History Main / EasyLogistics

4th Jun '18 1:55:32 PM IndustriousArc
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* In ''VideoGame/FireEmblemFates'' fanfic ''FanFic/ABrighterDark,'' Jakob consciously invokes this to the benefit of Corrin. Due to Jakob's talent with organizing and management, he assures his liege that she won't have to worry about any of the details involving troop movements, equipment, and maintenance when making her decisions and that whatever path they took, he would ensure everything ended up where it needed to be without her having to think about it.
--> ''Narration:'' All she needed to know, as Jakob put it, was that there would be an army of 300 men at arms, 100 archers, 50 calvary, 10 flyers, and even 2 mages all prepped and ready to march at the break of dawn.
23rd May '18 1:18:31 PM EDP
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* ''Anime/{{Robotech}}'' is one long aversion: the advanced technology that gives the name to the series is powered by Protoculture, a very specific fuel made from the Invid Flower of Life being processed through the Protoculture Matrix... And the only remaining supply of Flower of Life was on a ship that crashed on Earth, and the fight for that source is the entire reason for the first two arcs. The motif remains present in the New Generation saga, as while the Robotech Expeditionary Force has managed to set up its own plantations of Flower of Life and has a Matrix and the Invid have control of Earth (now teeming with the Flower) and have the knowledge to mass-produce the Protoculture Matrix, Scott's group is a small resistance cell stranded on Invid-controlled Earth and is often short on Protoculture supplies for their vehicles and weapons.
** The trope returns on large scale in ''WesternAnimation/RobotechTheShadowChronicles'': when the SDF-3 ''Pioneer'' disappeared it was carrying the REF Protoculture Matrix ''and'' the one guy who knew how to make more, and while the Invid are not hostile anymore-and in fact they now have a common enemy with the REF-they have disappeared to parts unknown.
23rd May '18 12:53:01 PM EDP
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** For the most part played straight for America during UsefulNotes/WorldWarII by virtue of the US ''immense'' industrial potential (it took ''every single one of the other big players combined'' to surpass it, and it wasn't by much): they could produce all the supplies their forces and those of their allies needed and then some, ''and'' the ships to carry them on the combat theatre and the trucks to bring them to the troops, and, to make things even easier on logistics, they reduced the types of material produced as much as possible. It went to to the point that in the latter half of 1944 they had to ''slow down production'' because ''the war was ending too fast to use all the things they were producing''. And during this time they not only didn't mobilize all their industrial potential for warmaking (they didn't have the time for that, the war ended too quickly), they also spent billions on ''improving'' what they were making and develop the atomic bomb.

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** For the most part played straight for America during UsefulNotes/WorldWarII by virtue of the US ''immense'' industrial potential (it took ''every single one of the other big players combined'' to surpass it, and it wasn't by much): they could produce all the supplies their forces and those of their allies needed and then some, ''and'' the ships to carry them on the combat theatre and the trucks to bring them to the troops, and, to make things even easier on logistics, they reduced the types of material produced as much as possible. It went to to the point that in the latter half of 1944 they had to ''slow down production'' because ''the war was ending too fast to use all the things they were producing''. And during this time they not only didn't mobilize all their industrial potential for warmaking (they didn't have the time for that, the war ended too quickly), they also spent billions on ''improving'' what they were making and develop the atomic bomb. A brief and abridged rundown can be found [[http://www.combinedfleet.com/economic.htm here]].
19th May '18 1:08:26 PM RedScharlach
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One of the most JustForFun/{{egregious}} examples, when you think about it, are the repair units. These little buggers can fix a heavy tank from [[CriticalExistenceFailure near disintegrated state]] in a matter of seconds with any needed spare parts being pulled out of {{hammerspace}} (otherwise the unit would be carrying a entire heavy tank in spare parts around) without making the repair crew actually get out, or even ''immobilizing'' the repaired unit for a short time. The latter part includes repairing an attack helicopter hovering over the repair unit. These guys are hardcore. [[ShootTheMedicFirst Shoot them first]].

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One of the most JustForFun/{{egregious}} examples, when you think about it, are the repair units. These little buggers can fix a heavy tank from [[CriticalExistenceFailure near disintegrated state]] in a matter of seconds with any needed spare parts being pulled out of {{hammerspace}} (otherwise the unit would be carrying a an entire heavy tank in spare parts around) without making the repair crew actually get out, or even ''immobilizing'' the repaired unit for a short time. The latter part includes repairing an attack helicopter hovering over the repair unit. These guys are hardcore. [[ShootTheMedicFirst Shoot them first]].



** In ''FanFic/AFightingChance'', Earth Alliance aquires quickly the technology to target the Minbari ships, leading to the above scenario much faster. Later turned back against Earth Alliance when Branmer manage to keep most of Earth's main force from chasing his fleet attacking [[spoiler: Earth itself]] when he destroys their fuel stockpiles after tricking them into using most of their onboard fuel in a running battle. [[spoiler: This is also the reason Branmer is attacking Earth: due their relative youth as a spacefaring nation, ''more than half'' of Earth Alliance's industrial production is still based on Earth itself with most of the rest placed on Mars and Proxima, and the loss of those industries would cripple the Alliance]].

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** In ''FanFic/AFightingChance'', Earth Alliance aquires quickly acquires the technology to target the Minbari ships, leading to the above scenario much faster. Later turned back against Earth Alliance when Branmer manage to keep most of Earth's main force from chasing his fleet attacking [[spoiler: Earth itself]] when he destroys their fuel stockpiles after tricking them into using most of their onboard fuel in a running battle. [[spoiler: This is also the reason Branmer is attacking Earth: due their relative youth as a spacefaring nation, ''more than half'' of Earth Alliance's industrial production is still based on Earth itself with most of the rest placed on Mars and Proxima, and the loss of those industries would cripple the Alliance]].



