History Main / DavidVersusGoliath

26th Mar '18 11:47:40 AM KYCubbie
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*** The insanity continued at the regional site in Charlotte. In the Elite Eight, K-State took down the region's top remaining seed, traditional superpower Kentucky, and Loyola scored [[RunningGag another last-second win]] over Nevada. This resulted in the first 9-and-11 matchup ever in a regional final... which [[TheLastOfTheseIsNotLikeTheOthers Loyola won by double digits]]. Loyola's run not only made them the fourth 11-seed to get to the Final Four, but also turned their team chaplain, 98-year-old nun Sister Jean, into a national and even international media sensation.

to:

*** The insanity continued at the regional site in Charlotte.Atlanta. In the Elite Eight, K-State took down the region's top remaining seed, traditional superpower Kentucky, and Loyola scored [[RunningGag another last-second win]] over Nevada. This resulted in the first 9-and-11 matchup ever in a regional final... which [[TheLastOfTheseIsNotLikeTheOthers Loyola won by double digits]]. Loyola's run not only made them the fourth 11-seed to get to the Final Four, but also turned their team chaplain, 98-year-old nun Sister Jean, into a national and even international media sensation.
26th Mar '18 11:45:41 AM KYCubbie
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*** The 1986 LSU Tigers, the first 11-seed to reach the Final Four, still tied for the lowest seed to do so. It took them two overtime periods just to get past their first opponent, 6-seed Purdue, but they kept rolling after that, and unlike future 11-seeds, they went through the toughest possible path, facing the 3-seed, 2-seed, and 1-seed in the following three rounds (the two later ones would face a 7 and a 10, in chronological order, in the Sweet 16 rather than a 2).

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*** The 1986 LSU Tigers, the first 11-seed to reach the Final Four, still tied for the lowest seed to do so. It took them two overtime periods just to get past their first opponent, 6-seed Purdue, but they kept rolling after that, and unlike future 11-seeds, they went through the toughest possible path, facing the 3-seed, 2-seed, and 1-seed in the following three rounds (the two three later ones would face a 7 7, 10, and a 10, 7, in chronological order, in the Sweet 16 rather than a 2).2, and the most recent one played a 9 in the Elite Eight instead of a 1).



*** The 2011 Virginia Commonwealth Rams. Five years after George Mason's run (see above), the Rams, coming from the same conference,[[note]]At the time, Mason and VCU were members of the Colonial Athletic Association. VCU left for the Atlantic 10 Conference, considered by some to be a major basketball league, in 2012; Mason rejoined them a year later.[[/note]] were considered a controversial at-large pick, but due to the newly expanded field, they had to play in the "First Four", forcing them to win just to reach the Round of 64. They easily handled their fellow borderline at-large selection, then crushed their next two opponents, 6-seed Georgetown and 3-seed Purdue. They struggled with fellow low seed Florida State, a 10-seed, in the Sweet 16, but rebounded to beat top seed Kansas, 71-61, to reach the Final Four, whereupon they ran into...

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*** The 2011 Virginia VCU[[note]]Virginia Commonwealth University[[/note]] Rams. Five years after George Mason's run (see above), the Rams, coming from the same conference,[[note]]At the time, Mason and VCU were members of the Colonial Athletic Association. VCU left for the Atlantic 10 Conference, considered by some to be a major basketball league, in 2012; Mason rejoined them a year later.[[/note]] were considered a controversial at-large pick, but due to the newly expanded field, they had to play in the "First Four", forcing them to win just to reach the Round of 64. They easily handled their fellow borderline at-large selection, then crushed their next two opponents, 6-seed Georgetown and 3-seed Purdue. They struggled with fellow low seed Florida State, a 10-seed, in the Sweet 16, but rebounded to beat top seed Kansas, 71-61, to reach the Final Four, whereupon they ran into...


