History Main / FadSuper

18th Jan '17 6:51:40 AM pinkdalek
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* {{Aggretsuko}} is a disillusioned Millennial, and also moonlights as a heavy metal growl vocalist in a frilly dress, a trend inspired by the popularity of {{BABYMETAL}}.

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* HelloKitty's birthplace is listed in her bio as "London". This was inspired by a fad for British culture and music in 1970s Japan when she was created, and Sanrio has been mildly embarrassed about it ever since.
* {{Gudetama}}, 'an egg with crippling depression', appeals to the strain of depressive, self-deprecating humour made possible by the internet culture of the 2010s.
* {{Aggretsuko}} is a disillusioned disillusioned and underemployed Millennial, and also moonlights as a heavy metal growl vocalist in a frilly dress, a trend inspired by the popularity of {{BABYMETAL}}.
18th Jan '17 6:45:29 AM pinkdalek
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[[folder: Mascots]]
* {{Aggretsuko}} is a disillusioned Millennial, and also moonlights as a heavy metal growl vocalist in a frilly dress, a trend inspired by the popularity of {{BABYMETAL}}.
[[/folder]]
18th Jan '17 6:31:26 AM pinkdalek
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** ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXV'' features Prompto, a photographer party member who takes shots of his friends, selfies, and photos of his food taken through filters. This was a fairly late addition to the game to ride the {{Instagram}} trend.

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**''VideoGame/FinalFantasyX2'' owes a lot to Music/DestinysChild, with IdolSinger characters, an all-female party in the fashions of the time, a funk-influenced R&B soundtrack and some SpyFiction aesthetic flourishes taken right out of the video for "Independent Woman Pt. 1".
** ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXV'' features Prompto, a photographer party member who takes shots of his friends, selfies, and photos of his food taken through with fake-analog filters. This was a fairly late addition to the game to ride the {{Instagram}} Instagram trend.
18th Jan '17 6:24:55 AM pinkdalek
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* ''Franchise/FinalFantasy'' generally avoids this due to its setting, but has had a couple.
** In ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVIII'', Selphie has an 'Online Diary' which you can read at various points of the game. In 1998, LiveJournal had just launched, and blogging was seen as futuristic.
**''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXV'' features Prompto, a photographer party member who takes shots of his friends, selfies, and photos of his food taken through filters. This was a fairly late addition to the game to ride the {{Instagram}} trend.
7th Jan '17 4:29:58 PM nombretomado
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** There was a wave of nostalgia for UniversalHorror tropes in the early-to-mid 70s, which gave rise to the Fourth Doctor's portrayal as a bohemian Victorian {{Swashbuckler}} fighting aliens that resembled classic horror monsters.

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** There was a wave of nostalgia for UniversalHorror Franchise/UniversalHorror tropes in the early-to-mid 70s, which gave rise to the Fourth Doctor's portrayal as a bohemian Victorian {{Swashbuckler}} fighting aliens that resembled classic horror monsters.
5th Jan '17 12:30:44 PM SeptimusHeap
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* Night Thrasher, leader of the ComicBook/NewWarriors in the Franchise/MarvelUniverse, was created in 1990 with a skateboard grafted onto his urbanized Franchise/{{Batman}} schtick to cash in on the rising popularity of the sport in the late '80s. As the '90s progressed, he used the board less and less and settled on a CoolBike early in the series, plus as any connection between skateboards and the term "thrashing" largely passed out of public awareness, his name [[NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast just sounds]] [[FreudWasRight awfully nasty]] (although Spider-Man [[LampshadeHanging made a joke]] along this line in ''1991''.) He fought with twin eskrima sticks so the thrashing part of his name could easily be applied to his weapons of choice. An odd detail that downplayed it with time was that he's a ''black'' skateboarder. For the uninitiated - his heyday was long before there were any big-name black skaters. (The aforementioned Rocket Racer, Marvel's ''other'' black skateboarding superhero, has much the same problem at first.) The concept has become less baffling now, since there is a subculture of African-American skateboarders. Music/LupeFiasco's hit "Kick, Push" is credited with helping popularize the sport among black teenagers.

