History Main / FloweryElizabethanEnglish

24th Jun '17 9:47:57 AM nombretomado
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* Brother Andrew (1928 - ) spoke like this when he was attending a missionary school in Great Britain some time after WorldWarTwo because he learned English by using a Dutch-English Dictionary and The ''King James Bible'' (first printed in ''1611''). In his autobiography ''God's Smuggler'', he showed the effect this had on his English by recalling an incident where he once asked for butter saying "Thus sayeth the neighbour of Andrew, that thou wouldst be pleased to pass the butter." Oh, and he had a very thick Dutch accent that made it hard for him to pronounce the "th" digraph.

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* Brother Andrew (1928 - ) spoke like this when he was attending a missionary school in Great Britain some time after WorldWarTwo UsefulNotes/WorldWarII because he learned English by using a Dutch-English Dictionary and The ''King James Bible'' (first printed in ''1611''). In his autobiography ''God's Smuggler'', he showed the effect this had on his English by recalling an incident where he once asked for butter saying "Thus sayeth the neighbour of Andrew, that thou wouldst be pleased to pass the butter." Oh, and he had a very thick Dutch accent that made it hard for him to pronounce the "th" digraph.
20th May '17 1:58:42 PM nombretomado
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* ''ValkyrieProfile'' has many characters use this kind of English.

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* ''ValkyrieProfile'' ''VideoGame/ValkyrieProfile'' has many characters use this kind of English.
2nd Apr '17 10:15:29 AM nombretomado
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* ''PandoraHearts'' has Rufus Barma, the Duke of Barma, who speaks in an antiquated form of Japanese in the original work, and in Early Modern English in the localized translations. Though there are some exceptions, the use of grammar conventions are for the most part consistent with the rules of Early Modern English, and Barma's vocabulary consists of many old fashioned words and turns of phrases, not merely grammar conventions.

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* ''PandoraHearts'' ''Manga/PandoraHearts'' has Rufus Barma, the Duke of Barma, who speaks in an antiquated form of Japanese in the original work, and in Early Modern English in the localized translations. Though there are some exceptions, the use of grammar conventions are for the most part consistent with the rules of Early Modern English, and Barma's vocabulary consists of many old fashioned words and turns of phrases, not merely grammar conventions.
27th Feb '17 7:42:05 AM Doug86
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* In the ''Literature/{{Retief}}'' short story, "Ballots and Bandits", the natives of the planet Oberon all speak this way, for no apparent reason beyond RuleOfFunny. (The name of the planet is a reference to the character from Shakespeare's ''AMidsummerNightsDream''.)

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* In the ''Literature/{{Retief}}'' short story, "Ballots and Bandits", the natives of the planet Oberon all speak this way, for no apparent reason beyond RuleOfFunny. (The name of the planet is a reference to the character from Shakespeare's ''AMidsummerNightsDream''.''Theatre/AMidsummerNightsDream''.)
26th Jan '17 7:46:36 PM PaulA
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* In ''[[{{Literature/Foundation}} Foundation and Empire]]'', Magnifico's speech is rendered similar to this (stated to be the accent of the galactic center). ''Foundation and Earth'' features a LostColony on Alpha Centauri speaking an even more archaic dialect (stated to be "Classical Galactic").

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* ''Literature/{{Foundation}}'' series:
**
In ''[[{{Literature/Foundation}} Foundation and Empire]]'', ''Literature/FoundationAndEmpire'', Magnifico's speech is rendered similar to this (stated to be the accent of the galactic center). ''Foundation and Earth'' center).
** ''Literature/FoundationAndEarth''
features a LostColony on Alpha Centauri speaking an even more archaic dialect (stated to be "Classical Galactic").
9th Jan '17 1:46:12 PM Trying2CIt
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The immense popularity of Creator/WilliamShakespeare and the King James version of Literature/TheBible has made the style in which those works were written very popular. For this reason, Flowery Elizabethan English is often the first thing that writers turn to when they want to show that a character is ''extremely'' old-fashioned -- generally more so than an ordinary human could be. His speech will be sprinkled with terms like "prithee" or "forsooth", use archaic pronouns like "thou" or "ye", and archaic verb endings like "-est" or "-eth".

