History Main / GratuitousPanning

20th Nov '17 4:01:55 PM OnGreenDolphinStreet
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* During the early 1960s, when stereo on disc was still a novelty, several labels came up with "audiophile" series of exquisitely packaged records with music that emphasized stereo separation. Some labels even specialized in those kinds of releases. The fad mostly died down by the mid-60s, although a few labels soldiered on. A few examples:
** Command Records, founded by producer Enoch Light in 1959 especially to market those "audiophile" albums. They featured abstract artwork and gatefold packaging with extensive liner notes about the album and each individual track; those would be endlessly copied by other labels.
** Creator/RCARecords' "Stereo Action" series, which featured songs where instruments would be constantly panned from one channel to the other (enough so to disorientate or give a headache!) and die-cut sleeves that revealed artwork printed alongside liner notes onto the inner sleeve.
** Creator/CapitolRecords' "Staged for Stereo" series, whose releases were packaged in hinged plastic boxes, kind of a predecessor to modern CD jewel cases.
** Liberty Records' "Premier" series, which featured die-cut gatefold covers. By 1964, that series had become a vehicle for Tommy Garrett's "50 Guitars" albums exclusively, but it managed to last until 1969.
16th Nov '17 1:16:03 AM Cryoclaste
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* "Before the Storm" by Joker (off the OverClockedRemix album ''Project Chaos'') opens with a synth-bell melody that switches between the left and right channels with every single note. It's fast enough that you have to listen to the song on headphones to catch it.

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* "Before the Storm" by Joker (off the OverClockedRemix Music/OverClockedRemix album ''Project Chaos'') opens with a synth-bell melody that switches between the left and right channels with every single note. It's fast enough that you have to listen to the song on headphones to catch it.
4th Oct '17 4:51:08 PM DavidDelony
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* Creator/CapitolRecords' "Duophonic" process, which artificially turned a lot of songs recorded in mono into pseudo-stereo. -- Amongst others, Music/TheBeatles, Music/TheBeachBoys and Music/FrankSinatra underwent this particular form of ExecutiveMeddling. Capitol Records would take a mono recording, delay the right channel by a millisecond, play it through their famed echo chamber, and -- presto! -- fake stereo. Reportedly, Brian Wilson's father Murry ''preferred'' Duophonic, so much so that 8 of their albums were only available in mono or Duophonic. (Brian mixed in mono because he was deaf in one ear.) Many other record companies used similar processes to create fake stereo, labeling these records as "electronically rechanneled for stereo" or "reprocessed." (A few mono recordings from the 1950s actually had the voices and instruments on separate channels; these were somewhat more amenable to stereo reprocessing.) Most audiophiles disliked the result, preferring original mono recordings over fake stereo. The practice faded away after actual stereo recording techniques became widespread. Most reissues of recordings from the '50s and '60s these days use the original mono version if an actual stereo mix isn't available.

to:

* Creator/CapitolRecords' "Duophonic" process, which artificially turned a lot of songs recorded in mono into pseudo-stereo. -- Amongst others, Music/TheBeatles, Music/TheBeachBoys and Music/FrankSinatra underwent this particular form of ExecutiveMeddling. Capitol Records would take a mono recording, delay the right channel by a millisecond, play it through their famed echo chamber, and -- presto! -- fake stereo. Reportedly, Brian Wilson's father Murry ''preferred'' Duophonic, so much so that 8 of their albums were only available in mono or Duophonic. (Brian mixed in mono because he was deaf in one ear.) Many other record companies used similar processes to create fake stereo, labeling these records as "electronically rechanneled for stereo" or "reprocessed." (A few mono recordings from the 1950s actually had the voices and instruments on separate channels; these were somewhat more amenable to stereo reprocessing.) Most audiophiles disliked the result, results, preferring original mono recordings over fake stereo. The practice faded away after actual stereo recording techniques became widespread. Most reissues of recordings from the '50s and '60s these days use the original mono version if an actual stereo mix isn't available.
1st Oct '17 2:18:45 PM hamakei
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* "Slave to the Rhythm" by Music/GraceJones largely averts this. However, one track 'Don't Cry, It's only the Rhythm' features very heavy panning. At parts the music is played entirely in one channel, with sound effects in the other. From time to time it switches over, at one point doing so several times a second. Since the rest of the album is otherwise well balanced, it must have been a deliberate decision.
12th Jul '17 11:28:52 AM JasonBatman
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* "Runaway" from Kanye West's Music/MyBeautifulDarkTwistedFantasy pans the accusation 'who got you?' from left to right, as though the listener is being accosted from every direction.
2nd Jun '17 4:51:36 PM DavidDelony
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* Creator/CapitolRecords' "Duophonic" process, which artificially turned a lot of songs recorded in mono into pseudo-stereo. -- Amongst others, Music/TheBeatles, Music/TheBeachBoys and Music/FrankSinatra underwent this particular form of ExecutiveMeddling. Capitol Records would take a mono recording, delay the right channel by a millisecond, play it through their famed echo chamber, and -- presto! -- fake stereo. Reportedly, Brian Wilson's father Murry ''preferred'' Duophonic, so much so that 8 of their albums were only available in mono or Duophonic. (Brian mixed in mono because he was deaf in one ear.) Many other record companies used similar processes to create fake stereo, labeling these records as "electronically rechanneled for stereo" or "reprocessed." (A few mono recordings from the 1950s actually had the voices and instruments on separate channels; these were somewhat more amenable to stereo reprocessing.) Most audiophiles disliked the result, preferring original mono recordings over fake stereo. The practice faded away after actual stereo recording techniques became more widespread. Most reissues of recordings from the '50s and '60s these days use the original mono version if an actual stereo mix isn't available.

