History Main / CriticalHit

26th Nov '16 7:52:23 AM DarkStorm
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** Many dungeon masters seem to have house rules that any roll of Natural 20 is an exceptional effect of some kind (even when the rulebooks explicitly say otherwise, like 3.5 skill checks).

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** Many dungeon masters seem to have house rules that any roll of Natural 20 for any sort of check is an exceptional effect of some kind (even when the rulebooks explicitly say otherwise, like 3.5 skill checks).
10th Nov '16 2:21:43 PM ashlay
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** Likewise, ''VideoGame/{{Persona 3}}'' and ''VideoGame/{{Persona 4}}'''s "One More" system give the character who landed the Critical Hit another free action. There are even spells (Rebellion and Revolution) that increased the probability of Critical Hits for everyone in the battlefield, which is useful against purely-magical foes who won't take advantage of them.
*** In ''Persona 3'', each character has a condition with four possible states: Great, Good, Tired, and Sick, determined by how much a character spent time in Tartarus in the past few nights, as well as random factors for non-protagonist characters. Characters in Great condition have a higher chance of nailing critical hits (it's not uncommon to nail two or even ''three'' criticals in a row), while characters in Tired or Sick condition will be more likely to get whacked with critical hits. The Distress status effect can also increase one's suspectability to a critical.

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** Likewise, ''VideoGame/{{Persona 3}}'' 3}}'', ''VideoGame/{{Persona 4}}'' and ''VideoGame/{{Persona 4}}'''s 5}}'''s "One More" system give the character who landed the Critical Hit another free action. There are even spells (Rebellion and Revolution) that increased the probability of Critical Hits for everyone in the battlefield, which is useful against purely-magical foes who won't take advantage of them.
*** In ''Persona 3'', each character has a condition with four possible states: Great, Good, Tired, and Sick, determined by how much a character spent time in Tartarus in the past few nights, as well as random factors for non-protagonist characters. Characters in Great condition have a higher chance of nailing critical hits (it's not uncommon to nail two or even ''three'' criticals in a row), while characters in Tired or Sick condition will be more likely to get whacked with critical hits. The Distress status effect can also increase one's suspectability susceptibility to a critical.


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** On top of the extra damage, ''Persona 5'''s critical attacks have characters perform an extended attack animation where the party member uses both their melee weapon and gun, or pops a creepy SlasherSmile if they used a Persona's physical skill instead.
21st Oct '16 12:01:30 AM Hylarn
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* In ''VideoGame/ColdFear'', [[SmashingSurvival breaking free from a monster's grip]] allows Tom to retaliate via [[ActionCommands Action Command]], provided you have ammo for the weapon he'll use (either the Pistol or Shotgun). The words "CRITICAL HIT" appear on the screen, and the monster is either killed instantly or takes massive damage.
[[spoiler:Notably, this is the ''only'' way to damage the FinalBoss.]]

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* In ''VideoGame/ColdFear'', [[SmashingSurvival breaking free from a monster's grip]] allows Tom to retaliate via [[ActionCommands Action Command]], provided you have ammo for the weapon he'll use (either the Pistol or Shotgun). The words "CRITICAL HIT" appear on the screen, and the monster is either killed instantly or takes massive damage. \n [[spoiler:Notably, this is the ''only'' way to damage the FinalBoss.]]
19th Oct '16 1:16:19 PM skyandbeyond49
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* In ''VideoGame/ShinMegamiTenseiIIINocturne'', scoring a Critical Hit will score the attacking party (the player's or the enemies) a free turn in the Turn Press System.

