History Main / FilmNoir

23rd Mar '17 8:19:31 AM TheAmazingBlachman
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* ''Film/TheHitchHiker'' (1953) A psycho kidnaps to friends on their to a fishing trip and has them drive him to Mexico. This film has the distinction of being the first film noir directed by a woman, Creator/IdaLupino.

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* ''Film/TheHitchHiker'' (1953) A psycho kidnaps to two friends on their to a fishing trip and has forces them at gunpoint drive him to Mexico. This film has the distinction of being the first film noir directed by a woman, Creator/IdaLupino.
21st Mar '17 9:14:48 AM JamesAustin
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* ''Film/BeyondTheForest'' (1949) A woman bored with life in a small town squeezes her husband to pay their bills so she can visit Chicago, but that soon proves to be the beginning of a violent conflict. Famous for star Creator/BetteDavis line "What a dump!" being remembered as being pronounced far more enthusiastically than it actually was said in the film.
* ''Film/StrayDog'' (1949), directed by Creator/AkiraKurosawa and set amidst the ruins of postwar Tokyo.



* ''Film/StrayDog'' (1949), directed by Creator/AkiraKurosawa and set amidst the ruins of postwar Tokyo.


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* ''Film/{{Niagara}}'' (1953) When two couples are visiting Niagara Falls, tensions between one wife and her husband reach the level of murder. Arguably the film that put Creator/MarilynMonroe on the map, alongside ''Gentlemen Prefer Blondes'' and ''How to Marry a Millionaire''.
9th Mar '17 12:39:04 PM Mdumas43073
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[[quoteright:310:[[Film/{{DOA}} http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/Noir_8041.png]]]]
[-[[caption-width-right:310: PrivateDetective? Check. FemmeFatale? Check. {{Chiaroscuro}} lighting? Check. This is Film Noir.]]-]

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[[quoteright:310:[[Film/{{DOA}} [[quoteright:300:[[Film/{{DOA}} http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/Noir_8041.png]]]]
[-[[caption-width-right:310: [-[[caption-width-right:300: PrivateDetective? Check. FemmeFatale? Check. {{Chiaroscuro}} lighting? Check. This is Film Noir.]]-]


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* ''Film/TheSaltonSea'' (2002)
2nd Mar '17 6:17:05 PM Mdumas43073
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Trying to explain Film Noir is hard, since it's kind of a mix of European cynicism and post-war American angst. The clash between crude pulp fiction narratives and complex storytelling and characterization, derived from emerging psychology, research in criminal behaviour as well as wider influences in modern art and literature. The term was first used by French critics (hence the name) and it derives from "Serie Noir" the label of French translations of American pulp fiction, and French imitations, [[ForeignCultureFetish which was highly popular in France at the time]]. The French critics looked at the American crime films from ''their'' perspective of post-Occupation France. To some extent they over-exaggerated the doom and gloom of American films by projecting their experiences in their writings of these films. Later, American writers when translating these articles into English brought this into PopCulturalOsmosis. The mix of European cynicism with American landscape is also borne out in the fact that several directors of films noir - Creator/BillyWilder (who lost his mother in Auschwitz), Robert Siodmak, Creator/FritzLang, Creator/OttoPreminger - were refugees, exiles and emigres from Nazi Germany, being quite active in [[WeimarRepublic 1920s Berlin]] which in many ways was the closest a real-life city came to being the exaggerated CityNoir landscape. The lighting in Film Noir was also strongly influenced by European trends, especially GermanExpressionism but later after the war, the Italian neorealist films of Creator/RobertoRossellini also influenced it greatly. The period became especially fertile during the post-war years. The subtext of many of these films often dealt with the trauma of the returning ShellShockedVeteran (most notably, ''Act of Violence'') and the rising RedScare and UsefulNotes/TheHollywoodBlacklist which made the working climate in Hollywood highly paranoid and hostile, and this infused the films made in the late 40s.

