History Main / DomesticAbuse

7th Nov '17 5:25:19 PM ImperialMajestyXO
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* Example [[OlderThanSteam too venerable]] [[GrandfatherClause to stop soon]]: it seems unlikely that Mr. Punch will stop clubbing Judy.[[Theatre/PunchandJudy]]

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* Example [[OlderThanSteam too venerable]] [[GrandfatherClause to stop soon]]: it seems unlikely that [[Theatre/PunchAndJudy Mr. Punch will stop clubbing Judy.[[Theatre/PunchandJudy]]Judy]].
7th Nov '17 5:19:42 PM ImperialMajestyXO
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** The marriage of King Robert Baratheon and Cersei Lannister is a particularly hellish and complicated case. Robert overthrew the previous dynasty when its crown prince, Rhaegar, kidnapped (or perhaps secretly eloped with) his beloved fiancee Lyanna. Meanwhile, Cersei had her heart set on Rhaegar. Robert killed Rhaegar in battle and won the crown, but Lyanna died during the war. To ensure the loyalty of her powerful noble family, Robert married Cersei. As you might expect, the marriage of two strangers, one of whom is mourning his true love while the other is resentful of both the fact that her new husband killed her crush and that she had no say in the marriage doesn't go well. When the books start about 15 years into their marriage, they're both regularly cheating on the other, Cersei is a sociopath who verbally abuses Robert at every turn and threatens the lives of his bastard children, and BoisterousBruiser Robert doesn't know any way to respond to Cersei except by either drinking himself unconscious or hitting her. (Robert fully and regretfully admits afterward that being physically abusive isn't right, but honestly has no clue on other ways to deal with Cersei.) He also used to extort to his MaritalRapeLicense once in a while in the early days of their marriage when he was drunk and pretended that 'it was all wine and he doesn't remember it anyway' in the mornings after. (Cersei recalls, however, Robert acting somewhat smug the morning after and suspects he was satisfied he'd ensured his dominance over her and was aware what he was doing.) The happy marriage ends by Robert dying in a HuntingAccident that Cersei and a coconspirator helped along by [[AlcoholInducedStupidity getting Robert enormously drunk]] right before he tried [[FullBoarAction facing off with a wild boar]].

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** The marriage of King Robert Baratheon and Cersei Lannister is a particularly hellish and complicated case. Robert overthrew the previous dynasty when its crown prince, Rhaegar, kidnapped (or perhaps secretly eloped with) his beloved fiancee Lyanna. Meanwhile, Cersei had her heart set on Rhaegar. Robert killed Rhaegar in battle and won the crown, but Lyanna died during the war. To ensure the loyalty of her powerful noble family, Robert married Cersei. As you might expect, the marriage of two strangers, one of whom is mourning his true love while the other is resentful of both the fact that her new husband killed her crush and that she had no say in the marriage doesn't go well. When the books start about 15 years into their marriage, they're both regularly cheating on the other, Cersei is a sociopath who verbally abuses Robert at every turn and threatens the lives of his bastard children, and BoisterousBruiser Robert doesn't know any way to respond to Cersei except by either drinking himself unconscious or hitting her. (Robert fully and regretfully admits afterward that being physically abusive isn't right, but honestly has no clue on other ways to deal with Cersei.) He also used to extort to his MaritalRapeLicense once in a while in the early days of their marriage when he was drunk and pretended that 'it was all wine and he doesn't remember it anyway' in the mornings after. (Cersei recalls, however, Robert acting somewhat smug the morning after and suspects he was satisfied he'd ensured his dominance over her and was aware what he was doing.) The happy marriage ends by Robert dying in a HuntingAccident that Cersei and a coconspirator co-conspirator helped along by [[AlcoholInducedStupidity getting Robert enormously drunk]] right before he tried [[FullBoarAction facing off with a wild boar]].
29th Oct '17 6:40:40 PM DrFraud
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* There's a fairy tale about a fairy woman who marries a human man, and tells him that she will leave him if he beats her. The first time, he hits her when she laughs at a funeral. (She has her reasons, she knows the person is going to heaven, or somesuch thing) He pleads with her to not leave him, and she forgives him. The second time, she cries at the christening of a child ... and so on. After he did it three times, she's gone forever. Apparently, when that tale originated, it was so unusual to not tolerate domestic abuse, that only fairies could do it.