Added DiffLines:

*** The 2018 tournament was loaded with these... especially in the South Region, which we'll get to in a bit.
**** The other three regions had a few surprises, though they were ultimately won by two 1-seeds (Villanova in the Midwest and Kansas in the East) and a 3-seeded traditional power ([[UsefulNotes/UniversityOfMichigan Michigan]] in the West). In the Midwest, Syracuse made the field as a very controversial 11-seed (i.e., not a few commentators believed they shouldn't have been in the tournament) in the Midwest and got to the Sweet 16; Marshall scored a big upset over Wichita State in the East; and Michigan beat 9-seed Florida State in the regional final after the Seminoles had taken down 1-seed Xavier and 4-seed Gonzaga in the prior two rounds. Now, we'll get to the South...
**** In Thursday's first-round action, Loyola–Chicago took down Miami (the one in Florida) on a buzzer-beater in an 11-over-6 upset, and 13-seed Buffalo blasted 4-seed and trendy Final Four pick Arizona.
**** Friday's first-round action saw unquestionably the biggest upset in the history of the NCAA (men's) tournament. Ever since the tournament field expanded to 64 teams in 1985, no 16 seed had ever beaten a 1 seed.[[note]]It ''had'' happened in the women's tournament in 1998, though that was a fluke that involved a matchup between an underseeded Harvard team and a Stanford team that lost its two best players to knee injuries in the week before the tournament.[[/note]] Enter UMBC.[[note]]University of Maryland, Baltimore County[[/note]] The Retrievers faced top overall tournament seed Virginia... and didn't just beat them, but turned it into a CurbStompBattle, never trailing in the second half on their way to a 20-point win.
**** In the second round, Loyola used another last-second shot to beat 3-seed Tennessee, and Nevada[[note]]Nevada–Reno; there's also a Nevada–Las Vegas, but that school calls itself UNLV.[[/note]] took down 2-seed Cincinnati. [[RealityEnsues Reality ensued]] for UMBC, which lost a hard-fought game to 9-seed Kansas State. Still, all this made the 2018 South the first region in the history of the men's tournament in which none of the top four seeds made it to the Sweet 16.
**** The insanity continued at the regional site in Charlotte. In the Elite Eight, K-State took down the region's top remaining seed, traditional superpower Kentucky, and Loyola scored [[RunningGag another last-second win]] over Nevada. This resulted in the first 9-and-11 matchup ever in a regional final... which [[TheLastOfTheseIsNotLikeTheOthers Loyola won by double digits]]. Loyola's run not only made them the fourth 11-seed to get to the Final Four, but also turned their team chaplain, 98-year-old nun Sister Jean, into a national and even international media sensation.
7th Mar '18 3:56:17 PM nombretomado
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* The 2007-2008 season NFL SuperBowl match up between the undefeated New England Patriots and the struggling New York Giants. The New England Patriots looked unstoppable and was often called the greatest team in NFL history by many sports pundits. Meanwhile, the New York Giants had a season that started off so bad, their coach Tom Coughlin was close to being fired. But somehow the Giants made it to the playoffs with a late seed and made it to the Superbowl. They stunned the New England Patriots whom were the overwhelming favorites.

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* The 2007-2008 season NFL SuperBowl UsefulNotes/SuperBowl match up between the undefeated New England Patriots and the struggling New York Giants. The New England Patriots looked unstoppable and was often called the greatest team in NFL history by many sports pundits. Meanwhile, the New York Giants had a season that started off so bad, their coach Tom Coughlin was close to being fired. But somehow the Giants made it to the playoffs with a late seed and made it to the Superbowl. They stunned the New England Patriots whom were the overwhelming favorites.
25th Feb '18 2:19:36 PM VanHohenheimOfXerxes
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* The {{trope namer}}s is the aforementioned story in the [[Literature/TheBible Old Testament]] [[Literature/BooksOfSamuel Book of 1 Samuel]], where David kills the large and fearsome Goliath first by [[SufferTheSlings knocking him down with a rock launched from a sling]] and then [[OffWithHisHead cutting off the giant's head]] with [[{{BFS}} his own sword]]. Goliath, depending on translation, was either just under seven feet tall or just under ''nine feet tall'' and clad in nearly 150 pounds of bronze armor; David was in his late teens and completely unarmored. [[note]] From the biblical account, it has been argued that Goliath was suffering from complications of gigantism that affected his mobility and vision, making him slow to react and blind from some angles. The Bible account stresses that Goliath needed an attendant to place his shield and guide his steps. While this was not unknown in armies of the day - the shield referred to was a large slab of wood and hide that could not be carried and needed to be emplaced - circumstantial evidence strongly suggests Goliath suffered from aggravated gigantism, which would allow a smaller, nimbler, foe to attack from his blind sides.[[/note]][[note]]Claims about Goliath being disabled by gigantism, however, does require one to disregard the fact that Goliath was the ''champion'' and greatest fighter among the Philistine army, which would certainly imply great prowess and an ability to handle major combat; this was not a cripple with a glaring weakness, it was a hardened veteran who knew what he was doing.[[/note]] The application of this trope in the story has suffered somewhat from TechnologyMarchesOn; a [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sling_%28weapon%29 sling]] is ''not'' a slingshot, it [[LethalJokeItem hits like a bullet]]. What David did was essentially the same thing as [[CombatPragmatist pulling out a pistol]] and [[BoomHeadshot shooting Goliath in the face]]; compare the scene in ''Film/RaidersOfTheLostArk'' when Franchise/IndianaJones quickly grabs his revolver and disposes of the goon waving swords at him. It was also something of a cultural in-joke; Hebrew militia units frequently deployed slings in large numbers thanks to shepherds using them against predators.

