History Main / ExplosiveDecompression

26th Jul '17 5:31:43 AM WanderingTedium
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->''"Sudden decompression sucks!"''
-->-- ''VideoGame/SpaceQuestIIIThePiratesOfPestulon'' [[HaveANiceDeath death message]]
1st Jul '17 9:11:35 AM nombretomado
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* The aforementioned [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Byford_Dolphin#Diving_bell_accident Byford Dolphin]] accident is perhaps the only real case of truly Explosive Decompression. [[{{Squick}} Be warned that the results are not for the faint of heart or those with an overly graphic imagination.]] TheOtherWiki states: "Subsequent investigation by forensic pathologists determined Diver 4, being exposed to the highest pressure gradient, violently exploded due to the rapid and massive expansion of internal gases. All of his thoracic and abdominal organs, and even his thoracic spine were ejected, as were all of his limbs. Simultaneously, his remains were expelled through the narrow trunk opening left by the jammed chamber door, less than 60 centimetres (24 in) in diameter. Fragments of his body were found scattered about the rig. One part was even found lying on the rig's derrick, 10 metres (30 ft) directly above the chambers."

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* The aforementioned [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Byford_Dolphin#Diving_bell_accident Byford Dolphin]] accident is perhaps the only real case of truly Explosive Decompression. [[{{Squick}} Be warned that the results are not for the faint of heart or those with an overly graphic imagination.]] TheOtherWiki Wiki/TheOtherWiki states: "Subsequent investigation by forensic pathologists determined Diver 4, being exposed to the highest pressure gradient, violently exploded due to the rapid and massive expansion of internal gases. All of his thoracic and abdominal organs, and even his thoracic spine were ejected, as were all of his limbs. Simultaneously, his remains were expelled through the narrow trunk opening left by the jammed chamber door, less than 60 centimetres (24 in) in diameter. Fragments of his body were found scattered about the rig. One part was even found lying on the rig's derrick, 10 metres (30 ft) directly above the chambers."
27th May '17 4:20:20 PM WillBGood
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* Naturally, ''ComicStrip/ThePerryBibleFellowship'' has its own sick [[http://www.pbfcomics.com/?cid=PBF022-Space_Helmet.jpg contribution]] to the topic.

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* Naturally, ''ComicStrip/ThePerryBibleFellowship'' has its own sick [[http://www.pbfcomics.com/?cid=PBF022-Space_Helmet.jpg [[http://pbfcomics.com/comics/space-helmet/ contribution]] to the topic.
14th May '17 12:40:29 AM AthenaBlue
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[[folder:Films -- Animated]]

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[[folder:Films [[folder:Film -- Animated]]



[[folder:Films -- Live-Action]]

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[[folder:Films [[folder:Film -- Live-Action]]




* Partially averted in ''Film/TwoThousandOneASpaceOdyssey''. When Dave Bowman has to reenter his ship through the airlock he realizes that he has left behind his spacesuit's helmet. After blowing himself out of his pod into the open airlock he has several seconds of workable consciousness until he can throw a valve to pressurize the airlock again. He apparently suffers no ill effects, though it appears that he attempted to force all possible air out of his lungs.[[note]]For what it's worth, Creator/ArthurCClarke said if he were on the set when that scene was filmed, he would've corrected the error.[[/note]]
* Used in a different fashion to the usual in the film ''Film/AlienResurrection'', where the Newborn is killed by using acidic blood to melt a relatively small hole in the viewing port behind it; the pressure first pins the xenomorph/human hybrid against the wall, and then the continued pressure difference... well, it [[FoldSpindleMutilation blows the Newborn through the hole]]... over a relatively long time-period, while the vacuum from a relatively small hole seems to hold him pinned to it (despite that in the prior film ''Aliens'', Ripley is able to avoid being blown into space just by locking her arm on a ladder-rung, and actually climb out).
* Averted in ''Film/DangerDiabolik''. Mob boss Valmont shoots his gun inside his tiny jetliner, putting a good sized hole in it. One of his Mooks casually takes his gum and covers it up.
* ''Film/EventHorizon:''
** A possessed member of the crew attempts suicide by ejecting himself out the airlock. He doesn't explode, but the whole thing is portrayed very messily. To the film's credit, he needs a lot of medical attention when he's eventually returned to breathable atmosphere. His small blood vessels rupture in the decompression, resulting in hemorrhage from his cavities. It's pretty realistic, though whether there'd be quite that much blood is anybody's guess. The dialog during the event even has the Captain telling the young crew member to blow all the air out of his lungs just before the doors open
** Defied when the crew first explores the bridge of the ''Event Horizon''. There is a corpse floating around in zero-gravity with all sorts of nasty-looking injuries [[spoiler:that very much resemble the purposeful, patterned gashes Doctor Wier will have during the film's climax,]] and one of the walls looks like it had several people smashed against it so hard they impacted with a splash instead of a thud. Immediately, one of the crew cites explosive decompression as a possible cause, and another shoots it down just as fast; "Decompression doesn't ''do'' that."
* Averted in ''Film/{{Gravity}}''. [[spoiler:Ryan is startled to see a NotQuiteDead Kowalski outside the Soyuz hatch, which he opens even though she's not wearing her helmet, blowing out all the air but leaving her unharmed once he closes the hatch and raises the oxygen levels. Turns out it's AllJustADream anyway.]]
* Averted in ''Film/GuardiansOfTheGalaxy'': when Peter takes off his breather mask in space [[spoiler:in order to rescue Gamora]], his face swells slightly, his eyes turn bloodshot and his skin [[SpaceIsCold gets slowly covered in frost]].
** He seems to get away with fewer decompression injuries than he should, shrugging about 1 minute of exposure off after maybe 20 seconds back in an atmosphere, but then again he is later stated to [[spoiler:only be half-human, his daddy being something "very ancient" and unknown to the Nova Empire]], so it may be his unusual genetics give him higher resilience.
* A realistic example happens in ''Film/{{Interstellar}}'', when [[spoiler: Dr. Mann]] opens the inner door of an improperly sealed airlock.



* Averted in ''Film/MissionToMars'': Commander Woody Blake sacrifices himself on the way to Mars by taking off his spacesuit's helmet, and then he just kind of turns purple and dies. However, it does play SpaceIsCold straight by having him insta-freeze.