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* There's a fairy tale about a fairy woman who marries a human man, and tells him that she will leave him if he beats her. The first time, he hits her when she laughs at a funeral. (She has her reasons, she knows the person is going to heaven, or somesuch some such thing) He pleads with her to not leave him, and she forgives him. The second time, she cries at the christening of a child ... and so on. After he did it three times, she's gone forever. Apparently, when that tale originated, it was so unusual to not tolerate domestic abuse, that only fairies could do it.



* In "Wee Cooper of Fife," #277 of the ''Literature/ChildBallads'', the cooper responds to his wife's refusal to perform housework by putting a sheepskin over her back.
-->''Oh I'll no thrash your gentle kin\\
Nickety nackety noo noo noo\\
But I will thrash my ain sheepskin''



* In ''Theatre/{{Fiorello}}'' an exasperated Marie, fed up with the title character never noticing her as a romantic possibility, declares to a fellow employee that she'll marry "The Very Next Man" who comes along, whatever the circumstances.

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* In ''Theatre/{{Fiorello}}'' an exasperated Marie, fed up with the title character Fiorello never noticing her as a romantic possibility, declares to a fellow employee that she'll marry "The Very Next Man" who comes along, whatever the circumstances.
28th Oct '17 1:56:27 PM darkemyst
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* It's heavily implied in [[Literature/HarryPotterAndTheOrderOfThePhoenix Order of the Phoenix]] that Snape's father was at the very least verbally abusive and likely physically abusive as well to Snape's mother, and that this was a large contributing factor in his anti-Muggle attitudes.
16th Oct '17 12:24:32 AM dbdude01
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** When a battered wife was plotting to kill her abusive husband, Samaritan, in a PetTheDog moment, killed him first.
12th Oct '17 5:54:47 PM DarkPhoenix94
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* A less overt case than most in ''Fanfic/ChildOfTheStorm'' and its sequel, ''Ghosts of the Past'', in the form of Joe Danvers' psychological abuse of his children. It's intentionally depicted as insidious and very hard to pin down [[TruthInTelevision (as psychological abuse often is)]]. At first, when he's off-screen, it comes off as him and his daughter having standard parent/teenager squabbles, though there's hints of it being more. In the sequel, it becomes clear that he's been psychologically abusing his older two children because they don't follow his expectations - Carol is a sporty, HotBlooded teenage ActionGirl, while Stevie is a slight, [[TheQuietOne softly spoken]], arty boy. As his mother-in-law Alison notes, if they'd been the other way around, he'd have been delighted. As it is, he tries to force them to become what he thinks they should be - their polar opposites, essentially.

