History Main / FadSuper

13th Aug '17 9:35:37 PM PatPayne
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*** Though, in what may have been a deliberate TakeThat, the "disco" [[http://www.therealgentlemenofleisure.com/2011/10/x-amining-x-men-130.html Scott and Jean visit]] looks much more like [[https://www.pinterest.com/pin/412501647091774824 the Masque in Los Angeles]] than [[http://www.gettyimages.com/detail/news-photo/view-of-clubgoers-amid-the-light-towers-on-the-dance-floor-news-photo/583737453?#view-of-clubgoers-amid-the-light-towers-on-the-dance-floor-at-studio-picture-id583737453 Studio 54]]...
4th Aug '17 12:10:46 AM GastonRabbit
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* Similarly, books like ''Comicbook/TheMovement'' and ''Comicbook/WeAreRobin'' were created in response to youth-heavy social movies of the 2010's, like Black Lives Matter and Occupy Wall Street.
** ''The Movement'' also had a counterpart book, a relaunch of a failed 1970s concept of rich-kid adventurers called ''The Green Team''. The idea was that the Movement was "the 99 percent" while the Green Team was "the 1 percent".
* ''Comicbook/{{Superboy}}'' (TheNineties version, Kon-El/Connor Kent) was created to be a TotallyRadical reimagining of the "kid Superman" concept.
** In his debut, he had a buzzcut fade, a hoop earring, a leather jacket (which nearly every hero had at the time), sunglasses, and a costume that invoked TooManyBelts. He of course, used hip slang and made constant references to pop culture.
** His next costume kept the jacket, earring and shades (although with a new design and color scheme), but his hairstyle was radically changed since a fade had been way past dated by that point. His slang got slightly toned down as well, but was still in use.
** The third costume (which he kept up until the reboot of the ''Comicbook/{{New 52}}'') was an extensive overhaul. It ditched the jacket, skintight costume, earring, shades and TotallyRadical attitude (the CivvieSpandex look took a heavy turn toward "civvie", with a t-shirt and jeans). Instead, he became more dark, brooding, and angsty, which became popular following the late 2000s.

to:

* Similarly, books Books like ''Comicbook/TheMovement'' and ''Comicbook/WeAreRobin'' were created in response to youth-heavy social movies of the 2010's, like Black Lives Matter and Occupy Wall Street.
**
Street. ''The Movement'' also had a counterpart book, a relaunch of a failed 1970s concept of rich-kid adventurers called ''The Green Team''. The idea was that the Movement was "the 99 percent" while the Green Team was "the 1 percent".
* ''Comicbook/{{Superboy}}'' (TheNineties version, Kon-El/Connor Kent) was created to be a TotallyRadical reimagining of the "kid Superman" concept. \n** \\
In his debut, he had a buzzcut fade, a hoop earring, a leather jacket (which nearly every hero had at the time), sunglasses, and a costume that invoked TooManyBelts. He of course, used hip slang and made constant references to pop culture.
**
culture.\\
His next costume kept the jacket, earring and shades (although with a new design and color scheme), but his hairstyle was radically changed since a fade had been way past dated by that point. His slang got slightly toned down as well, but was still in use.
**
use.\\
The third costume (which he kept up until the reboot of the ''Comicbook/{{New 52}}'') was an extensive overhaul. It ditched the jacket, skintight costume, earring, shades and TotallyRadical attitude (the CivvieSpandex look took a heavy turn toward "civvie", with a t-shirt and jeans). Instead, he became more dark, brooding, and angsty, which became popular following the late 2000s.



** There's also Screwball, a [[LeParkour traceuse]] who likes recording her exploits and then uploading them to Website/YouTube and talking about them on Website/{{Twitter}}. Peter himself has apparently begun studying Parkour as well, as showcased by an issue where he's forced to operate in an area without high-rise buildings from which to web-swing.

to:

** There's also Screwball, Screwball is a [[LeParkour traceuse]] who likes recording her exploits and then uploading them to Website/YouTube and talking about them on Website/{{Twitter}}. Peter himself has apparently begun studying Parkour as well, as showcased by an issue where he's forced to operate in an area without high-rise buildings from which to web-swing.



