History Main / FreeRangeChildren

21st Feb '17 10:08:43 PM BoukenDutch
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* ''Literature/BatPat'': in both the books and the animated adaption, the parents of the 3 main protagonists donít seem too concerned about their kids going out in the night or traveling all over town on their own.
31st Jan '17 9:23:27 PM JMQwilleran
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* ''WesternAnimation/MaxAndRuby'' features an older sister who seems to care for her younger brother 24 hours a day, 7 days a week with only sporadic intervention by their grandmother. The two regularly go shopping across town via bus, among other things. Supposedly the parents are [[InvisibleParents offscreen]] but nothing suggests this in-series.

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* ''WesternAnimation/MaxAndRuby'' features an older sister who seems to care for her younger brother 24 hours a day, 7 days a week with only sporadic intervention by their grandmother. The two regularly go shopping across town via bus, among other things. Supposedly the parents are [[InvisibleParents offscreen]] but nothing suggests this in-series. At least until the 2016 ReTool, which added on-screen parents.
27th Jan '17 11:42:42 PM TheFuzzinator
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* This is in full effect in ''Series/StrangerThings'' with Mike and his friends in the first half of the season, and even moreso near the end.

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* This is in full effect in ''Series/StrangerThings'' with Mike and his friends in the first half of the season, and even moreso near the end. Stranger Danger hadn't yet kicked in in 1983, so this wouldn't have been unusual, especially in a small-town setting.
11th Jan '17 10:00:38 AM jamespolk
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It was in [[TheEighties the mid-eighties]] when [[YouCanPanicNow media-promoted fears]] [[StrangerDanger of kidnapping and strangers caused parents and society to clamp down on the freedom of children to wander unsupervised]]. Before then, kids were commonly allowed much more latitude, particularly in the summer months, concerning what they did and where they went. While the freedom kids had to run about town still wasn't nearly as great as it tends to be in fiction (parents still needed to know where they were going, when they were going to be back, etc.), they were often allowed to at least take their bikes to local shopping centers, swimming pools, libraries, or woods. This was the particular case in a CloseKnitCommunity where other adults would notice and intervene in cases of danger.

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It was in [[TheEighties the mid-eighties]] when [[YouCanPanicNow media-promoted fears]] [[StrangerDanger of kidnapping and strangers caused parents and society to clamp down on the freedom of children to wander unsupervised]]. [[note]]The disappearance of 6-year-old Etan Patz in 1979, when he was walking two blocks to his school bus stop, was a huge story and helped whip up fears.[[/note]] Before then, kids were commonly allowed much more latitude, particularly in the summer months, concerning what they did and where they went. While the freedom kids had to run about town still wasn't nearly as great as it tends to be in fiction (parents still needed to know where they were going, when they were going to be back, etc.), they were often allowed to at least take their bikes to local shopping centers, swimming pools, libraries, or woods. This was the particular case in a CloseKnitCommunity where other adults would notice and intervene in cases of danger.


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* ''Film/TheCaveOfTheYellowDog'': Maybe it's different when you're a family of nomads living on the actual range--or the steppes of UsefulNotes/{{Mongolia}} as it were. Still, Nansal can't be more than nine, is tasked with getting on a horse and taking the sheep out to graze. Her mother gets very upset when Nansal doesn't come homeóNansal got distracted looking for her dog.
29th Dec '16 10:07:27 PM Ramidel
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** Averted with a vengeance in ''VideoGame/TheSims2'', where even ''latchkey kids'' who are home alone after school while the parents work are likely to draw the attention of the Social Worker. Going Downtown to a nightclub on their own is right out.
29th Dec '16 5:38:12 AM kawaiineko333
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* This is in full effect in ''Series/StrangerThings'' with Mike and his friends in the first half of the season, and even moreso near the end.
14th Dec '16 10:36:55 PM ImpudentInfidel
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* Deconstructed, in a way, in ''WesternAnimation/AvatarTheLastAirbender'', where a bunch of kids can travel around the world because, with the exception of a few characters, all of their parents are either dead or busy fighting the war. It doesn't help that every one of the kids is essentially a ChildSoldier.

