History Main / GonzoJournalism

16th Apr '18 6:36:47 PM Ninamarie124
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24th Dec '17 11:52:32 AM nombretomado
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** This is more likely to occur with local broadcasts. While the professional leagues and major media networks have agreements to broadcast big games across the US on a regular basis,[[note]]e.g., {{ESPN}} has ''Sunday Night Baseball'' and ''Monday Night Football''[[/note]] most professional teams have agreements with local or regional networks to broadcast the vast majority of games that don't get on national TV.[[note]]UsefulNotes/AmericanFootball is the major exception, due to its ''massive'' popularity and relatively fewer games -- once a week for 16 weeks. Compare that with basketball, ice hockey (82 games, 3-4 games a week), and baseball (162 games, a game nearly every day).[[/note]] Consequently, while nationwide telecasts have announcers who will be calling games for different teams week after week (and an announcer with such an obvious bias to one team will alienate a huge chunk of the audience, whether its fans of the other team or just casual fans), games on local broadcasts will see pretty much the same announcers for the same team being covered and will generally have fans of that particular team as their main audience. After all, if you're going through the effort to find that team on a cable channel or radio, you're more likely to be a loyal fan of that team in general.

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** This is more likely to occur with local broadcasts. While the professional leagues and major media networks have agreements to broadcast big games across the US on a regular basis,[[note]]e.g., {{ESPN}} Creator/{{ESPN}} has ''Sunday Night Baseball'' and ''Monday Night Football''[[/note]] most professional teams have agreements with local or regional networks to broadcast the vast majority of games that don't get on national TV.[[note]]UsefulNotes/AmericanFootball is the major exception, due to its ''massive'' popularity and relatively fewer games -- once a week for 16 weeks. Compare that with basketball, ice hockey (82 games, 3-4 games a week), and baseball (162 games, a game nearly every day).[[/note]] Consequently, while nationwide telecasts have announcers who will be calling games for different teams week after week (and an announcer with such an obvious bias to one team will alienate a huge chunk of the audience, whether its fans of the other team or just casual fans), games on local broadcasts will see pretty much the same announcers for the same team being covered and will generally have fans of that particular team as their main audience. After all, if you're going through the effort to find that team on a cable channel or radio, you're more likely to be a loyal fan of that team in general.
12th Dec '17 7:23:15 PM WillKeaton
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* P.J. O'Rourke is often viewed as the conservative/libertarian counterpart to Thompson, who was staunchly left-wing and sympathized with the [[NewAgeRetroHippie '60s counterculture]]. He does, however, cite Thompson as an influence (along with H. L. Mencken), and [[http://www.stopsmilingonline.com/story_detail.php?id=365 looks favorably on him]].

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* P.J. O'Rourke is often viewed as the conservative/libertarian counterpart to Thompson, who was staunchly left-wing and sympathized with the [[NewAgeRetroHippie '60s counterculture]]. He does, however, cite Thompson as an influence (along with H. L. Mencken), and [[http://www.stopsmilingonline.com/story_detail.php?id=365 looks favorably on him]].him.]]



** This is more likely to occur with local broadcasts. While the professional leagues and major media networks have agreements to broadcast big games across the US on a regular basis[[note]]e.g., {{ESPN}} has ''Sunday Night Baseball'' and ''Monday Night Football''[[/note]], most professional teams have agreements with local or regional networks to broadcast the vast majority of games that don't get on national TV.[[note]]UsefulNotes/AmericanFootball is the major exception, due to its ''massive'' popularity and relatively fewer games -- once a week for 16 weeks. Compare that with basketball, ice hockey (82 games, 3-4 games a week), and baseball (162 games, a game nearly every day).[[/note]] Consequently, while nationwide telecasts have announcers who will be calling games for different teams week after week (and an announcer with such an obvious bias to one team will alienate a huge chunk of the audience, whether its fans of the other team or just casual fans), games on local broadcasts will see pretty much the same announcers for the same team being covered and will generally have fans of that particular team as their main audience. After all, if you're going through the effort to find that team on a cable channel or radio, you're more likely to be a loyal fan of that team in general.

to:

