History Main / FunWithForeignLanguages

9th Oct '17 9:06:25 AM PixelKnight
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** In ''Discworld/TheFifthElephant'' he also tries to speak Dwarfish he's learned on the street, identifying himself as "Overseer Vimes of the Look" (Captain of the Watch) and not knowing that the word he's using as "you" implies that the dwarf he's talking to is a criminal.

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** In ''Discworld/TheFifthElephant'' he also tries to speak Dwarfish he's learned on the street, identifying himself as "Overseer Vimes of the Look" (Captain of the Watch) and not knowing that the word he's using as "you" implies that the dwarf he's talking literally translates as something similar to is a criminal."punk".
30th Sep '17 2:32:38 AM PaulA
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See also FunnyForeigner, BilingualBonus, TactfulTranslation.

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See also FunnyForeigner, BilingualBonus, TactfulTranslation.TactfulTranslation, EitherWorldDominationOrSomethingAboutBananas.
24th Sep '17 3:01:17 PM nombretomado
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* In the comedy ''Film/{{Water 1985}}'', American oil executives land on the island of Cascara and come across the local radical liberation front -- all two of them (one of whom is BillyConnolly, whose character only communicates through [[DreadfulMusician bad singing]]).

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* In the comedy ''Film/{{Water 1985}}'', American oil executives land on the island of Cascara and come across the local radical liberation front -- all two of them (one of whom is BillyConnolly, Creator/BillyConnolly, whose character only communicates through [[DreadfulMusician bad singing]]).
9th Sep '17 6:03:35 AM nighttrainfm
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* This shows up in the ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'' book ''Jingo'', where a Klatchian general insults an Ankh-Morpork general by slipping into his native tongue, and passing it off as an old Klatchian saying. (This has double comedic impact, because the usual apology for rough language in ''Discworld'' books is "Pardon my Klatchian", a la the real idiom "Pardon my French".)

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* This shows up in the ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'' book ''Jingo'', where ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'':
** In ''Discworld/{{Jingo}}'',
a Klatchian general insults an Ankh-Morpork general by slipping into his native tongue, and passing it off as an old Klatchian saying. (This has double comedic impact, because the usual apology for rough language in ''Discworld'' books is "Pardon my Klatchian", a la the real idiom "Pardon my French".)



*** Later in the same book, in a deliberate nod to JFK, Vimes attempts to say "I am a citizen of Borogravia" and instead comes out with "I am a cherry pancake." Being Vimes, it doesn't bother him too much.

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*** ** Later in the same book, in a deliberate nod to JFK, Vimes attempts to say "I am a citizen of Borogravia" and instead comes out with "I am a cherry pancake." Being Vimes, it doesn't bother him too much.



** In ''Discworld/InterestingTimes'', it's mentioned that "Argh!" translates in one Discworld language as "Your wife is a big hippo", "Hello, thinks Mr. Purple Cat", or "I would like to eat your foot" depending on inflection. This becomes a running gag, where Rincewind's screams are literally translated into these phrases; at one point, Rincewind screams "Argh!" and another character responds "What's that about a hippo?"
*** It also translates to "Quick! More boiling oil!" in yet another language. Considering one of the characters is an insane emperor, this has ''unfortunate'' consequences.

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** In ''Discworld/InterestingTimes'', it's mentioned that "Argh!" translates in one certain Discworld language languages as "Your wife is a big hippo", "Hello, thinks Mr. Purple Cat", or "I would like to eat your foot" depending on inflection. This becomes a running gag, where Rincewind's various characters' screams are literally translated into these phrases; at one point, Rincewind screams "Argh!" and another character responds "What's that about a hippo?"
*** ** It also translates to "Quick! More boiling oil!" in yet another language. Considering one of the characters is an insane emperor, this has ''unfortunate'' consequences.
1st Sep '17 6:14:42 AM CosmicFerret
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* Done in ''[[TheFlash Impulse]]'' when Bart Allen "teaches" his mentor Interlac.

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* Done in ''[[TheFlash ''[[ComicBook/TheFlash Impulse]]'' when Bart Allen "teaches" his mentor Interlac.
16th Jul '17 9:34:04 AM nombretomado
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* ''Series/AlloAllo'' is a bit of a strange one. While, from the viewers' perspective, there aren't any foreign languages in play, its WW2-era France setting means that there are characters who, logically speaking, would be speaking French, German and English. In order to keep the jokes intact, the actors simply use accents to denote which language that character would be speaking. The British airmen on the run from the Germans (who don't speak French at all) speak in the stereotypical RP/upper-class English accents known the world over, while the French and German characters speak in respective accents. Better yet, the frequently-appearing Officer Crabtree is in fact British but, unlike the escaped airmen, he ''does'' speak French. However, he speaks it ''badly'', which is reflected in him mispronouncing words for comedic effect, such as his greeting of ''[[CatchPhrase "Good moaning."]]''

