History Main / GoodLawyersGoodClients

2nd Sep '17 2:25:09 AM SeptimusHeap
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* Played completely straight in ''Film/AndJusticeForAll''. AlPacino plays a scrupulous attorney who focuses on defending honest clients, then is blackmailed into protecting a rapist judge who enjoyed screwing with him. He breaks down and tells the jury he hates his client, then quits law forever.

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* Played completely straight in ''Film/AndJusticeForAll''. AlPacino Creator/AlPacino plays a scrupulous attorney who focuses on defending honest clients, then is blackmailed into protecting a rapist judge who enjoyed screwing with him. He breaks down and tells the jury he hates his client, then quits law forever.
31st Aug '17 11:55:50 PM PaulA
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* ''[[Literature/DoctorDolittle The Voyages of Doctor Dolittle]]'' includes a trial where the Doctor's old friend is falsely accused of murder. The attorney is a genial, jovial, nice guy, while the prosecutor is described as a "frowning, spluttering, long-nosed" quarrelsome individual.

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* ''[[Literature/DoctorDolittle The Voyages of Doctor Dolittle]]'' ''Literature/TheVoyagesOfDoctorDolittle'' includes a trial where the Doctor's old friend is falsely accused of murder. The attorney is a genial, jovial, nice guy, while the prosecutor is described as a "frowning, spluttering, long-nosed" quarrelsome individual.
22nd Aug '17 6:58:08 PM eroock
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->There was one murder per week in this community, so you'd think that, under the law of averages, the law-enforcement authorities, led by District Attorney Hamilton Burger, would at least occasionally arrest a guilty person. But they ''never'' did. They ''always'' arrested an innocent person, and that person ''always'' hired Perry Mason, who ''always'' won the case...
-->--''Creator/DaveBarry Turns 50'', regarding ''Franchise/PerryMason''

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->There ->''"There was one murder per week in this community, so you'd think that, under the law of averages, the law-enforcement authorities, led by District Attorney Hamilton Burger, would at least occasionally arrest a guilty person. But they ''never'' did. They ''always'' arrested an innocent person, and that person ''always'' hired Perry Mason, who ''always'' won the case...
-->--''Creator/DaveBarry
case..."''
-->-- ''Creator/DaveBarry
Turns 50'', regarding ''Franchise/PerryMason''
15th Jun '17 3:15:40 PM Chytus
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** In ''VisualNovel/TheEmptyTurnabout'', a fan-made case:
*** {{Subverted|Trope}} with [[spoiler:''Athena Cykes'' of all people, who actually killed ''Simon Blackquill'' but was acquitted by Apollo... even though he genuinely believed she was innocent]].
*** [[ZigZaggingTrope Zig-zagged]] with Nathaniel Marston, the current case's defendant. He confessed to the crime, but Apollo believes that he didn't do it. [[spoiler:Fast forward to the end of the trial, and Marston is found guilty as he wanted. It's implied that he didn't really do it.]]

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** * In ''VisualNovel/TheEmptyTurnabout'', a fan-made ''Franchise/AceAttorney'' case:
*** ** {{Subverted|Trope}} with [[spoiler:''Athena Cykes'' of all people, who actually killed ''Simon Blackquill'' but was acquitted by Apollo... even though he genuinely believed she was innocent]].
*** ** [[ZigZaggingTrope Zig-zagged]] with Nathaniel Marston, the current case's defendant. He confessed to the crime, but Apollo believes that he didn't do it. [[spoiler:Fast forward to the end of the trial, and Marston is found guilty as he wanted. It's implied that he didn't really do it.]]
15th Jun '17 12:52:14 PM Gosicrystal
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Added DiffLines:

** In ''VisualNovel/TheEmptyTurnabout'', a fan-made case:
*** {{Subverted|Trope}} with [[spoiler:''Athena Cykes'' of all people, who actually killed ''Simon Blackquill'' but was acquitted by Apollo... even though he genuinely believed she was innocent]].
*** [[ZigZaggingTrope Zig-zagged]] with Nathaniel Marston, the current case's defendant. He confessed to the crime, but Apollo believes that he didn't do it. [[spoiler:Fast forward to the end of the trial, and Marston is found guilty as he wanted. It's implied that he didn't really do it.]]
24th Apr '17 8:21:14 AM dmcreif
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** It's revealed as season 1 progresses that Matt and Foggy chose to start up their own firm with this trope as the intended goal, rather than take a lucrative job offer with [[AmoralAttorney Landman & Zack]].


