History Main / FrictionlessReentry

31st Aug '16 6:20:45 AM MadSpy
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** In the pilot, we see a Reaver ship maneuvering to present its presumably better-shielded side to atmo, and the ship being surrounded by white-hot plasma. {{ShownTheirWork}}, indeed.

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** In the pilot, we see a Reaver ship maneuvering to present its presumably better-shielded side to atmo, and the ship being surrounded by white-hot plasma. {{ShownTheirWork}}, ShownTheirWork, indeed.
31st Aug '16 6:19:35 AM MadSpy
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** During the very first X-Wing book, Corron actually uses a planet's atmosphere to damage a TIE fighter by luring it close enough to the planet during a dogfight to cause reentry heat to begin building up.

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** During the very first X-Wing book, Corron Corran actually uses a planet's atmosphere to damage a TIE fighter by luring it close enough to the planet during a dogfight to cause reentry heat to begin building up.
31st Aug '16 6:17:51 AM MadSpy
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It's fairly common for fiction to ignore this little inconvenient fact, because it means characters and impractically designed spaceships can get onto (or off) a planet without burning up. It simply doesn't include an atmosphere. In some cases, AppliedPhlebotinum is used (DeflectorShields are a common method for sufficiently advanced sci-fi cultures; shields that can block a nuclear weapon can usually also handle reentry), or the ship simply slows down before reentry to avoid burning up. The later isn't necessarily too unrealistic for a ship which is using nuclear engines, or otherwise doesn't need to worry about fuel (or balancing fuel consumption with arrival time). If you have enough energy, cooling and propellant (the latter two are still needed until the air itself becomes dense enough to be useful), you can move as slowly as you want, but "enough" here is ''really big''. The issue for all current orbital spacecraft is that they need to use most of their fuel to lift fuel (not crew or payload) to the altitude where it will be burned, and a ship that used its engines to slow down would be much more expensive since it'd have to carry '''even more''' fuel.

to:

It's fairly common for fiction to ignore this little inconvenient fact, because it means characters and impractically designed spaceships can get onto (or off) a planet without burning up. It simply doesn't include an atmosphere. In some cases, AppliedPhlebotinum is used (DeflectorShields are a common method for sufficiently advanced sci-fi cultures; shields that can block a nuclear weapon can usually also handle reentry), or the ship simply slows down before reentry to avoid burning up. The later latter isn't necessarily too unrealistic for a ship which is using nuclear engines, or otherwise doesn't need to worry about fuel (or balancing fuel consumption with arrival time). If you have enough energy, cooling and propellant (the latter two are still needed until the air itself becomes dense enough to be useful), you can move as slowly as you want, but "enough" here is ''really big''. The issue for all current orbital spacecraft is that they need to use most of their fuel to lift fuel (not crew or payload) to the altitude where it will be burned, and a ship that used its engines to slow down would be much more expensive since it'd have to carry '''even more''' fuel.
27th Jul '16 9:51:37 AM InsaneMystic
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It's fairly common for fiction to ignore this little inconvenient fact, because it means characters and impractically designed spaceships can get onto (or off) a planet without burning up. It simply doesn't include an atmosphere. In some cases, AppliedPhlebotinum is used (DefelctorShields are a common method for sufficiently advanced sci-fi cultures; shields that can block a nuclear weapon can usually also handle reentry), or the ship simply slows down before reentry to avoid burning up. The later isn't necessarily too unrealistic for a ship which is using nuclear engines, or otherwise doesn't need to worry about fuel (or balancing fuel consumption with arrival time). If you have enough energy, cooling and propellant (the latter two are still needed until the air itself becomes dense enough to be useful), you can move as slowly as you want, but "enough" here is ''really big''. The issue for all current orbital spacecraft is that they need to use most of their fuel to lift fuel (not crew or payload) to the altitude where it will be burned, and a ship that used its engines to slow down would be much more expensive since it'd have to carry '''even more''' fuel.

to:

It's fairly common for fiction to ignore this little inconvenient fact, because it means characters and impractically designed spaceships can get onto (or off) a planet without burning up. It simply doesn't include an atmosphere. In some cases, AppliedPhlebotinum is used (DefelctorShields (DeflectorShields are a common method for sufficiently advanced sci-fi cultures; shields that can block a nuclear weapon can usually also handle reentry), or the ship simply slows down before reentry to avoid burning up. The later isn't necessarily too unrealistic for a ship which is using nuclear engines, or otherwise doesn't need to worry about fuel (or balancing fuel consumption with arrival time). If you have enough energy, cooling and propellant (the latter two are still needed until the air itself becomes dense enough to be useful), you can move as slowly as you want, but "enough" here is ''really big''. The issue for all current orbital spacecraft is that they need to use most of their fuel to lift fuel (not crew or payload) to the altitude where it will be burned, and a ship that used its engines to slow down would be much more expensive since it'd have to carry '''even more''' fuel.
12th Jul '16 1:59:45 AM SSJMagus
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It's fairly common for fiction to ignore this little inconvenient fact, because it means characters and impractically designed spaceships can get onto (or off) a planet without burning up. It simply doesn't include an atmosphere. In some cases, AppliedPhlebotinum is used, or the ship simply slows down before reentry to avoid burning up. The later isn't necessarily too unrealistic for a ship which is using nuclear engines, or otherwise doesn't need to worry about fuel (or balancing fuel consumption with arrival time). If you have enough energy, cooling and propellant (the latter two are still needed until the air itself becomes dense enough to be useful), you can move as slowly as you want, but "enough" here is ''really big''. The issue for all current orbital spacecraft is that they need to use most of their fuel to lift fuel (not crew or payload) to the altitude where it will be burned, and a ship that used its engines to slow down would be much more expensive since it'd have to carry '''even more''' fuel.

to:

It's fairly common for fiction to ignore this little inconvenient fact, because it means characters and impractically designed spaceships can get onto (or off) a planet without burning up. It simply doesn't include an atmosphere. In some cases, AppliedPhlebotinum is used, used (DefelctorShields are a common method for sufficiently advanced sci-fi cultures; shields that can block a nuclear weapon can usually also handle reentry), or the ship simply slows down before reentry to avoid burning up. The later isn't necessarily too unrealistic for a ship which is using nuclear engines, or otherwise doesn't need to worry about fuel (or balancing fuel consumption with arrival time). If you have enough energy, cooling and propellant (the latter two are still needed until the air itself becomes dense enough to be useful), you can move as slowly as you want, but "enough" here is ''really big''. The issue for all current orbital spacecraft is that they need to use most of their fuel to lift fuel (not crew or payload) to the altitude where it will be burned, and a ship that used its engines to slow down would be much more expensive since it'd have to carry '''even more''' fuel.
10th Jun '16 9:10:31 AM UmbrellasWereAwesome
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** Hikaru's VF-1 get's quite hot and beat-up during its re-entry during the climactic battle.
** While it does generate a lot of heat the YF-19 shows just how far craft have come in ''Anime/{{Macross Plus}}'' since it not only makes a safe re-entry but it does so completely unpowered and spinning uncontrollably while trying to avoid the orbital defence satellites.
** Also comes up in the final battle of ''Anime/MacrossFrontier: [[TheMovie Sayonara no Tsubasa]]'' when its commented that the Macross Quarter will burn up if they enter the atmosphere at full speed. So they make sure to get behind a large piece of debris to use as a heat shield. [[CrazyAwesome Then they proceed to]] ''[[SkySurfing sky surf it]].''