to:

* Creator/CapitolRecords' "Duophonic" process, which artificially turned a lot of songs recorded in mono into pseudo-stereo. -- Amongst others, Music/TheBeatles, Music/TheBeachBoys and Music/FrankSinatra underwent this particular form of ExecutiveMeddling. Capitol Records would take a mono recording, delay the right channel by a millisecond, play it through their famed echo chamber, and -- presto! -- fake stereo. Reportedly, Brian Wilson's father Murry ''preferred'' Duophonic, so much so that 8 of their albums were only available in mono or Duophonic. (Brian mixed in mono because he was deaf in one ear.) Many other record companies used similar processes to create fake stereo, labeling these records as "electronically rechanneled for stereo" or "reprocessed." (A few mono recordings from the 1950s actually had the voices and instruments on separate channels; these were somewhat more amenable to stereo reprocessing.) Most audiophiles disliked the result, preferring original mono recordings over fake stereo. The practice faded away after actual stereo recording techniques became more widespread. Most reissues of recordings from the '50s and '60s these days use the original mono version if an actual stereo mix isn't available.
2nd Jun '17 4:50:42 PM DavidDelony
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* Creator/CapitolRecords' "Duophonic" process, which artificially turned a lot of songs recorded in mono into pseudo-stereo. -- Amongst others, Music/TheBeatles, Music/TheBeachBoys and Music/FrankSinatra underwent this particular form of ExecutiveMeddling. Capitol Records would take a mono recording, delay the right channel by a millisecond, play it through their famed echo chamber, and -- presto! -- fake stereo. Reportedly, Brian Wilson's father Murry ''preferred'' Duophonic, so much so that 8 of their albums were only available in mono or Duophonic. (Brian mixed in mono because he was deaf in one ear.) Many other record companies used similar processes to create fake stereo, labeling these records as "electronically rechanneled for stereo" or "reprocessed." (A few mono recordings from the 1950s actually had the voices and instruments on separate channels; these were somewhat more amenable to stereo reprocessing.) Most audiophiles disliked the result, preferring original mono recordings over fake stereo. The practice faded away after actual stereo recording techniques became more widespread. Most reissues of recordings in the '50s and '60s use the original mono version if an actual stereo mix isn't available.

to:

* Creator/CapitolRecords' "Duophonic" process, which artificially turned a lot of songs recorded in mono into pseudo-stereo. -- Amongst others, Music/TheBeatles, Music/TheBeachBoys and Music/FrankSinatra underwent this particular form of ExecutiveMeddling. Capitol Records would take a mono recording, delay the right channel by a millisecond, play it through their famed echo chamber, and -- presto! -- fake stereo. Reportedly, Brian Wilson's father Murry ''preferred'' Duophonic, so much so that 8 of their albums were only available in mono or Duophonic. (Brian mixed in mono because he was deaf in one ear.) Many other record companies used similar processes to create fake stereo, labeling these records as "electronically rechanneled for stereo" or "reprocessed." (A few mono recordings from the 1950s actually had the voices and instruments on separate channels; these were somewhat more amenable to stereo reprocessing.) Most audiophiles disliked the result, preferring original mono recordings over fake stereo. The practice faded away after actual stereo recording techniques became more widespread. Most reissues of recordings in from the '50s and '60s these days use the original mono version if an actual stereo mix isn't available.
28th Jan '17 11:05:51 AM Prfnoff
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* Capitol Records' "Duophonic" process, which artificially turned a lot of songs recorded in mono into pseudo-stereo. -- Amongst others, Music/TheBeatles, Music/TheBeachBoys and Music/FrankSinatra underwent this particular form of ExecutiveMeddling. Capitol Records would take a mono recording, delay the right channel by a millisecond, play it through their famed echo chamber, and -- presto! -- fake stereo. Reportedly, Brian Wilson's father Murry ''preferred'' Duophonic, so much so that 8 of their albums were only available in mono or Duophonic. (Brian mixed in mono because he was deaf in one ear.) Many other record companies used similar processes to create fake stereo, labeling these records as "electronically rechanneled for stereo" or "reprocessed." Most audiophiles disliked the result, preferring original mono recordings over fake stereo. The practice faded away after actual stereo recording techniques became more widespread. Most reissues of recordings in the '50s and '60s use the original mono version if an actual stereo mix isn't available.

