History Main / FloweryElizabethanEnglish

18th Mar '18 12:10:01 PM Ferot_Dreadnaught
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->'''Iron Man:''' Uh, Shakespeare in the park? Doth mother know you [[YeOldeButcheredEnglish weareth]] her drapes?

to:

->'''Iron Man:''' Uh, Shakespeare in the park? Doth mother know you [[YeOldeButcheredEnglish weareth]] weareth her drapes?
27th Jan '18 10:21:21 PM Fireblood
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* This is how the North Korean dialect is usually translated into English in English-language media, in contrast to the South Korean dialect, which is normally translated into neutral English. This is because the North Korean accent is quite archaic compared to its South Korean counterpart. This became extremely notable when Kim Jong Un called Donald Trump a "deranged U.S. dotard", being "dotard" a very archaic word for a senile old man in English. Other languages translated that insult into their local equivalents as well.

to:

* This is how the North Korean dialect is usually translated into English in English-language media, in contrast to the South Korean dialect, which is normally translated into neutral English. This is because the North Korean accent is quite archaic compared to its South Korean counterpart. This became extremely notable when Kim Jong Un called Donald Trump a "deranged U.S. dotard", being "dotard" being a very archaic word for a senile old man in English. Other languages translated that insult into their local equivalents as well.
23rd Jan '18 12:12:07 PM SantosLHalper
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* Brother Andrew (1928 - ) spoke like this when he was attending a missionary school in Great Britain some time after UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, because he learned English by using a Dutch-English Dictionary and the King James Bible (first printed in ''1611''). In his autobiography ''God's Smuggler'', he showed the effect this had on his English by recalling an incident where he once asked for butter saying "Thus sayeth the neighbour of Andrew, that thou wouldst be pleased to pass the butter." Oh, and he had a very thick Dutch accent that made it hard for him to pronounce the "th" digraph.

to:

* Brother Andrew (1928 - ) spoke like this when he was attending a missionary school in Great Britain some time after UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, because he learned English by using a Dutch-English Dictionary and the King James Bible (first printed in ''1611''). In his autobiography ''God's Smuggler'', he showed the effect this had on his English by recalling an incident where he once asked for butter saying "Thus sayeth saith the neighbour of Andrew, that thou wouldst be pleased to pass the butter." Oh, and he had a very thick Dutch accent that made it hard for him to pronounce the "th" digraph.
9th Jan '18 5:58:37 PM eddievhfan1984
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Added DiffLines:

** ''Literature/TheSilmarillion'' also features similar language to an even larger degree, which makes sense, considering it's a chronicle of Elvish legend and history covering tens of thousands of years prior to ''Literature/TheLordOfTheRings'', making it biblical in breadth. The ''Ainulindalie'' features overt use of Biblical pronouns (''thee'' and ''thou'') befitting its status as a creation narrative, and particularly dramatic spoken lines (Fëanor's threat to Fingolfin, Beren's response to Thingol's accusations, and Gurthang speaking to Turin) are commonly written in an overtly archaic style.
4th Dec '17 1:42:11 PM TheGreatConversation
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->'''Iron Man:''' Uh, Shakespeare in the park? Doth mother know you weareth her drapes?

to:

->'''Iron Man:''' Uh, Shakespeare in the park? Doth mother know you weareth [[YeOldeButcheredEnglish weareth]] her drapes?
7th Oct '17 3:45:45 PM DaibhidC
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* Averted for the most part in series two of ''Series/{{Blackadder}}'', which is actually set in Elizabethan England. The trope is, however, parodied at one point, with [[TheDitz Lord Percy Percy]] saying things like "beshrew me" and "tush" and Blackadder immediately pointing out that only "stupid actors say 'beshrew me'."
-->'''Blackadder''': And don't say "tush" either. It's only a short step from "tush" to "hey nonny nonny" and then I'm afraid I shall have to call the police.

to:

* Averted for the most part in series two of ''Series/{{Blackadder}}'', which is actually set in Elizabethan England. The trope is, however, parodied at one point, a couple of times:
** In "Bells", when Blackadder asks a "young crone" if he's in Putney:
--->'''Young Crone''': It be! That it be!
--->'''Blackadder''': "Yes it is", not "That it be". You don't have to talk in that stupid voice to me, I'm not a tourist.
** In "Beer",
with [[TheDitz Lord Percy Percy]] saying things like "beshrew me" and "tush" and Blackadder immediately pointing out that only "stupid actors say 'beshrew me'."
-->'''Blackadder''': --->'''Blackadder''': And don't say "tush" either. It's only a short step from "tush" to "hey nonny nonny" and then I'm afraid I shall have to call the police.
28th Sep '17 6:27:52 PM luisedgarf
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* This is how the North Korean dialect is usually translated into English in English-language media, in contrast to the South Korean dialect, which is normally translated into neutral English. This is because the North Korean accent is quite archaic compared to its South Korean counterpart. This became extremely notable when Kim Jong Un called Donald Trump a "deranger U.S. dotard", being "dotard" a very archaic word for a senile old man in English. Other languages translated that insult into their local equivalents as well.

to:

* This is how the North Korean dialect is usually translated into English in English-language media, in contrast to the South Korean dialect, which is normally translated into neutral English. This is because the North Korean accent is quite archaic compared to its South Korean counterpart. This became extremely notable when Kim Jong Un called Donald Trump a "deranger "deranged U.S. dotard", being "dotard" a very archaic word for a senile old man in English. Other languages translated that insult into their local equivalents as well.
22nd Sep '17 10:21:59 PM luisedgarf
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Added DiffLines:

* This is how the North Korean dialect is usually translated into English in English-language media, in contrast to the South Korean dialect, which is normally translated into neutral English. This is because the North Korean accent is quite archaic compared to its South Korean counterpart. This became extremely notable when Kim Jong Un called Donald Trump a "deranger U.S. dotard", being "dotard" a very archaic word for a senile old man in English. Other languages translated that insult into their local equivalents as well.
13th Sep '17 4:48:18 PM nombretomado
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* In the original AppleMacintosh version of ''VideoGame/{{Shadowgate}}'', the GameOver scene (with TheGrimReaper staring you in the face) was titled "Thou Art Dead!"

to:

* In the original AppleMacintosh UsefulNotes/AppleMacintosh version of ''VideoGame/{{Shadowgate}}'', the GameOver scene (with TheGrimReaper staring you in the face) was titled "Thou Art Dead!"
29th Aug '17 11:39:26 AM Theriocephalus
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* This was one of many, many jarring changes made to the VideoGame/KingsQuest series by ''VideoGame/KingsQuestMaskOfEternity''. For seven games everyone's talk was very plain and modern, and then out of nowhere it's pseudo-Shakespeare city, even though this is supposed to be happening a decade or two ''later''.
** The one exception to the plain and modern speech is Alexander in ''VideoGame/KingsQuestVI'', who uses a number of old-fashioned quirks as a method of GettingCrapPastTheRadar, with "Zounds!" in particular reaching a sort of RunningGag status.

to:

* This was one of many, many jarring changes made to the VideoGame/KingsQuest series by ''VideoGame/KingsQuestMaskOfEternity''. For seven games everyone's talk was very plain and modern, and then out of nowhere it's pseudo-Shakespeare city, even though this is supposed to be happening a decade or two ''later''.
**
''later''. The one exception to the plain and modern speech is Alexander in ''VideoGame/KingsQuestVI'', who uses a number of old-fashioned quirks as a method of GettingCrapPastTheRadar, with "Zounds!" in particular reaching a sort of RunningGag status.



* In ''Mishap 2: An Intentional Haunting'' wrestler Larry Lerpis, aka "The Savage Romeo" combines this with being a LargeHam for an...''interesting'' effect.

to:

* In ''Mishap 2: An Intentional Haunting'' wrestler Larry Lerpis, aka "The Savage Romeo" combines this with being a LargeHam for an... ''interesting'' effect.



* Princess Luna from ''WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagic'' speaks this way in "Luna Eclipsed", having been [[SealedEvilInACan imprisoned in the moon]] for the last thousand years. Surprisingly for a kids' show, [[ShownTheirWork it's mostly grammatically correct]][[note]]There are a couple of places where she should have used "thine", but didn't.[[/note]] not a stray "-eth" in sight.
* ''WesternAnimation/HomeMovies'' - Mr. Lynch, running the Medieval Faire, insists his employees all talk this way. Coach Mc Guirk doesn't get it, or just doesn't care - when told to talk "in Elizabethan" he speaks in an effeminate falsetto.

to:

* Princess Luna from ''WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagic'' speaks this way in "Luna Eclipsed", "[[Recap/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicS2E4LunaEclipsed Luna Eclipsed]]", having been [[SealedEvilInACan imprisoned in the moon]] for the last thousand years. Surprisingly for a kids' show, [[ShownTheirWork it's mostly grammatically correct]][[note]]There are a couple of places where she should have used "thine", but didn't.[[/note]] -- not a stray "-eth" in sight.
* ''WesternAnimation/HomeMovies'' - ''WesternAnimation/HomeMovies'': Mr. Lynch, running the Medieval Faire, insists his employees all talk this way. Coach Mc Guirk doesn't get it, or just doesn't care - -- when told to talk "in Elizabethan" he speaks in an effeminate falsetto.



* Brother Andrew (1928 - ) spoke like this when he was attending a missionary school in Great Britain some time after UsefulNotes/WorldWarII because he learned English by using a Dutch-English Dictionary and The ''King James Bible'' (first printed in ''1611''). In his autobiography ''God's Smuggler'', he showed the effect this had on his English by recalling an incident where he once asked for butter saying "Thus sayeth the neighbour of Andrew, that thou wouldst be pleased to pass the butter." Oh, and he had a very thick Dutch accent that made it hard for him to pronounce the "th" digraph.

to:

* Brother Andrew (1928 - ) spoke like this when he was attending a missionary school in Great Britain some time after UsefulNotes/WorldWarII UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, because he learned English by using a Dutch-English Dictionary and The ''King the King James Bible'' Bible (first printed in ''1611''). In his autobiography ''God's Smuggler'', he showed the effect this had on his English by recalling an incident where he once asked for butter saying "Thus sayeth the neighbour of Andrew, that thou wouldst be pleased to pass the butter." Oh, and he had a very thick Dutch accent that made it hard for him to pronounce the "th" digraph.
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