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** It's revealed as season 1 progresses that Matt and Foggy chose to start up their own firm with this trope as the intended goal, rather than take a lucrative job offer with [[AmoralAttorney Landman & Zack]].

Zack]], which would have had them working for the sorts of people for whom lawyers are their way of making legal problems disappear.

15th Apr '17 4:59:52 PM dmcreif
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* In ''Film/{{Daredevil}}'', Matt Murdock will only accept innocent clients. Because of his super lie-detecting powers, he knows exactly who they are. But of course there aren't that many of them so the movie notes that the firm is nearly broke. To keep the legal scene more exciting in the movie, they apparently made Matt Murdock the prosecuting attorney in a rape case, which private attorneys cannot do unless they have a prosecutor's brief from the state to take the pressure off a Crown Prosecutor or DA for that case. It gets {{lampshaded}} early on, when Foggy reminds Matt that they were taught in law school that they have to defend people who might not be innocent, and Matt snarks that it was Foggy's best class.

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* In ''Film/{{Daredevil}}'', Matt Murdock will only accept innocent clients. Because of his super lie-detecting powers, he knows exactly who they are. But of course there aren't that many of them so the movie notes that the firm is nearly broke. To keep the legal scene more exciting in the movie, they apparently made Matt Murdock the prosecuting attorney in a rape case, which private attorneys cannot do unless they have a prosecutor's brief from the state to take the pressure off a Crown Prosecutor or DA for that case. It gets {{lampshaded}} early on, when Foggy reminds Matt that they were taught in law school that they have to defend people who might not be innocent, and Matt snarks that it was Foggy's best class.



* ''Series/Daredevil2015'': Nelson & Murdock zigzags this trope.

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* ''Series/Daredevil2015'': Nelson & Murdock zigzags this trope.trope, since Matt believes only in defending purely innocent people while Foggy believes "innocent" means "everyone not yet convicted of a crime".
10th Mar '17 8:05:22 PM dmcreif
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Added DiffLines:

*''Series/Daredevil2015'': Nelson & Murdock zigzags this trope.
**On the one hand, Matt decides to defend Karen Page despite her lack of money to pay them and her case being fairly open-and-shut, because he knows from her heartrate that she's innocent.
**On the other hand, their first paying client is [[TheDragon James Wesley]], hiring them to defend one of Wilson Fisk's henchmen. While Foggy has reservations about defending the obviously guilty sociopath, Matt decides to do it for the substantial fee, and to get a line into Fisk's organization.
**In season 2, they choose to help Grotto get protection from the Punisher, despite Grotto being a Kitchen Irish member, since Matt believes that he really does want a second chance. [[HorribleJudgeOfCharacter After Frank Castle makes Grotto admit in front of Matt to killing innocent people, he's absolutely horrified.]]
**It's revealed as season 1 progresses that Matt and Foggy chose to start up their own firm with this trope as the intended goal, rather than take a lucrative job offer with [[AmoralAttorney Landman & Zack]].

10th Sep '16 3:47:10 PM eliaskelham
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** One episode featured Bobby Donnell being forced to provide a ''pro bono'' defense for an accused qualified rapist. He made it quite clear to the jury (despite the rule prohibiting lawyers from presenting their opinions) that he's sure of his client's guilt and that he doesn't care about what happens to the client but said that the jury must acquit because of the precedent a conviction based on the word of a kid who tells lies to get people's attention would create. [[spoiler: The jury found the defendant not guilty]].

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** One episode featured Bobby Donnell being forced to provide a ''pro bono'' defense for an accused qualified rapist. He made it quite clear to the jury (despite the rule prohibiting lawyers from presenting their opinions) that he's sure of thinks his client's guilt client is guilty and that he doesn't care about what happens to the client client, but said that the jury must acquit because of the precedent a conviction based on the word of a kid who tells lies to get people's attention would create. [[spoiler: The jury found the defendant not guilty]].
4th May '16 6:22:46 AM Morgenthaler
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* Sometimes averted with Matt Murdock and Foggy Nelson's law practice in ''Comicbook/{{Daredevil}}''. Most of the people they defend are indeed innocent (since Matt can hear the heartbeats to know when he's being lied to), but they believe enough in the letter of the law to have defended some real scumbags.

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* Sometimes averted with ''Comicbook/{{Daredevil}}'':
** Most of the people
Matt Murdock and Foggy Nelson's law practice in ''Comicbook/{{Daredevil}}''. Most of the people they defend are indeed innocent (since Matt can hear the heartbeats to know when he's being lied to), but they believe enough in the letter of the law to have defended some real scumbags.