* A very striking example can be found in one of the novellas by Vasil' Bykov (one of the Soviet WWII-veterans/writers whose works were later collectively dubbed "lieutenants' prose"). In ''His Batallion'', a precarious situation is presented. A batallion, together with a small partisan strike force, has to take a fortified hill. A battle has been going for some time, the attack has stalled, the enemy has a killing field sighted in with [=HMGs=] and air-burst artillery. At the same time, batallion cannot pull back, lest it be almost completely annihilated. To make things worse, the protagonist (a batallion CO) is stripped of command by vengeful regiment commander, replaced by his lieutenant. The cincher? Batallion artillery has only '''ten shells left'''. Cue the arguments over their application, the PointOfNoReturn when they're expended (without desired effect), and a desperate and bloody trench battle where the ex-batallion CO fights along his soldiers without any support and with drastically dwindled numbers - haphazardly collecting enemy grenades, manning an [=HMG=] like a ''VideoGame/Left4Dead'' character, using enemy's ThrowAwayGuns when running out of ammo and even accepting first aid from a German grunt. All of the obstacles in the novella hinge on logistics: ammunition, transport, medical supplies and food. The stalwart bravery of the soldiers is certainly required, ''but not nearly enough''.

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* A very striking example can be found in one of the novellas by Vasil' Bykov (one of the Soviet WWII-veterans/writers WWII veterans/writers whose works were later collectively dubbed "lieutenants' prose"). In ''His Batallion'', Battalion'', a precarious situation is presented. A batallion, battalion, together with a small partisan strike force, has to take a fortified hill. A battle has been going for some time, the attack has stalled, the enemy has a killing field sighted in with [=HMGs=] and air-burst artillery. At the same time, batallion the battalion cannot pull back, lest it be almost completely annihilated. To make things worse, the protagonist (a batallion battalion CO) is stripped of command by a vengeful regiment commander, and replaced by his lieutenant. The cincher? Batallion The battalion artillery has only '''ten shells left'''. Cue the arguments over their application, the PointOfNoReturn when they're expended (without desired effect), and a desperate and bloody trench battle where the ex-batallion ex-battalion CO fights along his soldiers without any support and with drastically dwindled numbers - -- haphazardly collecting enemy grenades, manning an [=HMG=] like a ''VideoGame/Left4Dead'' character, using the enemy's ThrowAwayGuns when running out of ammo and even accepting first aid from a German grunt. All of the obstacles in the novella hinge on logistics: ammunition, transport, medical supplies and food. The stalwart bravery of the soldiers is certainly required, ''but not nearly enough''.



* ''Literature/EndersGame'' takes averting this to a new level - the logistics of an interstellar war in a universe without FTL travel are so difficult that they're essentially ''impossible'', as it would literally take years for any supply ships to reach a deployed fleet. So they don't even try - every fleet is essentially sent out on a suicide mission, having been given enough supplies to reach their target system and fight one battle, after which they will either have taken the system and can colonize it, or they will be dead.

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* ''Literature/EndersGame'' takes averting this to a new level - -- the logistics of an interstellar war in a universe without FTL travel are so difficult that they're essentially ''impossible'', as it would literally take years for any supply ships to reach a deployed fleet. So they don't even try - -- every fleet is essentially sent out on a suicide mission, having been given enough supplies to reach their target system and fight one battle, after which they will either have taken the system and can colonize it, or they will be dead.



* While the actual fight takes place off-page, several books in the ''Literature/HonorHarrington'' series mention the importance of taking Trevor's Star because of it's logistical importance. Because it's connected to Manticore by the wormhole nexus, once it is secure, they can use the wormhole to ship supplies and reinforcements from Manticore to the front and damaged ships back in a matter of hours rather than weeks, making logistics trivial. It also has the added bonus of removing a major avenue of attack the Havenites could use, allowing the Manticorans to reduce the resources they need to use manning the wormhole defenses.

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* While the actual fight takes place off-page, several books in the ''Literature/HonorHarrington'' series mention the importance of taking Trevor's Star because of it's its logistical importance. Because it's connected to Manticore by the wormhole nexus, once it is secure, they can use the wormhole to ship supplies and reinforcements from Manticore to the front and damaged ships back in a matter of hours rather than weeks, making logistics trivial. It also has the added bonus of removing a major avenue of attack the Havenites could use, allowing the Manticorans to reduce the resources they need to use manning the wormhole defenses.



* On ''Series/StargateSG1'' the humans spend a lot of time making fun of how hopeless the Jaffa are as soldiers, and how ineffective their equipment is compared to a good old P-90. What is never explored is the massive logistical advantage that the System Lords seem to have. Staff Weapons appear to have a power source that lasts for years compared to the few hundred rounds a human could reasonably carry for his weapon. On the medicinal front, human medicine seems to be more effective against massive trauma, but the Jaffa's Symbiotes render them immune to infection, minor wounds, and disease. Human special ops teams with quick gate access are way ahead of their Jaffa opponents in a quick fight, but the System Lords seem to have an immense logistical advantage, having eliminated the need to supply their troops with ammunition or medical supplies. This is adequately demonstrated whenever a system lord, or just about any foe, learns earth's location and move to attack, SG-1 had to pull more than a few Deus Ex Machinas to avoid earth getting gibbed, and it was shown in several multiverse episodes they were the only earth not about or in the process of being destroyed.

