History Main / GainaxEnding

26th Jun '17 12:34:30 AM jamespolk
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* ''Places in the Heart'' has a fairly mild example. The film was one of several entries into the 1980's "farm movie" genre about families working to save their farms. Set in the 1930's in a small Texas town, it follows a fairly standard narrative for much of its runtime, dealing with the social and racial tensions in the town. After a climactic showdown with local Klan members, which sees the main black character run out of town, the final scene takes place in a church service. At first it seems like a normal service, grounded in realism like the rest of the film, but as communion is passed around, nearly every character previously seen in the film--friend and foe, good and bad, living and dead--is seen taking part in the communion. The final shot is completely startling and unexpected, but it forces the viewer to rethink everything we've seen before, and the way it suggests grace and reconciliation qualifies as a genuine [[TearJerker tear jerker]].

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* ''Places in the Heart'' ''Film/PlacesInTheHeart'' has a fairly mild example. The film was one of several entries into the 1980's "farm movie" genre about families working to save their farms. Set in the 1930's in a small Texas town, it follows a fairly standard narrative for much of its runtime, dealing with the social and racial tensions in the town. After a climactic showdown with local Klan members, which sees the main black character run out of town, the final scene takes place in a church service. At first it seems like a normal service, grounded in realism like the rest of the film, but as communion is passed around, nearly every character previously seen in the film--friend and foe, good and bad, living and dead--is seen taking part in the communion. The final shot is completely startling and unexpected, but it forces the viewer to rethink everything we've seen before, and the way it suggests grace and reconciliation qualifies as a genuine [[TearJerker tear jerker]].
8th Jun '17 7:31:39 AM jamespolk
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* Here is how Creator/CharlieChaplin film ''Film/{{Sunnyside}}'' ends: Charlie, grief-stricken after his girl rejects him, commits suicide by stepping in front of a speeding car. This is revealed to be a dream when Charlie wakes up in the hotel, and instead we get a HappyEnding in which Charlie embraces his girl and sends the city chap packing. However, there is nothing intrinsic to the narrative saying ''which'' part of the film is the dream. It is equally possible to assume that Charlie ''did'' get hit by the car and the last part, with Charlie winning his girl and the city chap leaving, is his DyingDream. Critics have been arguing about how to interpret the end to this movie ever since.
7th Jun '17 11:26:02 PM Madrugada
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* The ending of ''Film/DonnieDarko'', as well as the exact meaning of the film itself, is still speculated upon by many to this day. The director's cut apparently clears up a number of questions that went unanswered in the theatrical release.



* ''Film/LiveAndLetDie'' ended with a voodoo priest apparently resurrecting himself [[RealAfterAll for real.]] Then the movie just ends.



* ''Film/BigManJapan'' is a {{mockumentary}} about a guy who has a crappy personal life who happens to be able to grow giant from electricity and fight {{kaiju}}. At the end the title character is getting the crap beat out of him by a monster, then it suddenly switches to a StylisticSuck {{toku}} style, some Series/{{Ultraman}}-esque [[EagleLand American]] characters show up and brutally kill the monster without much effort. Roll credits over the main character having dinner with the American Ultraman family. It's supposed to symbolize the decline of Japan's place in the world or something but... [[FlatWhat What]].

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* ''Film/BigManJapan'' is a {{mockumentary}} about a guy who has a crappy personal life who happens to be able to grow giant from electricity and fight {{kaiju}}. At the end the title character is getting the crap beat out of him by a monster, then it suddenly switches to a StylisticSuck {{toku}} style, some Series/{{Ultraman}}-esque [[EagleLand American]] characters show up and brutally kill the monster without much effort. Roll credits over the main character having dinner with the American Ultraman family. It's supposed to symbolize the decline of Japan's place in the world or something but... [[FlatWhat What]].What?.