to:

* Capitol Records' Creator/CapitolRecords' "Duophonic" process, which artificially turned a lot of songs recorded in mono into pseudo-stereo. -- Amongst others, Music/TheBeatles, Music/TheBeachBoys and Music/FrankSinatra underwent this particular form of ExecutiveMeddling. Capitol Records would take a mono recording, delay the right channel by a millisecond, play it through their famed echo chamber, and -- presto! -- fake stereo. Reportedly, Brian Wilson's father Murry ''preferred'' Duophonic, so much so that 8 of their albums were only available in mono or Duophonic. (Brian mixed in mono because he was deaf in one ear.) Many other record companies used similar processes to create fake stereo, labeling these records as "electronically rechanneled for stereo" or "reprocessed." (A few mono recordings from the 1950s actually had the voices and instruments on separate channels; these were somewhat more amenable to stereo reprocessing.) Most audiophiles disliked the result, preferring original mono recordings over fake stereo. The practice faded away after actual stereo recording techniques became more widespread. Most reissues of recordings in the '50s and '60s use the original mono version if an actual stereo mix isn't available.
13th Jan '17 4:22:58 PM DavidDelony
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* In the breakdown at the end of Music/PinkFloyd's "Interstellar Overdrive" from ''Music/ThePiperAtTheGatesOfDawn'', the whole thing pans back and forth pretty fast to sound like the music is spinning around the listener.

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* Music/PinkFloyd is infamous for using the technique:
**
In the breakdown at the end of Music/PinkFloyd's "Interstellar Overdrive" from ''Music/ThePiperAtTheGatesOfDawn'', the whole thing pans back and forth pretty fast to sound like the music is spinning around the listener.listener. There's a reason most fans prefer the mono mix of the album.
13th Jan '17 4:18:30 PM DavidDelony
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* Capitol Records' "Duophonic" process, which artificially turned a lot of songs recorded in mono into pseudo-stereo. -- Amongst others, Music/TheBeatles, Music/TheBeachBoys and Music/FrankSinatra underwent this particular form of ExecutiveMeddling. Capitol Records would take a mono recording, delay the right channel by a millisecond, play it through their famed echo chamber, and -- presto! -- fake stereo. Reportedly, Brian Wilson's father Murry ''preferred'' Duophonic, so much so that 8 of their albums were only available in mono or Duophonic. Many other record companies used similar processes to create fake stereo, labeling these records as "electronically rechanneled for stereo" or "reprocessed." Most audiophiles disliked the result, preferring original mono recordings over fake stereo. The practice faded away after actual stereo recording techniques became more widespread. Most reissues of recordings in the '50s and '60s use the original mono version if an actual stereo mix isn't available.

to:

* Capitol Records' "Duophonic" process, which artificially turned a lot of songs recorded in mono into pseudo-stereo. -- Amongst others, Music/TheBeatles, Music/TheBeachBoys and Music/FrankSinatra underwent this particular form of ExecutiveMeddling. Capitol Records would take a mono recording, delay the right channel by a millisecond, play it through their famed echo chamber, and -- presto! -- fake stereo. Reportedly, Brian Wilson's father Murry ''preferred'' Duophonic, so much so that 8 of their albums were only available in mono or Duophonic. (Brian mixed in mono because he was deaf in one ear.) Many other record companies used similar processes to create fake stereo, labeling these records as "electronically rechanneled for stereo" or "reprocessed." Most audiophiles disliked the result, preferring original mono recordings over fake stereo. The practice faded away after actual stereo recording techniques became more widespread. Most reissues of recordings in the '50s and '60s use the original mono version if an actual stereo mix isn't available.
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