* Night Thrasher, leader of the ComicBook/NewWarriors in the Franchise/MarvelUniverse, was created in 1990 with a skateboard grafted onto his urbanized Franchise/{{Batman}} schtick to cash in on the rising popularity of the sport in the late '80s. As the '90s progressed, he used the board less and less and settled on a CoolBike early in the series, plus as any connection between skateboards and the term "thrashing" largely passed out of public awareness, his name [[NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast just sounds]] awfully nasty (although Spider-Man [[LampshadeHanging made a joke]] along this line in ''1991''.) He fought with twin eskrima sticks so the thrashing part of his name could easily be applied to his weapons of choice. An odd detail that downplayed it with time was that he's a ''black'' skateboarder. For the uninitiated - his heyday was long before there were any big-name black skaters. (The aforementioned Rocket Racer, Marvel's ''other'' black skateboarding superhero, has much the same problem at first.) The concept has become less baffling now, since there is a subculture of African-American skateboarders. Music/LupeFiasco's hit "Kick, Push" is credited with helping popularize the sport among black teenagers.
** And while a superhero on a skateboard is fodder for jokes, in-universe ''ComicBook/ThePunisher'' noted how versatile Night Trasher's skateboard actually was: "I called it stupid? It's a shield, a weapon and transport. Maybe ''I'' should get one..."

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* Night Thrasher, leader of the ComicBook/NewWarriors in the Franchise/MarvelUniverse, was created in 1990 with a skateboard grafted onto his urbanized Franchise/{{Batman}} schtick to cash in on the rising popularity of the sport in the late '80s. As the '90s progressed, he used the board less and less and settled on a CoolBike early in the series, plus as any connection between skateboards and the term "thrashing" largely passed out of public awareness, his name [[NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast just sounds]] awfully nasty (although Spider-Man [[LampshadeHanging made a joke]] along this line in ''1991''.) He fought with twin eskrima sticks so the thrashing part of his name could easily be applied to his weapons of choice. An odd detail that downplayed it with time was that he's a ''black'' skateboarder. For the uninitiated - his heyday was long before there were any big-name black skaters. (The aforementioned Rocket Racer, Marvel's ''other'' black skateboarding superhero, has much the same problem at first.) The concept has become less baffling now, since there is a subculture of African-American skateboarders. Music/LupeFiasco's hit "Kick, Push" is credited with helping popularize the sport among black teenagers.
** And while
teenagers. While a superhero on a skateboard is fodder for jokes, in-universe ''ComicBook/ThePunisher'' noted how versatile Night Trasher's skateboard actually was: "I called it stupid? It's a shield, a weapon and transport. Maybe ''I'' should get one..."



* There were a lot of black superheroes created in the wake of the {{Blaxploitation}} trend. In addition to the aforementioned Luke Cage and Misty Knight, there was also ComicBook/BlackLightning, Black Goliath and Franchise/WonderWoman's black "sister" Nubia.
** Creator/DwayneMcDuffie ended up creating the ''ComicBook/{{Icon}}'' character Buck Wild as a parody of this trend.

to:

* There were a lot of black superheroes created in the wake of the {{Blaxploitation}} trend. In addition to the aforementioned Luke Cage and Misty Knight, there was also ComicBook/BlackLightning, Black Goliath and Franchise/WonderWoman's black "sister" Nubia.
**
Nubia. Creator/DwayneMcDuffie ended up creating the ''ComicBook/{{Icon}}'' character Buck Wild as a parody of this trend.



* Naturally, any Soviet-themed comic character [[TheGreatPoliticsMessUp that is now hopelessly dated]]. Granted, the USSR was around for more than seven decades, so it's a pretty long fad.
** Combining this with ComicBookTime gives nearly every one of these characters his or her own ContinuitySnarl.
*** The only aversions are Omega Red, an ''intentional'' throwback who, in his first appearance, was explicitly [[SealedEvilInACan kept in stasis]] since the Cold War until woken in the post-Soviet era, and "Cold Warrior", a similarly stored surplus-parts cyborg whose whole schtick is trying to bring back the People's Glory Days.
*** Ironically, Omega Red was created in 1992, early enough that stasis could not have been needed.