* Japanese {{toku}} parody/deconstruction/reconstruction/SOMETHING ''Film/{{Zebraman}}'' is about a teacher who's dissatisfied with his life due to a cheating wife, kids who like him, and hates his job. He escapes from all this by watching the titular TV series. He decides to make his own costume and become a Batman {{Expy}}, fighting crime apparently through the power of [[MindScrew his opponents being unsure if he's real or not]]. [[GiantSpaceFleaFromNowhere some aliens who want to take over Earth]] realize he's basing his actions off of a TV show, [[WrongGenreSavvy start doing the same so they can find a way to beat him]], and finally DO beat him because, unlike the "real" Zebraman, he has no super powers. Then, in his dream/death vision, his wife in a Zebragirl costume comes out of nowhere, sticks him with an oversized novelty syringe, and when he wakes up he turns into a flying unicorn zebra and carves a big "Z" in the head alien's face. The movie literally ends here, with no sort of wrap-up of any kind. ''The sequel never answers any questions, either.''
7th Jun '17 11:18:30 PM Madrugada
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* ''The Day the Earth Caught Fire'' (1961) ends on a deliberately ambiguous note. The Earth is hurtling towards the Sun, but a series of massive nuclear detonations in Siberia may avert the catastrophe. The last scene shows the journalists waiting in the print room with two editions ready for printing, one saying WORLD SAVED and the other WORLD DOOMED. (The American distribution however [[ExecutiveMeddling included the sound of church bells ringing]], implying that the world had been saved). At first the viewers ''only'' see the first headline, so they think it's a happy ending. It's only when the camera pans across and shows the other headline that they realise the disaster hasn't been averted yet.



* ''Film/{{Titanic 1997}}'': [[AllJustADream Is Rose dreaming at the end]]? [[BittersweetEnding Did she die peacefully in her sleep]] [[SugarWiki/HeartwarmingMoments and rejoin Jack and the crew]]? [[ShrugOfGod Apparently, we're supposed to decide for ourselves]]. For anyone familiar with [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spiritism Spiritism]], believer or not, the ending makes more sense.



* A [[Creator/{{Syfy}} Sci Fi Channel]] [[Film/SyfyOriginalMovie movie]] about a mission to UsefulNotes/{{Mars}} is notable for being shown mostly from camera angles. The crew has to undergo several hardships, including sabotage efforts by a CorruptCorporateExecutive but manage to successfully land on the red planet. Since the captain is suffering from a nanite infection (that's killing his nerve cells), his [[NumberTwo Number One]] makes the historic first step on another planet. All the world is watching as the camera she set up is zoomed on her face. She starts giving a speech, only to suddenly look somewhere off to the side and say "oh my God" with an astonished face, before the feed suddenly cuts out. The news anchors reporting on the mission say that a satellite in orbit is being repositioned to take a look at the landing site. The movie ends with a fly-by of the Martian landscape and a CliffHanger.

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* A [[Creator/{{Syfy}} Sci Fi Channel]] [[Film/SyfyOriginalMovie movie]] Film/SyfyOriginalMovie about a mission to UsefulNotes/{{Mars}} is notable for being shown mostly from camera angles. The crew has to undergo several hardships, including sabotage efforts by a CorruptCorporateExecutive but manage to successfully land on the red planet. Since the captain is suffering from a nanite infection (that's killing his nerve cells), his [[NumberTwo Number One]] makes the historic first step on another planet. All the world is watching as the camera she set up is zoomed on her face. She starts giving a speech, only to suddenly look somewhere off to the side and say "oh my God" with an astonished face, before the feed suddenly cuts out. The news anchors reporting on the mission say that a satellite in orbit is being repositioned to take a look at the landing site. The movie ends with a fly-by of the Martian landscape and a CliffHanger.



* An early example can be seen in the '50's era movie ''Film/TheIncredibleShrinkingMan.'' Did the eponymous man become so small that he died? Did he become one with the cosmos? And just who is he narrating his story to?