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* Night Thrasher, leader of the ComicBook/NewWarriors in the Franchise/MarvelUniverse, was created in 1990 with a skateboard grafted onto his urbanized Franchise/{{Batman}} schtick to cash in on the rising popularity of the sport in the late '80s. As the '90s progressed, he used the board less and less and settled on a CoolBike early in the series, plus as any connection between skateboards and the term "thrashing" largely passed out of public awareness, his name [[NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast just sounds]] [[FreudWasRight awfully nasty]] nasty (although Spider-Man [[LampshadeHanging made a joke]] along this line in ''1991''.) He fought with twin eskrima sticks so the thrashing part of his name could easily be applied to his weapons of choice. An odd detail that downplayed it with time was that he's a ''black'' skateboarder. For the uninitiated - his heyday was long before there were any big-name black skaters. (The aforementioned Rocket Racer, Marvel's ''other'' black skateboarding superhero, has much the same problem at first.) The concept has become less baffling now, since there is a subculture of African-American skateboarders. Music/LupeFiasco's hit "Kick, Push" is credited with helping popularize the sport among black teenagers.
28th Oct '16 11:01:26 PM narm00
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** The [[Franchise/XMen mutant]] [[Music/MonsterMagnet Negasonic Teenage Warhead]], or Why It's A Bad Idea Let A Goth Teen Name Herself. (She's less goth, but still a moody teen, in ''Film/{{Deadpool 2016}}''.)

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** The [[Franchise/XMen mutant]] [[Music/MonsterMagnet Negasonic Teenage Warhead]], or Why It's A Bad Idea To Let A Goth Teen Name Herself. (She's less goth, but still a moody teen, in ''Film/{{Deadpool 2016}}''.)



** WordOfGod is that the Bouncing Beatnik actually changes identities to social trends of the time. There's been three known (in-universe) incarnations of the Beatnik, though only two have appeared in stories to date.

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** WordOfGod is that the Bouncing Beatnik actually The Beatnik's an interesting case, since he changes identities to match social trends of the time. There's been three known (in-universe) incarnations of the Beatnik, though only two have appeared in stories to date.time -- ragtime, jazz, hippies, etc. (It helps he's not human, but a mystical entity.)
14th Oct '16 6:07:54 AM pinkdalek
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** Any of the numerous Margaret Thatcher-themed villains in the mid-to-late 80s would qualify, but especially Helen A from "The Happiness Patrol", a crazed, bigoted, hedonistic matriarch with a HenpeckedHusband.

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** Any of the numerous Margaret Thatcher-themed villains in the mid-to-late 80s would qualify, but especially Helen A from "The Happiness Patrol", a crazed, bigoted, hedonistic matriarch fascist with a HenpeckedHusband.ghastly hairdo and a HenpeckedHusband, fitting the contemporary satirical shorthand.




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** Series 10 is set to give us "killer {{Emoji}}".
14th Oct '16 6:03:30 AM pinkdalek
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** There was a wave of nostalgia for UniversalHorror tropes in the early-to-mid 70s, which gave rise to the Fourth Doctor's portrayal as a bohemian Victorian {{Swashbuckler}} fighting aliens that resembled classic horror monsters.


Added DiffLines:

** Any of the numerous Margaret Thatcher-themed villains in the mid-to-late 80s would qualify, but especially Helen A from "The Happiness Patrol", a crazed, bigoted, hedonistic matriarch with a HenpeckedHusband.
29th Sep '16 8:39:18 AM JamesAustin
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[[folder:Comic Books - DC]]
* ComicBook/WonderWoman was once caught up in this trope. For a time in the late 1960s and early 1970s, Wonder Woman lost her powers and familiar uniform, gained a wise old Asian mentor who taught her martial arts, and had espionage adventures wearing a white jumpsuit ... right around the time spy shows like ''Series/TheAvengers'' were popular. Most people hated this, Gloria Steinem even commenting how it was a needless depowering of the strongest female hero in comics, and it's pretty well in a DorkAge.
** Ironically, the spy concept as well as the white-jumpsuit were both used in a more recent volume of Wonder Woman following Infinite Crisis. Judging by some reviews, people liked it.

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[[folder:Comic Books - DC]]
* ComicBook/WonderWoman was once caught up in this trope. For a time in the late 1960s and early 1970s, Wonder Woman lost her powers and familiar uniform, gained a wise old Asian mentor who taught her martial arts, and had espionage adventures wearing a white jumpsuit ... right around the time spy shows like ''Series/TheAvengers'' were popular. Most people hated this, Gloria Steinem even commenting how it was a needless depowering of the strongest female hero in comics, and it's pretty well in a DorkAge.
**
DorkAge. Ironically, the spy concept as well as the white-jumpsuit were both used in a more recent volume of Wonder Woman following Infinite Crisis. Judging by some reviews, people liked it.



