History Main / EasyLogistics

24th Jun '17 10:54:48 PM CV12Hornet
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*** And even the occasions the Americans did run into supply problems (the Guadalcanal campaign wasn't nicknamed "Operation Shoestring" for nothing), said problems were almost all in 1942 before production hit its peak and tended to be not nearly as bad as what their opponents were facing.
24th Jun '17 10:52:33 PM CV12Hornet
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** Half of Rommel's troubles in Africa during UsefulNotes/WorldWarII came from the fact logistics weren't easy for him (as the Italian merchant ships had to run the gauntlet of minefields and British ships and airplanes, the latter of which often ''knew'' where they would pass, while carrying insufficient supplies, and both the Italians and his Afrika Korps had too little trucks and carriages to bring them to the front) but, proportionally speaking, they ''were'' for the Eighth Army (as the Royal Navy was that much better defending the merchant ships, the merchant ships were always full with useful stuff coming from either Britain or America, and the American supplies included enough trucks to bring the stuff to the front). The other half came from him ''squandering'' his reserves of fuel and spare parts and sometimes neglecting to salvage damaged but repairable tanks from the battlefield and demolishing the British ones, thus making the logistic situation even worse.
** Pretty much played straight for America during UsefulNotes/WorldWarII by virtue of the US ''immense'' industrial potential (it took ''every single one of the other big players combined'' to surpass it, and it wasn't by much): they could produce all the supplies their forces and those of their allies needed and then some, ''and'' the ships to carry them on the combat theatre and the trucks to bring them to the troops, and, to make things even easier on logistics, they reduced the types of material produced as much as possible. It went to to the point that in the latter half of 1944 they had to ''slow down production'' because ''the war was ending too fast to use all the things they were producing''.

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** Half of Rommel's troubles in Africa during UsefulNotes/WorldWarII came from the fact logistics weren't easy for him (as the Italian merchant ships had to run the gauntlet of minefields and British ships and airplanes, the latter of which often ''knew'' where they would pass, while carrying insufficient supplies to ports that ''couldn't'' handle enough supplies, and both the Italians and his Afrika Korps had too little trucks and carriages to bring them to the front) front... oh, and the roads couldn't handle the necessary supply load anyway, much like the ports) but, proportionally speaking, they ''were'' for the Eighth Army (as the Royal Navy was that much better defending the merchant ships, the merchant ships were always full with useful stuff coming from either Britain or America, Alexandria and other Egyptian ports beat the pants off Tripoli in capacity, and the American supplies included enough trucks to bring the stuff to the front). The other half came from him ''squandering'' his reserves of fuel and spare parts and sometimes neglecting to salvage damaged but repairable tanks from the battlefield and demolishing the British ones, thus making the logistic situation even worse.
** Pretty much For the most part played straight for America during UsefulNotes/WorldWarII by virtue of the US ''immense'' industrial potential (it took ''every single one of the other big players combined'' to surpass it, and it wasn't by much): they could produce all the supplies their forces and those of their allies needed and then some, ''and'' the ships to carry them on the combat theatre and the trucks to bring them to the troops, and, to make things even easier on logistics, they reduced the types of material produced as much as possible. It went to to the point that in the latter half of 1944 they had to ''slow down production'' because ''the war was ending too fast to use all the things they were producing''.
29th May '17 11:48:46 AM CaptainCrawdad
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* ''Literature/SecondApocalypse'': Both series place logistics as a primary concern in the massive invasions they follow. More soldiers die in the Holy War during the marching than in the actual battles. In the second series, the logistics of the Great Ordeal take 20 years for an ImpossibleGenius to plan and implement, and even then, he has to plan for the army to start ''eating their enemy'' midway through.

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* ''Literature/SecondApocalypse'': Both series place logistics as a primary concern in the massive invasions they follow. More soldiers die in the Holy War during the marching than in the actual battles. In the second series, the logistics of the Great Ordeal take 20 years for an ImpossibleGenius to plan and implement, and even then, he has to plan for the army to start ''eating their enemy'' midway through. One of the aspects of [[OurGoblinsAreDifferent Sranc]] that makes them so dangerous is their ability to live on practically anything, allowing them to sustain their staggering numbers.
29th May '17 11:38:07 AM CaptainCrawdad
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* ''Literature/SecondApocalypse'': Both series place logistics as a primary concern in the massive invasions they follow. More soldiers die in the great Holy War in the marching than in the actual battles. In the second series, the logistics of the Great Ordeal take 20 years for an ImpossibleGenius to plan and implement, and even then, he has to plan for the army to start ''eating their enemy'' midway through.