The standard Noir landscape is [[CityNoir a large, oppressive city (filmed in dark and dusky conditions to create a moody atmosphere)]]. Familiar haunts include dimly-lit bars, [[DenOfIniquity nightclubs filled with questionable clientele]] (including, the {{Gayngster}}) whom the lead may intimidate for information, gambling dens, juke joints and the ubiquitous seedy [[AbandonedWarehouse waterfront warehouse]]. At night in the big city, you can bet the streets are slick with rain, reflecting streetlights like a Hopper painting. [[HumansAreBastards Most of the characters (including the lead) are cynical, misanthropical and hopeless]] all the way through the film, and never find [[RedemptionQuest true redemption]]. It is important to note that the term "Film Noir" was not available to the people who made them in the 40s and 50s. As Robert Mitchum famously stated, "We called them B-Movies." It comes from later audiences and critics who rediscovered these films in revival theaters and clubs and picked up the subtext, visual clues and other HiddenDepths. Many historians feel that the classic Film Noir genre died when it became self-conscious. Raymond Borde and Etienne Chaumenton cite the MGM musical ''The Band Wagon'' (made in 1952) where the final number featured a technicolor parody of a Mickey Spillane crime setting, with Fred Astaire and Cyd Charisse playing the detective and femme fatale in an obvious send-up. Others feel that Creator/OrsonWelles' ''Film/TouchOfEvil'' was the real end since it was made by the director of ''Film/CitizenKane'' (which while not a Noir influenced the lighting and style of several other films noir) and the genre conventions were pretty much stretched inside and outside. They also argue that Noir only worked in a climate of censorship since the crime genre often falling BeneathSuspicion allowed writers and directors more chances to subvert cliches. Once censorship eroded, Film Noir had pretty much served its purpose and achieved its goals.

to:

Trying to explain Film Noir is hard, since it's kind of a mix of European cynicism and post-war American angst. The clash between crude pulp fiction narratives and complex storytelling and characterization, derived from emerging psychology, research in criminal behaviour as well as wider influences in modern art and literature. The term was first used by French critics (hence the name) and it derives from "Serie Noir" the label of French translations of American pulp fiction, and French imitations, [[ForeignCultureFetish which was highly popular in France at the time]]. The French critics looked at the American crime films from ''their'' perspective of post-Occupation France. To some extent they over-exaggerated the doom and gloom of American films by projecting their experiences in their writings of these films. Later, American writers when translating these articles into English brought this into PopCulturalOsmosis. The mix of European cynicism with American landscape is also borne out in the fact that several directors of films noir - Creator/BillyWilder (who lost his mother in Auschwitz), Robert Siodmak, Creator/FritzLang, Creator/OttoPreminger - were refugees, exiles and emigres from Nazi Germany, being quite active in [[WeimarRepublic 1920s Berlin]] which in many ways was the closest a real-life city came to being the exaggerated CityNoir landscape. The lighting in Film Noir was also strongly influenced by European trends, especially GermanExpressionism but later after the war, the Italian neorealist films of Creator/RobertoRossellini also influenced it greatly. The period became especially fertile during the post-war years. The subtext of many of these films often dealt with the trauma of the returning ShellShockedVeteran (most notably, ''Act of Violence'') and the rising RedScare and UsefulNotes/TheHollywoodBlacklist which made the working climate in Hollywood highly paranoid and hostile, and this infused the films made in the late 40s.

'40s.

The standard Noir landscape is [[CityNoir a large, oppressive city (filmed in dark and dusky conditions to create a moody atmosphere)]]. Familiar haunts include dimly-lit bars, [[DenOfIniquity nightclubs filled with questionable clientele]] (including, the {{Gayngster}}) whom the lead may intimidate for information, gambling dens, juke joints and the ubiquitous seedy [[AbandonedWarehouse waterfront warehouse]]. At night in the big city, you can bet the streets are slick with rain, reflecting streetlights like a Hopper painting. [[HumansAreBastards Most of the characters (including the lead) are cynical, misanthropical and hopeless]] all the way through the film, and never find [[RedemptionQuest true redemption]]. It is important to note that the term "Film Noir" was not available to the people who made them in the 40s '40s and 50s.'50s. As Robert Mitchum famously stated, "We called them B-Movies." It comes from later audiences and critics who rediscovered these films in revival theaters and clubs and picked up the subtext, visual clues and other HiddenDepths. Many historians feel that the classic Film Noir genre died when it became self-conscious. Raymond Borde and Etienne Chaumenton cite the MGM musical ''The Band Wagon'' (made in 1952) where the final number featured a technicolor parody of a Mickey Spillane crime setting, with Fred Astaire and Cyd Charisse playing the detective and femme fatale in an obvious send-up. Others feel that Creator/OrsonWelles' ''Film/TouchOfEvil'' was the real end since it was made by the director of ''Film/CitizenKane'' (which while not a Noir influenced the lighting and style of several other films noir) and the genre conventions were pretty much stretched inside and outside. They also argue that Noir only worked in a climate of censorship since the crime genre often falling BeneathSuspicion allowed writers and directors more chances to subvert cliches. Once censorship eroded, Film Noir had pretty much served its purpose and achieved its goals.