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* On ''Series/StargateSG1'' the humans spend a lot of time making fun of how hopeless the Jaffa are as soldiers, and how ineffective their equipment is compared to a good old P-90. What is never explored is the massive logistical advantage that the System Lords seem to have. Staff Weapons appear to have a power source that lasts for years compared to the few hundred rounds a human could reasonably carry for his weapon. On the medicinal front, human medicine seems to be more effective against massive trauma, but the Jaffa's Symbiotes render them immune to infection, minor wounds, and disease. Human special ops teams with quick gate access are way ahead of their Jaffa opponents in a quick fight, but the System Lords seem to have an immense logistical advantage, having eliminated the need to supply their troops with ammunition or medical supplies. This is adequately demonstrated whenever a system lord, or just about any foe, learns earth's location and move to attack, SG-1 had to pull more than a few Deus Ex Machinas to avoid earth Earth getting gibbed, and it was shown in several multiverse episodes they were the only earth Earth not about or in the process of being destroyed.



* While {{TabletopGame/Warhammer}} usually takes the efficacy of supply lines as a given, and focuses entirely on the drama of the actual combat engagement, there have been forays in the past into ways of representing supply lines and logistics should players be keen to do so. The most involved was undoubtedly the original Mighty Empires game - which could be played entirely on its own as a simulation of warring empires, but was designed with the notion in mind that when armies clash across the game map you play Warhammer battles to decide the outcome. In Mighty Empires each army piece had to maintain an unbroken, uncontested supply line of friendly tiles back to one of the player's home cities, or it began to lose troops rapidly and would eventually disappear. It also had to return to its home city during the winter season, just as real ancient and medieval armies were usually forced to do.

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* While {{TabletopGame/Warhammer}} usually takes the efficacy of supply lines as a given, and focuses entirely on the drama of the actual combat engagement, there have been forays in the past into ways of representing supply lines and logistics should players be keen to do so. The most involved was undoubtedly the original Mighty Empires game - -- which could be played entirely on its own as a simulation of warring empires, but was designed with the notion in mind that when armies clash across the game map you play Warhammer battles to decide the outcome. In Mighty Empires each army piece had to maintain an unbroken, uncontested supply line of friendly tiles back to one of the player's home cities, or it began to lose troops rapidly and would eventually disappear. It also had to return to its home city during the winter season, just as real ancient and medieval armies were usually forced to do.



** ''Imperial Armour Volume III - The Taros Campaign'', one of Forge World's published companion books, details the Imperial attempt to liberate the [[SingleBiomePlanet desert world]] Taros from the Tau Empire's annexation of it. The entire conflict was precipitated by logistics, the planet's xeno-collusion being revealed accidentally during an Administratum audit to see if it could increase mining output in anticipation of Abbadon's Thirteenth Black Crusade. An entire chapter is devoted to covering simply the planning it took, the choices made of force composition for the invasion, the kinds of supplies that would be needed, and the compromises that had to be made when balancing against other needs. The whole of the conflict's outcome hinged on logistics. The Tau knew they could not muster the kind of forces the Imperium could hit them with, and they knew that the Imperium's goal was to capture the planetary capital (the only major city on the world.) So they entrenched what supplies they could while the Imperium mustered, then focused on bleeding the Imperial advance's strength with hit-and-run attacks, forcing them to slow and commit their reserves to replace losses. As the Imperial advance inevitably gained ground, the Tau used nighttime Orca DropShip insertions of Stealthsuit and Pathfinder teams behind the Imperial line to harry their supply and reinforcement caravans. This forced the Imperium to change their immediate objective to divert to one of the few fresh water processing facilities on the planet to make up for losses in their own supplies. The fighting over it was fierce, and while the Imperium ultimately took the ground, the facility had sustained so much damage as to make it functionally useless for replenishment. Thought they had plenty of forces left, the Imperium was forced to abort the invasion shortly after that as their Guardsmen were dying of dehydration and their frontline vehicles could not get enough fuel or munitions.

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** ''Imperial Armour Volume III - III: The Taros Campaign'', one of Forge World's published companion books, details the Imperial attempt to liberate the [[SingleBiomePlanet desert world]] Taros from the Tau Empire's annexation of it. The entire conflict was precipitated by logistics, the planet's xeno-collusion being revealed accidentally during an Administratum audit to see if it could increase mining output in anticipation of Abbadon's Thirteenth Black Crusade. An entire chapter is devoted to covering simply the planning it took, the choices made of force composition for the invasion, the kinds of supplies that would be needed, and the compromises that had to be made when balancing against other needs. The whole of the conflict's outcome hinged on logistics. The Tau knew they could not muster the kind of forces the Imperium could hit them with, and they knew that the Imperium's goal was to capture the planetary capital (the only major city on the world.) So they entrenched what supplies they could while the Imperium mustered, then focused on bleeding the Imperial advance's strength with hit-and-run attacks, forcing them to slow and commit their reserves to replace losses. As the Imperial advance inevitably gained ground, the Tau used nighttime Orca DropShip insertions of Stealthsuit and Pathfinder teams behind the Imperial line to harry their supply and reinforcement caravans. This forced the Imperium to change their immediate objective to divert to one of the few fresh water processing facilities on the planet to make up for losses in their own supplies. The fighting over it was fierce, and while the Imperium ultimately took the ground, the facility had sustained so much damage as to make it functionally useless for replenishment. Thought they had plenty of forces left, the Imperium was forced to abort the invasion shortly after that as their Guardsmen were dying of dehydration and their frontline vehicles could not get enough fuel or munitions.



