The ComicBook/DisneyDucksComicUniverse stories have more than a few in stories that involve Paperinik, DonaldDuck's superhero alter ego (in no small part due him starting out as an outright ''criminal''). The most notable are:
** Inspector Pinko, who chases Paperinik for no apparent reason beyond "he looks like a criminal".
** Commissioner Alcmeone Pinko, the other Pinko's father, who hunted Fantomius, the one whose legacy Paperinik inherited. This time there's a better justification, as Fantomius was, by his own admission, a GentlemanThief ([[LampshadeHanging as stated again and again in the series' tagline]] and Fantomius' own {{Calling Card}}s), no matter [[AssholeVictim what his victims do to get a visit from Fantomius or the fact he often has to arrest them too]].
** ''ComicBook/PaperinikNewAdventures'':
*** Colonel (later general) Clint E. Westcock has this dynamic with Paperinik, and was actually extatic when he was ordered to arrest him, due Paperinik infiltrating a secret base and getting away with it. He changes his opinion after the Evronians raid his command, the Dept. 51, and Paperinik holds the line ''alone'' long enough for the soldiers to rally and come to the rescue.
** Detective Spader, from Duckburg's police department, tries to arrest Paperinik because, even if his contributions in keeping the crime down are undeniable (and will use his help to deal with other criminals), he still remains a vigilante who breaks the law all the time.
25th Jan '17 5:18:16 PM LentilSandEater
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* ''Literature/LesMiserables'' named the trope with the original Inspector Javert. In his face, the narrator describes seeing "what could be called [[PureIsNotGood all the evil]] of good." Javert subverted the trope of maniacal lawfulness once in the book: during the street brawl of Fantine and Monsieur Bamatabois, he thought her guilty of everything and refused to hear how she had been attacked, because she was a prostitute. A character true to the spirit of the trope would have accused both of them. This is a display of idealism rather than [[LawfulStupid stupidity]]--Fantine, being a prostitute, was already a law-breaker, whereas Monsieur Bamatabois was 'innocent.' Similarly, he refuses to accept that Jean Valjean was not necessarily in the wrong when he stole a loaf of bread, and he follows Valjean mercilessly for decades for what amounted to a parole violation. Worst of all [[spoiler:even after Valjean saves his life, Javert still can't make himself admit that he's wrong, and is actually DrivenToSuicide for his failure, in effect killing himself over his failure to accomplish a goal that never had any real importance.]]
** That's not the only way to interpret Javert's decision; he could instead [[spoiler:[[HeelRealization have realized just]] [[BlackAndWhiteInsanity how wrong he was about the world]], and critically failed to cope]].
*** Most likely, it's both. He is a man of complex emotions.
*** It certainly is complex - the lead-up to his suicide goes on for several pages, as we watch him struggle with a dilemma he can barely process. He seems to finally get the idea that the law is maybe too harsh on convicts: one of his last acts is to write down a list of pragmatic reforms for the local prison, such as suggesting that they should stop making prisoners stand around barefoot in the freezing cold [[PragmaticVillainy because when they get sick it's expensive to treat them]]. But this is, perhaps, the essence of his dilemma: he has operated under the belief that "law" and "good" are the same entity, but in this instance, they're clearly not. Letting Valjean go is moral, but unlawful; imprisoning him again is lawful, but immoral. No matter what he does, he betrays his purpose; since he can't serve his purpose, he finds no reason to live.
** Also of note is that when Javert isn't chasing Valjean, he's otherwise very good at his job. He leads a group of Paris police officers in catching the Patron-Minette street gang, and correctly pegged "Monsieur Madeleine" as Valjean. However, when a case of MistakenIdentity leads him to think that he had WronglyAccused Madeleine, he begs Valjean to dismiss him for his screwup-showing that Javert is no more tolerant of his own sins than he is of anyone else's.
*** Javert lives the most rigid and unyielding code of conduct of anyone in the novel, and shows mercy to no one - not even himself. By releasing Valjean, he's committed a capital crime. As a man of the law, his code of conduct requires that he [[spoiler: give his life]] as punishment for that crime.

