History Main / EasyLogistics

27th Mar '17 7:14:10 AM RappaR
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**Not four of the largest. USSR, Great Britain, France, Canada, USA, China, Brasil, Australia - eight of the largest countries in the world. Germans really screwed at picking their opponents.
16th Mar '17 7:03:07 PM Ferot_Dreadnaught
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** Any Zentraedi fleet has many planetoid-sized [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin Factory Satellites]] to keep it supplied, so they should play it straight. The problem is, [[{{Precursors}} the Protoculture]], [[GenreSavvy fearing their slave soldiers would one day rebel]], willingly weakened the Zentraedi by denying them the technical know-how necessary to maintain and repair their ships or reverse-engineer existing designs. As the Zentraedi rebelled and wiped out the Protoculture 500,000 years ago, modern Zentraedi ships degrade into progressively worse conditions as they’re used, and don’t have access to [[NuclearWeaponsTaboo reaction weapons]] because all the Factory Satellites producing them were wiped out and they’ve long run out of preexisting supplies. Additionally, at least the fleet appearing in ''Anime/SuperDimensionFortressMacross'' is shown to have only a limited supply of Glaug officer pods due to their Satellite for that one getting destroyed too. The New UN Spacy stealing any Factory Satellite they stumble upon (including those of the Zentraedi fleet they defeated in the original series) isn't helping the situation of independent Zentraedi fleets either, though those who have allied with humanity have benefited from the latter's technical know-how.

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** Any Zentraedi fleet has many planetoid-sized [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin Factory Satellites]] to keep it supplied, so they should play it straight. The problem is, [[{{Precursors}} the Protoculture]], [[GenreSavvy fearing their slave soldiers would one day rebel]], rebel, willingly weakened the Zentraedi by denying them the technical know-how necessary to maintain and repair their ships or reverse-engineer existing designs. As the Zentraedi rebelled and wiped out the Protoculture 500,000 years ago, modern Zentraedi ships degrade into progressively worse conditions as they’re used, and don’t have access to [[NuclearWeaponsTaboo reaction weapons]] because all the Factory Satellites producing them were wiped out and they’ve long run out of preexisting supplies. Additionally, at least the fleet appearing in ''Anime/SuperDimensionFortressMacross'' is shown to have only a limited supply of Glaug officer pods due to their Satellite for that one getting destroyed too. The New UN Spacy stealing any Factory Satellite they stumble upon (including those of the Zentraedi fleet they defeated in the original series) isn't helping the situation of independent Zentraedi fleets either, though those who have allied with humanity have benefited from the latter's technical know-how.
14th Mar '17 3:42:25 PM Prfnoff
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Airplanes will normally be the exception, if anything is, as chances are they'll be restrained by their fuel capacity or their ammo; once one of such is depleted, they usually have to return to a nearby landing strip (or, if the military is advanced enough, provided with in-flight (mid-air) refueling, which then means they have to have additional bases capable of providing for tanker planes along the way). This is for both stylistic and balance reasons, it would be overpowered to have an infinite bombing run, and the aircraft carriers have to do something.

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Airplanes will normally be the exception, if anything is, as chances are they'll be restrained by their fuel capacity or their ammo; once one of such is depleted, they usually have to return to a nearby landing strip (or, if the military is advanced enough, provided with in-flight (mid-air) refueling, which then means they have to have additional bases capable of providing for tanker planes along the way). This is for both stylistic and balance reasons, reasons: it would be overpowered to have an infinite bombing run, and the aircraft carriers have to do something.



One aspect of this trope is partially true for the US military. There is only one fuel. Almost everything the US fields, from camp stoves to aircraft to battle tanks, runs on JP-8 jet fuel; even Humvees powered by diesel engines use special components that make them compatible with JP-8. By the same token, the US tries to field as many weapons as possible that rely on the same types of ammunition, and use as many of the same pieces of equipment between the services as possible, to move real-world logistics closer to the abstraction.

This is also one reason the US military is considered among the most powerful. It has by far the largest mid-air refueling fleet. It can draw on the US civilian transport fleet for air cargo. They have highly computerized inventory and shipping processes. To make up for the biggest lack, the lack of naval shipping, the US pays various commercial ships for the right to use them in a military emergency.

The US military also applies the overwhelming importance of logistics to its attack strategies. The ''enemies'' supply routes, manufacturing and distribution centers, storage facilities, transportation hubs, shipping ports, and sources of raw materials are all considered high priority targets and can count on getting thoroughly pounded. The reasoning is simple: Enemy forces can't attack your forces if they don't have fuel, ammunition, food, water, spare parts... [[UsefulNotes/YamamotoIsoroku Yamamoto]], after Pearl Harbor, considered it one of his greatest mistakes to not launch a 3rd attack wave against Pearl Harbor's maintenance yards and fuel storage depots. If he had done so, it would have added anywhere from eighteen months to two years before America would have been able to take the fight to the Japanese.
13th Feb '17 4:25:46 PM Bissek
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* Averted in ''Literature/CodexAlera''; the series go into considerable detail with the day-to-day functioning of a military encampment and the administrative problems it poses. It helps that TheHero Tavi (before experiencing a case of YouAreInCommandNow,) was actually a subtribune tasked with precisely the sort of logistical issues that often get overlooked in other works. Transport is also a major issue, with Tavi coming to recognise that even ''marching'' is more difficult than one would think, and an enemy has a decisive advantage because of their ability to force-march faster for longer without relying on the established transport routes.