to:

* The {{trope namer}}s is the aforementioned story in the [[Literature/TheBible Old Testament]] [[Literature/BooksOfSamuel Book of 1 Samuel]], where David kills the large and fearsome Goliath first by [[SufferTheSlings knocking him down with a rock launched from a sling]] and then [[OffWithHisHead cutting off the giant's head]] with [[{{BFS}} his own sword]]. Goliath, depending on translation, was either just under seven feet tall or just under ''nine feet tall'' and clad in nearly 150 pounds of bronze armor; David was in his late teens and completely unarmored. [[note]] From the biblical account, it has been argued that Goliath was suffering from complications of gigantism that affected his mobility and vision, making him slow to react and blind from some angles. The Bible account stresses that Goliath needed an attendant to place his shield and guide his steps. While this was not unknown in armies of the day - the shield referred to was a large slab of wood and hide that could not be carried and needed to be emplaced - circumstantial evidence strongly suggests Goliath suffered from aggravated gigantism, which would allow a smaller, nimbler, foe to attack from his blind sides.[[/note]][[note]]Claims about Goliath being disabled by gigantism, however, does require one to disregard the fact that Goliath was the ''champion'' and greatest fighter among the Philistine army, which would certainly imply great prowess and an ability to handle major combat; this was not a cripple with a glaring weakness, it was a hardened veteran who knew what he was doing.[[/note]] The application of this trope in the story has suffered somewhat from TechnologyMarchesOn; a [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sling_%28weapon%29 sling]] is ''not'' a slingshot, it [[LethalJokeItem hits like a bullet]]. What David did was essentially the same thing as [[CombatPragmatist pulling out a pistol]] and [[BoomHeadshot shooting Goliath in the face]]; compare the scene in ''Film/RaidersOfTheLostArk'' when Franchise/IndianaJones quickly immediately grabs his revolver and disposes of the goon waving swords at him. It was also something of a cultural in-joke; Hebrew militia units frequently deployed slings in large numbers thanks to shepherds using them against predators.
25th Feb '18 2:19:04 PM VanHohenheimOfXerxes
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* The {{trope namer}}s is the aforementioned story in the [[Literature/TheBible Old Testament]] [[Literature/BooksOfSamuel Book of 1 Samuel]], where David kills the large and fearsome Goliath first by [[SufferTheSlings knocking him down with a rock launched from a sling]] and then [[OffWithHisHead cutting off the giant's head]] with [[{{BFS}} his own sword]]. Goliath, depending on translation, was either just under seven feet tall or just under ''nine feet tall'' and clad in nearly 150 pounds of bronze armor; David was in his late teens and completely unarmored. [[note]] From the biblical account, it has been argued that Goliath was suffering from complications of gigantism that affected his mobility and vision, making him slow to react and blind from some angles. The Bible account stresses that Goliath needed an attendant to place his shield and guide his steps. While this was not unknown in armies of the day - the shield referred to was a large slab of wood and hide that could not be carried and needed to be emplaced - circumstantial evidence strongly suggests Goliath suffered from aggravated gigantism, which would allow a smaller, nimbler, foe to attack from his blind sides.[[/note]][[note]]Claims about Goliath being disabled by gigantism, however, does require one to disregard the fact that Goliath was the ''champion'' and greatest fighter among the Philistine army, which would certainly imply great prowess and an ability to handle major combat; this was not a cripple with a glaring weakness, it was a hardened veteran who knew what he was doing.[[/note]] The application of this trope in the story has suffered somewhat from TechnologyMarchesOn; a [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sling_%28weapon%29 sling]] is ''not'' a slingshot, it [[LethalJokeItem hits like a bullet]]. What David did was essentially the same thing as [[CombatPragmatist pulling out a pistol]] and [[BoomHeadshot shooting Goliath in the face]]; compare the scene in ''Film/RaidersOfTheLostArk'' when Franchise/IndianaJones {{quick draw}}s his revolver and immediately disposes of the goon waving swords at him. It was also something of a cultural in-joke; Hebrew militia units frequently deployed slings in large numbers thanks to shepherds using them against predators.