** The British were slightly-less hated than other armies because their army was considerably smaller (and thus less raid-y) than everyone else's, and they tended to hand out receipts for the stuff they looted. While they rarely actually paid out on these receipts, on the other hand there were times when they actually paid for the stuff they'd taken - something ''no-one else'' did (if only because the British banking system was so ridiculously advanced compared to everyone else's). During the Peninsular War, paying for supplies was one of the requirement imposed by the Duke of Wellington. He figured it helped prevent the civilians from murdering the soldiers. This allowed him to free up soldiers that would normally be protecting the supply lines. Wellington could see very clearly how important civilian attitudes were because the French Army was being torn apart by Spanish guerrilleros at the time. British funds not only kept the guerrilleros from attacking the British but also enabled them to hurt the French more.

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** The British were slightly-less slightly less hated than other armies because their army was considerably smaller (and thus less raid-y) than everyone else's, and they tended to hand out receipts for the stuff they looted. While they rarely actually paid out on these receipts, on the other hand there were times when they actually paid for the stuff they'd taken - -- something ''no-one else'' did (if only because the British banking system was so ridiculously advanced compared to everyone else's). During the Peninsular War, paying for supplies was one of the requirement imposed by the Duke of Wellington. He figured it helped prevent the civilians from murdering the soldiers. This allowed him to free up soldiers that would normally be protecting the supply lines. Wellington could see very clearly how important civilian attitudes were because the French Army was being torn apart by Spanish guerrilleros at the time. British funds not only kept the guerrilleros from attacking the British but also enabled them to hurt the French more.



### Their logistical capabilities could be unproblematically boosted by impressing 20k civilian, French, and [[BreadEggsBreadedEggs French civilian trucks]] into service for a total of 120k trucks (versus their 724k draft-horses). Their pre-existing truck fleet was already alarmingly heterogenous, but this move meant they were using more than 2000 different types of vehicle - with a million different and often mutually-incompatible spare parts for them. [[note]] Their truck loss-rate (''loss'' as in 'lost forever') per-month, when they weren't going anywhere or doing anything, was 2% of total strength versus a replacement-rate of 1% (the replacements also being unfit for cross-country performance or heavy loads). [[/note]]

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### Their logistical capabilities could be unproblematically boosted by impressing 20k civilian, French, and [[BreadEggsBreadedEggs French civilian trucks]] into service for a total of 120k trucks (versus their 724k draft-horses). Their pre-existing truck fleet was already alarmingly heterogenous, but this move meant they were using more than 2000 different types of vehicle - -- with a million different and often mutually-incompatible spare parts for them. [[note]] Their truck loss-rate (''loss'' as in 'lost forever') per-month, when they weren't going anywhere or doing anything, was 2% of total strength versus a replacement-rate of 1% (the replacements also being unfit for cross-country performance or heavy loads). [[/note]]



** In ''VideoGame/{{Civilization}} IV'', all units have infinite amounts of whatever, but the player is required to pay money to support the units after a certain point; when invading other civilizations, the units also incur a supply line cost. However, units are still supported even if a certain resource is gone - such as vehicles working indefinitely if the player loses control of all their oil resources. Planes are mainly based in cities, forts, and carriers; they go out and do their missions and immediately return to their base.

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** In ''VideoGame/{{Civilization}} IV'', all units have infinite amounts of whatever, but the player is required to pay money to support the units after a certain point; when invading other civilizations, the units also incur a supply line cost. However, units are still supported even if a certain resource is gone - -- such as vehicles working indefinitely if the player loses control of all their oil resources. Planes are mainly based in cities, forts, and carriers; they go out and do their missions and immediately return to their base.



** Played with. Your ships will spawn with a full load of ammo and fuel, but they will deplete them as they fight and fly around - though how fast depends on [[DesignItYourselfEquipment how many guns it has, subsystem modifiers, the size of the ammo/fuel caches, ship mass, engine size, etc]]. Ships (by default) will automatically fly to planets and designated "tenders" / "tankers" to reload their ammo and refuel, though [[ArtificialStupidity not always in a way that makes sense]]. However, the player will need to keep a constant stream of tender ships moving in and out to supply a fleet that lacks sufficient ammo/fuel storage capacity. In the ''Galactic Armory'' GameMod, fuel and ammunition are resources that must be built in planetary factories or via [[MobileFactory ship subsystems]], which are then exported into the Galactic Bank (your empire-wide resource pool). Good luck invading that enemy system if your ships are sputtering out of fuel and can't load their guns!

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** Played with. Your ships will spawn with a full load of ammo and fuel, but they will deplete them as they fight and fly around - -- though how fast depends on [[DesignItYourselfEquipment how many guns it has, subsystem modifiers, the size of the ammo/fuel caches, ship mass, engine size, etc]]. Ships (by default) will automatically fly to planets and designated "tenders" / "tankers" to reload their ammo and refuel, though [[ArtificialStupidity not always in a way that makes sense]]. However, the player will need to keep a constant stream of tender ships moving in and out to supply a fleet that lacks sufficient ammo/fuel storage capacity. In the ''Galactic Armory'' GameMod, fuel and ammunition are resources that must be built in planetary factories or via [[MobileFactory ship subsystems]], which are then exported into the Galactic Bank (your empire-wide resource pool). Good luck invading that enemy system if your ships are sputtering out of fuel and can't load their guns!



* Logistics in ''VideoGame/EveOnline'' is a major part of managing a successful corporation or alliance, especially in outlaw space. Raw materials need to be extracted and refined, starbases consume fuel and supplies, taxes and rents need to be paid, ammo is expended, capital ships need fuel for their jump drives and spare ships and other equipment need to be manually hauled to replace losses. While this [[TimeManagementGame keeps industrialists busy]], it also provides ample targets for enemies looking for something expensive to shoot, and disruption of supply lines is a viable tactic to undermine combat readiness. To be specific it's the players that mine, haul and produce everything, it's to the point where if you buy something from just another space station you have to go fetch it yourself. It's a bit odd considering the number of {{Mega Corp}}s in the fluff. However, one of the most successful and renowned player corporations in EVE is... [[http://red-frog.org a freight line.]]