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* Averted in ''Literature/CodexAlera''; the series go into considerable detail with the day-to-day functioning of a military encampment and the administrative problems it poses. It helps that TheHero Tavi (before experiencing a case of YouAreInCommandNow,) was actually a subtribune tasked with precisely the sort of logistical issues that often get overlooked in other works. Transport is also a major issue, with Tavi coming to recognise that even ''marching'' is more difficult than one would think, and an enemy has a decisive advantage because of their ability to force-march faster for longer without relying on the established transport routes.routes (Furycasting allows the Legions and their supply wagons to travel incredibly fast on the causeways, which is nice at the strategic level but useless at the tactical level against opponents who don't operate near the causeways).
23rd Jan '17 9:56:29 AM morane
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* ''Seriously'' averted both in Sunzi's Literature/TheArtOfWar and Clausewitz's Literature/OnWar. Both relate ''very'' seriously on logistics and their importance.
14th Jan '17 5:36:55 AM Morgenthaler
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* Mostly averted in the ''{{Deadlock}}'' games, where each of your conquered territories requires resources to run...whether they produce them themselves or not, and shipping resources also costs money. This makes blockades a rather effective (and annoying) tactic. Only mostly averted because certain technologies lower the cost of shipping, and one (transporters) not only makes it free, but renders one immune to blockades.

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* Mostly averted in the ''{{Deadlock}}'' ''VideoGame/{{Deadlock}}'' games, where each of your conquered territories requires resources to run...whether they produce them themselves or not, and shipping resources also costs money. This makes blockades a rather effective (and annoying) tactic. Only mostly averted because certain technologies lower the cost of shipping, and one (transporters) not only makes it free, but renders one immune to blockades.
13th Jan '17 4:22:09 PM CountDorku
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** Ships have a set "range" from friendly territory determined by their supply upgrades. A ship outside its supply range cannot move except to head directly towards friendly space (which means that hilarious results can be gained with wormhole anomalies on large maps, as your flagship disappears to the far side of the map and meets everyone while charging back)). However, this resupply appears to work by magic. There is nothing wrong with having a ship soar around in a giant circle at extreme range indefinitely, so long as it doesn't stray outside it.
7th Jan '17 3:14:19 PM nombretomado
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* A very striking example can be found in one of the novellas by Vasil' Bykov (one of the Soviet WWII-veterans/writers whose works were later collectively dubbed "lieutenants' prose"). In ''His Batallion'', a precarious situation is presented. A batallion, together with a small partisan strike force, has to take a fortified hill. A battle has been going for some time, the attack has stalled, the enemy has a killing field sighted in with [=HMGs=] and air-burst artillery. At the same time, batallion cannot pull back, lest it be almost completely annihilated. To make things worse, the protagonist (a batallion CO) is stripped of command by vengeful regiment commander, replaced by his lieutenant. The cincher? Batallion artillery has only '''ten shells left'''. Cue the arguments over their application, the PointOfNoReturn when they're expended (without desired effect), and a desperate and bloody trench battle where the ex-batallion CO fights along his soldiers without any support and with drastically dwindled numbers - haphazardly collecting enemy grenades, manning an [=HMG=] like a Left4Dead character, using enemy's ThrowAwayGuns when running out of ammo and even accepting first aid from a German grunt. All of the obstacles in the novella hinge on logistics: ammunition, transport, medical supplies and food. The stalwart bravery of the soldiers is certainly required, ''but not nearly enough''.

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* A very striking example can be found in one of the novellas by Vasil' Bykov (one of the Soviet WWII-veterans/writers whose works were later collectively dubbed "lieutenants' prose"). In ''His Batallion'', a precarious situation is presented. A batallion, together with a small partisan strike force, has to take a fortified hill. A battle has been going for some time, the attack has stalled, the enemy has a killing field sighted in with [=HMGs=] and air-burst artillery. At the same time, batallion cannot pull back, lest it be almost completely annihilated. To make things worse, the protagonist (a batallion CO) is stripped of command by vengeful regiment commander, replaced by his lieutenant. The cincher? Batallion artillery has only '''ten shells left'''. Cue the arguments over their application, the PointOfNoReturn when they're expended (without desired effect), and a desperate and bloody trench battle where the ex-batallion CO fights along his soldiers without any support and with drastically dwindled numbers - haphazardly collecting enemy grenades, manning an [=HMG=] like a Left4Dead ''VideoGame/Left4Dead'' character, using enemy's ThrowAwayGuns when running out of ammo and even accepting first aid from a German grunt. All of the obstacles in the novella hinge on logistics: ammunition, transport, medical supplies and food. The stalwart bravery of the soldiers is certainly required, ''but not nearly enough''.
26th Dec '16 7:19:08 AM Gosicrystal
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* Mostly averted in ''VideoGame/JointTaskForce'', where bullets are unlimited but cannon shells and supplies for repairs are not. 'Special' equipment like anti-tank rockets and mines also has a set number of uses before it is LostForever.

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* Mostly averted in ''VideoGame/JointTaskForce'', where bullets are unlimited but cannon shells and supplies for repairs are not. 'Special' equipment like anti-tank rockets and mines also has a set number of uses before it is LostForever.[[PermanentlyMissableContent lost forever]].
21st Dec '16 4:53:22 PM Bissek
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* In ''Literature/TheLostFleet'', the titular fleet has its own squadron of ships that are ultimately nothing more than giant flying machine shops to produce spare parts, fuel and munitions so the fleet can keep going despite being stuck behind enemy lines. However, this still doesn't solve all their logistics problems, as they have to stop to loot more raw materials the supply ships need to make all those things after roughly every other battle, and the simple fact that there are several hundred warships of various sizes in the fleet and only four supply ships means that the fleet uses supplies faster than they can replace them. At the end of the fifth book, some ships end up dropping out of formation because they're totally out of fuel and can no longer run the engines. [[spoiler:Fortunately, this happens in an Alliance border system, so once the battle is over they can ask the system fleet for a tow to the nearest shipyard.]]
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