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* A less overt case than most in ''Fanfic/ChildOfTheStorm'' and its sequel, ''Ghosts of the Past'', in the form of [[AbusiveParents Joe Danvers' psychological abuse of his children. children.]] It's intentionally depicted as insidious and very hard to pin down [[TruthInTelevision (as psychological abuse often is)]]. At first, when he's off-screen, it comes off as him and his daughter having standard parent/teenager squabbles, though there's hints of it being more. In the sequel, it becomes clear that he's been psychologically abusing his older two children because they don't follow his expectations - Carol is a sporty, HotBlooded teenage ActionGirl, while Stevie is a slight, [[TheQuietOne softly spoken]], arty boy. As his mother-in-law Alison notes, if they'd been the other way around, he'd have been delighted. As it is, he tries to force them to become what he thinks they should be - their polar opposites, essentially.
12th Oct '17 5:54:22 PM DarkPhoenix94
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* A less overt case than most in ''Fanfic/ChildOfTheStorm'' and its sequel, ''Ghosts of the Past'', in the form of Joe Danvers' treatment of his children. It's intentionally depicted as insidious and very hard to pin down [[TruthInTelevision (as psychological abuse often is)]]. He never raises a hand to his children, and genuinely loves them, in a twisted way, genuinely thinking that he's doing what's best for them. At first, it comes off as him and his daughter having standard parent/teenager squabbles, though there's hints of it being more. When he appears in the sequel, it becomes clear that he's been psychologically abusing his older two children because they don't follow his expectations - his daughter, Carol, is a sporty, HotBlooded teenage ActionGirl, while Stevie is a slight, [[TheQuietOne softly spoken]], arty boy. As his mother-in-law Alison notes, if they'd been the other way around, he'd have been delighted. As it is, he tries to force them to become what he thinks they should be - their polar opposites, essentially.
** The way it is (lots of little incidents rather than something big and obvious) means that it only becomes really obvious in retrospect to both characters and readers. Carol's understated but rampant self-esteem issues, spiky attitude, reflexive reaction against authority (usually male), and latching onto [[ParentalSubstitute alternate father figures]], such as her uncle Jack O'Neill and [[spoiler: Steve, her great-grandfather]] are a direct product, for instance. As for Stevie, when Harry's invited round to dinner at the Danvers house in chapter 6 of ''Ghosts'', he asks about Stevie's drawing. Before Stevie can say anything, his little brother Joe Junior loudly says that "Drawing's for girls," whereupon his father laughs and ruffles his hair in approval. Stevie wilts and shuts his mouth. Alison also notes that under pressure, Carol got stubborn and had an [[FourStarBadass uncle,]] [[ActionGirl cousin,]] and [[LadyOfWar grandmother]] all on her exact mental wavelength, then fell in with Harry, who becomes her BestFriend and consistently expresses his support of her and sincere belief that she's amazing, plus the Avengers, who also support her, all of which shored up her self-esteem (as did [[spoiler: being chosen briefly as the Green Lantern and gifted an uru shield by Odin for her part in the Battle of London]]). Stevie had none of that. He didn't have Harry/the Avengers, and while those family members love him dearly and his mother (who he takes after) does her best, such as buying him art things (impressions of her as an ExtremeDoormat are much mistaken), he responded to the pressure by retreating into himself. [[WellDoneSonGuy He desperately wants his father's approval]], and the latter's constant subtle put-downs giving him what Alison terms as [[BreakTheCutie 'a psychological death by a thousand cuts'.]]
** Also chapter 6 of ''Ghosts'', it turns out that Mr Danvers' invited Harry to get the measure of his daughter's BestFriend and to ask him to use his PsychicPowers to change her, to [[MindRape 'make her take the right path'.]] Harry erupts with rage, gives him a ReasonYouSuckSpeech, then telepathically knocks him out, but only ends up giving only a limited account to Carol's mother (who thinks that they simply argued, Harry having been engaging in PassiveAggressiveKombat with him all evening - including very thoroughly shooting down the 'drawing is for girls' point by citing Steve, Tony, and Loki, and Mr Danvers' ideas of ladies not fighting). When Alison gets the full account from Carol in chapter 20, which she passes onto her daughter/Carol and Stevie's mother (who, she notes, would have kicked her husband out in a heartbeat if she'd known the full story earlier), they both agree that Mr Danvers has to go - Alison pulls strings and he's KickedUpstairs to a job out of state and [[NeverMessWithGranny she terrifies him]] into going along with it.

to:

* A less overt case than most in ''Fanfic/ChildOfTheStorm'' and its sequel, ''Ghosts of the Past'', in the form of Joe Danvers' treatment psychological abuse of his children. It's intentionally depicted as insidious and very hard to pin down [[TruthInTelevision (as psychological abuse often is)]]. He never raises a hand to his children, and genuinely loves them, in a twisted way, genuinely thinking that At first, when he's doing what's best for them. At first, off-screen, it comes off as him and his daughter having standard parent/teenager squabbles, though there's hints of it being more. When he appears in In the sequel, it becomes clear that he's been psychologically abusing his older two children because they don't follow his expectations - his daughter, Carol, Carol is a sporty, HotBlooded teenage ActionGirl, while Stevie is a slight, [[TheQuietOne softly spoken]], arty boy. As his mother-in-law Alison notes, if they'd been the other way around, he'd have been delighted. As it is, he tries to force them to become what he thinks they should be - their polar opposites, essentially.
** The way form it is (lots of little incidents rather than something big and obvious) takes means that it only becomes really obvious clear in retrospect retrospect, to both characters and readers. Carol's understated but rampant self-esteem issues, spiky attitude, reflexive reaction against authority (usually male), and latching onto [[ParentalSubstitute alternate father figures]], such as her uncle Jack O'Neill and [[spoiler: Steve, her great-grandfather]] are a direct product, for instance. As for Stevie, when one incident makes it clear: Harry's invited round to dinner at the Danvers house in chapter 6 of ''Ghosts'', he ''Ghosts''. He asks about Stevie's drawing. Before Stevie can say anything, his little brother Joe Junior loudly says that "Drawing's for girls," whereupon his father laughs and ruffles his hair in approval. Stevie wilts and shuts his mouth. Alison also notes that under pressure, Carol got stubborn and had an [[FourStarBadass uncle,]] [[ActionGirl cousin,]] and [[LadyOfWar grandmother]] all on her exact mental wavelength, then fell in with Harry, who becomes her BestFriend and consistently expresses his support of her and sincere belief that she's amazing, plus the Avengers, who also support her, all of which shored up her self-esteem (as did [[spoiler: being chosen briefly as the Green Lantern and gifted an uru shield by Odin for her part in the Battle of London]]). Stevie had none of that. He didn't have Harry/the Avengers, and while those family members love him dearly and While his mother (who he takes after) does her best, such as buying him art things (impressions of supplies and supporting him, as well as reprimanding her as an ExtremeDoormat are much mistaken), he responded to the pressure by retreating into himself. husband, [[WellDoneSonGuy He he desperately wants his father's approval]], and the latter's constant subtle put-downs giving him what Alison terms as [[BreakTheCutie 'a psychological death by a thousand cuts'.]]
** Also chapter 6 of ''Ghosts'', it turns out that Mr Danvers' invited Harry to get the measure of his daughter's BestFriend and to ask him to use his PsychicPowers to change her, to [[MindRape 'make her take the right path'.]] Harry erupts with rage, gives him a ReasonYouSuckSpeech, then telepathically knocks him out, but only ends up giving only a limited account to Carol's mother (who thinks that they simply argued, Harry having been engaging in PassiveAggressiveKombat with him all evening - including very thoroughly shooting down the 'drawing is for girls' point by citing Steve, Tony, and Loki, and Mr Danvers' ideas of ladies not fighting). evening). When Alison gets the full account from Carol in chapter 20, which she passes onto her daughter/Carol and Stevie's mother (who, she notes, would have kicked her husband out in a heartbeat if she'd known the full story earlier), Carol's mother, they both agree that Mr Danvers has to go - go: Alison pulls strings and he's KickedUpstairs to a job out of state and [[NeverMessWithGranny she terrifies him]] into going along with it.it, as well as staying away from his family.
12th Oct '17 5:42:23 PM DarkPhoenix94
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Added DiffLines:

* A less overt case than most in ''Fanfic/ChildOfTheStorm'' and its sequel, ''Ghosts of the Past'', in the form of Joe Danvers' treatment of his children. It's intentionally depicted as insidious and very hard to pin down [[TruthInTelevision (as psychological abuse often is)]]. He never raises a hand to his children, and genuinely loves them, in a twisted way, genuinely thinking that he's doing what's best for them. At first, it comes off as him and his daughter having standard parent/teenager squabbles, though there's hints of it being more. When he appears in the sequel, it becomes clear that he's been psychologically abusing his older two children because they don't follow his expectations - his daughter, Carol, is a sporty, HotBlooded teenage ActionGirl, while Stevie is a slight, [[TheQuietOne softly spoken]], arty boy. As his mother-in-law Alison notes, if they'd been the other way around, he'd have been delighted. As it is, he tries to force them to become what he thinks they should be - their polar opposites, essentially.
** The way it is (lots of little incidents rather than something big and obvious) means that it only becomes really obvious in retrospect to both characters and readers. Carol's understated but rampant self-esteem issues, spiky attitude, reflexive reaction against authority (usually male), and latching onto [[ParentalSubstitute alternate father figures]], such as her uncle Jack O'Neill and [[spoiler: Steve, her great-grandfather]] are a direct product, for instance. As for Stevie, when Harry's invited round to dinner at the Danvers house in chapter 6 of ''Ghosts'', he asks about Stevie's drawing. Before Stevie can say anything, his little brother Joe Junior loudly says that "Drawing's for girls," whereupon his father laughs and ruffles his hair in approval. Stevie wilts and shuts his mouth. Alison also notes that under pressure, Carol got stubborn and had an [[FourStarBadass uncle,]] [[ActionGirl cousin,]] and [[LadyOfWar grandmother]] all on her exact mental wavelength, then fell in with Harry, who becomes her BestFriend and consistently expresses his support of her and sincere belief that she's amazing, plus the Avengers, who also support her, all of which shored up her self-esteem (as did [[spoiler: being chosen briefly as the Green Lantern and gifted an uru shield by Odin for her part in the Battle of London]]). Stevie had none of that. He didn't have Harry/the Avengers, and while those family members love him dearly and his mother (who he takes after) does her best, such as buying him art things (impressions of her as an ExtremeDoormat are much mistaken), he responded to the pressure by retreating into himself. [[WellDoneSonGuy He desperately wants his father's approval]], and the latter's constant subtle put-downs giving him what Alison terms as [[BreakTheCutie 'a psychological death by a thousand cuts'.]]
** Also chapter 6 of ''Ghosts'', it turns out that Mr Danvers' invited Harry to get the measure of his daughter's BestFriend and to ask him to use his PsychicPowers to change her, to [[MindRape 'make her take the right path'.]] Harry erupts with rage, gives him a ReasonYouSuckSpeech, then telepathically knocks him out, but only ends up giving only a limited account to Carol's mother (who thinks that they simply argued, Harry having been engaging in PassiveAggressiveKombat with him all evening - including very thoroughly shooting down the 'drawing is for girls' point by citing Steve, Tony, and Loki, and Mr Danvers' ideas of ladies not fighting). When Alison gets the full account from Carol in chapter 20, which she passes onto her daughter/Carol and Stevie's mother (who, she notes, would have kicked her husband out in a heartbeat if she'd known the full story earlier), they both agree that Mr Danvers has to go - Alison pulls strings and he's KickedUpstairs to a job out of state and [[NeverMessWithGranny she terrifies him]] into going along with it.
9th Oct '17 11:15:51 AM lillolillo
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* In ''Franchise/{{Superman}}'' story ''Fanfic/SupermanOf2499TheGreatConfrontation'':
** First day in the job, [[Franchise/{{Superman}} Alan]] confronts a wife-beater.
** Later [[ComicBook/{{Supergirl}} Kath]] also saves another woman from her "partner".
** George Kent's wife openly and constantly disparages and treats her husband as a brainless moron until he becomes fed up with this treatment and leaves.



* Part 1 of ''Fanfic/CaveStoryVersusIMMeen'' basically ''revolves'' around this trope.

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* Part 1 of ''Fanfic/CaveStoryVersusIMMeen'' ''Cave Story Versus IM Meen'' basically ''revolves'' around this trope.
4th Oct '17 1:59:48 PM Dragon101
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* Light from ''Manga/DeathNote'' seems verbally abusive at times to Misa, his "girlfriend". Nothing suggests he does anything worse than yelling at her.

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* Light from ''Manga/DeathNote'' seems verbally abusive at times to Misa, his "girlfriend". Nothing suggests he does anything worse than yelling at her.her; though he does attempt to '''kill''' her at several points in the story on the grounds of YouHaveOutlivedYourUsefulness, she invariably ends up surviving anyway due to changing circumstances.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.DomesticAbuse