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* Logistics in ''VideoGame/EveOnline'' is a major part of managing a successful corporation or alliance, especially in outlaw space. Raw materials need to be extracted and refined, starbases consume fuel and supplies, taxes and rents need to be paid, ammo is expended, capital ships need fuel for their jump drives and spare ships and other equipment need to be manually hauled to replace losses. While this [[TimeManagementGame keeps industrialists busy]], it also provides ample targets for enemies looking for something expensive to shoot, and disruption of supply lines is a viable tactic to undermine combat readiness. To be specific it's the players that mine, haul and produce everything, it's to the point where if you buy something from just another a space station you have to go fetch it yourself. It's a bit odd considering the number of {{Mega Corp}}s in the fluff. However, one of the most successful and renowned player corporations in EVE is... [[http://red-frog.org a freight line.]]



** Played straight with infantry weapons and averted with vehicle weapons. Infantry weapons can be restocked by a engineer throwing down an supply box roughly the size of a man's open hand or at any infantry based terminal. Vehicles on the other hand require either a landing pad (for aircraft) or a ammo tower (for land vehicles). Also a purchasable perk for a Sunderer allows you to restock/repair nearby vehicles, which plays this trope straight. This is given a justification with the ACE system, basically nano machines which are capable of constructing anything from tanks to bullets.

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** Played straight with infantry weapons and averted with vehicle weapons. Infantry weapons can be restocked by a an engineer throwing down an supply box roughly the size of a man's open hand or at any infantry based terminal. Vehicles on the other hand require either a landing pad (for aircraft) or a an ammo tower (for land vehicles). Also a purchasable perk for a Sunderer allows you to restock/repair nearby vehicles, which plays this trope straight. This is given a justification with the ACE system, basically nano machines which are capable of constructing anything from tanks to bullets.



** Slightly dealt with - more units ''do'' hurt your resource income. Though you still gain resources for ''capturing points'', for whatever probably-not-realistic reason, making it likely that this was put in to help players who were currently behind their opponent(s).

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** Slightly dealt with - -- more units ''do'' hurt your resource income. Though you still gain resources for ''capturing points'', for whatever probably-not-realistic reason, making it likely that this was put in to help players who were currently behind their opponent(s).



*** Fixed wing aircraft are handle a little more unusually. They must return to an Airbase structure once they have exhausted their munitions, or for repairs. However, damage has little effect on their airworthiness (until they reach CriticalExistenceFailure) and they can loiter in the air indefinitely - unless their Airbase is destroyed, at which point they apparently begin to consume fuel (which damages the plane, somehow) and will crash when it runs out.

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*** Fixed wing aircraft are handle a little more unusually. They must return to an Airbase structure once they have exhausted their munitions, or for repairs. However, damage has little effect on their airworthiness (until they reach CriticalExistenceFailure) and they can loiter in the air indefinitely - -- unless their Airbase is destroyed, at which point they apparently begin to consume fuel (which damages the plane, somehow) and will crash when it runs out.



* Averted to a minor degree in ''VideoGame/SupremeCommander''. Ground and naval units have unlimited ammunition and fuel, how they receive these supplies never being explained, but while aircraft still have infinite ammunition their primary fuel is finite. An aircraft which exhausts its fuel can still fly, but receives a massive speed penalty, being reduced to around 10% of their maximum speed. Their fuel regenerates extremely slowly when landed, though resupply structures will repair aircraft and refuel them at greater speed. These resupply structures can be built anywhere, however, and need no connection to the main base or a firebase in order to function at maximum efficiency.

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* Averted to a minor degree in ''VideoGame/SupremeCommander''. Ground and naval units have unlimited ammunition and fuel, how they receive these supplies never being explained, but while aircraft still have infinite ammunition their primary fuel is finite. An aircraft which exhausts its fuel can still fly, but receives a massive speed penalty, being reduced to around 10% of their its maximum speed. Their Its fuel regenerates extremely slowly when landed, though resupply structures will repair aircraft and refuel them at greater speed. These resupply structures can be built anywhere, however, and need no connection to the main base or a firebase in order to function at maximum efficiency.



** The human element is modeled with a whole another form of HitPoints: units have Manpower and Organization. The latter represents chains of command, communication lines, supply delivery - basically everything other than men and materiel. Warfare software. An unit with 0 organization is technically ''there'', but it's not going to do any good. Among the implications, pretty much everything has to be CastFromHitPoints, units regenerate when left alone, and researching such things as land combat doctrines or limited NCO initiative gives bonus health. We could go on to compare regional infrastructure to GeoEffects, but this has gotten silly.

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** The human element is modeled with a whole another form of HitPoints: units have Manpower and Organization. The latter represents chains of command, communication lines, supply delivery - -- basically everything other than men and materiel. Warfare software. An unit with 0 organization is technically ''there'', but it's not going to do any good. Among the implications, pretty much everything has to be CastFromHitPoints, units regenerate when left alone, and researching such things as land combat doctrines or limited NCO initiative gives bonus health. We could go on to compare regional infrastructure to GeoEffects, but this has gotten silly.



** Averted in the broad gameplay. Armies are what you bring with you, purchased through "requisition points" earned during missions. There are realistic limits on how much ammo each unit can carry - save for infantry (unlimited bullets but limited special weapons such as grenades) and, surprisingly, supply and repair vehicles, both of which have unlimited amounts of supply on Easy mode. Compensated for by that fact that supply vehicles are EXTREMELY vulnerable (being depicted in-game as picket-style flatbed trucks). Playing the game as either British or American forces makes you wonder how the Allies won the war - as there's never enough requisition to allow the Americans to utilize swarm tactics as they did in WWII - and the less said about the British "land fortress" concept, the better.