** Explosive Decompression happened frequently in this movie, which opened with an anonymous character exploding inside his space-suit; the same occurs to another character later on. Another is exposed more slowly in a space-elevator, and is afterward shown simply with his guts exploded.... so it seems the film tried to preserve ''some'' realism :D.

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** Explosive Decompression happened frequently in this movie, which opened with an anonymous character exploding inside his space-suit; the same occurs to another character later on. Another is exposed more slowly in a space-elevator, and is afterward shown simply with his guts exploded.... so it seems the film tried to preserve ''some'' realism :D.realism.
* Averted in ''Film/{{Supernova}}'' when Karl Larson sends the corpse of a man he just murdered out of a casualty chute. The body gets accelerated by a puff of gas but simply flies off into space without so much as even expanding.



* ''Film/{{Watchmen}}'' averted this when Laurie was teleported to Mars by Dr. Manahattan. She was simply unable to breathe and fell to her knees gasping before Manhattan provided her with a Earth-like atmosphere. Although, in this case, some of the effects of sudden decompression ''should'' have been present; they were either ignored or Manhattan fixed them when he created the atmosphere.
* ''Film/EventHorizon:''
** A possessed member of the crew attempts suicide by ejecting himself out the airlock. He doesn't explode, but the whole thing is portrayed very messily. To the film's credit, he needs a lot of medical attention when he's eventually returned to breathable atmosphere. His small blood vessels rupture in the decompression, resulting in hemorrhage from his cavities. It's pretty realistic, though whether there'd be quite that much blood is anybody's guess. The dialog during the event even has the Captain telling the young crew member to blow all the air out of his lungs just before the doors open
** Defied when the crew first explores the bridge of the ''Event Horizon.'' There is a corpse floating around in zero-gravity with all sorts of nasty-looking injuries [[spoiler: that very much resemble the purposeful, patterned gashes Doctor Wier will have during the film's climax,]] and one of the walls looks like it had several people smashed against it so hard they impacted with a splash instead of a thud. Immediately, one of the crew cites explosive decompression as a possible cause, and another shoots it down just as fast; "Decompression doesn't ''do'' that.''
* A realistic example happens in ''Film/{{Interstellar}}'', when [[spoiler: Dr. Mann]] opens the inner door of an improperly sealed airlock.
* Averted in ''Film/MissionToMars'': Commander Woody Blake sacrifices himself on the way to Mars by taking off his space-suit's helmet, and then he just kind of turns purple and dies. However, it does play SpaceIsCold straight by having him insta-freeze.
* Averted in ''Film/{{Supernova}}'' when Karl Larson sends the corpse of a man he just murdered out of a casualty chute. The body gets accelerated by a puff of gas but simply flies off into space without so much as even expanding.
* Partially averted in ''Film/TwoThousandOneASpaceOdyssey''. When Dave Bowman has to reenter his ship through the airlock he realizes that he has left behind his spacesuit's helmet. After blowing himself out of his pod into the open airlock he has several seconds of workable consciousness until he can throw a valve to pressurize the airlock again. He apparently suffers no ill effects, though it appears that he attempted to force all possible air out of his lungs.[[note]]For what it's worth, Creator/ArthurCClarke said if he were on the set when that scene was filmed, he would've corrected the error.[[/note]]
* Used in a different fashion to the usual in the film ''Film/AlienResurrection'', where the Newborn is killed by using acidic blood to melt a relatively small hole in the viewing port behind it; the pressure first pins the xenomorph/human hybrid against the wall, and then the continued pressure difference... well, it [[FoldSpindleMutilation blows the Newborn through the hole]]... over a relatively long time-period, while the vacuum from a relatively small hole seems to hold him pinned to it (despite that in the prior film ''Aliens,'' Ripley is able to avoid being blown into space just by locking her arm on a ladder-rung, and actually climb out).
* Averted in ''Film/{{Gravity}}''. [[spoiler:Ryan is startled to see a NotQuiteDead Kowalski outside the Soyuz hatch, which he opens even though she's not wearing her helmet, blowing out all the air but leaving her unharmed once he closes the hatch and raises the oxygen levels. Turns out it's AllJustADream anyway.]]
* Averted in ''Film/DangerDiabolik''. Mob boss Valmont shoots his gun inside his tiny jetliner, putting a good sized hole in it. One of his Mooks casually takes his gum and covers it up.
* Averted in ''Film/GuardiansOfTheGalaxy'': when Peter takes off his breather mask in space [[spoiler:in order to rescue Gamora]], his face swells slightly, his eyes turn bloodshot and his skin [[SpaceIsCold gets slowly covered in frost]].
** He seems to get away with fewer decompression injuries than he should, shrugging about 1 minute of exposure off after maybe 20 seconds back in an atmosphere, but then again he is later stated to [[spoiler:only be half human, his daddy being something "very ancient" and unknown to the Nova Empire]], so it may be his unusual genetics give him higher resilience.

to:

* ''Film/{{Watchmen}}'' averted this when Laurie was teleported to Mars by Dr. Manahattan.Manhattan. She was simply unable to breathe and fell to her knees gasping before Manhattan provided her with a Earth-like atmosphere. Although, in this case, some of the effects of sudden decompression ''should'' have been present; they were either ignored or Manhattan fixed them when he created the atmosphere.
* ''Film/EventHorizon:''
** A possessed member of the crew attempts suicide by ejecting himself out the airlock. He doesn't explode, but the whole thing is portrayed very messily. To the film's credit, he needs a lot of medical attention when he's eventually returned to breathable atmosphere. His small blood vessels rupture in the decompression, resulting in hemorrhage from his cavities. It's pretty realistic, though whether there'd be quite that much blood is anybody's guess. The dialog during the event even has the Captain telling the young crew member to blow all the air out of his lungs just before the doors open
** Defied when the crew first explores the bridge of the ''Event Horizon.'' There is a corpse floating around in zero-gravity with all sorts of nasty-looking injuries [[spoiler: that very much resemble the purposeful, patterned gashes Doctor Wier will have during the film's climax,]] and one of the walls looks like it had several people smashed against it so hard they impacted with a splash instead of a thud. Immediately, one of the crew cites explosive decompression as a possible cause, and another shoots it down just as fast; "Decompression doesn't ''do'' that.''
* A realistic example happens in ''Film/{{Interstellar}}'', when [[spoiler: Dr. Mann]] opens the inner door of an improperly sealed airlock.
* Averted in ''Film/MissionToMars'': Commander Woody Blake sacrifices himself on the way to Mars by taking off his space-suit's helmet, and then he just kind of turns purple and dies. However, it does play SpaceIsCold straight by having him insta-freeze.
* Averted in ''Film/{{Supernova}}'' when Karl Larson sends the corpse of a man he just murdered out of a casualty chute. The body gets accelerated by a puff of gas but simply flies off into space without so much as even expanding.
* Partially averted in ''Film/TwoThousandOneASpaceOdyssey''. When Dave Bowman has to reenter his ship through the airlock he realizes that he has left behind his spacesuit's helmet. After blowing himself out of his pod into the open airlock he has several seconds of workable consciousness until he can throw a valve to pressurize the airlock again. He apparently suffers no ill effects, though it appears that he attempted to force all possible air out of his lungs.[[note]]For what it's worth, Creator/ArthurCClarke said if he were on the set when that scene was filmed, he would've corrected the error.[[/note]]
* Used in a different fashion to the usual in the film ''Film/AlienResurrection'', where the Newborn is killed by using acidic blood to melt a relatively small hole in the viewing port behind it; the pressure first pins the xenomorph/human hybrid against the wall, and then the continued pressure difference... well, it [[FoldSpindleMutilation blows the Newborn through the hole]]... over a relatively long time-period, while the vacuum from a relatively small hole seems to hold him pinned to it (despite that in the prior film ''Aliens,'' Ripley is able to avoid being blown into space just by locking her arm on a ladder-rung, and actually climb out).
* Averted in ''Film/{{Gravity}}''. [[spoiler:Ryan is startled to see a NotQuiteDead Kowalski outside the Soyuz hatch, which he opens even though she's not wearing her helmet, blowing out all the air but leaving her unharmed once he closes the hatch and raises the oxygen levels. Turns out it's AllJustADream anyway.]]
* Averted in ''Film/DangerDiabolik''. Mob boss Valmont shoots his gun inside his tiny jetliner, putting a good sized hole in it. One of his Mooks casually takes his gum and covers it up.
* Averted in ''Film/GuardiansOfTheGalaxy'': when Peter takes off his breather mask in space [[spoiler:in order to rescue Gamora]], his face swells slightly, his eyes turn bloodshot and his skin [[SpaceIsCold gets slowly covered in frost]].
** He seems to get away with fewer decompression injuries than he should, shrugging about 1 minute of exposure off after maybe 20 seconds back in an atmosphere, but then again he is later stated to [[spoiler:only be half human, his daddy being something "very ancient" and unknown to the Nova Empire]], so it may be his unusual genetics give him higher resilience.
atmosphere.



* It doesn't actually happen in the ''ComicBook/XWingSeries'', but after the bridge of his capital ship is breached, General Solo reflects that if the crew can't get into a pressurized area before the bridge is sealed off, they're going to experience the "joys of explosive decompression". To be fair, he might not actually know how people in space die.
** One would imagine many space-folks - especially the danger-chasing type - would not wish to learn.
** An early book shows he does indeed know, from personal experience. In ''[[Literature/TheHanSoloTrilogy The Paradise Snare]]'' he remembers having to clean up after someone cycled the airlock to kill themselves, and it was apparently quite messy. So the trope is played straight there.
** Later on in the Star Wars timeline, his daughter Jaina Solo witnesses the aftermath of a [[ScaryDogmaticAliens Yuuzhan Vong]] attack. Mention of explosively-decompressed bodies is made. Although maybe they just suffered the side effects of being on an exploding ship.
** In Spectre of the Past by Timothy Zhan, Luke "cold-shirts" (spacewalking without a pressure suit) from an exploding pirate base to a rescue ship. He uses a Jedi hibernation trance to minimize the damage, and dialogue implies that, if the ship had been able to get closer, he wouldn't have even needed to do that.
* In Godwin's science fiction short story ''Literature/TheColdEquations'', the young woman found stowed away inside of the EDS fearfully describes what she knows will happen to her if she's jettisoned through the airlock. Although it isn't a tremendously accurate picture of what would happen to someone stuck in the vacuum without a space suit, it certainly is a disturbing one.
* Creator/LarryNiven's works tend to invert the trope, making vacuum relatively easy to deal with, usually by not having the pressure drop from 'normal' to hard vacuum in a fraction of a second unless the hole is pretty damn huge. In one short story, a ship's atmosphere escapes, when the crew are suited but not helmeted. They survive easily, because they have stashed the helmets within arm's reach; the only harm they suffer is annoyance, since they can't eat real food until they can get air and take the helmets off.
* Creator/CharlesSheffield's ''{{Literature/The McAndrew Chronicles}}'' offers what seems like a realistic aversion in the Sturm Invocation, a training protocol that, when activated with a special whistle, invokes an involuntary reaction of quick blinks to preserve your eyesight plus other adaptations that allow one to stay in vacuum just long enough to cross a short distance (from one ship to another) and get to safety. The penalties for false activations are very severe. Notably, blinking is inverted--instead of eyes open most of the time your eyes are closed most of the time. This has nothing to do with pressure, but is designed to prevent eye damage from excess UV radiation.



* Discussed and averted in the Literature/EighthDoctorAdventures novel ''The Taking of Planet 5''. [[spoiler:The Doctor]] survives the vacuum of space just fine--he does, however, have temperature, cosmic radiation, and the bends to worry about.

to:

* In Godwin's science fiction short story ''Literature/TheColdEquations'', the young woman found stowed away inside of the EDS fearfully describes what she knows will happen to her if she's jettisoned through the airlock. Although it isn't a tremendously accurate picture of what would happen to someone stuck in the vacuum without a spacesuit, it certainly is a disturbing one.
* ''Franchise/DoctorWhoExpandedUniverse'':
**
Discussed and averted in the Literature/EighthDoctorAdventures novel ''The Taking of Planet 5''. [[spoiler:The Doctor]] survives the vacuum of space just fine--he fine -- he does, however, have temperature, cosmic radiation, and the bends to worry about.