* The original run of the ''ComicBook/TeenTitans'' comics featured two villainous examples who used then-trendy fads as covers for their criminal schemes: [[HaveAGayOldTime Ding-Dong Daddy]] (a caricature of Ed "Big Daddy" Roth, whose shtick was Hot Rods) and the Mad Mod (whose shtick was the fashions of the "Mod" look). Appropriately, such villains have returned as part of a nostalgia fad, to evoke the era in which the original fads appeared. [[WesternAnimation/TeenTitans The animated series]] revealed that the youth-scene-oriented Mad Mod is actually a crotchety old man using holograms and stage magic to create his younger appearance, [[ExploitedTrope trying to steal and/or control youth.]]

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* ''ComicBook/TeenTitans'':
**
The original run of the ''ComicBook/TeenTitans'' ''Teen Titans'' comics featured two villainous examples who used then-trendy fads as covers for their criminal schemes: [[HaveAGayOldTime Ding-Dong Daddy]] (a caricature of Ed "Big Daddy" Roth, whose shtick was Hot Rods) and the Mad Mod (whose shtick was the fashions of the "Mod" look). Appropriately, such villains have returned as part of a nostalgia fad, to evoke the era in which the original fads appeared. [[WesternAnimation/TeenTitans The animated series]] revealed that the youth-scene-oriented Mad Mod is actually a crotchety old man using holograms and stage magic to create his younger appearance, [[ExploitedTrope trying to steal and/or control youth.]]



* Guy Gardner didn't become an actual Franchise/GreenLantern until the 1980s, where he was essentially made into a walking parody of Reagan-era policies. He started a war with the USSR and frequently expressed admiration for the amoral corporate raiders of the era. His characterization has progressed since then, but his 1980s look remains intact.

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* ''Franchise/GreenLantern'':
**
Guy Gardner didn't become an actual Franchise/GreenLantern Green Lantern until the 1980s, where he was essentially made into a walking parody of Reagan-era policies. He started a war with the USSR and frequently expressed admiration for the amoral corporate raiders of the era. His characterization has progressed since then, but his 1980s look remains intact.



* ComicBook/{{Legion of Super-Heroes}}' Karate Kid, who has since moved beyond his fad into a fairly RoundedCharacter.
** There was a karate fad in the United States in the 1950s and 1960s. He was reworked to fit the kung fu fad of the 1970s. He still predates the movie ''Film/TheKarateKid'' by decades[[note]]In fact, the film states that it's not related to the DC Comics character, and had to get DC's permission to use the title.[[/note]], so he's not quite as derivative as he sounds.
--->'''Beast Boy:''' "Karate Kid"? Ha! "Wax on. Wax off."
--->'''Apparition:''' Superboy said that, too. What does it mean?
--->'''Karate Kid:''' I have no idea.

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* ComicBook/{{Legion of Super-Heroes}}' Karate Kid, who has since moved beyond his fad into a fairly RoundedCharacter.
** There
though not in the way you might think. He was born when there was a karate fad in the United States in the 1950s and 1960s. He 1960s, and he was reworked to fit the kung fu fad of the 1970s. He still 1970s, so he actually predates the movie ''Film/TheKarateKid'' by decades[[note]]In decades,[[note]]In fact, the film states that it's not related to the DC Comics character, and had to get DC's permission to use the title.[[/note]], so [[/note]] and as such he's not quite as derivative as he sounds.
--->'''Beast
sounds. He has since moved beyond his fad into a fairly RoundedCharacter.
-->'''Beast
Boy:''' "Karate Kid"? Ha! "Wax on. Wax off."
--->'''Apparition:'''
"\\
'''Apparition:'''
Superboy said that, too. What does it mean?
--->'''Karate
mean?\\
'''Karate
Kid:''' I have no idea.



* Obscure Franchise/{{Batman}} villain Magpie used to sport a mohawk and an outfit that made her look like a reject from an 80's hair metal video.
** They brought her back in the ''WesternAnimation/BewareTheBatman''. To modernize her look, she was redesigned to resemble Music/LadyGaga.