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** Averted in the broad gameplay. Armies are what you bring with you, purchased through "requisition points" earned during missions. There are realistic limits on how much ammo each unit can carry - -- save for infantry (unlimited bullets but limited special weapons such as grenades) and, surprisingly, supply and repair vehicles, both of which have unlimited amounts of supply on Easy mode. Compensated for by that fact that supply vehicles are EXTREMELY vulnerable (being depicted in-game as picket-style flatbed trucks). Playing the game as either British or American forces makes you wonder how the Allies won the war - -- as there's never enough requisition to allow the Americans to utilize swarm tactics as they did in WWII - -- and the less said about the British "land fortress" concept, the better.



** Played with, at least in the second game. While mechs can go on for miles without losing juice (since they're powered by [[AllThereInTheManual contained]], but [[GoingCritical volatile]] nuclear fusion reactors), their weapons are subject to ammo depletion and {{overheating}}. Replenishment of ammo and health requires the deployment of a Repair Truck. Suffice to say, the Repair Truck defies the repair unit stereotype hard. To repair and reload a mech, the mech in question must be immobilized and shut down first. And unlike [[BottomlessMagazines Bottomless Spare Parts]] repairers, each Repair Truck only carries a limited truckload of spare parts and ammo (called ''repair resources''), meaning that once the Repair Truck runs out of resources left to spend, you're not getting that Truck back. But what makes it Easy Logistics: the Repair Truck seemingly has [[UniversalAmmunition only one kind of repair resource]] -- whether it's a damaged limb that needs to be fixed or a gun that needs to be reloaded, it's all taken cared of by the same resource pool.

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** Played with, at least in the second game. While mechs can go on for miles without losing juice (since they're powered by [[AllThereInTheManual contained]], but [[GoingCritical volatile]] nuclear fusion reactors), their weapons are subject to ammo depletion and {{overheating}}. Replenishment of ammo and health requires the deployment of a Repair Truck. Suffice to say, the Repair Truck defies the repair unit stereotype hard. To repair and reload a mech, the mech in question must be immobilized and shut down first. And unlike [[BottomlessMagazines Bottomless Spare Parts]] repairers, each Repair Truck only carries a limited truckload of spare parts and ammo (called ''repair resources''), meaning that once the Repair Truck runs out of resources left to spend, you're not getting that Truck back. But what makes it Easy Logistics: the Repair Truck seemingly has [[UniversalAmmunition only one kind of repair resource]] -- whether it's a damaged limb that needs to be fixed or a gun that needs to be reloaded, it's all taken cared care of by the same resource pool.



* ''VideoGame/SteelBattalion'' mostly averted this - the mech had limited fuel and limited ammunition for almost all of the weapons (including machine guns) - it could be replenished by calling in a supply helicopter (which could get shot down if you weren't careful). Mind you, if I recall correctly, it seemed to have infinite chaff and windscreen wash supplies.

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* ''VideoGame/SteelBattalion'' mostly averted this - -- the mech had limited fuel and limited ammunition for almost all of the weapons (including machine guns) - -- it could be replenished by calling in a supply helicopter (which could get shot down if you weren't careful). Mind you, if I recall correctly, it seemed to have infinite chaff and windscreen wash supplies.



* The ''VideoGame/FreeSpace'' series averts this somewhat by the need to call a support ship to reload secondary weapons. The support ship can bring subsystems (such as communications and sensors) back to life but cannot repair your ship's hull. Depending on the weapons you have on board, they can take a bit of time to reload - bigger missiles and bombs, for example, take forever to load on your ship, leaving you highly vulnerable to enemy fire. Only one support ship can be present in the area at a given time, which means that if your wingmen run out of ammo the support ship will momentarily be unavailable for you to reload and repair. However, the ship itself can reload any number of missiles of any type on ship any number of times, despite the training instructor in both games telling you that the support ship can only carry a limited amount of ordinance. Then again, your support ship will probably blow up (with a big bang, with all those bombs on board!) after one or two reloads (or even in transit before it reloads anybody's ship), in which you'd need to call a another one in anyway. And in a more general subversion, there are several missions where you are defending supply ships or cutting enemy supply lines, providing at least a nod in the direction of logistics.

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* The ''VideoGame/FreeSpace'' series averts this somewhat by the need to call a support ship to reload secondary weapons. The support ship can bring subsystems (such as communications and sensors) back to life but cannot repair your ship's hull. Depending on the weapons you have on board, they can take a bit of time to reload - -- bigger missiles and bombs, for example, take forever to load on your ship, leaving you highly vulnerable to enemy fire. Only one support ship can be present in the area at a given time, which means that if your wingmen run out of ammo the support ship will momentarily be unavailable for you to reload and repair. However, the ship itself can reload any number of missiles of any type on ship any number of times, despite the training instructor in both games telling you that the support ship can only carry a limited amount of ordinance. Then again, your support ship will probably blow up (with a big bang, with all those bombs on board!) after one or two reloads (or even in transit before it reloads anybody's ship), in which you'd need to call a another one in anyway. And in a more general subversion, there are several missions where you are defending supply ships or cutting enemy supply lines, providing at least a nod in the direction of logistics.



* And of course, completely averted in ''VideoGame/DwarfFortress'': every single piece of equipment (weapons, ammo, armor, or even the clothes beneath), as well as food, water, ammo for the siege engines, maintenance of the traps, etc... has to be created / performed / hauled by a dwarf, as part of his or her daily routine. So creating a working army from scratch is a arduous process that can take years of ingame time, because you have to assign immigrants dwarves to the military, then mine the metal needed for the weapon, smelt it (which necessitate additional coal or charcoal), manufacture it into a weapon, and repeat the process for every single weapon, element of armor or ammo that each dwarf need to carry. Then you have to cook food and create waterskins for them, and create a place to store ammo and spare weapons. And finally, you have to train the dwarves, giving them spaces to train, plotting training rotation schedules, and by crafting or buying training weapons.