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* Deconstructed, in a way, in ''WesternAnimation/AvatarTheLastAirbender'', where a bunch of kids can travel around the world because, with the exception of a few characters, all of their parents are either dead or busy fighting the war. It doesn't help that every one of the kids is essentially a ChildSoldier. There's also some DeliberateValuesDissonance involved; sixteen year olds are considered full adults, and many of the villains have high military rank despite being in the same age range as the heroes.
26th Nov '16 12:58:03 PM NaraNumas
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** This is deconstructed again in ''VideoGame/PokemonSunAndMoon'', Team Skull is just a bunch of teenagers who turned to a life of crime because leaving on (and failing) their Island Challenge has left them homeless, jobless, and with almost zero self-esteem. Unlike the other villain teams, their biggest concern is just getting enough money to buy food from day-to-day.
20th Nov '16 11:13:22 PM shonengirl
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** As a franchise, Pokémon follows this. [[ComicBookTime No matter how many seasons pass]], Ash remains 10 years old. Apparently this is an appropriate age to be given an incredibly powerful monster to keep as a companion and travel around a world inhabited by monsters and crooks with only the company of other children near their age. School is never mentioned whatsoever outside of Pokémon-based ones, and even these seem to be optional, and the one Ash attends in ''Sun and Moon'' has two adults/late teenagers, a girl who is an [[VagueAge ambiguous amount of years older than him]], and two kids about his age as his classmates. This may be a {{justified|Trope}} in that this is an alternate world where the societal beliefs are much different from our own. But considering that this is a world populated by dangerous monsters yet none of the adults seem too concerned for the children's safety, it still makes one wonder how this kind of society developed these standards in the first place. Most of these children have god-like monsters at their beck and call, giving them enough power to utterly destroy the world if they had half a mind to do so. We must all hope that none of them ever get dumped or depressed. There is even a Poke-Mafia/Yakuza, although [[GoldfishPoopGang the most recurring members at least really suck]] (aside from ''Best Wishes!'' where they are much more dangerous), as well as two warring eco-terrorist organizations, a cult with loads of weapons and technology lead by a man with a [[AGodAmI God complex]], and general WesternTerrorists. Since all of society revolves around Pokemon and journeys are the norm, kids seem to have some knowledge about survival. WordOfGod is that, by this time, people are considered of age for journeys. The (albeit non-canon) [[DarkerAndEdgier novelization]] by head writer of the original series Takeshi Shudo even explicitly mentioned that the legal age of adulthood is, indeed, 10, with all of the privileges and responsibilities that come with that.

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** As a franchise, Pokémon follows this. [[ComicBookTime No matter how many seasons pass]], Ash remains 10 years old. Apparently this is an appropriate age to be given an incredibly powerful monster to keep as a companion and travel around a world inhabited by monsters and crooks with only the company of other children near their age. School is never mentioned whatsoever outside of Pokémon-based ones, and even these seem to be optional, and the one Ash attends in ''Sun and Moon'' has two adults/late teenagers, a girl who is an [[VagueAge ambiguous amount of years older than him]], and two kids about his age as his classmates. This may be a {{justified|Trope}} in that this is an alternate world where the societal beliefs are much different from our own. But considering that this is a world populated by dangerous monsters yet none of the adults seem too concerned for the children's safety, it still makes one wonder how this kind of society developed these standards in the first place. Most of these children have god-like monsters at their beck and call, giving them enough power to utterly destroy the world if they had half a mind to do so. We must all hope that none of them ever get dumped or depressed. There is even a Poke-Mafia/Yakuza, although [[GoldfishPoopGang the most recurring members at least really suck]] (aside from ''Best Wishes!'' where they are much more dangerous), as well as two warring eco-terrorist organizations, a cult with loads of weapons and technology lead by a man with a [[AGodAmI God complex]], and general WesternTerrorists. Since all of society revolves around Pokemon and journeys are the norm, kids seem to have some knowledge about survival. WordOfGod is that, by this time, people are considered of age for journeys. The (albeit non-canon) [[DarkerAndEdgier novelization]] by head writer of the original series Takeshi Shudo even explicitly mentioned that the legal age of adulthood is, indeed, 10, with all of the privileges and responsibilities that come with that.