* The 1985 New Zealand film adaptation of ''Film/TheQuietEarth'' ends this way. The protagonist, one of only three people left alive in New Zealand (it seems), after some sort of never-fully-explained scientific experiment that went haywire resulted in some sort of change that has left the universe increasingly unstable, apparently tries to reverse the experiment, which he believes will kill him in the process if he is successful. After a burst of special effects, the last scene of the film shows him waking up on a beach with a beautiful AlienSky in the background, and getting up to walk out of the frame. Where is he? What happened, or didn't happen?[[note]]The novel reveals he's stuck in a TimeLoop.[[/note]]
7th Jun '17 12:02:16 PM Madrugada
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* Many of the ''Film/CarryOn'' movies had one half of the main cast getting an ending, and the rest just having their story arcs stopped. For example, ''Film/CarryOnCamping'' ended with the principal and the school nurse of an all-girls school chasing after a truck on a tandem bike, the owners of said bike being at peace with each other (even though they have no way of getting home), and two thirty-something men finally getting laid with their prudish girlfriends while one of the girls' mother gets chased into the woods by a ram. Meanwhile, Creator/CharlesHawtrey's character had disappeared from the story at the midway point, and was probably waiting somewhere to be hitch-hiked back home.
* ''Film/TheShining'' ends with a long tracking shot to a closeup of a photograph from 1921 which in the foreground shows... Jack Nicholson. What this means is largely up to the viewer, though there are two likely explanations. Either he's been absorbed into the hotel along with all of the other ghostly "guests", or he was some sort of reincarnation of the previous caretaker [[HistoryRepeats who also went on a murderous rampage against his family]], and [[BecauseDestinySaysSo he was destined to go insane all along]]. Kubrick paid {{Homage}} to his friend Creator/RomanPolanski's ''Film/{{Repulsion}}'', which also ends with a similar, though higher-speed, closeup of a photograph which we had seen several other times in the film but never in closeup. Again, its meaning in the film's context isn't totally clear, though it's often taken to suggest that the main character in the film was molested as a child.
7th Jun '17 11:12:45 AM jamespolk
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* It's hard to tell what's real and what's not in ''Film/{{Oldboy 2003}}'' after Woo-jin completes his revenge on Dae-su and kills himself. Dae-su is left so utterly broken afterwards that anything out of all the disconnected events in the last few minutes could be all in his head.

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* It's hard to tell what's real and what's not in ''Film/{{Oldboy 2003}}'' ''Film/{{Oldboy|2003}}'' after Woo-jin completes his revenge on Dae-su and kills himself. Dae-su is left so utterly broken afterwards that anything out of all the disconnected events in the last few minutes could be all in his head.
22nd May '17 6:56:19 PM PaulA
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* Creator/JoeHaldeman has written several novels (''Mindbridge'', ''Forever Peace'', ''Worlds'' trilogy) where the plot seems to have come to a halt, and the resolution apparently is to introduce an all-powerful, invisible, sadistic alien that randomly murders and tortures several of the characters. Then this alien wanders off, apparently satisfied it's made its point, whatever that was. Then the plot continues to some anti-climactic 'and life goes on' type of ending. Haldeman's short story "Monster" is presented as a document being dictated by a Vietnam vet confined to a mental hospital. In it, the vet insists that, when he was a member of a LRRP patrol in 'Nam, he watched a black-skinned, black-furred [[HumanoidAbomination creature]] come out of nowhere and tear apart two other platoon members engaged in a homosexual encounter. However, a Viet Cong deserter who happened to approach at the same time testified that it was ''him'', our narrator, who committed the crime, and of course our narrator can't say he saw a monster for fear it will make him sound even more crazy. Our narrator spends years in an asylum, after being adjudged insane. While inside, he studies legend upon legend of monsters, but can't find anything in the literature that resembles what he ''knows'' he saw. When he comes out, he hunts down the former Viet Cong soldier, now an American citizen, and tortures him to make him admit the truth -- that either the former VC ''is'' the monster, or that he saw what our narrator saw and wouldn't admit it. To no avail; the former VC says nothing, and our narrator kills him, turns himself in and is put back into an insane asylum. The story ends with a doctor's report detailing the incident of the night before: Our narrator was found dead in his cell from having his heart torn out. But there was no break-in, no signs of a struggle, and no noise. The story's last line is: "He did it to himself, and in total silence." The questions the story raises remain unanswered -- was there really a monster or wasn't there?