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The immense popularity of Creator/WilliamShakespeare and the King James version of Literature/TheBible has made the style in which those works were written very popular. For this reason, Flowery Elizabethan English is often the first thing that writers turn to when they want to show that a character is ''extremely'' old-fashioned -- generally more so than an ordinary human could be. His speech will be sprinkled with terms like "prithee" or "forsooth", use archaic pronouns like "thou" or "ye", and archaic verb endings like "-est" or "-eth".
9th Jan '17 1:45:44 PM Trying2CIt
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The immense popularity of Creator/WilliamShakespeare and the King James version of Literature/TheBible has made the style in which those works were written very popular. For this reason, Flowery Elizabethan English is often the first thing that writers turn to when they want to show that a character is ''extremely'' old-fashioned -- generally more so than an ordinary human could be. Their speech will be sprinkled with terms like "prithee" or "forsooth", and use obsolete pronouns like "thee" or "thou".

to:

The immense popularity of Creator/WilliamShakespeare and the King James version of Literature/TheBible has made the style in which those works were written very popular. For this reason, Flowery Elizabethan English is often the first thing that writers turn to when they want to show that a character is ''extremely'' old-fashioned -- generally more so than an ordinary human could be. Their His speech will be sprinkled with terms like "prithee" or "forsooth", and use obsolete archaic pronouns like "thee" "thou" or "thou".
"ye", and archaic verb endings like "-est" or "-eth".



This even occurs in translated works, where it [[PragmaticAdaptation may signal]] a similar level of old-fashionedness in the original, or, in a language like Japanese, a formal or traditional style of speech that has no direct analogue in English.

In extreme cases, the characters may use GratuitousIambicPentameter as well. When done badly, perhaps for [[RuleOfFunny humor]], may shade into YeOldeButcheredeEnglishe. For characters who speak like they came from the much-later Victorian era, see AntiquatedLinguistics. TalkLikeAPirate is similar, but quite distinct.

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This even occurs in translated works, where it [[PragmaticAdaptation may signal]] a similar level of old-fashionedness being old-fashioned in the original, or, in a language like Japanese, a formal or traditional style of speech that has no direct analogue in English.

In extreme cases, the characters may use GratuitousIambicPentameter as well. When done badly, perhaps for [[RuleOfFunny humor]], it may shade into YeOldeButcheredeEnglishe. For characters who speak like they came come from the much-later Victorian era, see AntiquatedLinguistics. TalkLikeAPirate is similar, but quite distinct.



* Parodied in a comedy version of ''ComicBook/AlphaFlight'', in which the Native American character, Yukon Jack, a loincloth-clad savage from the Canadian north woods whose tribe has had very limited contact with the outside world, speaks fluent Shakespearian all the time.

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* Parodied in a comedy version of ''ComicBook/AlphaFlight'', in which the Native American character, Yukon Jack, a loincloth-clad savage from the Canadian north woods whose tribe has had very limited contact with the outside world, speaks fluent Shakespearian Shakespearean all the time.
3rd Nov '16 9:13:17 PM nombretomado
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* ''HomeMovies'' - Mr. Lynch, running the Medieval Faire, insists his employees all talk this way. Coach Mc Guirk doesn't get it, or just doesn't care - when told to talk "in Elizabethan" he speaks in an effeminate falsetto.

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* ''HomeMovies'' ''WesternAnimation/HomeMovies'' - Mr. Lynch, running the Medieval Faire, insists his employees all talk this way. Coach Mc Guirk doesn't get it, or just doesn't care - when told to talk "in Elizabethan" he speaks in an effeminate falsetto.
30th Oct '16 2:09:36 PM nombretomado
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* ''[[ComicBook/TheMightyThor Thor]]'', and all of the other Asgardians of the MarvelUniverse, spoke until recently in Ren Faire-esque English. There have been several nods to Shakespeare over the years, including many quotes, mis-quotes, and even the character Volstagg the Voluminous, a parody of Creator/WilliamShakespeare's Falstaff (from ''HenryIV parts 1 and 2''). (The most recent relaunch of the character has him and his fellow Asgardians speaking formally but not archaically, and they keep their own font.)

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* ''[[ComicBook/TheMightyThor Thor]]'', and all of the other Asgardians of the MarvelUniverse, spoke until recently in Ren Faire-esque English. There have been several nods to Shakespeare over the years, including many quotes, mis-quotes, and even the character Volstagg the Voluminous, a parody of Creator/WilliamShakespeare's Falstaff (from ''HenryIV ''Theatre/HenryIV parts 1 and 2''). (The most recent relaunch of the character has him and his fellow Asgardians speaking formally but not archaically, and they keep their own font.)
21st Oct '16 2:45:56 PM 0nyx
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* Minnie Mandy from ''Webcomic/GrimTalesFromDownBelow'' consistently speaks this way.
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