** Being an adaptation of the games, ''VideoGame/PokemonAdventures'' also uses this trope. However, there it's all the more egregious due to how the world of ''Adventures'' is portrayed to be significantly more dangerous than most other Pokémon universes are shown to be. On top of this, the preteen to teenage Dex Holders are often seen taking on adult responsibilities like it's completely expected and normal for them, some even having or seriously considering full-on jobs and careers, ranging from stand-up comedians to self-run Pokémon talent agencies to ''International Police officers''. One of them, Sun, somehow even got himself into millions of dollars in debt, and he's barely a teenager (possibly eleven if he's the same age as his game counterpart). And no one really seems to think any of this is unusual either, with their age barely being mentioned outside of some people calling them "kid" or "brat", much less there being any mention of school. One can reasonably believe their legal age of adulthood actually ''is'' about 12 or 13, as preteens wandering about with no supervision is pretty much treated the same as if it were 20-year-olds doing the same.

to:

** Being an adaptation of the games, ''VideoGame/PokemonAdventures'' also uses this trope. However, there it's all the more egregious due to how the world of ''Adventures'' is portrayed to be significantly more dangerous than most other Pokémon universes are shown to be. On top of this, the preteen to teenage Dex Holders are often seen taking on adult responsibilities like it's completely expected and normal for them, some even having or seriously considering full-on jobs and careers, ranging from stand-up comedians to self-run Pokémon talent agencies to ''International Police officers''.agents''. One of them, Sun, somehow even got himself into millions of dollars in debt, and he's barely a teenager (possibly eleven if he's the same age as his game counterpart). And no one really seems to think any of this is unusual either, with their age barely being mentioned outside of some people calling them "kid" or "brat", much less there being any mention of school. One can reasonably believe their legal age of adulthood actually ''is'' about 12 or 13, if not 11 or 10, as preteens wandering about with no supervision is treated pretty much treated the same like as if it they were 20-year-olds doing the same.high schoolers or full adults.
20th Nov '16 11:08:13 PM shonengirl
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** As a franchise, Pokémon follows this. [[ComicBookTime No matter how many seasons pass]], Ash remains 10 years old. Apparently this is an appropriate age to be given an incredibly powerful monster to keep as a companion and travel around a world inhabited by monsters and crooks with only the company of other children near their age. School is never mentioned whatsoever outside of Pokémon-based ones, and even these seem to be optional, and the one Ash attends in ''Sun and Moon'' has two adults/late teenagers, a girl who is an [[VagueAge ambiguous amount of years older than him]], and two kids about his age as his classmates. This may be a {{justified|Trope}} in that this is an alternate world where the societal beliefs are much different from our own. But considering that this is a world populated by dangerous monsters yet none of the adults seem too concerned for the children's safety, it still makes one wonder how this kind of society developed these standards in the first place. Most of these children have god-like monsters at their beck and call, giving them enough power to utterly destroy the world if they had half a mind to do so. We must all hope that none of them ever get dumped or depressed. There is even a Poke-Mafia/Yakuza, although [[GoldfishPoopGang the most recurring members at least really suck]] (aside from ''Best Wishes!'' where they are much more dangerous), as well as two warring eco-terrorist organizations, a cult with loads of weapons and technology lead by a man with a [[AGodAmI God complex]], and general WesternTerrorists. Since all of society revolves around Pokemon and journeys are the norm, kids seem to have some knowledge about survival. WordOfGod is that, by this time, people are considered of age for journeys. The (albeit non-canon) [[DarkerAndEdgier novelization]] by head writer of the original series Takeshi Shudo even explicitly mentioned that the legal age of adulthood is, indeed, 10, with all of the privileges and responsibilities that come with that.
** Although it's implied that it's only because of going with Pokemon that kids are allowed to travel like that, and if someone under 10 wants to follow them they may only do so if the Trainer is a direct relative, who then becomes their legal guardian. May hated Pokemon at first, and simply wanted to travel and see the world but for some reason explicitly couldn't do so unless she reported to the local professor for a Pokemon and dex and went out on a "Pokemon journey". Her younger brother meanwhile could only follow his big sister, a direct relative on her own journey. Once May decided to go off on her own at the end of ''Advanced Generation'' Max had no choice but to go home to his parents until he came of age to become a trainer himself. He couldn't travel on his own until that day, nor could he remain with Ash and Brock, who aren't family, on their next journey to Sinnoh. Meanwhile the only other children encountered out on the road are also trainers. Kids seemingly not interested in doing this stay in their towns like regular kids.
** Being an adaptation of the games, ''VideoGame/PokemonAdventures'' also uses this trope. However, there it's all the more egregious due to how the world of ''Adventures'' is portrayed to be significantly more dangerous than most other Pokémon universes are shown to be. On top of this, the preteen to teenage Dex Holders are often seen taking on adult responsibilities like it's completely expected and normal for them, some even having or seriously considering full-on jobs and careers, ranging from stand-up comedians to self-run Pokémon talent agencies to ''International Police officers''. One of them, Sun, somehow even got himself into millions of dollars in debt, and he's barely a teenager (possibly eleven if he's the same age as his game counterpart). And no one really seems to think any of this is unusual either, with their age barely being mentioned outside of some people calling them "kid" or "brat", much less there being any mention of school. One can reasonably believe their legal age of adulthood actually ''is'' about 12 or 13, as preteens wandering about with no supervision is pretty much treated the same as if it were 20-year-olds doing the same.