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* Naturally, any Soviet-themed comic character [[TheGreatPoliticsMessUp that is now hopelessly dated]]. Granted, the USSR was around for more than seven decades, so it's a pretty long fad.
**
fad. Combining this with ComicBookTime gives nearly every one of these characters his or her own ContinuitySnarl.
*** ** The only aversions are Omega Red, an ''intentional'' throwback who, in his first appearance, was explicitly [[SealedEvilInACan kept in stasis]] since the Cold War until woken in the post-Soviet era, and "Cold Warrior", a similarly stored surplus-parts cyborg whose whole schtick is trying to bring back the People's Glory Days.
***
Days. Ironically, Omega Red was created in 1992, early enough that stasis could not have been needed.



* [[http://www.internationalhero.co.uk/s/skateman.htm Skateman]] was made at a time when ''all'' skates had side-by-side wheels.
** Skateman is interesting because the other two major facets of his life, being a karate blackbelt and a Vietnam vet, are also heavily tied to the early 1970s.
* Occasionally employed in a self-aware manner by ''ComicBook/AstroCity'' -- for instance, flashbacks to TheFifties might feature an appearance by a hero called "The Bouncing Beatnik".
** The Beatnik's an interesting case, since he changes identities to match social trends of the time -- ragtime, jazz, hippies, etc. (It helps he's not human, but a mystical entity.)
** The "Dark Ages" story arc references the kung fu fad of the '70s with the Jade Dragons, and the space race with the Apollo Eleven.
** Older stories have featured brief glimpses of [[ThePioneer the Frontiersman]], complete with coonskin cap. If you don't get it, there was a popular ''Davy Crockett'' TV show in the 1950s.

to:

* [[http://www.internationalhero.co.uk/s/skateman.htm Skateman]] was made at a time when ''all'' skates had side-by-side wheels.
**
wheels. Skateman is interesting because the other two major facets of his life, being a karate blackbelt and a Vietnam vet, are also heavily tied to the early 1970s.
* Occasionally employed in a self-aware manner by ''ComicBook/AstroCity'' -- for instance, flashbacks to TheFifties might feature an appearance by a hero called "The Bouncing Beatnik".
**
Beatnik". The Beatnik's an interesting case, since he changes identities to match social trends of the time -- ragtime, jazz, hippies, etc. (It helps he's not human, but a mystical entity.)
**
) The "Dark Ages" story arc references the kung fu fad of the '70s with the Jade Dragons, and the space race with the Apollo Eleven.
**
Eleven.\\
Older stories have featured brief glimpses of [[ThePioneer the Frontiersman]], complete with coonskin cap. If you don't get it, there was a popular ''Davy Crockett'' TV show in the 1950s.



* ''Literature/{{Wild Cards}}'', being full of nods to the history of comics, created these characters on purpose.
** Mark Meadows, a hopeless nerd who wants to be a hippie, gets various abilities from different strains of LSD he created, and has various secret identities named after songs from the 60s and 70s. It's inherent in his backstory; by the time he managed to fit into the hippie crowd, the fad was already pretty much dead.
** Fortunato's motif incorporates the mysticism and occultism fad of the 60s. He actually doesn't give a crap about any of that stuff; a prostitute he hired introduced him to the subject and convinced him to study it when he got his powers.

to:

* ''Literature/{{Wild Cards}}'', being full of nods to the history of comics, created these characters on purpose. \n** Mark Meadows, a hopeless nerd who wants to be a hippie, gets various abilities from different strains of LSD he created, and has various secret identities named after songs from the 60s and 70s. It's inherent in his backstory; by the time he managed to fit into the hippie crowd, the fad was already pretty much dead. \n** Fortunato's motif incorporates the mysticism and occultism fad of the 60s. He actually doesn't give a crap about any of that stuff; a prostitute he hired introduced him to the subject and convinced him to study it when he got his powers.