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* In ''VideoGame/ShinMegamiTenseiIIINocturne'', ''[[VideoGame/ShinMegamiTenseiIV IV]]'', and ''[[VideoGame/ShinMegamiTenseiIVApocalypse Apocalypse]]'', scoring a Critical Hit will score the attacking party (the player's or the enemies) a free turn in the Turn Press System.
9th Oct '16 10:42:04 AM DarkStorm
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** 5th Edition is a compromise between the last two: you roll the damage dice twice before adding modifiers (like 3rd Edition), but you only have to roll the 20 once (like 4th Edition).
** Many dungeon masters seem to have house rules that any roll of Natural 20 is an exceptional effect of some kind (even when the rulebooks explicitly say otherwise, like 3.5 skill checks).
23rd Sep '16 1:39:18 AM Gadjiltron
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** In fact, the way most games in the series treat Critical Hits is the main reason why LinearWarriorsQuadraticWizards becomes inverted. While magic can hit various elemental weaknesses to gain extra turns, eventually the player will run into bosses or enemies that lack any weaknesses. However, physical specialists - especially with passives that bypass most types of physical resistance, can still gain extra turns via landing critical hits.
13th Aug '16 3:28:25 AM Morgenthaler
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* ''{{Rolemaster}}'' had pages upon pages of critical hit tables. It was famous for them. Overcoming your opponent in a battle in Rolemaster isn't so much about draining their hit points but landing criticals. Each attack consists of an attack roll (adding your skill bonus for the weapon you're using and subtracting the enemy's defensive bonus), and if the weapon's attack table indicates that you get a critical hit you roll for the critical (the severity of which depends on whether your hit resulted in A, B, C, D or E criticals) and see how well you succeed in that critical, the results of which range anywhere from small wounds to smashed skulls, so the criticals play a... erm, ''[[IncrediblyLamePun critical]]'' role in resolving a combat.
* ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer}} Fantasy Roleplay'' has the "Ulric's Fury!" (shouting it out loud when you get one optional), caused by rolling a 10 on a damage d10 and succeeding at a weapon skill check that allows you to roll another d10 for damage. And if that one comes up a 10 too, you keep on rolling, stopping only after you roll something other than a 10. The rules also have a 'critical hit', which is a hit that takes place once your opponent is out of HP and actually gets a permanent injury (or death) from an attack.
** The 40K version, ''DarkHeresy'', has the same thing (only it's now called the "Righteous Fury!", and isn't nearly as fun to shout), and still has critical damage when the target is out of HP (it stacks: If the enemy has a critical 5 damage on the arm, hitting them for 2HP on the torso will bring them to critical 7). There're also actual critical hit tables, like ''Rolemaster'' but much more fun. You can see scans of them on [[TheWikiRule 1d4chan]].
** ''TabletopGame/BlackCrusade'' replaced Righteous Fury with Zealous Hatred, which instead of making the damage die explosive, makes you roll a d5 on the critical damage table, independently from any other critical damage (the numbers don't stack). This makes BC's critical hits crippling blows rather than "hurting more" blows.

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* ''{{Rolemaster}}'' ''TabletopGame/{{Rolemaster}}'' had pages upon pages of critical hit tables. It was famous for them. Overcoming your opponent in a battle in Rolemaster isn't so much about draining their hit points but landing criticals. Each attack consists of an attack roll (adding your skill bonus for the weapon you're using and subtracting the enemy's defensive bonus), and if the weapon's attack table indicates that you get a critical hit you roll for the critical (the severity of which depends on whether your hit resulted in A, B, C, D or E criticals) and see how well you succeed in that critical, the results of which range anywhere from small wounds to smashed skulls, so the criticals play a... erm, ''[[IncrediblyLamePun critical]]'' role in resolving a combat.
* ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer}} Fantasy Roleplay'' ''TabletopGame/WarhammerFantasyRoleplay'' has the "Ulric's Fury!" (shouting it out loud when you get one optional), caused by rolling a 10 on a damage d10 and succeeding at a weapon skill check that allows you to roll another d10 for damage. And if that one comes up a 10 too, you keep on rolling, stopping only after you roll something other than a 10. The rules also have a 'critical hit', which is a hit that takes place once your opponent is out of HP and actually gets a permanent injury (or death) from an attack.
** * The 40K version, ''DarkHeresy'', ''TabletopGame/DarkHeresy'', has the same thing (only it's now called the "Righteous Fury!", and isn't nearly as fun to shout), and still has critical damage when the target is out of HP (it stacks: If the enemy has a critical 5 damage on the arm, hitting them for 2HP on the torso will bring them to critical 7). There're also actual critical hit tables, like ''Rolemaster'' but much more fun. You can see scans of them on [[TheWikiRule 1d4chan]].
** * ''TabletopGame/BlackCrusade'' replaced Righteous Fury with Zealous Hatred, which instead of making the damage die explosive, makes you roll a d5 on the critical damage table, independently from any other critical damage (the numbers don't stack). This makes BC's critical hits crippling blows rather than "hurting more" blows.



** The ''SavageWorlds'' system has a similar mechanic, where rolling the highest number on a die lets you reroll it and add, and every multiple of four over the difficulty you are makes the result better.

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** The ''SavageWorlds'' ''TabletopGame/SavageWorlds'' system has a similar mechanic, where rolling the highest number on a die lets you reroll it and add, and every multiple of four over the difficulty you are makes the result better.



* In ''EclipsePhase'', a 00 (rolling two ten-sided dice) is always a critical success. Any successful rolls that are doubles are also critical successes. Conversely, doubles on a failed roll is a critical failure, and 99 is always a critical failure.

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* In ''EclipsePhase'', ''TabletopGame/EclipsePhase'', a 00 (rolling two ten-sided dice) is always a critical success. Any successful rolls that are doubles are also critical successes. Conversely, doubles on a failed roll is a critical failure, and 99 is always a critical failure.



