History Main / GameplayAndStorySegregation

20th Oct '17 11:06:23 AM HiddenWindshield
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* In the ''VideoGame/{{LEGO|AdaptationGame}} Literature/TheLordOfTheRings'' game, it repeats Gimli's "You'll have to toss me -- don't tell the elf." part during the Battle Of Helm's Deep, which is all well and good... except for the fact that ''throwing Gimli is a gameplay mechanic'' (you even ''defeat a boss'' using it), and by that point Gimli has most likely been thrown all over the place by all manner of characters.

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* In the The ''VideoGame/{{LEGO|AdaptationGame}} Literature/TheLordOfTheRings'' game, it game repeats Gimli's "You'll have to toss me -- don't tell the elf." part elf" line [[Film/TheLordOfTheRings from the movie]] during the Battle Of Helm's Deep, which is all well and good... except for the fact that ''throwing throwing Gimli is a gameplay mechanic'' mechanic (you even ''defeat a boss'' using it), and by that point Gimli has most likely been thrown all over the place by all manner of characters.
20th Oct '17 10:59:11 AM HiddenWindshield
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The slaughter of a single NPC is a tragedy; the slaughter of [[WhatMeasureIsAMook one thousand]] {{mooks}} is a [[AMillionIsAStatistic statistic]]. This is especially jarring in [=RPGs=] where the BigBad will be accused of "slaughtering many people." Even though, by the time you reach that point in the game, your party has probably slaughtered more bodies than any of the villains combined.

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The slaughter of a single NPC is a tragedy; the slaughter of [[WhatMeasureIsAMook one thousand]] {{mooks}} is a [[AMillionIsAStatistic statistic]]. This is especially jarring in [=RPGs=] where the BigBad will be accused of "slaughtering many people." Even though, by the time you reach that point in the game, your party has probably slaughtered more bodies than any all of the villains combined.
5th Oct '17 5:58:12 PM ImpudentInfidel
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*** The Third War for Armageddon event for ''Warhammer 40,000'' was a bit of a disappointing stalemate, but the Eye of Terror campaign produced more dramatic results, with the forces of Chaos overrunning the defenders of the pivotal fortress world of Cadia, the Dark Eldar getting soundly defeated to the extent of having their capital sealed away in another dimension, and Orks and the Tau expanding all but unopposed. Yet for years subsequent material this attack from the Eye of Terror is only discussed in conjectural terms - the campaign occured in the final days of the year 40,999... until the ''Gathering Storm'' books advanced the narrative, starting with the fall of Cadia and the Eldar being overrun in several places. Then in the Fall of Medusa V campaign, Games Workshop declared the Space Marines the winning faction even though they ''failed'' their objectives, causing fans to accuse GW of favoring its mascot faction past the point of reason.

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*** The Third War for Armageddon event for ''Warhammer 40,000'' was a bit of a disappointing stalemate, but the Eye of Terror campaign produced more dramatic results, with the forces of Chaos overrunning the defenders of the pivotal fortress world of Cadia, the Dark Eldar getting soundly defeated to the extent of having their capital sealed away in another dimension, and Orks and the Tau expanding all but unopposed. Yet for years subsequent material this attack from the Eye of Terror is only discussed in conjectural terms - the campaign occured in the final days of the year 40,999... until the ''Gathering Storm'' books advanced the narrative, starting with the fall of Cadia and the Eldar being overrun in several places. Then in the Fall of Medusa V campaign, Games Workshop declared the Space Marines the winning faction even though they ''failed'' their objectives, objectives (the allied Imperial Guard were the actual winners and the Marines piggybacked on them), causing fans to accuse GW of favoring its mascot faction past the point of reason.
4th Oct '17 6:39:51 PM superkeijikun
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* In the story of ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXIV'', the PlayerCharacter is forced into exile to Ishgard during the events of ''Heavensward'' [[spoiler:following their being framed in the sultana's death]]. Outside of the story, however, the player is free to travel between Ishgard and the rest of Eorzea.
1st Oct '17 7:30:02 PM Malady
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1st Oct '17 7:29:11 PM Malady
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1st Oct '17 7:22:56 PM Malady
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* [[Videogame/TheForceUnleashed The Force Unleashed]] is an interesting example. The ''Franchise/StarWars'' Expanded Universe AKA Legends continuity, in case you didn't know, it very big, and sometimes crazy, and Starkiller (both Galen Malak and his clone) are nowhere near the most powerful in it. But Starkiller's skills with the force and the lightsaber far outshine anything Palpatine, Luke, Anakin or Yoda (the four supposedly most powerful) have ever done in the films, causing many to label him the most powerful force-sensetive ever. The game's developers and defenders have claimed it to be an example of this trope, but the problem is, the game's narratives actually seem to support Starkiller's insane skill and raw power. Forget canonically and infamously pulling a Star Destroyer out of the sky (technically, he only redirected its fall); he defeated Emperor Palpatine and Darth Vader twice, and (non-canonically, but in what-if stories) Boba Fett, Obi-Wan Kenobi, Obi Wan Kenobi's Force Ghost (seriously), an untrained-but-embracing-the-darkside Luke Skywalker, the Ewok tribe, Chewy, Han, and a fully trained Jedi Leia. The only hint at him having some limits to his abilities are the fact that these fights required boss battles, when judging by gameplay he should have been able to force-lightning or hack them all to bits in an instant.