* Creator/CharlesSheffield's ''{{Literature/The McAndrew Chronicles}}'' offers what seems like a realistic aversion in the Sturm Invocation, a training protocol that, when activated with a special whistle, invokes an involuntary reaction of quick blinks to preserve your eyesight plus other adaptations that allow one to stay in vacuum just long enough to cross a short distance (from one ship to another) and get to safety. The penalties for false activations are very severe. Notably, blinking is inverted -- instead of eyes open most of the time your eyes are closed most of the time. This has nothing to do with pressure, but is designed to prevent eye damage from excess UV radiation.
* Creator/LarryNiven's works tend to invert the trope, making vacuum relatively easy to deal with, usually by not having the pressure drop from 'normal' to hard vacuum in a fraction of a second unless the hole is pretty damn huge. In one short story, a ship's atmosphere escapes, when the crew are suited but not helmeted. They survive easily, because they have stashed the helmets within arm's reach; the only harm they suffer is annoyance, since they can't eat real food until they can get air and take the helmets off.
* ''Franchise/StarWarsLegends'':
** It doesn't actually happen in the ''ComicBook/XWingSeries'', but after the bridge of his capital ship is breached, General Solo reflects that if the crew can't get into a pressurized area before the bridge is sealed off, they're going to experience the "joys of explosive decompression". To be fair, he might not actually know how people in space die.
** One would imagine many space-folks -- especially the danger-chasing type -- would not wish to learn.
** An early book shows he does indeed know, from personal experience. In ''[[Literature/TheHanSoloTrilogy The Paradise Snare]]'' he remembers having to clean up after someone cycled the airlock to kill themselves, and it was apparently quite messy. So the trope is played straight there.
** Later on in the ''Star Wars'' timeline, his daughter Jaina Solo witnesses the aftermath of a [[ScaryDogmaticAliens Yuuzhan Vong]] attack. Mention of explosively-decompressed bodies is made. Although maybe they just suffered the side effects of being on an exploding ship.
** In ''[[Literature/HandOfThrawn Spectre of the Past]]'' by Timothy Zhan, Luke "cold-shirts" (spacewalking without a pressure suit) from an exploding pirate base to a rescue ship. He uses a Jedi hibernation trance to minimize the damage, and dialogue implies that, if the ship had been able to get closer, he wouldn't have even needed to do that.



[[folder:Live Action TV]]

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[[folder:Live Action [[folder:Live-Action TV]]



* PlayedForLaughs in ''Series/RedDwarf'', "Confidence and Paranoia": Confidence, suffering from an ego the size of a small galaxy, declares "Oxygen is for losers!" and takes his helmet off outside of the ship. He then promptly explodes.
* Implied (then averted) in an episode of ''Series/KnightRider'': The evil [=KARR=] starts to drain the air out of his cabin with a hostage inside, saying "Have you ever seen someone ''explode'' in a vacuum?"
* Averted in ''Series/BlakesSeven'' where several characters ''apparently'' explode after being teleported into space, but it is explicitly explained the first time it happens that this is not a pressure explosion but the result of teleporters being incapable of reassembling you properly if you get teleported beyond the safe range. ("Their atoms would be scattered to the solar winds" - poetically put.) On the occasions when a character actually went out of an airlock instead of being teleported into space, there is no indication they explode and in the first case the body was clearly shown floating away intact.
* Mentioned, though not shown, in ''Series/DefyingGravity'', an otherwise good show-disappointing, really.
* An episode of ''Series/SpacePrecinct'' had an alien with [[BloodyMurder acid blood]]. When shot its green blood dissolved through the hull causing the corpse to be blown out into space. A few seconds later it inflates and bursts.
* ''Series/{{Farscape}}'' references this in "Dream a Little Dream" when Zhaan has a nightmare about Crichton floating in space, his spacesuit visor cracking, and his head going pop, ''Outland''-style. However, the series otherwise averts the trope on repeated occasions in which characters are shown exposed to vacuum with no explosive consequences. By the start of Season 4, D'Argo, Rygel, Noranti and Crichton had all been exposed to space, with Crichton actually surviving exposure for a minute-and-a-half wearing nothing more than street clothes (occurs during the "Look at the Princess" trilogy). Though the ''actual'' length of his vacuum exposure is uncertain, given that the scene was in SlowMotion.
** In ''The Peacekeeper Wars'', D'Argo and Chiana end up with their ship blown up and them exposed to space. D'Argo's survival is explainable as it's been mentioned that Luxan physiology can survive space exposure for up to a few minutes; Chiana is a Nebari, though, and the ability of Nebari to survive in space is undocumented.

to:

* PlayedForLaughs Dr. Franklin on ''Series/BabylonFive'' mentions this trope -- or rather, how it presumably plays out in ''Series/RedDwarf'', "Confidence and Paranoia": Confidence, suffering from RealLife -- in regards to an ego the size of a small galaxy, declares "Oxygen is for losers!" and takes incident in his helmet off outside of the ship. He then promptly explodes.
* Implied (then averted) in an episode of ''Series/KnightRider'': The evil [=KARR=] starts to drain the air out
childhood when one of his cabin friends got [[ThrownOutTheAirlock spaced]] by accident.
-->'''Dr. Franklin:''' The one thing they never tell you is that you don't die instantly in vacuum. He just hung there, against the black, like a puppet
with a hostage inside, saying "Have you ever seen someone ''explode'' in a vacuum?"
* Averted in ''Series/BlakesSeven''
his strings all tangled up or like one of those old cartoons where several characters ''apparently'' explode after being teleported into space, but it is explicitly explained you run off the first time it happens edge of a cliff and your legs keep going. You could see that this is not a pressure explosion he was trying to breathe, but the result of teleporters being incapable of reassembling you properly if you get teleported beyond the safe range. ("Their atoms would be scattered to the solar winds" - poetically put.) On the occasions when a character actually went out of an airlock instead of being teleported into space, there is no indication was nothing. And one thing I remember when they explode and pulled in the first case the his body was clearly shown floating away intact.
* Mentioned, though not shown, in ''Series/DefyingGravity'', an otherwise good show-disappointing, really.
* An episode
his eyes were frozen. [long pause] A lot of ''Series/SpacePrecinct'' had an alien with [[BloodyMurder acid blood]]. When shot its green blood dissolved through the hull causing the corpse to be blown out into space. A few seconds later it inflates and bursts.
* ''Series/{{Farscape}}'' references this in "Dream a Little Dream" when Zhaan has a nightmare
people make jokes about Crichton floating in space, his spacesuit visor cracking, and his head going pop, ''Outland''-style. However, the series otherwise averts the trope on repeated occasions in which characters are shown exposed to vacuum with no explosive consequences. By the start of Season 4, D'Argo, Rygel, Noranti and Crichton had all been exposed to space, with Crichton actually surviving exposure for a minute-and-a-half wearing nothing more than street clothes (occurs during the "Look at the Princess" trilogy). Though the ''actual'' length of his vacuum exposure is uncertain, given that the scene was in SlowMotion.
** In ''The Peacekeeper Wars'', D'Argo and Chiana end up with their ship blown up and them exposed to space. D'Argo's survival is explainable as
spacing somebody, about shoving somebody out an airlock. [[DudeNotFunny I don't think it's been mentioned that Luxan physiology can survive space exposure for up to a few minutes; Chiana is a Nebari, though, and the ability of Nebari to survive in space is undocumented.funny]]. Never will.