* ''Film/{{Insomnia}}'' (2002): The [[ForeignRemake American adaptation]] of a Norwegian film from 1997. At its core a fairly straightforward noir with Creator/AlPacino as an angst-ridden cop dealing with past mistakes.


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* ''Film/TheGoodThief'' (2002)
* ''Film/{{Insomnia}}'' (2002): The [[ForeignRemake American adaptation]] of a Norwegian film from 1997. At its core a fairly straightforward noir with Creator/AlPacino as an angst-ridden cop dealing with past mistakes.
26th Feb '17 10:29:52 AM nombretomado
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* The Mina Davis books ''[[Literature/HungoverAndHandcuffed Hungover and Handcuffed]]'' and ''[[Literature/AssholeYakuzaBoyfriend Asshole Yakuza Boyfriend]]'' are extremely noiry, and their covers evoke classic noir imagery (HumphreyBogart and Film/Gilda specifically).

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* The Mina Davis books ''[[Literature/HungoverAndHandcuffed Hungover and Handcuffed]]'' and ''[[Literature/AssholeYakuzaBoyfriend Asshole Yakuza Boyfriend]]'' are extremely noiry, and their covers evoke classic noir imagery (HumphreyBogart (Creator/HumphreyBogart and Film/Gilda Film/{{Gilda}} specifically).
15th Feb '17 9:14:53 PM Mdumas43073
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* ''Film/{{DOA}}'' (1950) (Source of the above picture) A man walks into a police station to report a murder...''his'' murder. He goes on to tell his story. Remade in 1988, but you may know its rough 2009 incarnation: ''Film/{{Crank}}''.
* ''Film/GunCrazy'' (1950)



* ''Film/NightAndTheCity'' (1950)



* ''[[Film/{{DOA}} Dead On Arrival]]'' (1950)(Source of the above picture) A man walks into a police station to report a murder...''his'' murder. He goes on to tell his story. You may know its modern-day incarnation: ''Film/{{Crank}}''.
* ''Film/NightAndTheCity'' (1950)
2nd Feb '17 9:20:48 AM Mdumas43073
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** ''Film/{{Memento}}'' (2000): A man searches for his wife's killer in the aftermath of a violent home invasion that left him unable to form new memories. Has many of the stylistic elements that define classic Noir: an alienated, uncertain protagonist attempting to solve a nigh-impossible mystery, characters whose trustworthiness is constantly in flux, a sharply twisting plot that changes the audience's understanding of the story practically every scene, and a highly unreal, dreamlike tone, with half of the movie even arranged in backwards chronology to match the protagonist's inability to remember how or why he is in any given situation.
** ''Film/{{Insomnia}}'' (2002): The [[ForeignRemake American adaptation]] of a Norwegian film from 1997. At its core a fairly straightforward noir with Creator/AlPacino as an angst-ridden cop dealing with past mistakes.
** ''Film/TheDarkKnightTrilogy'' plays up the noirish aspects of Batman.
** ''Film/ThePrestige'' and ''Film/{{Inception}}'' have elements of noir, but each is a GenreBuster of sorts.

to:

** ''Film/{{Memento}}'' (2000): A man searches for his wife's killer in the aftermath of a violent home invasion that left him unable to form new memories. Has many of the stylistic elements that define classic Noir: an alienated, uncertain protagonist attempting to solve a nigh-impossible mystery, characters whose trustworthiness is constantly in flux, a sharply twisting plot that changes the audience's understanding of the story practically every scene, and a highly unreal, dreamlike tone, with half of the movie even arranged in backwards chronology to match the protagonist's inability to remember how or why he is in any given situation.
** ''Film/{{Insomnia}}'' (2002): The [[ForeignRemake American adaptation]] of a Norwegian film from 1997. At its core a fairly straightforward noir with Creator/AlPacino as an angst-ridden cop dealing with past mistakes.
** ''Film/TheDarkKnightTrilogy'' plays up the noirish aspects of Batman.
**
* ''Film/ThePrestige'' and ''Film/{{Inception}}'' have elements of noir, but each is a GenreBuster of sorts.



* ''Film/EightMM'' (1999)



* ''Film/{{Memento}}'' (2000): A man searches for his wife's killer in the aftermath of a violent home invasion that left him unable to form new memories. Has many of the stylistic elements that define classic Noir: an alienated, uncertain protagonist attempting to solve a nigh-impossible mystery, characters whose trustworthiness is constantly in flux, a sharply twisting plot that changes the audience's understanding of the story practically every scene, and a highly unreal, dreamlike tone, with half of the movie even arranged in backwards chronology to match the protagonist's inability to remember how or why he is in any given situation.



* ''Film/{{Insomnia}}'' (2002): The [[ForeignRemake American adaptation]] of a Norwegian film from 1997. At its core a fairly straightforward noir with Creator/AlPacino as an angst-ridden cop dealing with past mistakes.



* ''Film/TheDarkKnightTrilogy'' (2005-2012) plays up the noirish aspects of Batman.
* ''Film/TheGirlWithTheDragonTattoo''--both the Swedish trilogy (2005) and the Creator/DavidFincher remake (2011).
* ''Film/KissKissBangBang'' (2005) throws in a heavy dose of comedy.



* ''Film/KissKissBangBang'' (2005) throws in a heavy dose of comedy.
* ''Film/TheGirlWithTheDragonTattoo''--both the Swedish trilogy (2005) and the Creator/DavidFincher remake (2011).
2nd Feb '17 5:14:29 AM Kitchen90
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Added DiffLines:

* ''Film/CarryOnSpying'' (1963) -- a parody movie that is a mixture of film noir and Franchise/JamesBond spy movies, starring a teacher of a spy school (that has post-graduate links to {{MI6}}) and his best students.
1st Feb '17 7:16:33 PM Mdumas43073
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Added DiffLines:

* ''Film/UTurn'' (1997)
29th Jan '17 10:51:45 PM Mdumas43073
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[[quoteright:318:[[Film/{{DOA}} http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/Noir_8041.png]]]]
[-[[caption-width-right:318: PrivateDetective? Check. FemmeFatale? Check. {{Chiaroscuro}} lighting? Check. This is Film Noir.]]-]

to:

[[quoteright:318:[[Film/{{DOA}} [[quoteright:310:[[Film/{{DOA}} http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/Noir_8041.png]]]]
[-[[caption-width-right:318: [-[[caption-width-right:310: PrivateDetective? Check. FemmeFatale? Check. {{Chiaroscuro}} lighting? Check. This is Film Noir.]]-]



* ''Film/TheDeparted'' (2006), set in Boston.

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* ''Film/TheBlackDahlia'' (2006). Creator/BrianDePalma-directed try at [[UpToEleven "the ultimate film noir"]]. Known for its super-stylization and ''very'' complicated plot.
* ''Film/TheDeparted'' (2006), set in Boston.(2006)



* ''Film/TheBlackDahlia''. Creator/BrianDePalma-directed try at [[UpToEleven "the ultimate film noir"]]. Known for its super-stylization and ''very'' complicated plot.

to:

* ''Film/TheBlackDahlia''. Creator/BrianDePalma-directed try at [[UpToEleven "the ultimate film noir"]]. Known for its super-stylization and ''very'' complicated plot.''Film/BeforeTheDevilKnowsYoureDead'' (2007)
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