* ''NewHorizon'' lists a one on the [[ColorCodedForYourConvenience black die]] as an instant success, to be measured by the level of the white die.
* ''MutantsAndMasterminds'' has some brilliant critical rules. The "Natural 20 = Critical rule" also works outside combat. In a normal skill check, you figure out the degree of success as normal and then add another degree on top of it.

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* ''NewHorizon'' ''TabletopGame/NewHorizon'' lists a one on the [[ColorCodedForYourConvenience black die]] as an instant success, to be measured by the level of the white die.
* ''MutantsAndMasterminds'' ''TabletopGame/MutantsAndMasterminds'' has some brilliant critical rules. The "Natural 20 = Critical rule" also works outside combat. In a normal skill check, you figure out the degree of success as normal and then add another degree on top of it.



* ''NinjaBurger'', a card game of ninjas who deliver fast food to insanely improbable locations, has a mechanic where you test skills to complete your delivery. Rolling a 3 or 4 on three six-sided dice means the ninja did something so awesome, they gain one Honor (the game's Victory Points) just for that. In a game which starts players with six Honor each and ends typically when the average Honor reaches ten or four, this is a considerable bonus. And Combat is a skill every ninja possesses.

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* ''NinjaBurger'', ''TabletopGame/NinjaBurger'', a card game of ninjas who deliver fast food to insanely improbable locations, has a mechanic where you test skills to complete your delivery. Rolling a 3 or 4 on three six-sided dice means the ninja did something so awesome, they gain one Honor (the game's Victory Points) just for that. In a game which starts players with six Honor each and ends typically when the average Honor reaches ten or four, this is a considerable bonus. And Combat is a skill every ninja possesses.
12th Jul '16 11:22:13 PM Koveras
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* The ''TabletopGame/NewWorldOfDarkness'' has two versions of this, both of which apply to all sorts of rolls, not just combat. Players roll a "dice pool" and every die that comes up with an 8 or over is a success; if a die rolls a 10, that die is re-rolled, and if it gets another 10, it's re-rolled again, and so on (with certain equipment, spells, and so forth, this rule can extend to 9s and 8s). Furthermore, if more than five successes are scored on any one roll, it's considered an exceptional success, which means that it accomplishes truly neat things.

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* The ''TabletopGame/NewWorldOfDarkness'' has two versions of this, both of which apply to all sorts of rolls, not just combat. Players roll a "dice "UsefulNotes/{{dice}} pool" and every die that comes up with an 8 or over is a success; if a die rolls a 10, that die is re-rolled, and if it gets another 10, it's re-rolled again, and so on (with certain equipment, spells, and so forth, this rule can extend to 9s and 8s). Furthermore, if more than five successes are scored on any one roll, it's considered an exceptional success, which means that it accomplishes truly neat things.
8th Jul '16 7:25:23 PM Doug86
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* ''Franchise/FireEmblem'' ''lives'' by this trope. The series even has special animations for each unit when they do this. And they do ''obscene'' amounts of damage, thrice as much as normal. And from the third installment onward, they [[AlwaysAccurateAttack can't miss]]. (Of course, this is because crit checks are made after hit checks; attacks have to be able to connect before critical hits are even considered.)

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* ''Franchise/FireEmblem'' ''VideoGame/FireEmblem'' ''lives'' by this trope. The series even has special animations for each unit when they do this. And they do ''obscene'' amounts of damage, thrice as much as normal. And from the third installment onward, they [[AlwaysAccurateAttack can't miss]]. (Of course, this is because crit checks are made after hit checks; attacks have to be able to connect before critical hits are even considered.)
9th Jun '16 7:53:25 AM MadCat221
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** The hit location table, a roll made upon a successful hit, has a "critical hit" on the extreme low-end of the roll as well. While a roll of 2 Sixes results in a head hit, a roll of 2 Ones results in a potential thru-armor critical hit. Depending on rules of the game, this applies to just the center torso, or the "floating crit" rule means re-roll and do a critical hit chance roll at the location garnered from the second hit location roll. This is because 2 Sixes has the same odds of occurring as 2 Ones, with the "least helpful" rolls (values of 7 plus or minus 2 or so) being the "center mass" torso hits, which usually have (or start off with) more armor than the rest. Scatter-shot weapons (cluster munitions, missile weapons) or large arrays of small weapons tend to increase the odds of getting such quasi-critical hits on the hit location table than more focused-damage weapons. Conventional center-torso-only rules increases the odds of an engine or gyro damage kill, while floating crits instead increase the odds of an ammo critical hit kill.
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