* Usually averted on ''Franchise/StarTrek''. In fact, on ''Franchise/StarTrek'', brief exposure to space will just leave you out of breath, when you would actually require medical care. They are, at least, consistent in this manner.
** ''Enterprise'' displays a notable exception to this rule in the fourth season (after playing it straight in the first season, with the same character no less) when Archer is briefly exposed and spends the rest of the episode struggling to walk and breathe, with his eyes completely bloodshot.
*** ... which is probably the closest they've come to reality; both extremes of either "no side effects" or "instant explosion" are equally implausible.
** In ''The Next Generation'' episode "Disaster", Dr. Crusher and Geordi are stuck in a shuttle bay with a radioactive fire, and decide to put it out by opening the bay door for a few seconds, removing the oxygen (and every other gas) from the bay. The good doctor even advises Geordi to hold his breath and "resist the urge to exhale" while in the vacuum. (As mentioned above, [[TelevisionIsTryingToKillUs that's a good way to get dead even if you could otherwise be saved]].)
** PlayedStraight in a NoodleIncident Dukat mentions to Sisko in ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'', which kept him from sleeping for a week.
** Averted somewhat more realistically in the ''Franchise/StarTrekExpandedUniverse'' book ''[[Literature/StarTrekFederation Federation]]''. When the shuttle bay explosively decompresses with the whole ''Enterprise''-D command crew inside, everyone has to be treated for injuries sustained due to vacuum exposure after Data rescues them by shoving everyone into a shuttle. Wesley's worst off: having not gone through Starfleet Academy at this point and therefore not knowing you're supposed to exhale, he briefly tries to hold his breath and suffers lung damage.

to:

* Usually averted on ''Franchise/StarTrek''. In fact, on ''Franchise/StarTrek'', brief exposure to space will just leave Averted in ''Series/BlakesSeven'' where several characters ''apparently'' explode after being teleported into space, but it is explicitly explained the first time it happens that this is not a pressure explosion but the result of teleporters being incapable of reassembling you out of breath, when properly if you get teleported beyond the safe range. ("Their atoms would be scattered to the solar winds" -- poetically put.) On the occasions when a character actually require medical care. They are, at least, consistent in this manner.
** ''Enterprise'' displays a notable exception to this rule in the fourth season (after playing it straight
went out of an airlock instead of being teleported into space, there is no indication they explode and in the first season, with case the same character no less) when Archer is briefly exposed and spends the rest of the episode struggling to walk and breathe, with his eyes completely bloodshot.
*** ... which is probably the closest they've come to reality; both extremes of either "no side effects" or "instant explosion" are equally implausible.
** In ''The Next Generation'' episode "Disaster", Dr. Crusher and Geordi are stuck in a shuttle bay with a radioactive fire, and decide to put it out by opening the bay door for a few seconds, removing the oxygen (and every other gas) from the bay. The good doctor even advises Geordi to hold his breath and "resist the urge to exhale" while in the vacuum. (As mentioned above, [[TelevisionIsTryingToKillUs that's a good way to get dead even if you could otherwise be saved]].)
** PlayedStraight in a NoodleIncident Dukat mentions to Sisko in ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'', which kept him from sleeping for a week.
** Averted somewhat more realistically in the ''Franchise/StarTrekExpandedUniverse'' book ''[[Literature/StarTrekFederation Federation]]''. When the shuttle bay explosively decompresses with the whole ''Enterprise''-D command crew inside, everyone has to be treated for injuries sustained due to vacuum exposure after Data rescues them by shoving everyone into a shuttle. Wesley's worst off: having not gone through Starfleet Academy at this point and therefore not knowing you're supposed to exhale, he briefly tries to hold his breath and suffers lung damage.
body was clearly shown floating away intact.



* Dr. Franklin on ''Series/BabylonFive'' mentions this trope -- or rather, how it presumably plays out in RealLife -- in regards to an incident in his childhood when one of his friends got [[ThrownOutTheAirlock spaced]] by accident.
-->'''Dr. Franklin:''' The one thing they never tell you is that you don't die instantly in vacuum. He just hung there, against the black, like a puppet with his strings all tangled up or like one of those old cartoons where you run off the edge of a cliff and your legs keep going. You could see that he was trying to breathe, but there was nothing. And one thing I remember when they pulled in his body his eyes were frozen. [long pause] A lot of people make jokes about spacing somebody, about shoving somebody out an airlock. [[DudeNotFunny I don't think it's funny]]. Never will.
* Shown as one of the two principal problems with fishing from high orbit in ''Series/MysteryScienceTheater3000'' (the other being the absurd length of line and amount of reeling in needed): by the time you've reeled the fish up to your space station, it'll have been shredded and ruined by escaping fluids.

to:

* Dr. Franklin on ''Series/BabylonFive'' mentions this trope Mentioned, though not shown, in ''Series/DefyingGravity'', an otherwise good show -- or rather, how it presumably plays out in RealLife -- in regards to an incident in his childhood when one of his friends got [[ThrownOutTheAirlock spaced]] by accident.
-->'''Dr. Franklin:''' The one thing they never tell you is that you don't die instantly in vacuum. He just hung there, against the black, like a puppet with his strings all tangled up or like one of those old cartoons where you run off the edge of a cliff and your legs keep going. You could see that he was trying to breathe, but there was nothing. And one thing I remember when they pulled in his body his eyes were frozen. [long pause] A lot of people make jokes about spacing somebody, about shoving somebody out an airlock. [[DudeNotFunny I don't think it's funny]]. Never will.
* Shown as one of the two principal problems with fishing from high orbit in ''Series/MysteryScienceTheater3000'' (the other being the absurd length of line and amount of reeling in needed): by the time you've reeled the fish up to your space station, it'll have been shredded and ruined by escaping fluids.
disappointing, really.