** Subverted to Hell and back when Matt is hired to defend Mr. Hyde, an AxCrazy GeniusBruiser accused of murder. Hyde is as much of a bad guy as any of Daredevil's other enemies, but he repeatedly insists that, despite being guilty of a whole bunch of other crimes, he's innocent of the one he's hiring Matt to defend him against. [[spoiler:As it turns out, Hyde was telling the truth, and Matt tracks down the true killer as Daredevil]].

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** Subverted to Hell hell and back when Matt is hired to defend Mr. Hyde, an AxCrazy GeniusBruiser accused of murder. Hyde is as much of a bad guy as any of Daredevil's other enemies, but he repeatedly insists that, despite being guilty of a whole bunch of other crimes, [[NotMeThisTime he's innocent of the one he's hiring Matt to defend him against.against]]. [[spoiler:As it turns out, Hyde was telling the truth, and Matt tracks down the true killer as Daredevil]].



* Played completely straight in ''Film/TheDevilsAdvocate''. This is actually [[LouCypher Milton's]] master plan - create the most skilled {{Amoral Attorney}}s imaginable, put them at the disposal of the most despicable people in the world, and have them use the loopholes in the law to protect the guilty until the world is filled with human monsters, making the world his and his alone.

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* Played completely straight in ''Film/TheDevilsAdvocate''. ''Film/TheDevilsAdvocate''.
**
This is actually [[LouCypher Milton's]] master plan - create the most skilled {{Amoral Attorney}}s imaginable, put them at the disposal of the most despicable people in the world, and have them use the loopholes in the law to protect the guilty until the world is filled with human monsters, making the world his and his alone.



** A very good example of HollywoodLaw, as in reality, involuntary commitment to a mental institution can in fact be worse than incarceration-you stay there until the staff believes you should be released, with approval from a judge, and not before. For any violent patient like that shown in the film, the odds of release go way down. Of course, given the ease and skill with which this killer manipulated his lawyer, the court, ''and'' the professional psychiatrist who assessed him, its quite possible that for ''him'' it would only be a matter of time to play the part of a recovering/recovered patient and get released.



** Which would mean he ''knows'' if the guy is guilty ''before'' the trial...
*** Most lawyers will know exactly what their client thinks happened long before the trial starts, because a lawyer cannot prepare a good case unless you tell him everything. That's why we have attorney-client confidentiality. Keeping your own lawyer in the dark is like sending your champion out to fight for you blindfolded. That doesn't mean [[TooDumbToLive stupid people]] don't do it, of course ...
* ''Series/{{Matlock}}''
** Subverted at least once. And so he puts someone the client cares for on the stand, and all but accuses them of the murder, to make the client break down and confess.
* A big point of ''Series/ThePractice'' was that the clients were often guilty. The whole premise was intended to be a subversion. On several occasions, they actually defended someone apparently innocent, then later realized their guilt midway through the trial.

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** Which would mean he ''knows'' if the guy is guilty ''before'' the trial...
*** Most lawyers will know exactly what their client thinks happened long before the trial starts, because a lawyer cannot prepare a good case unless you tell him everything. That's why we have attorney-client confidentiality. Keeping your own lawyer in the dark is like sending your champion out to fight for you blindfolded. That doesn't mean [[TooDumbToLive stupid people]] don't do it, of course ...
* ''Series/{{Matlock}}''
**
''Series/{{Matlock}}'': Subverted at least once. And so he puts someone the client cares for on the stand, and all but accuses them of the murder, to make the client break down and confess.
* ''Series/ThePractice'':
**
A big point of ''Series/ThePractice'' the show was that the clients were often guilty. The whole premise was intended to be a subversion. On several occasions, they actually defended someone apparently innocent, then later realized their guilt midway through the trial.



* Played with a few different ways in ''Series/BostonLegal''. Somewhat justified with Denny, who is often stated to have never lost a case. He, like others on the list, doesn't want to take the case of a guilty person (he wants to protect his perfect record, of course) and when a judge assigns him to defend a child rapist/murderer, Denny goes so far as to shoot his client in the leg to keep from taking the case.

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* Played with a few different ways in ''Series/BostonLegal''. Somewhat justified with Denny, who ''Series/BostonLegal''.
** Denny
is often stated to have never lost a case. He, like others on the list, doesn't want to take the case of a guilty person (he wants to protect his perfect record, of course) and when a judge assigns him to defend a child rapist/murderer, Denny goes so far as to shoot his client in the leg to keep from taking the case.
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