to:

* The {{trope namer}}s is the aforementioned story in the [[Literature/TheBible Old Testament]] [[Literature/BooksOfSamuel Book of 1 Samuel]], where David kills the large and fearsome Goliath first by [[SufferTheSlings knocking him down with a rock launched from a sling]] and then [[OffWithHisHead cutting off the giant's head]] with [[{{BFS}} his own sword]]. Goliath, depending on translation, was either just under seven feet tall or just under ''nine feet tall'' and clad in nearly 150 pounds of bronze armor; David was in his late teens and completely unarmored. [[note]] From the biblical account, it has been argued that Goliath was suffering from complications of gigantism that affected his mobility and vision, making him slow to react and blind from some angles. The Bible account stresses that Goliath needed an attendant to place his shield and guide his steps. While this was not unknown in armies of the day - the shield referred to was a large slab of wood and hide that could not be carried and needed to be emplaced - circumstantial evidence strongly suggests Goliath suffered from aggravated gigantism, which would allow a smaller, nimbler, foe to attack from his blind sides.[[/note]][[note]]Claims about Goliath being disabled by gigantism, however, does require one to disregard the fact that Goliath was the ''champion'' and greatest fighter among the Philistine army, which would certainly imply great prowess and an ability to handle major combat; this was not a cripple with a glaring weakness, it was a hardened veteran who knew what he was doing.[[/note]] The application of this trope in the story has suffered somewhat from TechnologyMarchesOn; a [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sling_%28weapon%29 sling]] is ''not'' a slingshot, it [[LethalJokeItem hits like a bullet]]. What David did was essentially the same thing as [[CombatPragmatist pulling out a pistol]] and [[BoomHeadshot shooting Goliath in the face]]; compare the scene in ''Film/RaidersOfTheLostArk'' when Franchise/IndianaJones {{quick draw}}s quickly grabs his revolver and immediately disposes of the goon waving swords at him. It was also something of a cultural in-joke; Hebrew militia units frequently deployed slings in large numbers thanks to shepherds using them against predators.
25th Feb '18 2:18:03 PM VanHohenheimOfXerxes
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* The {{trope namer}}s is the aforementioned story in the [[Literature/TheBible Old Testament]] [[Literature/BooksOfSamuel Book of 1 Samuel]], where David kills the large and fearsome Goliath first by [[SufferTheSlings knocking him down with a rock launched from a sling]] and then [[OffWithHisHead cutting off the giant's head]] with [[{{BFS}} his own sword]]. Goliath, depending on translation, was either just under seven feet tall or just under ''nine feet tall'' and clad in nearly 150 pounds of bronze armor; David was in his late teens and completely unarmored. [[note]] From the biblical account, it has been argued that Goliath was suffering from complications of gigantism that affected his mobility and vision, making him slow to react and blind from some angles. The Bible account stresses that Goliath needed an attendant to place his shield and guide his steps. While this was not unknown in armies of the day - the shield referred to was a large slab of wood and hide that could not be carried and needed to be emplaced - circumstantial evidence strongly suggests Goliath suffered from aggravated gigantism, which would allow a smaller, nimbler, foe to attack from his blind sides.[[/note]][[note]]Claims about Goliath being disabled by gigantism, however, does require one to disregard the fact that Goliath was the ''champion'' and greatest fighter among the Philistine army, which would certainly imply great prowess and an ability to handle major combat; this was not a cripple with a glaring weakness, it was a hardened veteran who knew what he was doing.[[/note]] The application of this trope in the story has suffered somewhat from TechnologyMarchesOn; a [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sling_%28weapon%29 sling]] is ''not'' a slingshot, it [[LethalJokeItem hits like a bullet]]. What David did was essentially the same thing as [[CombatPragmatist pulling out a pistol]] and [[BoomHeadshot shooting Goliath in the face]]; compare the scene in ''Film/RaidersOfTheLostArk'' when Franchise/IndianaJones goes for his gun and shoots the guy waving swords at him. It was also something of a cultural in-joke; Hebrew militia units frequently deployed slings in large numbers thanks to shepherds using them against predators.