** In "The Ice Warriors", the leader of the titular monsters tortures the Doctor by trapping him in an airlock and drawing the atmosphere out of it. The Doctor, seemingly seriously, screams that he's going to explode. Maybe Time Lords are more fragile to decompression than humans?
*** Apparently not, given that during the Peter Davison era and again in the Eleventh Doctor story "The Doctor, The Widow and the Wardrobe", the Doctor is exposed to the full vacuum of space and withstands it, no ill effects. That said, it's possible the Doctor had never had this happen to him at the time of "The Ice Warriors" and as such wasn't sure what would happen to him.
** Averted in "The Impossible Planet"; Scootie is launched into space (by Satan, sort of) when the section of the base she's in gets shattered, and her body is still completely intact; though a) this is a family friendly show, so there was never going to be anything too gruesome, and b) her corpse is getting pulled into a Black Hole (hence the episode title, as said planet maintains a steady orbit around said Black Hole), so will likely result in 'Implosive Compression' before long.
** Averted [[ShownTheirWork in great detail]] in "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS36E5Oxygen Oxygen]]", which opens with the Doctor describing the physical effects of vacuum exposure. Later in the episode, Bill is exposed to the vacuum of space and loses consciousness in fifteen seconds, but does not explode.
** Doctor Who generally has a good track record for averting the trope. Katarina and Kirksen in ''The Daleks' Masterplan'' and Varan in ''The Mutants'' are examples of characters whose bodies floated intact in deep space.
* In ''Series/StargateSG1'', a hijacker is inadvertently teleported into space. He remains conscious long enough to fire a few ineffective handgun shots at the heroes' ship, before his dying body bounces comically against the window.

to:

** In [[Recap/DoctorWhoS5E3TheIceWarriors "The Ice Warriors", Warriors"]], the leader of the titular monsters tortures the Doctor by trapping him in an airlock and drawing the atmosphere out of it. The Doctor, seemingly seriously, screams that he's going to explode. Maybe Time Lords are more fragile to decompression than humans?
*** Apparently not, given that during the Peter Davison era and again in the Eleventh Doctor story [[Recap/DoctorWho2011CSTheDoctorTheWidowAndTheWardrobe "The Doctor, The Widow and the Wardrobe", Wardrobe"]], the Doctor is exposed to the full vacuum of space and withstands it, no ill effects. That said, it's possible the Doctor had never had this happen to him at the time of "The Ice Warriors" and as such wasn't sure what would happen to him.
** Averted in [[Recap/DoctorWhoS28E8TheImpossiblePlanet "The Impossible Planet"; Planet"]]; Scootie is launched into space (by Satan, sort of) when the section of the base she's in gets shattered, and her body is still completely intact; though a) this is a family friendly family-friendly show, so there was never going to be anything too gruesome, and b) her corpse is getting pulled into a Black Hole (hence the episode title, as said planet maintains a steady orbit around said Black Hole), so will likely result in 'Implosive Compression' "Implosive Compression" before long.
** Averted [[ShownTheirWork in great detail]] in "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS36E5Oxygen Oxygen]]", [[Recap/DoctorWhoS36E5Oxygen "Oxygen"]], which opens with the Doctor describing the physical effects of vacuum exposure. Later in the episode, Bill is exposed to the vacuum of space and loses consciousness in fifteen seconds, but does not explode.
** Doctor Who ''Doctor Who'' generally has a good track record for averting the trope. Katarina and Kirksen in ''The [[Recap/DoctorWhoS3E4TheDaleksMasterPlan The Daleks' Masterplan'' Master Plan"]] and Varan in ''The Mutants'' [[Recap/DoctorWhoS9E4TheMutants "The Mutants"]] are examples of characters whose bodies floated intact in deep space.
* ''Series/{{Farscape}}'' references this in "Dream a Little Dream" when Zhaan has a nightmare about Crichton floating in space, his spacesuit visor cracking, and his head going pop, ''Outland''-style. However, the series otherwise averts the trope on repeated occasions in which characters are shown exposed to vacuum with no explosive consequences. By the start of Season 4, D'Argo, Rygel, Noranti and Crichton had all been exposed to space, with Crichton actually surviving exposure for a minute-and-a-half wearing nothing more than street clothes (occurs during the "Look at the Princess" trilogy). Though the ''actual'' length of his vacuum exposure is uncertain, given that the scene was in SlowMotion.
**
In ''Series/StargateSG1'', a hijacker is inadvertently teleported into ''The Peacekeeper Wars'', D'Argo and Chiana end up with their ship blown up and them exposed to space. He remains conscious long enough D'Argo's survival is explainable as it's been mentioned that Luxan physiology can survive space exposure for up to fire a few ineffective handgun shots at minutes; Chiana is a Nebari, though, and the heroes' ship, before ability of Nebari to survive in space is undocumented.
* Implied (then averted) in an episode of ''Series/KnightRider'': The evil [=KARR=] starts to drain the air out of
his dying body bounces comically against cabin with a hostage inside, saying "Have you ever seen someone ''explode'' in a vacuum?"
* Shown as one of
the window.two principal problems with fishing from high orbit in ''Series/MysteryScienceTheater3000'' (the other being the absurd length of line and amount of reeling in needed): by the time you've reeled the fish up to your space station, it'll have been shredded and ruined by escaping fluids.