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* [[Videogame/TheForceUnleashed The Force Unleashed]] ''Videogame/TheForceUnleashed'' is an interesting example. The ''Franchise/StarWars'' Expanded Universe AKA Legends continuity, in case you didn't know, it very big, and sometimes crazy, and Starkiller (both Galen Malak and his clone) are nowhere near the most powerful in it. But Starkiller's skills with the force and the lightsaber far outshine anything Palpatine, Luke, Anakin or Yoda (the four supposedly most powerful) have ever done in the films, causing many to label him the most powerful force-sensetive force-sensitive ever. The game's developers and defenders have claimed it to be an example of this trope, but the problem is, the game's narratives actually seem to support Starkiller's insane skill and raw power. Forget canonically and infamously pulling a Star Destroyer out of the sky (technically, he only redirected its fall); he defeated Emperor Palpatine and Darth Vader twice, and (non-canonically, but in what-if stories) Boba Fett, Obi-Wan Kenobi, Obi Wan Kenobi's Force Ghost (seriously), an untrained-but-embracing-the-darkside Luke Skywalker, the Ewok tribe, Chewy, Han, and a fully trained Jedi Leia. The only hint at him having some limits to his abilities are the fact that these fights required boss battles, when judging by gameplay he should have been able to force-lightning or hack them all to bits in an instant.
1st Oct '17 1:23:42 PM nombretomado
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* ''WoodruffAndTheSchnibbleOfAzimuth'': Using the Discerning Formula on the three cup man makes Woodruff realize that the man is cheating, and how he does it. However, up until that point, it is completely possible to win against him by abuse of SaveScumming, which shouldn't be possible if he was actually cheating.

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* ''WoodruffAndTheSchnibbleOfAzimuth'': ''VideoGame/TheBizarreAdventuresOfWoodruffAndTheSchnibble'': Using the Discerning Formula on the three cup man makes Woodruff realize that the man is cheating, and how he does it. However, up until that point, it is completely possible to win against him by abuse of SaveScumming, which shouldn't be possible if he was actually cheating.
1st Oct '17 7:49:34 AM hyphz
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** ''{{VideoGame/Destiny 2}}'' begins with the villain blocking access to the Traveler, the entity which gives all Guardians their powers. Your Guardian alone discovers a shard of the Traveler which restores his/her powers alone. They are now uniquely placed to save the universe.. until you go to the first multiplayer sandbox map and meet hundreds of other Guardians who apparently all have exactly the same backstory.
19th Sep '17 3:03:05 PM Kadorhal
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* In ''VideoGame/{{Drakengard}}'', you're only allowed to take one party member with you into battle, and he doesn't follow along with you on the battlefield, no; you transform into him for a predetermined amount of time. Contrast this to the {{cutscene}}s, which show all the party members present in the battles when applicable. Dragonfire kills anything human in a single blow, but not so for some higher-end Mooks in-game. Caim wields a relatively smallish BFS as his default weapon in the cutscenes, but his default weapon in-game is realistically proportioned to be used by a human being. Manah can obliterate armies in cutscenes, but never displays this sort of power when fighting you in-game. And so on in that order.

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* In ''VideoGame/{{Drakengard}}'', you're only allowed to take one party member with you into battle, and he doesn't follow along with you on the battlefield, no; you transform into him for a predetermined amount of time. Contrast this to the {{cutscene}}s, which show all the party members present in the battles when applicable. Dragonfire kills anything human in a single blow, but not so for some higher-end Mooks in-game. Caim wields a relatively smallish BFS as his default weapon in the cutscenes, but his default weapon in-game is realistically proportioned to be used by a human being. Manah can obliterate armies in cutscenes, but never displays this sort of power when fighting you in-game. And so on in that order. Heck, an important NPC in ''Drakengard 2'' is one of the party members from the first game - who was completely unavailable until you beat the game once and as such never actually joins up with Caim or is even hinted to exist in the path to the ending that the second game follows from.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.GameplayAndStorySegregation