to:

** As a franchise, Pokémon follows this. [[ComicBookTime No matter how many seasons pass]], Ash remains 10 years old. Apparently this is an appropriate age to be given an incredibly powerful monster to keep as a companion and travel around a world inhabited by monsters and crooks with only the company of other children near their age. School is never mentioned whatsoever outside of Pokémon-based ones, and even these seem to be optional, and the one Ash attends in ''Sun and Moon'' has two adults/late teenagers, a girl who is an [[VagueAge ambiguous amount of years older than him]], and two kids about his age as his classmates. This may be a {{justified|Trope}} in that this is an alternate world where the societal beliefs are much different from our own. But considering that this is a world populated by dangerous monsters yet none of the adults seem too concerned for the children's safety, it still makes one wonder how this kind of society developed these standards in the first place. Most of these children have god-like monsters at their beck and call, giving them enough power to utterly destroy the world if they had half a mind to do so. We must all hope that none of them ever get dumped or depressed. There is even a Poke-Mafia/Yakuza, although [[GoldfishPoopGang the most recurring members at least really suck]] (aside from ''Best Wishes!'' where they are much more dangerous), as well as two warring eco-terrorist organizations, a cult with loads of weapons and technology lead by a man with a [[AGodAmI God complex]], and general WesternTerrorists. Since all of society revolves around Pokemon and journeys are the norm, kids seem to have some knowledge about survival. WordOfGod is that, by this time, people are considered of age for journeys. The (albeit non-canon) [[DarkerAndEdgier novelization]] by head writer of the original series Takeshi Shudo even explicitly mentioned that the legal age of adulthood is, indeed, 10, with all of the privileges and responsibilities that come with that.
** Although it's implied that it's only because of going with Pokemon that kids are allowed to travel like that, and if someone under 10 wants to follow them they may only do so if the Trainer is a direct relative, who then becomes their legal guardian. May hated Pokemon at first, and simply wanted to travel and see the world but for some reason explicitly couldn't do so unless she reported to the local professor for a Pokemon and dex and went out on a "Pokemon journey". Her younger brother meanwhile could only follow his big sister, a direct relative on her own journey. Once May decided to go off on her own at the end of ''Advanced Generation'' Generation'', Max had no choice but to go home to his parents until he came of age to become a trainer himself. He couldn't travel on his own until that day, nor could he remain with Ash and Brock, who aren't family, on their next journey to Sinnoh. Meanwhile the only other children encountered out on the road are also trainers. Kids seemingly not interested in doing this stay in their towns like regular kids.
** Being an adaptation of the games, ''VideoGame/PokemonAdventures'' also uses this trope. However, there it's all the more egregious due to how the world of ''Adventures'' is portrayed to be significantly more dangerous than most other Pokémon universes are shown to be. On top of this, the preteen to teenage Dex Holders are often seen taking on adult responsibilities like it's completely expected and normal for them, some even having or seriously considering full-on jobs and careers, ranging from stand-up comedians to self-run Pokémon talent agencies to ''International Police officers''. One of them, Sun, somehow even got himself into millions of dollars in debt, and he's barely a teenager (possibly eleven if he's the same age as his game counterpart). And no one really seems to think any of this is unusual either, with their age barely being mentioned outside of some people calling them "kid" or "brat", much less there being any mention of school. One can reasonably believe their legal age of adulthood actually ''is'' about 12 or 13, as preteens wandering about with no supervision is pretty much treated the same as if it were 20-year-olds doing the same.
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