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** Hikaru's VF-1 get's gets quite hot and beat-up during its re-entry during the climactic battle.
battle of ''Anime/SuperDimensionFortressMacross''.
** While it its re-entry does generate a lot of heat heat, the YF-19 shows just how far craft have come in by the time of ''Anime/{{Macross Plus}}'' Plus}}'', since it not only makes a safe re-entry but it does so completely unpowered and spinning uncontrollably while trying to avoid the orbital defence defense satellites.
** Also comes up in the final battle of ''Anime/MacrossFrontier: [[TheMovie Sayonara no Tsubasa]]'' when its it's commented that the Macross Quarter will burn up if they enter the atmosphere at full speed. So they make sure to get behind a large piece of debris to use as a heat shield. [[CrazyAwesome Then Which they proceed to]] ''[[SkySurfing sky surf it]].''surf]]''.
29th May '16 11:48:19 PM SuperFeatherYoshi
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** In the first episode of ''Anime/MobileSuitGundamWing'', Heero's Wing Gundam is shown undergoing re-entry heating while approaching Earth. It would make sense that the Gundams built for Operation Meteor would be made to withstand such heating since they were built on the space colonies for the purpose of going to Earth.

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** In the first episode of ''Anime/MobileSuitGundamWing'', Heero's Wing Gundam is shown undergoing re-entry heating while approaching Earth. It would make sense that the Gundams built for Operation Meteor would be made to withstand such heating since they were built on the space colonies for the purpose of going to Earth. Also, it was equipped with an outer shell that disguises it as a space shuttle, adding an extra layer of protection.
8th May '16 2:53:31 PM FurryKef
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** Contrary to popular belief, Friction contributes a relatively little amount of heat to reentry. The majority of the heat generated is actually from atmospheric compression, the spacecraft is moving so fast that the air in front of it can't get out of the way fast enough, so it gets squeezed, and when you squeeze a gas, you increase its temperature. Of course, most spacecraft do this ''on purpose'', as it's the easiest and cheapest way to slow the craft down enough that it doesn't [[NotTheFallThatKillsYou vaporize on contact with the surface of the planet]].

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** Contrary to popular belief, Friction contributes a relatively little amount of heat to reentry. The majority of the heat generated is actually from atmospheric compression, the spacecraft is moving so fast that the air in front of it can't get out of the way fast enough, so it gets squeezed, and when you squeeze a gas, you increase its temperature. Of course, most Most spacecraft do this ''on purpose'', as it's the easiest and cheapest way to slow the craft down enough that it doesn't [[NotTheFallThatKillsYou vaporize on contact with the surface of the planet]].
19th Jan '16 8:04:31 PM Adept
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** In ''MobileSuitGundamSEEDAstray'', Lowe and the Red Frame ends up facing this problem when a fight with the Gold Frame sends him hurtling into the gravity well of Earth. His Junk Guild buddies, however, use their ship and the massive amount of junk they gathered as a shield to grab Lowe and ride it out to Earth. They wreck their ship in the process, though.

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** In ''MobileSuitGundamSEEDAstray'', ''Manga/MobileSuitGundamSEEDAstray'', Lowe and the Red Frame ends up facing this problem when a fight with the Gold Frame sends him hurtling into the gravity well of Earth. His Junk Guild buddies, however, use their ship and the massive amount of junk they gathered as a shield to grab Lowe and ride it out to Earth. They wreck their ship in the process, though.
25th Nov '15 11:48:01 AM petersohn
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* Fully {{Averted| Trope}} in ''VideoGame/KerbalSpaceProgram'' as of version 1.0, which adds heating to the previously present slowdown effects of drag, necessitating heat shields to prevent burning up on re-entry. Note that the same effects can be achieved by ''any'' high-speed atmospheric travel, not just re-entry.

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* Fully {{Averted| Trope}} in ''VideoGame/KerbalSpaceProgram'' as of version 1.0, which adds heating to the previously present slowdown effects of drag, necessitating heat shields to prevent burning up on re-entry. Note that the same effects can be achieved by ''any'' high-speed atmospheric travel, not just re-entry. As with everything, the effects of re-entry is downplayed in the game: as long as you have a heat shield, it's safe to re-enter the atmosphere (unless you re-enter so steep that you can't slow down enough to be safe to deploy the parachutes until you hit the ground), even if you are somewhat off-angle.
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