** Similarly, ''Series/MahouSentaiMagiranger'' was made to cash in on ''Literature/HarryPotter'''s popularity, whereas its American counterpart ''Series/PowerRangersMysticForce'' was remade in the style of ''Film/LordOfTheRings''.
** The producers of ''Series/KaizokuSentaiGokaiger'' justified its {{Pirate}} theme by literally arguing, "Well, ''Manga/OnePiece'' is popular, innit?" (Averted when it came time to adapt it for ''Franchise/PowerRangers'', though; you'd think they might attempt to piggyback on ''Franchise/PiratesOfTheCaribbean'' but instead they tried to downplay the pirate theme as much as possible; ''[[Series/PowerRangersMegaforce Super Megaforce]]'' focuses on the [[MilestoneCelebration anniversary]] aspect instead.)
** Then there's the dance-based ''Series/BattleFeverJ'' (1979). And yes, one of the Rangers there danced disco (Miss America).
** ''Series/NinpuuSentaiHurricaneger''/''Series/PowerRangersNinjaStorm'' seemed fit to muscle in on a piece of the ninja pie inspired by ''Naruto'', as did ''Series/JukenSentaiGekiranger''/''Series/PowerRangersJungleFury''.

to:

** Similarly, * ''Series/MahouSentaiMagiranger'' was made to cash in on ''Literature/HarryPotter'''s popularity, whereas its American counterpart ''Series/PowerRangersMysticForce'' was remade in the style of ''Film/LordOfTheRings''.
** * The producers of ''Series/KaizokuSentaiGokaiger'' justified its {{Pirate}} theme by literally arguing, "Well, ''Manga/OnePiece'' is popular, innit?" (Averted when it came time to adapt it for ''Franchise/PowerRangers'', though; you'd think they might attempt to piggyback on ''Franchise/PiratesOfTheCaribbean'' but instead they tried to downplay the pirate theme as much as possible; ''[[Series/PowerRangersMegaforce Super Megaforce]]'' focuses on the [[MilestoneCelebration anniversary]] aspect instead.)
** Then there's the * The dance-based ''Series/BattleFeverJ'' (1979). And yes, one of the Rangers there danced disco (Miss America).
** * ''Series/NinpuuSentaiHurricaneger''/''Series/PowerRangersNinjaStorm'' seemed fit to muscle in on a piece of the ninja pie inspired by ''Naruto'', as did ''Series/JukenSentaiGekiranger''/''Series/PowerRangersJungleFury''.



** Some argue that Vicki (1965) is a [[ScooterRidingMod mod-themed]] companion, though it's mostly expressed with her fashion sense, which has generally stayed in style. In "The Space Museum", though, she arms the Xerons, who are portrayed as a load of young, coffee-drinking beatniks, and has them start a revolution over their middle-aged oppressors. Youth power!



** It can be argued that the retro theme of indie games could allow the 8-bit fad a reprieve.

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** It can be argued that the retro theme of indie games could allow the 8-bit fad a reprieve.
7th Jul '17 1:59:08 AM MadAnthony94
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** Fortunato's motif incorporates the mysticism and occultism fad of the 60s. He actually doesn't give a crap about any of that stuff; a prostitute he hired introduced him to the stuff and convinced him to study it when he got his powers.

to:

** Fortunato's motif incorporates the mysticism and occultism fad of the 60s. He actually doesn't give a crap about any of that stuff; a prostitute he hired introduced him to the stuff subject and convinced him to study it when he got his powers.
7th Jul '17 1:58:22 AM MadAnthony94
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Added DiffLines:

[[folder:Literature]]
* ''Literature/{{Wild Cards}}'', being full of nods to the history of comics, created these characters on purpose.
** Mark Meadows, a hopeless nerd who wants to be a hippie, gets various abilities from different strains of LSD he created, and has various secret identities named after songs from the 60s and 70s. It's inherent in his backstory; by the time he managed to fit into the hippie crowd, the fad was already pretty much dead.
** Fortunato's motif incorporates the mysticism and occultism fad of the 60s. He actually doesn't give a crap about any of that stuff; a prostitute he hired introduced him to the stuff and convinced him to study it when he got his powers.

[[/folder]]
1st Jul '17 12:45:42 AM Thrabalen
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to:

**It can be argued that the retro theme of indie games could allow the 8-bit fad a reprieve.
21st Jun '17 6:34:58 AM jormis29
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* ComicBook/{{Dazzler}} (who provides the page image), who later became a member of the Comicbook/XMen, was introduced with disco-based powers and costume (white jumpsuit and roller skates) just as disco was dying. It didn't help that she was given a big marketing push, meeting up with the likes of Galactus in a vain attempt to make the character cool, or that the entire project had begun as a proposal for a [[LiveActionAdaptation live action film]] in which character was at one stage to be black, and there are [[http://holdyourfireal.smugmug.com/COMIC-BOOK-IMAGES/Characters/Dazzler/JRJRDazzBogart/871688078_cKqUM-L.jpg John Romita Jr. sketches]] that exist of this early Dazzler. At one point they actually had a singer who was to play the Dazzler persona but the deal between Marvel and Casablanca fell apart. Later on, Jim Shooter put together a treatment for the aforementioned movie (also to feature Donna Summer, Cher, Rodney Dangerfield, [[Series/LaverneAndShirley Lenny and Squiggy]], Creator/RobinWilliams, the Village People and KISS), and the now revived Dazzler concept's appearance ended up based mainly on Bo Derek, who was slated to star (and when she was still attached to the role, People magazine even had her on the cover, the same month the character debuted, [[https://web.archive.org/web/20160411111032/http://goodcomics.comicbookresources.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/06/19800211-750-0.jpg with her husband holding a whole bunch of Marvel mags for research!]]). But at least she wasn't called the Disco Dazzler, as originally planned.

to:

* ComicBook/{{Dazzler}} (who provides the page image), who later became a member of the Comicbook/XMen, was introduced with disco-based powers and costume (white jumpsuit and roller skates) just as disco was dying. It didn't help that she was given a big marketing push, meeting up with the likes of Galactus in a vain attempt to make the character cool, or that the entire project had begun as a proposal for a [[LiveActionAdaptation live action film]] in which character was at one stage to be black, and there are [[http://holdyourfireal.smugmug.com/COMIC-BOOK-IMAGES/Characters/Dazzler/JRJRDazzBogart/871688078_cKqUM-L.jpg John Romita Jr. sketches]] that exist of this early Dazzler. At one point they actually had a singer who was to play the Dazzler persona but the deal between Marvel and Casablanca fell apart. Later on, Jim Shooter put together a treatment for the aforementioned movie (also to feature Donna Summer, Cher, Rodney Dangerfield, [[Series/LaverneAndShirley Lenny and Squiggy]], Creator/RobinWilliams, the Village People and KISS), and the now revived Dazzler concept's appearance ended up based mainly on Bo Derek, Creator/BoDerek, who was slated to star (and when she was still attached to the role, People magazine even had her on the cover, the same month the character debuted, [[https://web.archive.org/web/20160411111032/http://goodcomics.comicbookresources.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/06/19800211-750-0.jpg with her husband holding a whole bunch of Marvel mags for research!]]). But at least she wasn't called the Disco Dazzler, as originally planned.
20th Jun '17 11:09:15 AM comicwriter
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* The 2001 ReTool of ''ComicBook/XForce'' (later ''X-Statix'') cast the new team as a group of fame-hungry [[ThePrimaDonna Primma Donnas]] right around the time ''Series/BigBrother'' and other [[RealityShow reality shows]] were becoming wildly popular.

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* The 2001 ReTool of ''ComicBook/XForce'' (later ''X-Statix'') ''Comicbook/XStatix'') cast the new team as a group of fame-hungry [[ThePrimaDonna Primma Donnas]] right around the time ''Series/BigBrother'' and other [[RealityShow reality shows]] were becoming wildly popular.
11th Jun '17 11:30:28 AM nombretomado
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* The Koopalings, introduced in ''VideoGame/SuperMarioBros3'', were generally given a punk aesthetic to reflect [[TheEighties Eighties]]-era trends (the most notable exception being [[Creator/LudwigVanBeethoven Ludwig von Koopa]]). They went on hiatus after ''VideoGame/SuperMarioWorld'', which would seem to reflect on Nintendo abandoning past fads. Luckily for them, they got a comeback in the last dungeon of ''VideoGame/MarioAndLuigiSuperstarSaga'', followed by top billing in ''VideoGame/NewSuperMarioBrosWii''; WeirdAlEffect is definitely present, though.

to:

* The Koopalings, introduced in ''VideoGame/SuperMarioBros3'', were generally given a punk aesthetic to reflect [[TheEighties Eighties]]-era trends (the most notable exception being [[Creator/LudwigVanBeethoven [[Music/LudwigVanBeethoven Ludwig von Koopa]]). They went on hiatus after ''VideoGame/SuperMarioWorld'', which would seem to reflect on Nintendo abandoning past fads. Luckily for them, they got a comeback in the last dungeon of ''VideoGame/MarioAndLuigiSuperstarSaga'', followed by top billing in ''VideoGame/NewSuperMarioBrosWii''; WeirdAlEffect is definitely present, though.
2nd Jun '17 6:31:07 PM DragonRanger
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* Comicbook/{{Vibe}}, a member of the [[DorkAge much-maligned]] Detroit-based Franchise/JusticeLeagueOfAmerica, was a breakdancer with vibrational powers. To get an idea of what he used to be like have a look at [[http://youtu.be/2UTKRR3KRyQ this DC short.]] He got rebooted in the ComicBook/{{New 52}}, dropping the breakdancing but keeping the vibrational powers.

to:

* Comicbook/{{Vibe}}, a member of the [[DorkAge much-maligned]] Detroit-based Franchise/JusticeLeagueOfAmerica, was a breakdancer with vibrational powers. To get an idea of what he used to be like have a look at [[http://youtu.be/2UTKRR3KRyQ this DC short.]] He got rebooted in the ComicBook/{{New 52}}, 52}} and ''Series/TheFlash2014'', dropping the breakdancing but keeping the vibrational powers.



* Fire and Ice from the [[ComicBook/JusticeLeagueInternational JLI]] had very 1980s-looking costumes, complete with [[EightiesHair big hair]] and T-shirts over spandex. Ice even {{Lampshaded}} this by claiming she and Fire looked like they belonged in a HairMetal video. Needless to say, the more recent comics and cartoon adaptations have chosen to give them different outfits.

to:

* Fire and Ice from the [[ComicBook/JusticeLeagueInternational JLI]] ComicBook/JusticeLeagueInternational had very 1980s-looking costumes, complete with [[EightiesHair big hair]] and T-shirts over spandex. Ice even {{Lampshaded}} this by claiming she and Fire looked like they belonged in a HairMetal video. Needless to say, the more recent comics and cartoon adaptations have chosen to give them different outfits.



* Creator/DCComics announced in 2013 that they'd be debuting two new series, one a relaunch of the failed 1970s concept of rich-kid adventurers the Green Team, and the other a massive group of working-class heroes known as "The Movement". The idea was to represent "the 1 percent" and "the 99 percent."
* Hawk and Dove were created in response to the Vietnam War movements.
* Similarly, books like ''Comicbook/TheMovement'' and ''We Are Comicbook/{{Robin}}'' were created in response to youth-heavy social movies of the 2010's, like Black Lives Matter and Occupy Wall Street.

to:

* Creator/DCComics announced in 2013 that they'd be debuting two new series, one a relaunch of the failed 1970s concept of rich-kid adventurers the Green Team, and the other a massive group of working-class heroes known as "The Movement". The idea was to represent "the 1 percent" and "the 99 percent."
* Hawk and Dove
ComicBook/HawkAndDove were created in response to the Vietnam War movements.
* Similarly, books like ''Comicbook/TheMovement'' and ''We Are Comicbook/{{Robin}}'' ''Comicbook/WeAreRobin'' were created in response to youth-heavy social movies of the 2010's, like Black Lives Matter and Occupy Wall Street.Street.
** ''The Movement'' also had a counterpart book, a relaunch of a failed 1970s concept of rich-kid adventurers called ''The Green Team''. The idea was that the Movement was "the 99 percent" while the Green Team was "the 1 percent".



* Marvel's Angar the Screamer, an angry radical type whose screams cause intense hallucinations.

to:

* Marvel's Angar the Screamer, an angry radical type whose screams cause intense hallucinations.



* '''Adam X the X-Treme,''' from the early, well, [[UsefulNotes/TheDarkAgeOfComicBooks guess which decade]], who was almost made a ''completely unignorable'' OldShame by virtue of being ''the third Summers brother''. Fortunately, he vanished before the writers revealed that, and it ended up being someone completely different about a decade later. He hasn't disappeared completely, considering a few recent appearances - and it's still entirely possible he's the ''fourth'' Summers brother, if only a half-brother.
* The ''Heroes for Hire'', ComicBook/{{Luke Cage|HeroForHire}} and [[ComicBook/ImmortalIronFist Iron Fist]], capitalized on the popularity of blaxploitation and kung fu movies, respectively, by combining the two trends. As did their female counterparts, the ''Daughters of the Dragon'' Misty Knight and Colleen Wing. And the vaguely affiliated Sons of the Tiger.
* Marvel's Shang-Chi, Master of Kung Fu, first appeared in 1972 as part of the '70s kung fu revival. Not only was Shang-Chi meant to invoke Creator/BruceLee, but his origin came because Marvel owned the comic book rights to both [[YellowPeril Fu Manchu]] and ''Series/KungFu'' at the time.

