History Main / GameplayAndStorySegregation

1st Aug '17 8:15:44 PM ImpudentInfidel
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** In one cutscene in Episode II, we see [[TheSquad half a dozen]] or so [[SpaceMarines Terran Marines]] kill at least that many hydralisks before succumbing to their superior numbers; in gameplay Marines are far weaker. Note also that Ghosts are never seen wearing any kind of helmet or breathing apparatus, despite their routine deployment in hard vacuum (probably not a case of [[BatmanCanBreatheInSpace Batman Can Breathe In Space]] because cutscene Ghosts are always shown in an atmosphere or pressurized ship).

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** In one cutscene in Episode II, we see [[TheSquad half a dozen]] or so [[SpaceMarines Terran Marines]] kill at least that many hydralisks before succumbing to their superior numbers; in gameplay Marines are far weaker.weaker, and hydralisks have ranged attacks instead of relying on their claws. Note also that Ghosts are never seen wearing any kind of helmet or breathing apparatus, despite their routine deployment in hard vacuum (probably not a case of [[BatmanCanBreatheInSpace Batman Can Breathe In Space]] because cutscene Ghosts are always shown in an atmosphere or pressurized ship).
21st Jul '17 5:43:22 PM Malady
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* ''VideoGame/AVeryLongRopeToTheTopOfTheSky'', being an EasternRPG, lets you use magic abilities in battle. However, magic is never mentioned or referenced in the story except in regards to one subplot that happened in the distant past. This gets particularly egregious when one villain dismisses your magical powerhouse as a weak old man, even though, if magic is commonplace, he should know that frail old men can still be legitimate threats.
13th Jul '17 1:09:54 PM MBG
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** When he appears in fighting games, Future Gohan always has both his arms, despite the fact that his most iconic trait is him losing his left arm against the Androids. It gets even stranger with cases such as ''Raging Blast 2'', where Future Gohan's fighting style is specifically programmed only to use his right arm (such as performing one-handed versions of his signature attacks, the Masenko and Kamehameha). This is presumably because making him one-handed would require a completely distinct version of the common attack animations, and simply making his left arm "invisible" would result in animations that didn't make sense.

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** When he appears in fighting games, Future Gohan always has both his arms, despite the fact that his most iconic trait is him losing his left arm against the Androids. It gets even stranger with cases such as ''Raging Blast 2'', where Future Gohan's fighting style is specifically programmed only to use his right arm (such as performing one-handed versions of his signature attacks, the Masenko and Kamehameha). This is presumably believed to be because making him one-handed would require a completely distinct version of the common attack animations, and simply making his left arm "invisible" would result censorship issues in animations that didn't make sense.Japan relating to characters losing limbs; various ''Dragonball'' games developed in America don't have this problem.
12th Jul '17 3:37:52 AM Wuz
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12th Jul '17 3:37:48 AM Wuz
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A loosely equivalent technical term for this is "ludonarrative dissonance", a term coined by Clint Hocking (a former employee of Creator/LucasArts). "Ludonarrative" is the portion of the story told through the gameplay ("ludo" comes from the Latin word meaning "play" or "game"), so ludonarrative dissonance is when there are logical inconsistencies between what is conveyed through the gameplay and what is conveyed through the story, or when the gameplay is presenting one message while the story is presenting another. The term lies closer to BrokenAesop that comes from the messages of the gameplay mechanics undercutting the messages of its narrative, rather than just continuity conflicts between the story told through gameplay and the actual story.

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A loosely equivalent technical term for this is "ludonarrative dissonance", a term coined by Clint Hocking (a former employee of Creator/LucasArts). "Ludonarrative" is the portion of the story told through the gameplay ("ludo" comes from the Latin word meaning "play" or "game"), so ludonarrative dissonance is when there are logical inconsistencies between what is conveyed through the gameplay and what is conveyed through the story, or when the gameplay is presenting one message while the story is presenting another. The term as it is used today lies closer to BrokenAesop that comes from the messages of the gameplay mechanics undercutting the messages of its narrative, rather than just continuity conflicts between the story told through gameplay and the actual story.
12th Jul '17 3:36:36 AM Wuz
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The technical term for this is "ludonarrative dissonance", a term coined by Clint Hocking (a former employee of Creator/LucasArts). "Ludonarrative" is the portion of the story told through the gameplay ("ludo" comes from the Latin word meaning "play" or "game"), so ludonarrative dissonance is when there are logical inconsistencies between what is conveyed through the gameplay and what is conveyed through the story, or when the gameplay is presenting one message while the story is presenting another.

to:

The A loosely equivalent technical term for this is "ludonarrative dissonance", a term coined by Clint Hocking (a former employee of Creator/LucasArts). "Ludonarrative" is the portion of the story told through the gameplay ("ludo" comes from the Latin word meaning "play" or "game"), so ludonarrative dissonance is when there are logical inconsistencies between what is conveyed through the gameplay and what is conveyed through the story, or when the gameplay is presenting one message while the story is presenting another.
another. The term lies closer to BrokenAesop that comes from the messages of the gameplay mechanics undercutting the messages of its narrative, rather than just continuity conflicts between the story told through gameplay and the actual story.
3rd Jun '17 1:26:59 AM drac0blade
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Added DiffLines:

*** Also, the technique Tear uses to send the entire mansion to sleep is supposed to be a powerful spell that only does just that. Gameplay wise, it does damage like a normal attack, without any special effects.
3rd Jun '17 12:25:49 AM drac0blade
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*** The quest [[http://elderscrolls.wikia.com/wiki/Forbidden_Legend Forbidden Legend]] has you reforge an amulet that was reputed to be powerful and dangerous enough that even split into three it caused problems. This amulets power? [[spoiler: +30 to health, magicka and stamina]], useful but not that powerful.

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*** The quest [[http://elderscrolls.wikia.com/wiki/Forbidden_Legend Forbidden Legend]] has you reforge an amulet that was reputed to be powerful and dangerous enough that even split into three it caused problems. This amulets amulet's power? [[spoiler: +30 to health, magicka and stamina]], useful but not that powerful.
20th May '17 10:45:30 AM nombretomado
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* ''Franchise/{{Ultima}}'':

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* ''Franchise/{{Ultima}}'':''VideoGame/{{Ultima}}'':
19th May '17 12:39:10 PM Crino37
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** Several of the Grand Theft Auto games have missions involving recurring [[NPC NPCs]] that end with you dropping them off somewhere and them leaving. During the brief period after dropping them off, when the mission is considered complete but before they actually disappear, you can do anything to them, including killing them, and nothing will happen - and they'll be back for the next mission. This becomes surreal when Trevor can thank a lady for a date by blasting her in the face with a shotgun after dropping her off, causing her to collapse in a pool of her own blood, and she'll not only be fine next time but won't remember it and will date him again.

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** Several of the Grand Theft Auto games have missions involving recurring [[NPC [[NonPlayerCharacter NPCs]] that end with you dropping them off somewhere and them leaving. During the brief period after dropping them off, when the mission is considered complete but before they actually disappear, you can do anything to them, including killing them, and nothing will happen - and they'll be back for the next mission. This becomes surreal when Trevor can thank a lady for a date by blasting her in the face with a shotgun after dropping her off, causing her to collapse in a pool of her own blood, and she'll not only be fine next time but won't remember it and will date him again.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.GameplayAndStorySegregation