History Main / FairPlayWhoDunnit

11th Jan '17 7:00:01 PM nombretomado
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* There's a LordPeterWimsey mystery where a particular missing item from a painter's setup is an important clue that the painter had been murdered, rather than died accidentally, and the page revealing what it is before TheSummation, in a vaguely clever twist, is removed for "the entertainment of the reader".

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* There's a LordPeterWimsey Literature/LordPeterWimsey mystery where a particular missing item from a painter's setup is an important clue that the painter had been murdered, rather than died accidentally, and the page revealing what it is before TheSummation, in a vaguely clever twist, is removed for "the entertainment of the reader".
23rd Dec '16 9:23:04 PM FuzzyBoots
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* In ''Film/HangmansCurse'', all of the clues are provided to the audience, giving them the material to determine the person behind it all by halfway through the film, earlier than it takes for the protagonists to figure it out.
9th Dec '16 7:34:13 PM benda
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* Creator/AgathaChristie was a member of the Detection Club, the members of which promised to write their stories like this. However, that didn't stop her from having the narrator lead the reader down the garden path to the wrong answer. For example: in "Hercule Poirot's Christmas", Poirot asks the butler what the date was three days ago; the butler walks over to a wall calendar and reads off 'the 22nd'; and the reader is led to conclude that there is something important about the date. However, during TheSummation, Poirot says that the whole point was to find out if the butler had ''bad eyesight''. She also plays fast and loose with the [[spoiler: no doubles or hitherto unknown twins]] rules, by dropping [[spoiler:''two'' hitherto unknown illegitimate sons of the victim]] into the pot.

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* Creator/AgathaChristie was a member of the Detection Club, the members of which promised to write their stories like this. However, that didn't stop her from having the narrator lead the reader down the garden path to the wrong answer. For example: in "Hercule Poirot's Christmas", Poirot asks the butler what the date was three days ago; the butler walks over to a wall calendar and reads off 'the 22nd'; and the reader is led to conclude that there is something important about the date. However, during TheSummation, Poirot says that the whole point was to find out if the butler had ''bad eyesight''. She also plays fast and loose with the [[spoiler: no doubles or hitherto unknown twins]] rules, by dropping [[spoiler:''two'' hitherto unknown illegitimate sons of the victim]] into the pot.pot (though, to be fair, [[spoiler: the possibility of their existence was explicitly stated by their father himself]]).
18th Nov '16 7:45:22 PM Scorpion451
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# No [[AppliedPhlebotinum hitherto undiscovered poisons may be used, nor any appliance]] which will need [[{{Technobabble}} a long scientific explanation at the end]].

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# No [[AppliedPhlebotinum hitherto undiscovered poisons may be used, nor any appliance]] which will need [[{{Technobabble}} a long scientific explanation at the end]]. [[note]]Like the supernatural rule, this is somewhat relaxed in the modern interpretation, but again the Phlebotinum must be [[ChekhovsClassroom introduced and clearly explained beforehand]].[[/note]]
4th Nov '16 7:54:56 PM Venatius
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* Though more like logic puzzles or memory tests than traditional mysteries, the short stories in the ''Clue'' books by A. E. Parker, by design, always culminated in a specific mystery, for which the reader was given enough information to deduce the answer. Generally this simply involved keeping track of a series of fairly transparent mix-ups earlier in each story.
4th Nov '16 7:42:38 PM Venatius
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* The ''Franchise/WhenTheyCry'' mysteries have Fair Play ''solutions'', but apparent violations are [[MindScrew used to misdirect]] the viewer, and either come from [[UnreliableNarrator unreliable]] [[UnreliableExpositor sources]], or they're [[RedHerring irrelevant to the who- and howdunnit]]. [[spoiler: While the individual mystery stories can be solved, there is ultimately no solution given for the broader question of what happened in the "real" mystery, or indeed what exactly that was, making the broader plot closer to a CluelessMystery.]]
** ''VisualNovel/UminekoWhenTheyCry'' starts out rather questionably if it's a mystery or a fantasy, and it's the main conflict of the first four arcs--as in ''the characters actually argue'' over the genre: Beatrice insists that she killed everyone with magic while Battler refuses to believe that magic exists at all, though he also handicaps himself by refusing to admit that this means someone he knows committed the murders. As the story progresses, we're first shown Beatrice killing everyone with magic, which makes Battler despair until it's explained that anything not seen from the personal perspective of his piece on the "game board" is unreliable information. In the fifth arc, the reader is presented with the Knox's Decalogue as a hint to solving the mysteries presented, with a further hint being that if it's possible for Battler to be right, then the story must by definition be a FairPlayWhodunnit. The only question is whether he can figure out how it was actually done or, more importantly, the real meaning of the game and what magic actually is.