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* ''Literature/SecondApocalypse'': Both series place logistics as a primary concern in the massive invasions they follow. More soldiers die in the great Holy War in during the marching than in the actual battles. In the second series, the logistics of the Great Ordeal take 20 years for an ImpossibleGenius to plan and implement, and even then, he has to plan for the army to start ''eating their enemy'' midway through.
29th May '17 11:20:42 AM CaptainCrawdad
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* ''Literature/SecondApocalypse'': Both series place logistics as a primary concern in the massive invasions they follow. More soldiers die in the great Holy War in the marching than in the actual battles. In the second series, the logistics of the Great Ordeal take 20 years for an ImpossibleGenius to plan and implement, and even then, he has to plan for the army to start ''eating their enemy'' midway through.
28th May '17 8:58:42 AM Bissek
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* ''Literature/EndersGame'' takes averting this to a new level - the logistics of an interstellar war in a universe without FTL travel are so difficult that they're essentially ''impossible'', as it would literally take years for any supply ships to reach a deployed fleet. So they don't even try - every fleet is essentially sent out on a suicide mission, having been given enough supplies to reach their target system and fight one battle, after which they will either have taken the system and can colonize it, or they will be dead.
13th May '17 9:57:37 AM Bissek
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* In the Larry Bond novel ''Red Phoenix'', the turning point of the Second Korean War wasn't a battle. It was when the NATO supply officers were successfully pulled war enough away from the front that they could get back to work and reorganize their side's logistics, allowing the NATO troops to have the supplies they needed to fight the decisive battle.

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* In the Larry Bond novel ''Red Phoenix'', the turning point of the Second Korean War wasn't a battle. It was when the NATO supply officers were successfully pulled war far enough away from the front that they could get back to work and reorganize their side's logistics, allowing the NATO troops to have the supplies they needed to fight the decisive battle.
13th May '17 9:35:08 AM Bissek
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* In the Larry Bond novel ''Red Phoenix'', the turning point of the Second Korean War wasn't a battle. It was when the NATO supply officers were successfully pulled war enough away from the front that they could get back to work and reorganize their side's logistics, allowing the NATO troops to have the supplies they needed to fight the decisive battle.
6th May '17 3:46:24 PM FearlessSon
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** ''Imperial Armour Volume III - The Taros Campaign'', one of Forge World's published companion books, details the Imperial attempt to liberate the [[SingleBiomePlanet desert world]] Taros from the Tau Empire's annexation of it. The entire conflict was precipitated by logistics, the planet's xeno-collusion being revealed accidentally during an Administratum audit to see if it could increase mining output in anticipation of Abbadon's Thirteenth Black Crusade. An entire chapter is devoted to covering simply the planning it took, the choices made of force composition for the invasion, the kinds of supplies that would be needed, and the compromises that had to be made when balancing against other needs. The whole of the conflict's outcome hinged on logistics. The Tau knew they could not muster the kind of forces the Imperium could hit them with, and they knew that the Imperium's goal was to capture the planetary capital (the only major city on the world.) So they entrenched what supplies they could while the Imperium mustered, then focused on bleeding the Imperial advance's strength with hit-and-run attacks, forcing them to slow and commit their reserves to replace losses. As the Imperial advance inevitably gained ground, the Tau used nighttime Orca DropShip insertions of Stealthsuit and Pathfinder teams behind the Imperial line to harry their supply and reinforcement caravans. This forced the Imperium to change their immediate objective to divert to one of the few fresh water processing facilities on the planet to make up for losses in their own supplies. The fighting over it was fierce, and while the Imperium ultimately took the ground, the facility had sustained so much damage as to make it functionally useless for replenishment. Thought they had plenty of forces left, the Imperium was forced to abort the invasion shortly after that as their Guardsmen were dying of dehydration and their frontline vehicles could not get enough fuel or munitions.
1st May '17 11:35:40 AM Discar
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* ''Webcomic/{{Erfworld}}'': A [[LampshadeHanging Lampshaded]]/[[JustifiedTrope Justified]] example. Because the titular universe explicitly [[RPGMechanicsVerse runs on the rules of a Turn-Based Strategy game]], as long as you have enough Schmuckers food, weapons, armor, and anything else you require simply appear out of thin air.

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* ''Webcomic/{{Erfworld}}'': A [[LampshadeHanging Lampshaded]]/[[JustifiedTrope Justified]] example. Because the titular universe explicitly [[RPGMechanicsVerse runs on the rules of a Turn-Based Strategy game]], as long as you have enough Schmuckers for upkeep, then food, weapons, armor, and anything else you require simply appear out of thin air.
air. That being said, there are still some logistical concerns. Giving units rations reduces their upkeep, and hunting feral units for food does the same. The primary way to get Schmuckers is from cities, but cities have diminishing returns on the amount they produce, thus limiting the size of each Side.
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