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* And of course, completely averted in ''VideoGame/DwarfFortress'': every single piece of equipment (weapons, ammo, armor, or and even the clothes beneath), clothes), as well as food, water, ammo for the siege engines, maintenance of the traps, etc... has to be created / performed / hauled created[=/=]performed[=/=]hauled by a dwarf, as part of his or her daily routine. So creating a working army from scratch is a an arduous process that can take years of ingame time, because you have to assign immigrants immigrant dwarves to the military, then mine the metal needed for the a weapon, smelt it (which necessitate necessitates additional coal or charcoal), manufacture it into a the weapon, and repeat the process for every single weapon, element of armor or ammo that each dwarf need needs to carry. Then you have to cook food and create waterskins for them, and create a place to store ammo and spare weapons. And finally, you have to train the dwarves, giving them spaces to train, plotting training rotation schedules, and by crafting or buying training weapons.weapons to train with.



** Things like deserts, hills and the dead of winter are represented in the game. During the winter, income is generally lower and armies are unable to march as far. Marching through difficult terrain cuts their movement even more severely. Note that hostile armies inside enemy territory do reduce that territory's income, as the enemy army is considered to be pillaging from the land (this is shown by having the ground around the unit slowly be burned down). Also, the further a territory is from your capital city, the lower it's maximum happiness is. Though this penalty is not affected by being isolated from the nations other territories by enemy provinces, there is a separate penalty to a town's max happiness if that province is surrounded by enemies... Although, your troops can pillage from farmland, frozen tundra or ''desert'', with equal ease.
** A recently captured city may very well rebel and chuck you and your troops out, on its own, If it isn't kept happy enough (sometimes rejoining it's previous owner, sometimes becoming an isolated rebel settlement).
** Many games have the problem of being able to recruit or retrain faction-specific units anywhere with basic facilities where it wouldn't make sense, (excepting the Romans who did (eventually) recruit most of their troops abroad, and the Shogun games that take place in a CivilWar). The ''Medieval II'' ExpansionPack ''Kingdoms'' fixes this two separate ways: In it's Teutonic, Americas and Crusades campaigns, many units require converting the conquered territory to your religion a certain amount, before you can recruit or retrain more than basic levies from it. In the Britannia campaign, after conquering a province of a different culture, [[EnemyExchangeProgram you can only recruit units of the nation you conquered it from]], until a governor converts the Provence to your culture enough to recruit or retrain your own. This realism has been integrated into various mods as well (requiring that you own Kingdoms to install them).

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** Things like deserts, hills and the dead of winter are represented in the game. During the winter, income is generally lower and armies are unable to march as far. Marching through difficult terrain cuts their movement even more severely. Note that hostile armies inside enemy territory do reduce that territory's income, as the enemy army is considered to be pillaging from the land (this is shown by having the ground around the unit slowly be burned down). Also, the further a territory is from your capital city, the lower it's its maximum happiness is. Though this penalty is not affected by being isolated from the nations other territories by enemy provinces, there is a separate penalty to a town's max happiness if that province is surrounded by enemies... Although, your troops can pillage from farmland, frozen tundra or ''desert'', with equal ease.
** A recently captured city may very well rebel and chuck you and your troops out, on its own, If it isn't kept happy enough (sometimes rejoining it's its previous owner, sometimes becoming an isolated rebel settlement).
** Many games have the problem of being able to recruit or retrain faction-specific units anywhere with basic facilities where it wouldn't make sense, (excepting the Romans who did (eventually) recruit most of their troops abroad, and the Shogun games that take place in a CivilWar). The ''Medieval II'' ExpansionPack ''Kingdoms'' fixes this two separate ways: In it's its Teutonic, Americas and Crusades campaigns, many units require converting the conquered territory to your religion a certain amount, before you can recruit or retrain more than basic levies from it. In the Britannia campaign, after conquering a province of a different culture, [[EnemyExchangeProgram you can only recruit units of the nation you conquered it from]], until a governor converts the Provence to your culture enough to recruit or retrain your own. This realism has been integrated into various mods as well (requiring that you own Kingdoms to install them).



** Actual supply lines are introduced in the dwarf add-on to Heroes V, in the form of caravans from creature dwellings. Rather than having to hire heroes to "do the rounds" of the various creature dwellings around the map (tedious micromanaging to say the least), you can now hire them directly from a town, at which point they'll spawn a caravan that'll move toward the city each turn. You can also hire one city's creatures from the next city over, resulting in the same thing. Raiding the enemy's caravans is a good strategy : better to face one week's worth of unled creatures today than a month's worth of mooks led by your enemy's best hero tomorrow. Caravans do exist in Heroes IV, but they are much less realistic and much more powerful. You only need a clear path between source and destination to set the caravan on its way. After that, it doesn't appear on the map so it can't be intercepted. These caravans also work between towns, so it's possible to quickly send heroes over to defend a town just before the enemy arrives.

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** Actual supply lines are introduced in the dwarf add-on to Heroes V, in the form of caravans from creature dwellings. Rather than having to hire heroes to "do the rounds" of the various creature dwellings around the map (tedious micromanaging to say the least), you can now hire them directly from a town, at which point they'll spawn a caravan that'll move toward the city each turn. You can also hire one city's creatures from the next city over, resulting in the same thing. Raiding the enemy's caravans is a good strategy : strategy: better to face one week's worth of unled creatures today than a month's worth of mooks led by your enemy's best hero tomorrow. Caravans do exist in Heroes IV, but they are much less realistic and much more powerful. You only need a clear path between source and destination to set the caravan on its way. After that, it doesn't appear on the map so it can't be intercepted. These caravans also work between towns, so it's possible to quickly send heroes over to defend a town just before the enemy arrives.