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* ''Series/AlloAllo'' is a bit of a strange one. While, from the viewers' perspective, there aren't any foreign languages in play, its WW2-era [=WW2=]-era France setting means that there are characters who, logically speaking, would be speaking French, German and English. In order to keep the jokes intact, the actors simply use accents to denote which language that character would be speaking. The British airmen on the run from the Germans (who don't speak French at all) speak in the stereotypical RP/upper-class English accents known the world over, while the French and German characters speak in respective accents. Better yet, the frequently-appearing Officer Crabtree is in fact British but, unlike the escaped airmen, he ''does'' speak French. However, he speaks it ''badly'', which is reflected in him mispronouncing words for comedic effect, such as his greeting of ''[[CatchPhrase "Good moaning."]]''
1st Jul '17 3:12:34 PM nombretomado
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** Then again, said Minister is well known for his otherworldly turns of speech, [[TheOtherWiki The Other Wiki]] even has a name for that: [[http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raffarinade The Raffarinades!]]

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** Then again, said Minister is well known for his otherworldly turns of speech, [[TheOtherWiki The Other Wiki]] Wiki/TheOtherWiki even has a name for that: [[http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raffarinade The Raffarinades!]]
24th Jun '17 4:54:17 PM Origin
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* ''Series/AlloAllo'' is a bit of a strange one. While, from the viewers' perspective, there aren't any foreign languages in play, its WW2-era France setting means that there are characters who, logically speaking, would be speaking French, German and English. In order to keep the jokes intact, the actors simply use accents to denote which language that character would be speaking. The British airmen on the run from the Germans (who don't speak French at all) speak in the stereotypical RP/upper-class English accents known the world over, The French and German characters speak in respective accents. Better yet, the frequently-appearing Officer Crabtree is in fact British but, unlike the escaped airmen, he ''does'' speak French. However, he speaks it ''badly'', which is reflected in him mispronouncing words for comedic effect, such as his greeting of ''[[CatchPhrase "Good moaning."]]''

to:

* ''Series/AlloAllo'' is a bit of a strange one. While, from the viewers' perspective, there aren't any foreign languages in play, its WW2-era France setting means that there are characters who, logically speaking, would be speaking French, German and English. In order to keep the jokes intact, the actors simply use accents to denote which language that character would be speaking. The British airmen on the run from the Germans (who don't speak French at all) speak in the stereotypical RP/upper-class English accents known the world over, The while the French and German characters speak in respective accents. Better yet, the frequently-appearing Officer Crabtree is in fact British but, unlike the escaped airmen, he ''does'' speak French. However, he speaks it ''badly'', which is reflected in him mispronouncing words for comedic effect, such as his greeting of ''[[CatchPhrase "Good moaning."]]''
24th Jun '17 4:53:16 PM Origin
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* In ''Series/AlloAllo'', characters "speak" French, German, and English. To viewers, it's actually ''all'' English, but they speak in different accents to simulate speaking the other languages. Among the characters are a pair of British airmen who "don't speak a word of the lingo", and a policeman (actually a Brit in disguise) who speaks bad French, frequently saying "Good moaning," when he comes in, often to deliver a "massage from Michelle."

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* In ''Series/AlloAllo'', ''Series/AlloAllo'' is a bit of a strange one. While, from the viewers' perspective, there aren't any foreign languages in play, its WW2-era France setting means that there are characters "speak" who, logically speaking, would be speaking French, German, German and English. To viewers, it's actually ''all'' English, but they speak in different In order to keep the jokes intact, the actors simply use accents to simulate speaking the other languages. Among the characters are a pair of denote which language that character would be speaking. The British airmen who "don't on the run from the Germans (who don't speak a word of French at all) speak in the lingo", stereotypical RP/upper-class English accents known the world over, The French and a policeman (actually a Brit German characters speak in disguise) who respective accents. Better yet, the frequently-appearing Officer Crabtree is in fact British but, unlike the escaped airmen, he ''does'' speak French. However, he speaks bad French, frequently saying it ''badly'', which is reflected in him mispronouncing words for comedic effect, such as his greeting of ''[[CatchPhrase "Good moaning," when he comes in, often to deliver a "massage from Michelle."moaning."]]''
10th Apr '17 12:19:24 PM nombretomado
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* ''Film/{{Meteor}}'' (1979). A Russian scientist is meeting with a U.S. GeneralRipper to begin politically sensitive negotiations to aim nuclear missiles at the oncoming DeathFromAbove. Each side has their "English voice" and "Russian voice", both speaking at the same time to avoid accusations of duplicity. Eventually SeanConnery gets tired of the babble and just has them speaking English with the pretty female Russian translating -- at the end the general turns to his Russian voice and demands, "Is that what I said?" The translator just says, "[[TranslationYes Yes]]."

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* ''Film/{{Meteor}}'' (1979). A Russian scientist is meeting with a U.S. GeneralRipper to begin politically sensitive negotiations to aim nuclear missiles at the oncoming DeathFromAbove. Each side has their "English voice" and "Russian voice", both speaking at the same time to avoid accusations of duplicity. Eventually SeanConnery Creator/SeanConnery gets tired of the babble and just has them speaking English with the pretty female Russian translating -- at the end the general turns to his Russian voice and demands, "Is that what I said?" The translator just says, "[[TranslationYes Yes]]."
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