* PlayedForLaughs in ''Series/RedDwarf'', "Confidence and Paranoia": Confidence, suffering from an ego the size of a small galaxy, declares "Oxygen is for losers!" and takes his helmet off outside of the ship. He then promptly explodes.
* An episode of ''Series/SpacePrecinct'' had an alien with [[BloodyMurder acid blood]]. When shot its green blood dissolved through the hull causing the corpse to be blown out into space. A few seconds later it inflates and bursts.
* In ''Series/StargateSG1'', a hijacker is inadvertently teleported into space. He remains conscious long enough to fire a few ineffective handgun shots at the heroes' ship, before his dying body bounces comically against the window.
* Usually averted on ''Franchise/StarTrek''. In fact, on ''Franchise/StarTrek'', brief exposure to space will just leave you out of breath, when you would actually require medical care. They are, at least, consistent in this manner.
** ''Enterprise'' displays a notable exception to this rule in the fourth season (after playing it straight in the first season, with the same character no less) when Archer is briefly exposed and spends the rest of the episode struggling to walk and breathe, with his eyes completely bloodshot.
*** ... which is probably the closest they've come to reality; both extremes of either "no side effects" or "instant explosion" are equally implausible.
** In ''The Next Generation'' episode "Disaster", Dr. Crusher and Geordi are stuck in a shuttle bay with a radioactive fire, and decide to put it out by opening the bay door for a few seconds, removing the oxygen (and every other gas) from the bay. The good doctor even advises Geordi to hold his breath and "resist the urge to exhale" while in the vacuum. (As mentioned above, [[TelevisionIsTryingToKillUs that's a good way to get dead even if you could otherwise be saved]].)
** PlayedStraight in a NoodleIncident Dukat mentions to Sisko in ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'', which kept him from sleeping for a week.
** Averted somewhat more realistically in the ''Franchise/StarTrekExpandedUniverse'' book ''[[Literature/StarTrekFederation Federation]]''. When the shuttle bay explosively decompresses with the whole ''Enterprise''-D command crew inside, everyone has to be treated for injuries sustained due to vacuum exposure after Data rescues them by shoving everyone into a shuttle. Wesley's worst off: having not gone through Starfleet Academy at this point and therefore not knowing you're supposed to exhale, he briefly tries to hold his breath and suffers lung damage.



* Used when ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons''' Itchy and Scratchy go into space. Scratchy's head blows up like a balloon; it explodes when Itchy pricks it with a pin.
** Also when Homer and Bart accidentally board a shuttle of famous people headed for the sun, then jump out the airlock to get away from Rosie O'Donnell. They blow up and pop like balloons.
** Although they then got it right(er) in one of the Treehouse of Horror episodes when Homer accidentally fires Bill Clinton and Bob Dole into space - they struggle for a bit, then expire.
* Played for laughs in ''WesternAnimation/{{Sealab 2021}}'', where a couple people from Spacelab fall victim to this.
* In the ''WesternAnimation/RobotChicken'' episode "Maurice Was Caught", little orphan Annie is given Mars for her sweet sixteen party, and upon visiting it, trips and loses her space suit helmet. [[YourHeadAsplode Guess what happens?]]

to:

* Used when ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons''' Itchy and Scratchy go into space. Scratchy's head blows up like a balloon; it explodes when Itchy pricks it with a pin.
** Also when Homer and Bart accidentally board a shuttle of famous people headed for
Parodied in the sun, then jump out the airlock to get away from Rosie O'Donnell. They blow up and pop like balloons.
** Although they then got it right(er) in one of the Treehouse of Horror episodes when Homer accidentally fires Bill Clinton and Bob Dole into space - they struggle for a bit, then expire.
* Played for laughs in ''WesternAnimation/{{Sealab 2021}}'', where a couple people from Spacelab fall victim to this.
* In the ''WesternAnimation/RobotChicken''
''WesternAnimation/AmericanDad'' episode "Maurice Was Caught", little orphan Annie is given Mars for her sweet sixteen party, "Familyland" when the factions ruling over the sections of an amusement park are fighting each other and upon visiting it, trips and Steve pulls off a spaceman's helmet in the space-themed area. This is primarily due to RuleOfFunny, as Steve can survive without equipment just fine.
* Averted early in ''WesternAnimation/ExoSquad''. Nara Burns
loses her space suit helmet. [[YourHeadAsplode Guess what happens?]][[CollapsibleHelmet helmet]] and Marsala gives her his own before the back trip to their ship through some vacuum. Leutenant Marsh expresses concern whether Marsala will make it to the ship, and the latter reassures him he will: as a [[SuperSoldier Neosapien]], he can survive without the air far longer than any human, and this trope isn't apparently an issue. The back trip itself isn't shown, but Marsala is fine afterwards.



* Brock Sampson gets briefly exposed to the vacuum of space in ''WesternAnimation/TheVentureBrothers'', but survives due to his MadeOfIron nature.
* ''WesternAnimation/{{Metalocalypse}}'': In the second episode, producer Dick "Magic Ears" Knubbler is leaving a submarine recording session in a bathysphere that's rising way too fast - the camera lingers an agonizingly long time on him screaming until his eyeballs pop. During the end credits, we see he's been fitted with a pair of robotic eyes and he's feeling great.



* Parodied in the ''WesternAnimation/AmericanDad'' episode "Familyland" when the factions ruling over the sections of an amusement park are fighting each other and Steve pulls off a spaceman's helmet in the space-themed area. This is primarily due to RuleOfFunny, as Steve can survive without equipment just fine.
* Averted early in ''WesternAnimation/ExoSquad''. Nara Burns loses her [[CollapsibleHelmet helmet]] and Marsala gives her his own before the back trip to their ship through some vacuum. Leutenant Marsh expresses concern whether Marsala will make it to the ship, and the latter reassures him he will: as a [[SuperSoldier Neosapien]], he can survive without the air far longer than any human, and this trope isn't apparently an issue. The back trip itself isn't shown, but Marsala is fine afterwards.

to:

* Parodied in ''WesternAnimation/{{Metalocalypse}}'': In the ''WesternAnimation/AmericanDad'' episode "Familyland" when second episode, producer Dick "Magic Ears" Knubbler is leaving a submarine recording session in a bathysphere that's rising way too fast - the factions ruling over camera lingers an agonizingly long time on him screaming until his eyeballs pop. During the sections end credits, we see he's been fitted with a pair of an amusement park are fighting each other robotic eyes and Steve pulls off a spaceman's helmet in the space-themed area. This is primarily due to RuleOfFunny, as Steve can survive without equipment just fine.
* Averted early in ''WesternAnimation/ExoSquad''. Nara Burns loses her [[CollapsibleHelmet helmet]] and Marsala gives her his own before the back trip to their ship through some vacuum. Leutenant Marsh expresses concern whether Marsala will make it to the ship, and the latter reassures him he will: as a [[SuperSoldier Neosapien]], he can survive without the air far longer than any human, and this trope isn't apparently an issue. The back trip itself isn't shown, but Marsala is fine afterwards.
he's feeling great.