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* Obscure Franchise/{{Batman}} villain Magpie used to sport a mohawk and an outfit that made her look like a reject from an 80's hair metal video.
**
video. They brought her back in the ''WesternAnimation/BewareTheBatman''. To modernize her look, she was redesigned to resemble Music/LadyGaga.



* Another DC creation was the short-lived Brother Power, The Geek, a hippie-themed hero [[http://goodcomics.comicbookresources.com/2011/10/07/comic-book-legends-revealed-335/ whose exploits must simply be seen to be believed]].
** In 2009, there was an issue of ''ComicBook/TheBraveAndTheBold'' that was written, which essentially put forth the idea that Brother Power was too tied to the past to exist in the present. The issue ends with him burning to death after realizing he doesn't belong in the 21st century.
* Creator/DCComics announced in 2013 that they'd be debuting two new series, one a relaunch of the failed 1970s concept the Green Team and the other a massive group of working-class heroes known as "The Movement". The idea is to represent "the 1 percent" and "the 99 percent."

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* Another DC creation was the short-lived Brother Power, The Geek, a hippie-themed hero [[http://goodcomics.comicbookresources.com/2011/10/07/comic-book-legends-revealed-335/ whose exploits must simply be seen to be believed]].
**
believed]]. In 2009, there was an issue of ''ComicBook/TheBraveAndTheBold'' that was written, which essentially put forth the idea that Brother Power was too tied to the past to exist in the present. The issue ends with him burning to death after realizing he doesn't belong in the 21st century.
* Creator/DCComics announced in 2013 that they'd be debuting two new series, one a relaunch of the failed 1970s concept of rich-kid adventurers the Green Team Team, and the other a massive group of working-class heroes known as "The Movement". The idea is to represent "the 1 percent" and "the 99 percent.""



[[folder:Comic Books - Marvel]]
* ComicBook/{{Dazzler}} (pictured at right), who later became a member of the Comicbook/XMen, was introduced with disco-based powers and costume (white jumpsuit and roller skates) just as disco was dying. It didn't help that she was given a big marketing push, meeting up with the likes of Galactus in a vain attempt to make the character cool, or that the entire project had begun as a proposal for a [[LiveActionAdaptation live action film]] starring Bo Derek. But at least she wasn't called the Disco Dazzler, as originally planned.
** Going even further back there was a record/comic tie-in as the original concept. The character was at one stage to be black, and there are [[http://holdyourfireal.smugmug.com/COMIC-BOOK-IMAGES/Characters/Dazzler/JRJRDazzBogart/871688078_cKqUM-L.jpg John Romita Jr. sketches]] that exist of this early Dazzler. At one point they actually had a singer who was to play the Dazzler persona but the deal between Marvel and Casablanca fell apart. Later on, Jim Shooter put together a treatment for the aforementioned movie (also to feature Donna Summer, Cher, Rodney Dangerfield, [[Series/LaverneAndShirley Lenny and Squiggy]], Creator/RobinWilliams, the Village People and KISS), and the now revived Dazzler concept's appearance ended up based mainly on Bo Derek (and when she was still attached to the role, People magazine even had her [[http://goodcomics.comicbookresources.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/06/19800211-750-0.jpg on the cover holding a whole bunch of Marvel mags for research]]!)

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[[folder:Comic Books - Marvel]]
* ComicBook/{{Dazzler}} (pictured at right), who later became a member of the Comicbook/XMen, was introduced with disco-based powers and costume (white jumpsuit and roller skates) just as disco was dying. It didn't help that she was given a big marketing push, meeting up with the likes of Galactus in a vain attempt to make the character cool, or that the entire project had begun as a proposal for a [[LiveActionAdaptation live action film]] starring Bo Derek. But at least she wasn't called the Disco Dazzler, as originally planned.
** Going even further back there was a record/comic tie-in as the original concept. The
in which character was at one stage to be black, and there are [[http://holdyourfireal.smugmug.com/COMIC-BOOK-IMAGES/Characters/Dazzler/JRJRDazzBogart/871688078_cKqUM-L.jpg John Romita Jr. sketches]] that exist of this early Dazzler. At one point they actually had a singer who was to play the Dazzler persona but the deal between Marvel and Casablanca fell apart. Later on, Jim Shooter put together a treatment for the aforementioned movie (also to feature Donna Summer, Cher, Rodney Dangerfield, [[Series/LaverneAndShirley Lenny and Squiggy]], Creator/RobinWilliams, the Village People and KISS), and the now revived Dazzler concept's appearance ended up based mainly on Bo Derek Derek, who was slated to star (and when she was still attached to the role, People magazine even had her [[http://goodcomics.on the cover, the same month the character debuted, [[https://web.archive.org/web/20160411111032/http://goodcomics.comicbookresources.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/06/19800211-750-0.jpg on the cover with her husband holding a whole bunch of Marvel mags for research]]!)research!]]). But at least she wasn't called the Disco Dazzler, as originally planned.