** This is more likely to occur with local broadcasts. While the professional leagues and major media networks have agreements to broadcast big games across the US on a regular basis[[note]]e.basis,[[note]]e.g., {{ESPN}} has ''Sunday Night Baseball'' and ''Monday Night Football''[[/note]], Football''[[/note]] most professional teams have agreements with local or regional networks to broadcast the vast majority of games that don't get on national TV.[[note]]UsefulNotes/AmericanFootball is the major exception, due to its ''massive'' popularity and relatively fewer games -- once a week for 16 weeks. Compare that with basketball, ice hockey (82 games, 3-4 games a week), and baseball (162 games, a game nearly every day).[[/note]] Consequently, while nationwide telecasts have announcers who will be calling games for different teams week after week (and an announcer with such an obvious bias to one team will alienate a huge chunk of the audience, whether its fans of the other team or just casual fans), games on local broadcasts will see pretty much the same announcers for the same team being covered and will generally have fans of that particular team as their main audience. After all, if you're going through the effort to find that team on a cable channel or radio, you're more likely to be a loyal fan of that team in general.
12th Dec '17 7:22:51 PM WillKeaton
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* The protagonist of Bryan Young's ''Lost at the Con'' is a self-declared gonzo journalist, usually on the political beats, who gets sent to cover [[FanConvention Griffin*Con]][[note]]A thinly-veiled {{Expy}} of [=DragonCon=][[/note]]. At first he's very disparaging of the con and the kind of people who go there (both fans and guests) [[spoiler:but eventually winds up defending them against the kind of {{Jerk Jock}}s who pick on people that just want to have fun and be themselves]].

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* The protagonist of Bryan Young's ''Lost at the Con'' is a self-declared gonzo journalist, usually on the political beats, who gets sent to cover [[FanConvention Griffin*Con]][[note]]A Griffin*Con]].[[note]]A thinly-veiled {{Expy}} of [=DragonCon=][[/note]]. At first he's very disparaging of the con and the kind of people who go there (both fans and guests) [[spoiler:but eventually winds up defending them against the kind of {{Jerk Jock}}s who pick on people that just want to have fun and be themselves]].themselves.]]
17th Oct '17 4:23:21 PM GoblinCipher
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* [=McDougal=] from ''The Paper'' qualifies. Of course, the enemy he demonizes is the parking commissioner.

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* [=McDougal=] from ''The Paper'' qualifies.Paper''. Of course, the enemy he demonizes is the parking commissioner.
2nd Apr '17 3:35:21 AM WillBGood
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* The protagonist of Bryan Young's ''Lost at the Con'' is a self-declared gonzo journalist, usually on the political beats, who gets sent to cover [[FanConvention Griffin*Con]][[note]]A thinly-veiled {{Expy}} of DragonCon[[/note]]. At first he's very disparaging of the con and the kind of people who go there (both fans and guests) [[spoiler:but eventually winds up defending them against the kind of {{JerkJock}}s who pick on people that just want to have fun and be themselves]].

to:

* The protagonist of Bryan Young's ''Lost at the Con'' is a self-declared gonzo journalist, usually on the political beats, who gets sent to cover [[FanConvention Griffin*Con]][[note]]A thinly-veiled {{Expy}} of DragonCon[[/note]]. [=DragonCon=][[/note]]. At first he's very disparaging of the con and the kind of people who go there (both fans and guests) [[spoiler:but eventually winds up defending them against the kind of {{JerkJock}}s {{Jerk Jock}}s who pick on people that just want to have fun and be themselves]].
26th Feb '17 10:48:04 AM nombretomado
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Gonzo journalism developed during the 1960s, spearheaded by outlaw journalist HunterSThompson. Thompson wrote very stylized news stories told from the first person perspective (most news stories are written in third person) that were often sarcastic, vulgar and extremely negative of his opposition, including his personal [[ArchEnemy arch-nemesis]], U.S. President UsefulNotes/RichardNixon. The UrExample, TropeCodifier, and {{Genre Launch}}er is Thompson's "[[UsefulNotes/HorseRacing The Kentucky Derby]] is Decadent and Depraved", published in the short-lived literary magazine ''Scanlan's Monthly'' in June 1970, documenting his trip to Louisville--his hometown--and the bizarre festival that is the Derby.

to:

Gonzo journalism developed during the 1960s, spearheaded by outlaw journalist HunterSThompson.Creator/HunterSThompson. Thompson wrote very stylized news stories told from the first person perspective (most news stories are written in third person) that were often sarcastic, vulgar and extremely negative of his opposition, including his personal [[ArchEnemy arch-nemesis]], U.S. President UsefulNotes/RichardNixon. The UrExample, TropeCodifier, and {{Genre Launch}}er is Thompson's "[[UsefulNotes/HorseRacing The Kentucky Derby]] is Decadent and Depraved", published in the short-lived literary magazine ''Scanlan's Monthly'' in June 1970, documenting his trip to Louisville--his hometown--and the bizarre festival that is the Derby.



* ''Literature/FearAndLoathingInLasVegas'': Pretty much the TropeCodifier. A stream-of-conscious novel written by HunterSThompson in the early 1970s chronicling his experiences covering news stories in Las Vegas. Although ostensibly about his coverage of a motorcycle race and a police convention, Thompson used the setting to criticize what he saw as vile in American culture as well as lament the death of the ideals he and the hippies aspired to, but failed to see realized, in the previous decade.