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* In the ''WesternAnimation/RobotChicken'' episode "Maurice Was Caught", little orphan Annie is given Mars for her sweet sixteen party, and upon visiting it, trips and loses her space suit helmet. [[YourHeadAsplode Guess what happens?]]
* Played for laughs in ''WesternAnimation/{{Sealab 2021}}'', where a couple people from Spacelab fall victim to this.
* Used when ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons''' Itchy and Scratchy go into space. Scratchy's head blows up like a balloon; it explodes when Itchy pricks it with a pin.
** Also when Homer and Bart accidentally board a shuttle of famous people headed for the sun, then jump out the airlock to get away from Rosie O'Donnell. They blow up and pop like balloons.
** Although they then got it right(er) in one of the Treehouse of Horror episodes when Homer accidentally fires Bill Clinton and Bob Dole into space - they struggle for a bit, then expire.
* Brock Sampson gets briefly exposed to the vacuum of space in ''WesternAnimation/TheVentureBrothers'', but survives due to his MadeOfIron nature.


Added DiffLines:



Added DiffLines:

13th May '17 2:26:47 PM john_e
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Added DiffLines:

** Averted [[ShownTheirWork in great detail]] in "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS36E5Oxygen Oxygen]]", which opens with the Doctor describing the physical effects of vacuum exposure. Later in the episode, Bill is exposed to the vacuum of space and loses consciousness in fifteen seconds, but does not explode.
4th May '17 3:50:46 PM ScorpiusOB1
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Added DiffLines:

* Averted in ''Once Upon a Time... Space''. Near the end of one episode a Cassiopeian agent surprises the protagonists and , [[WhyDontYouJustShootHim after talking too much while pointing them with his gun]], his fishbowl helmet is broken by a stray object. The last scene shows him from the back, dead, and rotating widly.
11th Mar '17 6:31:38 PM jormis29
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* An episode of ''SpacePrecinct'' had an alien with [[BloodyMurder acid blood]]. When shot its green blood dissolved through the hull causing the corpse to be blown out into space. A few seconds later it inflates and bursts.

to:

* An episode of ''SpacePrecinct'' ''Series/SpacePrecinct'' had an alien with [[BloodyMurder acid blood]]. When shot its green blood dissolved through the hull causing the corpse to be blown out into space. A few seconds later it inflates and bursts.
21st Feb '17 3:27:37 PM LondonKdS
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* In ''Series/BlakesSeven'' there was the infamous sequence where a person teleported into space would explode. Particularly weird here because (as it was StockFootage) the figure blown up was ''[[SpecialEffectsFailure the same one every time]]'', so it looked as if the victim turned into a doll before expiring.
** To be fair, the first time this happened it was explicitly explained that this was a side-effect of teleporting beyond the safe range. ("Their atoms would be scattered to the solar winds" - poetically put.)
** Also, on the occasions when a character actually went out of an airlock instead of being teleported, there is no indication they explode and in the first case the body was clearly shown floating away intact.

to:

* In Averted in ''Series/BlakesSeven'' there was the infamous sequence where a person several characters ''apparently'' explode after being teleported into space would explode. Particularly weird here because (as space, but it was StockFootage) the figure blown up was ''[[SpecialEffectsFailure the same one every time]]'', so it looked as if the victim turned into a doll before expiring.
** To be fair, the first time this happened it was
is explicitly explained the first time it happens that this was is not a side-effect pressure explosion but the result of teleporting teleporters being incapable of reassembling you properly if you get teleported beyond the safe range. ("Their atoms would be scattered to the solar winds" - poetically put.)
** Also, on
) On the occasions when a character actually went out of an airlock instead of being teleported, teleported into space, there is no indication they explode and in the first case the body was clearly shown floating away intact.
3rd Feb '17 4:37:46 PM Xtifr
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* Charles Sheffield's ''{{Literature/The McAndrew Chronicles}}'' offers what seems like a realistic aversion in the Sturm Invocation, a training protocol that, when activated with a special whistle, invokes an involuntary reaction of quick blinks to preserve your eyesight plus other adaptations that allow one to stay in vacuum just long enough to cross a short distance (from one ship to another) and get to safety. The penalties for false activations are very severe.
** Notably, blinking is inverted - instead of eyes open most of the time your eyes are closed most of the time. This has nothing to do with pressure, but is designed to prevent eye damage from excess UV radiation.

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* Charles Sheffield's Creator/CharlesSheffield's ''{{Literature/The McAndrew Chronicles}}'' offers what seems like a realistic aversion in the Sturm Invocation, a training protocol that, when activated with a special whistle, invokes an involuntary reaction of quick blinks to preserve your eyesight plus other adaptations that allow one to stay in vacuum just long enough to cross a short distance (from one ship to another) and get to safety. The penalties for false activations are very severe.
**
severe. Notably, blinking is inverted - instead inverted--instead of eyes open most of the time your eyes are closed most of the time. This has nothing to do with pressure, but is designed to prevent eye damage from excess UV radiation.
23rd Jan '17 8:27:51 PM LucaEarlgrey
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* If the airliner you're in decides to dismantle itself at 30,000 feet you can expect ruptured lungs to be one of the clues that an in-flight breakup occurred during your autopsy. [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BOAC_Flight_781 BOAC Flight 781]] is one of the more notorious explosive decompressions to occur on a civilian airliner. [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aloha_Airlines_Flight_243 Aloha Airlines Flight 243]] did demonstrate that such an event is not necessarily completely fatal.

to:

* If the airliner you're in decides to dismantle itself at 30,000 feet you can expect ruptured lungs to be one of the clues that an in-flight breakup occurred during your autopsy. [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BOAC_Flight_781 BOAC Flight 781]] is one of the more notorious explosive decompressions to occur on a civilian airliner. [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/China_Airlines_Flight_611 China Airlines Flight 611]] is what happens when improper, incomplete repairs on hull damage go unnoticed for 22 years. [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aloha_Airlines_Flight_243 Aloha Airlines Flight 243]] did demonstrate that such an event is not necessarily completely fatal.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.ExplosiveDecompression