to:

* '''Adam Adam X the X-Treme,''' X-Treme, from the early, well, [[UsefulNotes/TheDarkAgeOfComicBooks guess which decade]], who was almost made a ''completely unignorable'' OldShame by virtue of being ''the third Summers brother''. Fortunately, he vanished before the writers revealed that, and it ended up being someone completely different about a decade later. He hasn't disappeared completely, considering a few recent appearances - and it's still entirely possible he's the ''fourth'' Summers brother, if only a half-brother.
* The ''Heroes for Hire'', ComicBook/{{Luke Cage|HeroForHire}} and [[ComicBook/ImmortalIronFist Iron Fist]], capitalized on the popularity of blaxploitation and kung fu movies, respectively, by combining the two trends. As did their female counterparts, the ''Daughters of the Dragon'' Misty Knight ''ComicBook/DaughtersOfTheDragon'' ComicBook/MistyKnight and Colleen Wing.ComicBook/ColleenWing. And the vaguely affiliated Sons of the Tiger.
* Marvel's Shang-Chi, ComicBook/ShangChi, Master of Kung Fu, first appeared in 1972 as part of the '70s kung fu revival. Not only was Shang-Chi meant to invoke Creator/BruceLee, but his origin came because Marvel owned the comic book rights to both [[YellowPeril Fu Manchu]] and ''Series/KungFu'' at the time.



* It's hard to tell whether ''Marvel: The Lost Generation'''s Hipster, a skinny, goateed beatnik and total JiveTurkey operating in late 1950s San Francisco, is intended as a spoof or a completely straight portrayal of this trope. However, he's definitely an example. When he meets Sunshine, a woman with psychadelic powers, he changes his costume and name to become Captain Hip.

to:

* It's hard to tell whether ''Marvel: The Lost Generation'''s Hipster, a skinny, goateed beatnik and total JiveTurkey operating in late 1950s San Francisco, is intended as a spoof or a completely straight portrayal of this trope. However, he's definitely an example. When he meets Sunshine, a woman with psychadelic psychedelic powers, he changes his costume and name to become Captain Hip.



* There were a lot of black superheroes created in the wake of the {{Blaxploitation}} trend. In addition to the aforementioned Cage and [[AfroAsskicker Misty Knight]], there was also ComicBook/BlackLightning, Black Goliath and Franchise/WonderWoman's black "sister" Nubia.

to:

* There were a lot of black superheroes created in the wake of the {{Blaxploitation}} trend. In addition to the aforementioned Luke Cage and [[AfroAsskicker Misty Knight]], Knight, there was also ComicBook/BlackLightning, Black Goliath and Franchise/WonderWoman's black "sister" Nubia.



* There are plenty of {{Goth}} superheroes, like Marvel's [[ComicBook/{{Runaways}} Nico]] [[ComicBook/AForce Minoru]] (formerly Sister Grimm until they decided to ditch the codenames) and DC's Black Alice.

to:

* There are plenty of {{Goth}} superheroes, like Marvel's [[ComicBook/{{Runaways}} Nico]] [[ComicBook/AForce Minoru]] ComicBook/NicoMinoru (formerly Sister Grimm until they decided to ditch the codenames) and DC's Black Alice.
22nd May '17 3:08:30 PM themisterfree
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** And while a superhero on a skateboard is fodder for jokes, in-universe ''ComicBook/ThePunisher'' noted how versatile Night Trasher's skateboard actually was, as it was a weapon, a shield, and transportation all in one- to the point where he pondered acquiring one.

to:

** And while a superhero on a skateboard is fodder for jokes, in-universe ''ComicBook/ThePunisher'' noted how versatile Night Trasher's skateboard actually was, as was: "I called it was a weapon, stupid? It's a shield, a weapon and transportation all in one- to the point where he pondered acquiring one.transport. Maybe ''I'' should get one..."
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