History Main / HeirClubForMen

9th Sep '17 7:40:55 PM Clanger00
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** Seven European countries have done away with this altogether: Sweden, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Belgium, Denmark, and the United Kingdom. In other words, these countries provide that a woman can inherit the throne even if she has younger brothers (sometimes known as "absolute primogeniture"). The first of these changes was passed in Sweden effective January 1, 1980, and so far no woman has actually inherited a crown via absolute primogeniture; Sweden's Crown Princess Victoria is likely to eventually become the first woman in the modern world to inherit a crown despite having a living brother. The British example is, as usual, a little bit odd, in that it was only passed in 2013 and does not apply retroactively; what this means, as a practical matter, is that nothing has seriously changed, since first child to be affected by the law, Prince George, would've had the same place in the succession under the old laws (being the eldest son as well as the eldest child); unless he (God forbid) predeceases his father (or abdicates), nothing has changed.[[note]]Bear in mind that the [[UsefulNotes/TheCommonwealth Commonwealth Realms]] put a substantial wrinkle in this; see below for details.[[/note]]
*** None of the British monarchs since 1910 (George V, Edward VIII, George VI, Elizabeth II, and the future (presumably) Charles III, William V, and George VII) would have been or would be affected by the change. You have to go back to 1841 when the future Edward VII was born a year after his older sister supplanting her as heir to Queen Victoria.

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** Seven European countries have done away with this altogether: Sweden, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Belgium, Denmark, and the United Kingdom. In other words, these countries provide that a woman can inherit the throne even if she has younger brothers (sometimes known as "absolute primogeniture"). The first of these changes was passed in Sweden effective January 1, 1980, and so far no woman has actually inherited a crown via absolute primogeniture; Sweden's Crown Princess Victoria is likely to eventually become the first woman in the modern world to inherit a crown despite having a living brother.
**
The British example is, as usual, a little bit odd, in that it was only passed in 2013 and does but would not apply retroactively; what this means, as make a practical matter, is that nothing has seriously changed, since first child difference to be affected by the law, current succession as Prince George, the first royal child born after the law change, is the oldest child and thus would've had the same place in the succession under the old laws (being the eldest son as well as the eldest child); unless he (God forbid) predeceases his father (or abdicates), nothing has changed.laws.[[note]]Bear in mind that the [[UsefulNotes/TheCommonwealth Commonwealth Realms]] put a substantial wrinkle in this; see below for details.[[/note]]
*** None
[[/note]] In fact, none of the British monarchs since 1910 (George V, Edward VIII, George VI, Elizabeth II, and the future (presumably) Charles III, William V, and George VII) would have been or would be affected by the change. You have to go back to 1841 when the future Edward VII was born a year after his older sister supplanting her as heir to Queen Victoria.
9th Sep '17 7:02:06 PM Clanger00
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The distinction is less clear than you might then. It's rarely the case that there are ''no'' male claimants, however, so if there's no ''clear'' heir then a SuccessionCrisis often results. The threat of such a crisis is reason enough for kings of countries with these laws to go to great lengths to ensure that they have at least one son on the ground who is both legitimate and his official heir.

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The distinction is less clear than you might then. think. It's rarely the case that there are ''no'' male claimants, however, so if there's no ''clear'' heir (the king has no sons, but does have brothers and uncles) then a SuccessionCrisis often results. The threat of such a crisis is reason enough for kings of countries with these laws to go to great lengths to ensure that they have at least one son on the ground who is both legitimate and his official heir.
3rd Sep '17 9:34:11 PM SSJMagus
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** Seven European countries have done away with this altogether: Sweden, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Belgium, Denmark, and the United Kingdom. In other words, these countries provide that a woman can inherit the throne even if she has younger brothers (sometimes known as "absolute primogeniture"). The first of these changes was passed in Sweden effective January 1, 1980, and so far no woman has actually inherited a crown via absolute primogeniture; Sweden's Crown Princess Victoria is likely to eventually become the first woman in the modern world to inherit a crown despite having a living brother. The British example is, as usual, a little bit odd, in that it was only passed in 2013 and does not apply retroactively; what this means, as a practical matter, is that nothing has seriously changed, since first child to be affected by the law, Prince George, would've had the same place in the succession under the old laws (being the eldest son as well as the eldest child); unless he (God forbid) predeceases his father, nothing has changed.[[note]]Bear in mind that the [[UsefulNotes/TheCommonwealth Commonwealth Realms]] put a substantial wrinkle in this; see below for details.[[/note]]

to:

** Seven European countries have done away with this altogether: Sweden, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Belgium, Denmark, and the United Kingdom. In other words, these countries provide that a woman can inherit the throne even if she has younger brothers (sometimes known as "absolute primogeniture"). The first of these changes was passed in Sweden effective January 1, 1980, and so far no woman has actually inherited a crown via absolute primogeniture; Sweden's Crown Princess Victoria is likely to eventually become the first woman in the modern world to inherit a crown despite having a living brother. The British example is, as usual, a little bit odd, in that it was only passed in 2013 and does not apply retroactively; what this means, as a practical matter, is that nothing has seriously changed, since first child to be affected by the law, Prince George, would've had the same place in the succession under the old laws (being the eldest son as well as the eldest child); unless he (God forbid) predeceases his father, father (or abdicates), nothing has changed.[[note]]Bear in mind that the [[UsefulNotes/TheCommonwealth Commonwealth Realms]] put a substantial wrinkle in this; see below for details.[[/note]]
30th Jul '17 12:50:29 PM Anderling
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* '''Agnatic-Cognatic Succession''': Women may inherit if there are no suitable make heir.