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* ''Literature/LesMiserables'' ''Literature/LesMiserables''
** The book
named the trope with the original Inspector Javert. In his face, the narrator describes seeing "what could be called [[PureIsNotGood all the evil]] of good." Javert subverted the trope of maniacal lawfulness once in the book: during the street brawl of Fantine and Monsieur Bamatabois, he thought her guilty of everything and refused to hear how she had been attacked, because she was a prostitute. A character true to the spirit of the trope would have accused both of them. This is a display of idealism rather than [[LawfulStupid stupidity]]--Fantine, being a prostitute, was already a law-breaker, whereas Monsieur Bamatabois was 'innocent.' Similarly, he refuses to accept that Jean Valjean was not necessarily in the wrong when he stole a loaf of bread, and he follows Valjean mercilessly for decades for what amounted to a parole violation. Worst of all [[spoiler:even after Valjean saves his life, Javert still can't make himself admit that he's wrong, and is actually DrivenToSuicide for his failure, in effect killing himself over his failure to accomplish a goal that never had any real importance.]]
** That's not the only way to interpret Javert's decision;
]]\\
\\
Alternatively,
he could instead [[spoiler:[[HeelRealization have realized just]] [[BlackAndWhiteInsanity how wrong he was about the world]], and critically failed to cope]].
*** Most likely, it's both. He is a man of complex emotions.
*** It certainly is complex - the
cope]]. The lead-up to his suicide goes on for several pages, as we watch him struggle with a dilemma he can barely process. He seems to finally get the idea that the law is maybe too harsh on convicts: one of his last acts is to write down a list of pragmatic reforms for the local prison, such as suggesting that they should stop making prisoners stand around barefoot in the freezing cold [[PragmaticVillainy because when they get sick it's expensive to treat them]]. But this is, perhaps, the essence of his dilemma: he has operated under the belief that "law" and "good" are the same entity, but in this instance, they're clearly not. Letting Valjean go is moral, but unlawful; imprisoning him again is lawful, but immoral. No matter what he does, he betrays his purpose; since he can't serve his purpose, he finds no reason to live.
**
live.\\
\\
Also of note is that when Javert isn't chasing Valjean, he's otherwise very good at his job. He leads a group of Paris police officers in catching the Patron-Minette street gang, and correctly pegged "Monsieur Madeleine" as Valjean. However, when a case of MistakenIdentity leads him to think that he had WronglyAccused Madeleine, he begs Valjean to dismiss him for his screwup-showing that Javert is no more tolerant of his own sins than he is of anyone else's. \n*** Javert lives the most rigid and unyielding code of conduct of anyone in the novel, and shows mercy to no one - not even himself. By releasing Valjean, he's committed a capital crime. As a man of the law, his code of conduct requires that he [[spoiler: give his life]] as punishment for that crime.
5th Jan '17 3:48:45 PM marcoasalazarm
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* ''ComicBook/JudgeDredd'': Old Stone Face can go here. Oh how he can go here. Dredd is extremely rigid in his application of the law, so he'll chase after people no matter how small the crime. Played with in that he's not completely unreasonable though, as he has (occasionally, and on a good day) been shown to use his judgment to go easy on people because of special circumstances.

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* ''ComicBook/JudgeDredd'': Old Stone Face can go here. Oh how he can go here. Dredd is extremely rigid in his application of the law, so he'll chase after people no matter how small the crime.crime (even across ''parallel universes'', as his crossovers with Batman can demonstrate). Played with in that he's not completely unreasonable though, as he has (occasionally, and on a good day) been shown to use his judgment to go easy on people because of special circumstances.



* A non-cop example, and arguably the most prominent comic-book example; J. Jonah Jameson, former editor of the Daily Bugle and current mayor of New York, and perpetual thorn in the side of ''SpiderMan''. Depending on who's writing him, he's depicted as total {{Jerkass}}, or as a semi-honorable businessman. When Peter was framed for murder during ComicBook/TheCloneSaga, Jameson paid for Peter's legal defense. When Bastion threatened his life if he refused to print an editorial condemning mutants, Jameson (a civil-rights advocate) refused to give in to threats. Jameson is a skinflint, a tight-wad and on occasion a BadBoss, but is also often portrayed as a man with a strong sense of honor and fair play. And no matter how much good Spider-Man does for the city of New York, Jameson will still make it his mission to bring Spider-Man down. In the Ultimate Universe Jameson's positive qualities are played up a lot more, to the point where he eventually recognises Spider-Man as a hero.
* General Sam Lane (Lois' father) has been portrayed as this to ''Comicbook/{{Superman}}'', of all people. Pre the New52, in the ComicBook/NewKrypton storyline, he was straight up GeneralRipper who was determined to destroy Superman's reputation and kill him, regardless of who got hurt in the process. In the New52 ComicBook/ActionComics, General Lane is portrayed as this in Superman's early years, where Superman is still a mysterious GoodIsNotNice vigilante. He's still gunning for Superman, believing him to be a potential threat to America, but he's not the psychotic GeneralRipper he was before the reboot.