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* ''Literature/FearAndLoathingInLasVegas'': Pretty much the TropeCodifier. A stream-of-conscious novel written by HunterSThompson Creator/HunterSThompson in the early 1970s chronicling his experiences covering news stories in Las Vegas. Although ostensibly about his coverage of a motorcycle race and a police convention, Thompson used the setting to criticize what he saw as vile in American culture as well as lament the death of the ideals he and the hippies aspired to, but failed to see realized, in the previous decade.
8th Jan '17 1:01:21 PM nombretomado
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* ''{{Transmetropolitan}}'': Main character Spider Jerusalem is a very obvious Hunter S. Thompson expy, based in some ill-defined future setting. Jerusalem violently accosts his enemies, uses his position to topple government officials and rally the masses out of their mindless funk. He clearly believes journalism is a weapon against evil and corrupt power. One point early on, he even has one of Thompson's books on his coffee table.

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\n* ''{{Transmetropolitan}}'': ''ComicBook/{{Transmetropolitan}}'': Main character Spider Jerusalem is a very obvious Hunter S. Thompson expy, based in some ill-defined future setting. Jerusalem violently accosts his enemies, uses his position to topple government officials and rally the masses out of their mindless funk. He clearly believes journalism is a weapon against evil and corrupt power. One point early on, he even has one of Thompson's books on his coffee table.
table.



























6th Oct '16 2:08:30 PM CaptainAmazing
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Gonzo journalism developed during the 1960s, spearheaded by outlaw journalist HunterSThompson. Thompson wrote very stylized news stories told from the first person perspective (most news stories are written in third person) that were often sarcastic, vulgar and extremely negative of his opposition, including his personal [[ArchEnemy arch-nemesis]], U.S. President UsefulNotes/RichardNixon. The UrExample, TropeCodifier, and {{Genre Launch}}er is Thompson's "[[UsefulNotes/HorseRacing The Kentucky Derby]] is Decadent and Depraved", published in the shortlived literary magazine ''Scanlan's Monthly'' in June 1970, documenting his trip to Louisville--his hometown--and the bizarre festival that is the Derby.

to:

Gonzo journalism developed during the 1960s, spearheaded by outlaw journalist HunterSThompson. Thompson wrote very stylized news stories told from the first person perspective (most news stories are written in third person) that were often sarcastic, vulgar and extremely negative of his opposition, including his personal [[ArchEnemy arch-nemesis]], U.S. President UsefulNotes/RichardNixon. The UrExample, TropeCodifier, and {{Genre Launch}}er is Thompson's "[[UsefulNotes/HorseRacing The Kentucky Derby]] is Decadent and Depraved", published in the shortlived short-lived literary magazine ''Scanlan's Monthly'' in June 1970, documenting his trip to Louisville--his hometown--and the bizarre festival that is the Derby.
The style was created entirely because Thompson was a RidiculousProcrastinator who was [[ChristmasRushed up against his deadline]] and, lacking anything to show for his work other than his basic notes on the event, simply started ripping pages out of his notebook and sending them in. The magazine published his first-person notes from the Derby as-is, and thus [[AccidentalArt Gonzo Journalism was born]].
21st Jan '16 6:33:56 PM nombretomado
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Gonzo journalism developed during the 1960s, spearheaded by outlaw journalist HunterSThompson. Thompson wrote very stylized news stories told from the first person perspective (most news stories are written in third person) that were often sarcastic, vulgar and extremely negative of his opposition, including his personal [[ArchEnemy arch-nemesis]], U.S. President UsefulNotes/RichardNixon. The UrExample, TropeCodifier, and {{Genre Launch}}er is Thompson's "[[HorseRacing The Kentucky Derby]] is Decadent and Depraved", published in the shortlived literary magazine ''Scanlan's Monthly'' in June 1970, documenting his trip to Louisville--his hometown--and the bizarre festival that is the Derby.

to:

Gonzo journalism developed during the 1960s, spearheaded by outlaw journalist HunterSThompson. Thompson wrote very stylized news stories told from the first person perspective (most news stories are written in third person) that were often sarcastic, vulgar and extremely negative of his opposition, including his personal [[ArchEnemy arch-nemesis]], U.S. President UsefulNotes/RichardNixon. The UrExample, TropeCodifier, and {{Genre Launch}}er is Thompson's "[[HorseRacing "[[UsefulNotes/HorseRacing The Kentucky Derby]] is Decadent and Depraved", published in the shortlived literary magazine ''Scanlan's Monthly'' in June 1970, documenting his trip to Louisville--his hometown--and the bizarre festival that is the Derby.
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