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* '''Agnatic-Cognatic Succession''': Women may inherit if there are is no suitable make male heir.
28th Jul '17 5:02:47 AM ErikModi
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* Averted in TabletopGame/BattleTech. The Successor States don't seem to care what gender their rulers are, so long as they have the right last name. Famously, Katrina Steiner was one of the Lyran Commonwealth's best and most beloved leaders, and her daughter Melissa inherited the title (though she also married Hanse Davion, ruled of the Federated Suns, making them joint rulers of the combined Federated Commonwealth). Hanse and Melissa name their eldest son, Victor Ian-Steiner Davion, as their heir, but that has more to do with him being firstborn. Their eldest daughter, Katherine (who later changed her name to Katrina) eventually takes the Lyran half of the Federated Commonwealth independent and rules it for several years before sneaking in behind Victor's back and ruling the Suns half as well, which is technically illegal. Not because she's a woman, but because she didn't undergo the five years of military service required for anyone to assume the title of First Prince.
** Thomas Marik also recognized his illegitimate daughter Isis as a potential heir when his legitimate, male heir developed severe leukemia.

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* Averted in TabletopGame/BattleTech. The Successor States don't seem to care what gender their rulers are, so long as they have the right last name. Famously, Katrina Steiner was one of the Lyran Commonwealth's best and most beloved leaders, and her daughter Melissa inherited the title (though she also married Hanse Davion, ruled ruler of the Federated Suns, making them joint rulers of the combined Federated Commonwealth). Hanse and Melissa name their eldest son, Victor Ian-Steiner Davion, as their heir, but that has more to do with him being firstborn. Their eldest daughter, Katherine (who later changed her name to Katrina) eventually takes the Lyran half of the Federated Commonwealth independent and rules it for several years before sneaking in behind Victor's back and ruling the Suns half as well, which is technically illegal. Not because she's a woman, but because she didn't undergo the five years of military service required for anyone to assume the title of First Prince.
Prince of the Federated Suns.
** Thomas Marik also recognized his illegitimate daughter Isis as a potential heir when his legitimate, male heir developed severe leukemia. While his son's [[spoiler: eventually terminal]] illness forced his hand, his reasons for keeping Isis illegitimate as long as possible had nothing to do with her gender.
28th Jul '17 4:58:54 AM ErikModi
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28th Jul '17 4:58:23 AM ErikModi
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28th Jul '17 4:57:54 AM ErikModi
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[[folder:Tabletop Games]]
* Averted in TabletopGame/BattleTech. The Successor States don't seem to care what gender their rulers are, so long as they have the right last name. Famously, Katrina Steiner was one of the Lyran Commonwealth's best and most beloved leaders, and her daughter Melissa inherited the title (though she also married Hanse Davion, ruled of the Federated Suns, making them joint rulers of the combined Federated Commonwealth). Hanse and Melissa name their eldest son, Victor Ian-Steiner Davion, as their heir, but that has more to do with him being firstborn. Their eldest daughter, Katherine (who later changed her name to Katrina) eventually takes the Lyran half of the Federated Commonwealth independent and rules it for several years before sneaking in behind Victor's back and ruling the Suns half as well, which is technically illegal. Not because she's a woman, but because she didn't undergo the five years of military service required for anyone to assume the title of First Prince.
** Thomas Marik also recognized his illegitimate daughter Isis as a potential heir when his legitimate, male heir developed severe leukemia.
** The Celestial Throne of the Capellan Confederation came to Romano Liao after Maxmillian Liao's death, even though Romano was Maxmillian's younger daughter. His older daughter, Candace, [[ScrewThisImOuttaHere left the Confederation to rule the St. Ives' Compact, an independent state carved out of the Confederation by the Federated Commonwealth's trouncing of the Confederation in the Fourth Succession War.]]
** The Draconis Combine seems to play this straight, which is fitting since they are generally portrayed as the most conservative and tradition-bound realm in the setting. Theodore Kurita's son, Hohiro, is set to rule the Combine after his father's (and grandfather's) death, while his sister, Omi, is set to become Keeper of the House Honor. It's not a true leadership position, but ''does'' grant a measure of political power, including advising the actual (male) ruler.
10th Jul '17 12:49:54 PM Monolaf317
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9th Jul '17 3:31:34 PM MarkLungo
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* In ''Anime/Acca13TerritoryInspectionDept'', Prince Schwan is regarded as the heir because he is the only (known) son of the king's daughters. [[spoiler: When he realizes Lotta is his cousin, he doesn't care, because she is a girl... until Magie tells him Lotta has a brother.]]

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* In ''Anime/Acca13TerritoryInspectionDept'', ''Manga/Acca13TerritoryInspectionDept'', Prince Schwan is regarded as the heir because he is the only (known) son of the king's daughters. [[spoiler: When he realizes Lotta is his cousin, he doesn't care, because she is a girl... until Magie tells him Lotta has a brother.]]



* Miroku of ''Anime/InuYasha'' needs to perpetuate his line (with a son) before the affliction that plagues all men in his family kills him. He attempts to do so by propositioning '''every''' girl he meets. [[spoiler:He loses the affliction before the end of the story but has at least three kids anyway with Sango, and one's a boy]].

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* Miroku of ''Anime/InuYasha'' ''Manga/InuYasha'' needs to perpetuate his line (with a son) before the affliction that plagues all men in his family kills him. He attempts to do so by propositioning '''every''' girl he meets. [[spoiler:He loses the affliction before the end of the story but has at least three kids anyway with Sango, and one's a boy]].
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.HeirClubForMen