to:

* A non-cop example, and arguably the most prominent comic-book example; J. Jonah Jameson, former editor of the Daily Bugle and current mayor of New York, and perpetual thorn in the side of ''SpiderMan''. Depending on who's writing him, he's depicted as total {{Jerkass}}, or as a semi-honorable businessman. When Peter was framed for murder during ComicBook/TheCloneSaga, Jameson paid for Peter's legal defense. When Bastion threatened his life if he refused to print an editorial condemning mutants, Jameson (a civil-rights advocate) refused to give in to threats. Jameson is a skinflint, a tight-wad and on occasion a BadBoss, but is also often portrayed as a man with a strong sense of honor and fair play. And no matter how much good Spider-Man does for the city of New York, Jameson will still make it his mission to bring Spider-Man down. In the Ultimate Universe Jameson's positive qualities are played up a lot more, to the point where he eventually recognises Spider-Man as a hero.
hero (and he just restarts his crusade because he, at first, believes Miles Morales is desecrating Peter's memory. He lets go once Miles builds a better rep).
* General Sam Lane (Lois' father) has been portrayed as this to ''Comicbook/{{Superman}}'', of all people. Pre the New52, in the ComicBook/NewKrypton storyline, he was straight up GeneralRipper who was determined to destroy Superman's reputation and kill him, regardless of who got hurt in the process. In the New52 ComicBook/ActionComics, General Lane is portrayed as this in Superman's early years, where Superman is still a mysterious GoodIsNotNice vigilante. He's still gunning for Superman, believing him to be a potential threat to America, but he's not the psychotic genocidal GeneralRipper he was before the reboot.



** He goes back to this during the road to ''Secret Wars 2016'', hunting down the Illuminati and goading every superhero he converses with into a WithUsOrAgainstUs situation--either they help him or they are abetting the Illuminati (even by inaction). Granted, the latter have all but JumpedOffTheSlipperySlope in their quest to save Earth 616 from the Incursions (and seek no other methods, thinking IDidWhatIHadToDo justifies everything), but people do point out that Rogers is wasting time and resources better used to try to stop the Incursions on his manhunt... which he ignores.



* Sheriff Buford T. Justice in ''Film/SmokeyAndTheBandit''. He begins making up charges to go after Bandit for, caring little whether or not it's true, or even where he does and does not have jurisdiction.

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* Sheriff Buford T. Justice in ''Film/SmokeyAndTheBandit''. He begins making up charges to go after Bandit for, caring little whether or not it's true, or even where he does and does not have jurisdiction.jurisdiction (he seriously believes saying he's in 'hot pursuit' would allow him to chase Bandit ''all over the United States'').
7th Dec '16 11:24:54 AM Mitis
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* Jim from ''WesternAnimation/CodeLyoko'' is this for Season 1. He suspects that Jeremie and his friends are up to know good since they've been sneaking around a lot within the last few months. In the season finale, his determination to find out the truth leads to him chasing Jeremie through the dorms, which leads to the latter getting a twisted ankle and Jim being fired.

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* Jim from ''WesternAnimation/CodeLyoko'' is this for Season 1. He suspects that Jeremie and his friends are up to know good since they've been sneaking around a lot within the last few months. In Near the season finale, end of the season, his determination to find out the truth leads to him chasing Jeremie through the dorms, which leads to the latter getting a twisted ankle and Jim being fired.fired. But that leads to him learning the truth and becoming an ally, meaning that after the gang presses the ResetButton, he becomes a much better character.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.InspectorJavert