to:

* The {{trope namer}}s is the aforementioned story in the [[Literature/TheBible Old Testament]] [[Literature/BooksOfSamuel Book of 1 Samuel]], where David kills the large and fearsome Goliath first by [[SufferTheSlings knocking him down with a rock launched from a sling]] and then [[OffWithHisHead cutting off the giant's head]] with [[{{BFS}} his own sword]]. Goliath, depending on translation, was either just under seven feet tall or just under ''nine feet tall'' and clad in nearly 150 pounds of bronze armor; David was in his late teens and completely unarmored. [[note]] From the biblical account, it has been argued that Goliath was suffering from complications of gigantism that affected his mobility and vision, making him slow to react and blind from some angles. The Bible account stresses that Goliath needed an attendant to place his shield and guide his steps. While this was not unknown in armies of the day - the shield referred to was a large slab of wood and hide that could not be carried and needed to be emplaced - circumstantial evidence strongly suggests Goliath suffered from aggravated gigantism, which would allow a smaller, nimbler, foe to attack from his blind sides.[[/note]][[note]]Claims about Goliath being disabled by gigantism, however, does require one to disregard the fact that Goliath was the ''champion'' and greatest fighter among the Philistine army, which would certainly imply great prowess and an ability to handle major combat; this was not a cripple with a glaring weakness, it was a hardened veteran who knew what he was doing.[[/note]] The application of this trope in the story has suffered somewhat from TechnologyMarchesOn; a [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sling_%28weapon%29 sling]] is ''not'' a slingshot, it [[LethalJokeItem hits like a bullet]]. What David did was essentially the same thing as [[CombatPragmatist pulling out a pistol]] and [[BoomHeadshot shooting Goliath in the face]]; compare the scene in ''Film/RaidersOfTheLostArk'' when Franchise/IndianaJones goes for {{quick draw}}s his gun revolver and shoots immediately disposes of the guy goon waving swords at him. It was also something of a cultural in-joke; Hebrew militia units frequently deployed slings in large numbers thanks to shepherds using them against predators.
25th Feb '18 2:15:06 PM VanHohenheimOfXerxes
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* The [[TropeNamers Trope Namer]] is the aforementioned story in the [[Literature/TheBible Old Testament]] [[Literature/BooksOfSamuel Book of 1 Samuel]], where David kills the large and fearsome Goliath first by [[SufferTheSlings knocking him down with a rock launched from a sling]] and then [[OffWithHisHead cutting off the giant's head]] with [[{{BFS}} his own sword]]. Goliath, depending on translation, was either just under seven feet tall or just under ''nine feet tall'' and clad in nearly 150 pounds of bronze armor; David was in his late teens and completely unarmored. [[note]] From the biblical account, it has been argued that Goliath was suffering from complications of giantism that affected his mobility and vision, making him slow to react and blind from some angles. The Bible account stresses that Goliath needed an attendant to place his shield and guide his steps. While this was not unknown in armies of the day - the shield referred to was a large slab of wood and hide that could not be carried and needed to be emplaced - circumstantial evidence strongly suggests Goliath suffered from aggravated giantism, which would allow a smaller, nimbler, foe to attack from his blind sides.[[/note]][[note]]Claims about Goliath being disabled by giantism, however, does require one to disregard the fact that Goliath was the ''champion'' and greatest fighter among the Philistine army, which would certainly imply great prowess and an ability to handle major combat; this was not a cripple with a glaring weakness, it was a hardened veteran who knew what he was doing.[[/note]] The application of this trope in the story has suffered somewhat from TechnologyMarchesOn; a [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sling_%28weapon%29 sling]] is ''not'' a slingshot, it [[LethalJokeItem hits like a bullet]]. What David did was essentially the same thing as [[CombatPragmatist pulling out a pistol]] and [[BoomHeadshot shooting Goliath in the face]]. It was also something of a cultural in-joke; Hebrew militia units frequently deployed slings in large numbers thanks to shepherds using them against predators.

to:

* The [[TropeNamers Trope Namer]] {{trope namer}}s is the aforementioned story in the [[Literature/TheBible Old Testament]] [[Literature/BooksOfSamuel Book of 1 Samuel]], where David kills the large and fearsome Goliath first by [[SufferTheSlings knocking him down with a rock launched from a sling]] and then [[OffWithHisHead cutting off the giant's head]] with [[{{BFS}} his own sword]]. Goliath, depending on translation, was either just under seven feet tall or just under ''nine feet tall'' and clad in nearly 150 pounds of bronze armor; David was in his late teens and completely unarmored. [[note]] From the biblical account, it has been argued that Goliath was suffering from complications of giantism gigantism that affected his mobility and vision, making him slow to react and blind from some angles. The Bible account stresses that Goliath needed an attendant to place his shield and guide his steps. While this was not unknown in armies of the day - the shield referred to was a large slab of wood and hide that could not be carried and needed to be emplaced - circumstantial evidence strongly suggests Goliath suffered from aggravated giantism, gigantism, which would allow a smaller, nimbler, foe to attack from his blind sides.[[/note]][[note]]Claims about Goliath being disabled by giantism, gigantism, however, does require one to disregard the fact that Goliath was the ''champion'' and greatest fighter among the Philistine army, which would certainly imply great prowess and an ability to handle major combat; this was not a cripple with a glaring weakness, it was a hardened veteran who knew what he was doing.[[/note]] The application of this trope in the story has suffered somewhat from TechnologyMarchesOn; a [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sling_%28weapon%29 sling]] is ''not'' a slingshot, it [[LethalJokeItem hits like a bullet]]. What David did was essentially the same thing as [[CombatPragmatist pulling out a pistol]] and [[BoomHeadshot shooting Goliath in the face]].face]]; compare the scene in ''Film/RaidersOfTheLostArk'' when Franchise/IndianaJones goes for his gun and shoots the guy waving swords at him. It was also something of a cultural in-joke; Hebrew militia units frequently deployed slings in large numbers thanks to shepherds using them against predators.
19th Feb '18 7:20:28 PM DarkPhoenix94
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** Notable examples include Luton Town, a team in the fifth level of English football (there are four professional divisions and further six amateur divisions), beating Premiership side Norwich to reach the Last 16 of the Cup. In general, it is not unheard of for a big club to be beaten or, at least, given an almighty fright by a side from somewhere they'd never even heard of until they were drawn against each other e.g. Havant and Waterlooville vs Liverpool. The latter were then the most successful team in English history, five times Champions of Europe and finalists in the Champions League the previous season, one of the biggest names in the history of the game and one of the 100 richest sports teams on the planet. The former were a side almost entirely composed of amateurs, who went on to take the lead twice. This sort of display is entirely typical of the FA Cup, except that the smaller club often wins.

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** Notable examples include Luton Town, a team in the fifth level of English football (there are four professional divisions and further six amateur divisions), beating Premiership side Norwich to reach the Last 16 of the Cup. In general, it is not unheard of for a big club to be beaten or, at least, given an almighty fright by a side from somewhere they'd never even heard of until they were drawn against each other e.g. Havant and Waterlooville vs Liverpool. Liverpool FC. The latter were then the most successful team in English history, five times Champions of Europe and finalists in the Champions League the previous season, one of the biggest names in the history of the game and one of the 100 richest sports teams franchises on the planet. The former were a side almost entirely composed of amateurs, who went on to take the lead twice. twice, before Liverpool finally woke up and turned on the style to win 5-2. This sort of display is entirely typical of the FA Cup, except that the smaller club often wins.wins - as recently as February 2018, League 1 Wigan Athletic knocked out Premier League runaway leaders Manchester City, who fielded a full strength side, and had only lost twice all season, once in the Champions League, and once narrowly to fellow Premier League giants Liverpool.
3rd Feb '18 4:30:36 PM nombretomado
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* You would have thought the story of impoverished orphan newsboys going on strike against newspaper tycoon Joseph Pulitzer was already an obvious David Versus Goliath story, but just so we didn't miss it, one of the main characters of {{Newsies}} is named "David", another character draws his attention to the coincidence ("As in David and Goliath?"), and then there's a further reference in one of the songs ("We'll slay the giant!").

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* You would have thought the story of impoverished orphan newsboys going on strike against newspaper tycoon Joseph Pulitzer was already an obvious David Versus Goliath story, but just so we didn't miss it, one of the main characters of {{Newsies}} ''Film/{{Newsies}}'' is named "David", another character draws his attention to the coincidence ("As in David and Goliath?"), and then there's a further reference in one of the songs ("We'll slay the giant!").
18th Jan '18 10:56:33 AM bitemytail
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* ''[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Miracle_on_Ice Do you believe in miracles?]]''
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