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* Creator/JoeHaldeman Creator/JoeHaldeman:
** Haldeman
has written several novels (''Mindbridge'', ''Forever Peace'', ''Worlds'' trilogy) where the plot seems to have come to a halt, and the resolution apparently is to introduce an all-powerful, invisible, sadistic alien that randomly murders and tortures several of the characters. Then this alien wanders off, apparently satisfied it's made its point, whatever that was. Then the plot continues to some anti-climactic 'and life goes on' type of ending. ending.
**
Haldeman's short story "Monster" is presented as a document being dictated by a Vietnam vet confined to a mental hospital. In it, the vet insists that, when he was a member of a LRRP patrol in 'Nam, he watched a black-skinned, black-furred [[HumanoidAbomination creature]] come out of nowhere and tear apart two other platoon members engaged in a homosexual encounter. However, a Viet Cong deserter who happened to approach at the same time testified that it was ''him'', our narrator, who committed the crime, and of course our narrator can't say he saw a monster for fear it will make him sound even more crazy. Our narrator spends years in an asylum, after being adjudged insane. While inside, he studies legend upon legend of monsters, but can't find anything in the literature that resembles what he ''knows'' he saw. When he comes out, he hunts down the former Viet Cong soldier, now an American citizen, and tortures him to make him admit the truth -- that either the former VC ''is'' the monster, or that he saw what our narrator saw and wouldn't admit it. To no avail; the former VC says nothing, and our narrator kills him, turns himself in and is put back into an insane asylum. The story ends with a doctor's report detailing the incident of the night before: Our narrator was found dead in his cell from having his heart torn out. But there was no break-in, no signs of a struggle, and no noise. The story's last line is: "He did it to himself, and in total silence." The questions the story raises remain unanswered -- was there really a monster or wasn't there?
10th May '17 1:49:21 PM mariofan1000
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* Nobody's quite sure as to what happened at the end of the ''WesternAnimation/{{Archer}}'' episode [[Recap/ArcherS6E5VisionQuest "Vision Quest"]]. After the casts spends the [[BottleEpisode entire episode]] trapped in an elevator, Ray finally is able to call Malory. It instead goes towards the elevator's phone, playing a voicemail message from Archer, at which point everyone assaults him. [[https://www.reddit.com/r/ArcherFX/comments/2wbkcf/s06e05_i_think_i_missed_the_joke/ A theory supported (but not confirmed)]] by someone who works on the show is that Archer deliberately set the elevator to get stuck and for calls to Malory to re-route to the elevator phone, but didn't account for Kreiger to install [[CellPhonesAreUseless signal-jammers above the elevator,]] leaving them stuck. It doesn't explain why Lana then accused Malory of deliberately getting them stuck, though.
5th May '17 7:33:49 PM Serasia
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* ''Manga/TsukuyomiMoonPhase''. The series is a comedy that is sometimes dark, what with fighting all the vampires and death usually lurking near. The last anime episode, though, ends with [[spoiler: everyone somehow suddenly stuck in a floating house on the ocean and only one person in the group questioning why. The episode ends with the house sinking because the huge cork keeping the water out was removed]]. It's the last episode of the anime, leaving probably many a fan going "....What?"

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* ''Manga/TsukuyomiMoonPhase''. The series is a comedy that is sometimes dark, what with fighting all the vampires and death usually lurking near. The last anime episode, though, ends with [[spoiler: everyone somehow suddenly stuck in a floating house on the ocean and only one person in the group questioning why. The episode ends with the house sinking because the huge cork keeping the water out was removed]]. It's the last episode of the anime, with a bizarre title, leaving probably many a fan going "....What?"
5th May '17 7:31:28 PM Serasia
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* ''Manga/TsukuyomiMoonPhase''. The series is a comedy that is sometimes dark, what with fighting all the vampires and death usually lurking near. The last episode, though, ends with [[spoiler: everyone stuck in a floating house on the ocean and only one person in the group questioning why. Then the episode ends with the house sinking and no one caring as much as they should.]]

to:

* ''Manga/TsukuyomiMoonPhase''. The series is a comedy that is sometimes dark, what with fighting all the vampires and death usually lurking near. The last anime episode, though, ends with [[spoiler: everyone somehow suddenly stuck in a floating house on the ocean and only one person in the group questioning why. Then the The episode ends with the house sinking and no one caring as much as they should.]]because the huge cork keeping the water out was removed]]. It's the last episode of the anime, leaving probably many a fan going "....What?"
This list shows the last 10 events of 710. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.GainaxEnding