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* The ''Franchise/WhenTheyCry'' mysteries have Fair Play ''solutions'', but apparent violations are [[MindScrew used to misdirect]] the viewer, and either come from [[UnreliableNarrator unreliable]] [[UnreliableExpositor sources]], or they're [[RedHerring irrelevant to the who- and howdunnit]]. [[spoiler: While the individual mystery stories can be solved, there is ultimately no solution given for the broader question of what happened in the "real" mystery, or indeed what exactly that was, making the broader plot closer to a CluelessMystery.]]
howdunnit]].
** ''VisualNovel/UminekoWhenTheyCry'' starts out rather questionably if it's a mystery or a fantasy, and it's the main conflict of the first four arcs--as in ''the characters actually argue'' over the genre: Beatrice insists that she killed everyone with magic while Battler refuses to believe that magic exists at all, though he also handicaps himself by refusing to admit that this means someone he knows committed the murders. As the story progresses, we're first shown Beatrice killing everyone with magic, which makes Battler despair until it's explained that anything not seen from the personal perspective of his piece on the "game board" is unreliable information. In the fifth arc, the reader is presented with the Knox's Decalogue as a hint to solving the mysteries presented, with a further hint being that if it's possible for Battler to be right, then the story must by definition be a FairPlayWhodunnit. The only question is whether he can figure out how it was actually done or, more importantly, the real meaning of the game and what magic actually is. [[spoiler: While some of the individual mystery stories can be solved, there is ultimately no solution given for the broader question of what happened in the "real" mystery, or indeed what exactly that was, making the broader plot closer to a CluelessMystery. Although literal clues abound, there is no way to confirm anything.]]
4th Nov '16 7:40:26 PM Venatius
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* The ''Franchise/WhenTheyCry'' mysteries have Fair Play ''solutions'', but apparent violations are [[MindScrew used to misdirect]] the viewer, and either come from [[UnreliableNarrator unreliable]] [[UnreliableExpositor sources]], or they're [[RedHerring irrelevant to the who- and howdunnit]].

to:

* The ''Franchise/WhenTheyCry'' mysteries have Fair Play ''solutions'', but apparent violations are [[MindScrew used to misdirect]] the viewer, and either come from [[UnreliableNarrator unreliable]] [[UnreliableExpositor sources]], or they're [[RedHerring irrelevant to the who- and howdunnit]]. [[spoiler: While the individual mystery stories can be solved, there is ultimately no solution given for the broader question of what happened in the "real" mystery, or indeed what exactly that was, making the broader plot closer to a CluelessMystery.]]
13th Oct '16 6:29:32 PM SteveMB
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** Asimov also tweaked the novelization of ''[[FantasticVoyagePlot Fantastic Voyage]]'' to provide clues to the identity of [[TheMole the saboteur in the crew]], as well as to [[HandWave paper over the scientific problems with the concept]].

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** Asimov also tweaked the novelization of ''[[FantasticVoyagePlot Fantastic Voyage]]'' ''Film/FantasticVoyage'' to provide clues to the identity of [[TheMole the saboteur in the crew]], as well as to [[HandWave paper over the scientific problems with the concept]].
29th Sep '16 11:37:49 PM PaulA
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* Creator/MichaelConnelly's mystery novels are often these; ''Literature/ThePoet'' actually won an award for Fair Play. Make sure you read this before reading its sequel ''The Narrows'', which itself has a fair play TwistEnding.

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* Creator/MichaelConnelly's mystery novels are often these; ''Literature/ThePoet'' actually won an award for Fair Play. Make sure you read this before reading its sequel ''The Narrows'', ''Literature/TheNarrows'', which itself has a fair play TwistEnding.
16th Sep '16 1:28:24 AM PaulA
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* The stories of Creator/JohnDicksonCarr (as well as his pseudonym Carter Dickson) always showed you all the clues. (Even when the supernatural was involved, as in ''The Devil in Velvet'', he always clearly laid out the [[MagicAIsMagicA rules the magic operated by]].) The only problem was usually that the murder was ''impossible'' to begin with, so you couldn't figure out ''how'', much less who. Carr even [[LampshadeHanging lampshaded the tar out of this]] in ''The Three Coffins'' when Dr. Fell stops in the middle of the novel to explain all the ways you can do a locked room mystery, [[BreakingTheFourthWall because there was no point in pretending they weren't in such a novel]]. At the end of the chapter (yes, it's a full chapter of all the ways to pull one off) the other characters tell him that the two murders don't fit into ''any'' of his categories. [[spoiler: They're really wrong.]]
** Carr's essay "The Greatest Game in the World" makes a key point about what makes a Fair-Play Whodunnit really fair, and good when done right: the key to the case isn't just one clue - a random word hidden in chapter six - but a system of interlocking clues that allow the reader to open a tapestry of interpretation that gives a larger picture: that of the truth.

to:

* The stories of Creator/JohnDicksonCarr (as well as his pseudonym Carter Dickson) always showed you all the clues. (Even when the supernatural was involved, as in ''The Devil in Velvet'', he always clearly laid out the [[MagicAIsMagicA rules the magic operated by]].) The only problem was usually that the murder was ''impossible'' to begin with, so you couldn't figure out ''how'', much less who. Carr even [[LampshadeHanging lampshaded the tar out of this]] in ''The Hollow Man'' (US: ''The Three Coffins'' Coffins'') when Dr. Fell Literature/DrGideonFell stops in the middle of the novel to explain all the ways you can do a locked room mystery, [[BreakingTheFourthWall because there was no point in pretending they weren't in such a novel]]. At the end of the chapter (yes, it's a full chapter of all the ways to pull one off) the other characters tell him that the two murders don't fit into ''any'' of his categories. [[spoiler: They're [[spoiler:They're really wrong.]]
**
]] Carr's essay "The Greatest Game in the World" makes a key point about what makes a Fair-Play Whodunnit really fair, and good when done right: the key to the case isn't just one clue - -- a random word hidden in chapter six - -- but a system of interlocking clues that allow the reader to open a tapestry of interpretation that gives a larger picture: that of the truth.
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