* ComicBook/{{Storm}} was another X-Woman who got in on the punk trend - she sported a mohawk for a while in the 1990s.
** WordOfGod is that the mohawk initially began as a joke, with someone suggesting that they should make Storm look like Creator/MrT from ''Series/TheATeam'', which was a wildly popular show at the time.
* A little earlier in Spider-Man's history, we have supervillains Rocket Racer (skateboard) and Hypno Hustler (disco). Disturbingly, Hypno Hustler [[OneSceneWonder never appeared again as a villain]] (aside from some cameos here and there) after his first appearance but has acquired a certain notoriety-based cachet among fans; Rocket Racer cameos every few years - his latest appearance portrays him as a genius BasementDweller with confidence issues, based on the engineering skills he often displayed in earlier stories.He's recently popped up in ''Avengers Academy'', seemingly back to using his old board.
** There's also Screwball, a [[LeParkour traceuse]] who likes recording her exploits and then uploading them to YouTube and talking about them on {{Twitter}}. Peter himself has apparently begun studying Parkour as well, as showcased by an issue where he's forced to operate in an area without high-rise buildings from which to web-swing.

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* ComicBook/{{Storm}} was another X-Woman who got in on the punk trend - she sported a mohawk for a while in the 1990s.
**
1990s. WordOfGod is that the mohawk initially began as a joke, with someone suggesting that they should make Storm look like Creator/MrT from ''Series/TheATeam'', which was a wildly popular show at the time.
* ''ComicBook/SpiderMan'':
**
A little earlier in Spider-Man's history, we have supervillains Rocket Racer (skateboard) and Hypno Hustler (disco). Disturbingly, Sadly, Hypno Hustler [[OneSceneWonder never appeared again as a villain]] (aside from some cameos here and there) after his first appearance but has acquired a certain notoriety-based cachet among fans; Rocket Racer cameos every few years - his latest appearance portrays him as a genius BasementDweller with confidence issues, based on the engineering skills he often displayed in earlier stories.He's recently popped up in ''Avengers Academy'', seemingly back to using his old board.
** There's also Screwball, a [[LeParkour traceuse]] who likes recording her exploits and then uploading them to YouTube Website/YouTube and talking about them on {{Twitter}}.Website/{{Twitter}}. Peter himself has apparently begun studying Parkour as well, as showcased by an issue where he's forced to operate in an area without high-rise buildings from which to web-swing.



* Night Thrasher, leader of the ComicBook/NewWarriors in the Franchise/MarvelUniverse, was created in 1990 with a skateboard grafted onto his urbanized Franchise/{{Batman}} schtick to cash in on the rising popularity of the sport in the late '80s. As the '90s progressed, he used the board less and less and settled on a CoolBike early in the series.
** And since any connection between skateboards and the term "thrashing" has largely passed out of public awareness, his name [[NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast just sounds]] [[FreudWasRight awfully nasty]] (although Spider-Man [[LampshadeHanging made a joke]] along this line in ''1991''.) He fought with twin eskrima sticks so the thrashing part of his name could easily be applied to his weapons of choice.
** Not just a skateboarder, mind you, but a ''black'' skateboarder. Marvel writers sure know their demographics. For the uninitiated - his heyday was long before there were any big-name black skaters.
** Rocket Racer, Marvel's ''other'' black skateboarding superhero, has much the same problem.
*** The concept has become less baffling now, since there is a subculture of African-American skateboarders. LupeFiasco's hit "Kick, Push" is credited with helping popularize the sport among black teenagers.

to:

* Night Thrasher, leader of the ComicBook/NewWarriors in the Franchise/MarvelUniverse, was created in 1990 with a skateboard grafted onto his urbanized Franchise/{{Batman}} schtick to cash in on the rising popularity of the sport in the late '80s. As the '90s progressed, he used the board less and less and settled on a CoolBike early in the series.
** And since
series, plus as any connection between skateboards and the term "thrashing" has largely passed out of public awareness, his name [[NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast just sounds]] [[FreudWasRight awfully nasty]] (although Spider-Man [[LampshadeHanging made a joke]] along this line in ''1991''.) He fought with twin eskrima sticks so the thrashing part of his name could easily be applied to his weapons of choice.
** Not just a skateboarder, mind you, but
choice. An odd detail that downplayed it with time was that he's a ''black'' skateboarder. Marvel writers sure know their demographics. For the uninitiated - his heyday was long before there were any big-name black skaters.
**
skaters. (The aforementioned Rocket Racer, Marvel's ''other'' black skateboarding superhero, has much the same problem.
***
problem at first.) The concept has become less baffling now, since there is a subculture of African-American skateboarders. LupeFiasco's Music/LupeFiasco's hit "Kick, Push" is credited with helping popularize the sport among black teenagers.



* You also used to get a lot of "kneejerk reactionary" villains in the 1980s, like [[ComicBook/CaptainAmerica Warhead]], who held the Washington Monument hostage until the United States started war with somebody, ''anybody''. Strangely, he was an inversion of a real-life incident where a peace protester threatened to blow up the monument unless the United States disarmed.

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* You also used to get a lot of "kneejerk reactionary" villains in the 1980s, like [[ComicBook/CaptainAmerica Warhead]], ComicBook/CaptainAmerica villain Warhead, who held the Washington Monument hostage until the United States started war with somebody, ''anybody''. Strangely, he was an inversion of a real-life incident where a peace protester threatened to blow up the monument unless the United States disarmed.



* The ''Heroes for Hire'', [[ComicBook/LukeCageHeroForHire Power Man]] and [[ComicBook/ImmortalIronFist Iron Fist]], capitalized on the popularity of blaxploitation and kung fu movies, respectively, by combining the two trends. As did their female counterparts, the ''Daughters of the Dragon'' Misty Knight and Colleen Wing. And the vaguely affiliated Sons of the Tiger.

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* The ''Heroes for Hire'', [[ComicBook/LukeCageHeroForHire Power Man]] ComicBook/{{Luke Cage|HeroForHire}} and [[ComicBook/ImmortalIronFist Iron Fist]], capitalized on the popularity of blaxploitation and kung fu movies, respectively, by combining the two trends. As did their female counterparts, the ''Daughters of the Dragon'' Misty Knight and Colleen Wing. And the vaguely affiliated Sons of the Tiger.



* ''ComicBook/MarvelZombies''. It's probably not a coincidence that an alternate universe where all the superheroes have become zombies became a recurring theme at the same time that books and movies about zombies were trendy.
** There's a bit of "retro on purpose" there, though. The Marvel Zombies universe (the first one, at least, before they go dimension-hopping) is a bit further back in the timeline than the "real", 616 Franchise/MarvelUniverse but doesn't perfectly match any particular era. Captain America was a colonel, Earth has never seen Galactus before, and most of the zombified heroes wore costumes that those characters hadn't worn since the 1970s. However, Magneto had acolytes, which didn't come along until the 1990s in the 616 Franchise/MarvelUniverse.

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* ''ComicBook/MarvelZombies''. It's probably not a coincidence that an alternate universe where all the superheroes have become zombies became a recurring theme at the same time that books and movies about zombies were trendy.
** There's
trendy, though there's a bit of "retro on purpose" there, though. The Marvel Zombies universe (the first one, at least, before they go dimension-hopping) is a bit further back in the timeline than the "real", 616 Franchise/MarvelUniverse but doesn't perfectly match any particular era. Captain America was a colonel, Earth has never seen Galactus before, and most of the zombified heroes wore costumes that those characters hadn't worn since the 1970s. However, Magneto had acolytes, which didn't come along until the 1990s in the 616 Franchise/MarvelUniverse.



* Marvel's ComicBook/IronFist was created to cash in on the Kung Fu craze, while ComicBook/DoctorStrange owes a lot of his influences to the upswing in Asian spirituality among America's hippies and artists in the 60's.

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* Marvel's ComicBook/IronFist was created to cash in on the Kung Fu craze, while ComicBook/DoctorStrange owes a lot of his influences to the upswing in Asian spirituality among America's hippies and artists in the 60's.



[[folder:Comic Books]]

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[[folder:Comic Books]] Books Other]]
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