** The game is a partial aversion - the wanzers (mechs) have unlimited fuel and ammo for melee and short range weapons, but NOT for the long range missile ones. You can resupply from a special unit, but you have to be standing next to that unit, and resupply takes a turn.

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** The game is a partial aversion - -- the wanzers (mechs) have unlimited fuel and ammo for melee and short range weapons, but NOT for the long range long-range missile ones. You can resupply from a special unit, but you have to be standing next to that unit, and resupply takes a turn.



** ''VideoGame/JaggedAlliance 2'' gives you two automobiles (A Humvee and an ice cream truck) as well as the ability to rent a helicopter. You have to keep the ground vehicles fueled, which is tough as the Queen rations it. The helicopter you rent, so you don't have to worry directly about fuel, though he will say he has to head back to base to refuel if he hangs around an area too long.

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** ''VideoGame/JaggedAlliance 2'' gives you two automobiles (A (a Humvee and an ice cream truck) as well as the ability to rent a helicopter. You have to keep the ground vehicles fueled, which is tough as the Queen rations it. The helicopter you rent, so you don't have to worry directly about fuel, though he will say he has to head back to base to refuel if he hangs around an area too long.



** There are minor subversions when they must be made. Some craft - the Interceptor, for example - use "regular" fuel, do need to be refueled, but you never have to buy units of it nor do you run out of it. Laser-based weapons do not run out of ammo; presumably your soldiers plug 'em into the base walls after a mission. Also, you have an infinite amount of manufacturing material when it doesn't include the exotic substances that must be scavenged from the aliens -- it's all represented by money spent on production.

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** There are minor subversions when they must be made. Some craft - -- the Interceptor, for example - -- use "regular" fuel, do need to be refueled, but you never have to buy units of it nor do you run out of it. Laser-based weapons do not run out of ammo; presumably your soldiers plug 'em into the base walls after a mission. Also, you have an infinite amount of manufacturing material when it doesn't include the exotic substances that must be scavenged from the aliens -- it's all represented by money spent on production.
19th May '18 5:53:15 AM kbissett
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** On the historical side, it was mentioned that the only reason the Angarak army stopped besieging the Algarian Stronghold and moved on to Vo Mimbre in a previous war was because after six years of trying to breach the walls, they were running out of things to forage for food.
19th May '18 5:51:05 AM kbissett
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* A major part of the Soviet strategy in ''Literature/RedStormRising'' is using submarine attacks and aerial bombing to gut any supply convoys between North America and Europe, depriving the NATO troops in Germany of munitions. On the NATO side, a good part of the war is figuring out ways to stop said attacks so that the troops fighting the land war don't run out of ammunition. The war ultimately ends when NATO learns that Russia started the war so that they could secure extra sources of petroleum to replace a ruined well and refinery, and moves fuel convoys and depots to the top of the priority list for air raids in response.
9th May '18 12:08:45 PM EDP
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* In ''Literature/TheBigOne'' series, the ability to produce fuel, weapons, spare parts and everything and bring them to the frontline is shown as crucial to prosecute the war. ''Kazan Thunderbolts'' shows it perfectly when a German 1943 offensive steamrolls the recently arrived US troops but is paralyzed and forced to retreat due American bombers wiping out their supply lines, the supply depots said lines started from, and [[NoKillLikeOverkill generally every transportation hub in German-occupied Russia for good measure]].
13th Apr '18 8:40:50 AM AceOfScarabs
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* In ''Fanfic/DavionAndDavionDeceased'', this is heavily averted.
** John Davion takes great pains to ensure his own supply lines are well-protected and prepares emergency fallback production for his industries in off-the-map sites so the other Great Houses know nothing of his true production and supply capabilities.
** Operation Oxbow is a deep-striking military operation John plans so that he can cripple the ability of his longtime foes to keep their fleets maintained.
** The SLDF offensive suffers after [[spoiler:John secedes from the now-rotten Star League]] as [[spoiler:without his taxes and materiel support]], the SLDF loses more than a third of its funding and supply capability. On top of that, with one of their biggest supply depots cut off from SLDF lines in now-hostile territory, they find themselves even more short on ''everything'' and are ultimately forced to effectively [[spoiler:become pseudo-mercenaries under the employ of the other Great Houses]].
12th Apr '18 7:28:47 PM kbissett
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* While the actual fight takes place off-page, several books in the ''Literature/HonorHarrington'' series mention the importance of taking Trevor's Star because of it's logistical importance. Because it's connected to Manticore by the wormhole nexus, once it is secure, they can use the wormhole to ship supplies and reinforcements from Manticore to the front and damaged ships back in a matter of hours rather than weeks, making logistics trivial. It also has the added bonus of removing a major avenue of attack the Havenites could use, allowing the Manticorans to reduce the resources they need to use manning the wormhole defenses.
8th Apr '18 5:50:06 AM onyhow
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* One of the thing people has to remember is that, while many of examples here are that of great tactics being hampered by poor logistics, the [[InvertedTrope inverse]] can also happen: you can have excellent or best in the world supply, but your troops and junior leaders are so bad that those supplies doesn't help, or, worse, it'll help the enemies when they overrun you. This can be seen the best with the Iraqi in the UsefulNotes/IranIraqWar, or the Libyan in [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chadian%E2%80%93Libyan_conflict Chadian-Libyan conflict]], especially after 1986.
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