History Main / CriticalHit

9th Jun '16 7:53:25 AM MadCat221
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** The hit location table, a roll made upon a successful hit, has a "critical hit" on the extreme low-end of the roll as well. While a roll of 2 Sixes results in a head hit, a roll of 2 Ones results in a potential thru-armor critical hit. Depending on rules of the game, this applies to just the center torso, or the "floating crit" rule means re-roll and do a critical hit chance roll at the location garnered from the second hit location roll. This is because 2 Sixes has the same odds of occurring as 2 Ones, with the "least helpful" rolls (values of 7 plus or minus 2 or so) being the "center mass" torso hits, which usually have (or start off with) more armor than the rest. Scatter-shot weapons (cluster munitions, missile weapons) or large arrays of small weapons tend to increase the odds of getting such quasi-critical hits on the hit location table than more focused-damage weapons. Conventional center-torso-only rules increases the odds of an engine or gyro damage kill, while floating crits instead increase the odds of an ammo critical hit kill.
6th Jun '16 11:29:17 AM Doug86
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* Similarly, during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, the battleship ''Arizona'' took an armor piercing bomb to the magazine. Over a thousand crew died in the resulting explosion, which was caught on film and is used as StockFootage whenever [[ThisMeansWar America's entry]] into WorldWarII is mentioned. Warships' magazines tend to be very heavily armored and deep inside the ship, making it very unlikely for them to take a hit. But when they ''do'' take a hit...

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* Similarly, during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, the battleship ''Arizona'' took an armor piercing bomb to the magazine. Over a thousand crew died in the resulting explosion, which was caught on film and is used as StockFootage whenever [[ThisMeansWar America's entry]] into WorldWarII UsefulNotes/WorldWarII is mentioned. Warships' magazines tend to be very heavily armored and deep inside the ship, making it very unlikely for them to take a hit. But when they ''do'' take a hit...
28th May '16 11:43:16 AM Shishkahuben
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* ''VideoGame/{{Borderlands}}'' has attacks that hit [[AttackItsWeakpoint an enemy's weakpoint]] cause "Critical Hit" to appear in big red letters... {{for massive damage}}. Otherwise, it is not statistically based, though there are methods to increase the damage bonus of said critical hits.

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* ''VideoGame/{{Borderlands}}'' has attacks that hit [[AttackItsWeakpoint [[AchillesHeel an enemy's weakpoint]] cause "Critical Hit" to appear in big red letters... {{for massive damage}}.letters to indicate equally impressive damage. Otherwise, it is not statistically based, though there are methods to increase the damage bonus of said critical hits.
24th Apr '16 1:56:57 PM X2X
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*** ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBros'' from ''Brawl'' onward plays with this, giving [[VideoGame/FireEmblemAkaneia Marth the Final Smash "Critical Hit" which does a ridiculous amount of damage (60%) and is the most likely attack to KO an opponent in one hit, aside from an attack used by the SNKBoss. When it hits, they even show a ''Fire Emblem'' health counter going from full to zero.

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*** ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBros'' from ''Brawl'' onward plays with this, giving [[VideoGame/FireEmblemAkaneia Marth Marth]] the Final Smash "Critical Hit" which does a ridiculous amount of damage (60%) and is the most likely attack to KO an opponent in one hit, aside from an attack used by the SNKBoss. When it hits, they even show a ''Fire Emblem'' health counter going from full to zero.



** In some games every class has a Mastery Skill based on other stats than Luck that mimics this (note: these games still have critical hits based on the luck-stat, so you have TWO obscene luck based attacks), which will generally include beyond just increased damage regaining an equal count of health, eliminating the opponent's Defensive stats, paralyzing them (if they survive) or attacking multiple times. And the best mix of all this is Ike, AKA [[Memes/SuperSmashBros He Who Fights For His Friends]], in ''Path of Radiance'' and ''Radiant Dawn'': his Aether Skill does two consecutive strikes, one healing him equal to the damage and the other eliminating defensive stats. Due to his own stats, this is generally ten new kinds of overkill.

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** In some games every class has a Mastery Skill based on other stats than Luck that mimics this (note: these games still have critical hits based on the luck-stat, so you have TWO obscene luck based Luck-based attacks), which will generally include beyond just increased damage regaining an equal count of health, eliminating the opponent's Defensive stats, paralyzing them (if they survive) or attacking multiple times. And the best mix of all this is Ike, AKA [[Memes/SuperSmashBros He Who Fights For His Friends]], in ''Path of Radiance'' and ''Radiant Dawn'': his Aether Skill does two consecutive strikes, one healing him equal to the damage and the other eliminating defensive stats. Due to his own stats, this is generally ten new kinds of overkill.
26th Mar '16 2:23:35 PM MarqFJA
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* ''The VideoGame/SuperRobotWars'' series uses critical hits, they do either 1.2 or 1.5 times the damage depending on the game. There's also a spirit command in some of the games that makes every attack made by that unit a critical attack for one turn.

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* ''The VideoGame/SuperRobotWars'' The ''VideoGame/SuperRobotWars'' series uses critical hits, they do either 1.2 or 1.5 times the damage depending on the game. There's also a spirit command in some of the games that makes every attack made by that unit a critical attack for one turn.
22nd Mar '16 4:39:03 PM X2X
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*** ''Awakening'' and ''Fates'' in particular have an oddity in which Lethality doesn't necessarily guarantee a successful hit, only certain death ''if'' it connects. If the user's hit rate is too low, the attack can be dodged, and a [[NoSell Dual Guard]] [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TARHQkipbdY will prevent the deathblow from striking its target.]] However, ''Lethality itself'' has a chance of becoming a critical hit, which sounds superfluous, but is actually useful because criticals are unavoidable and can't be Dual Guarded against. Luck-dependent Skills like [[LastChanceHitPoint Miracle and Miraculous Save]] can also counter Lethality. (The same applies for Aegis and Pavise, but a unit will die regardless.)
22nd Mar '16 1:09:47 PM X2X
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* In the ''{{Growlanser}}'' series, characters can learn skills that increase critical rate and some techniques that are guaranteed to do extra damage.

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* In the ''{{Growlanser}}'' ''VideoGame/{{Growlanser}}'' series, characters can learn skills that increase critical rate and some techniques that are guaranteed to do extra damage.



** ''VideoGame/DragonQuestI'' has criticals ("A terrific blow!"), just to show how long this has been in console {{RPG}}s. It is very useful for when fighting a MetalSlime, because a Critical Hit works by ignoring the enemy defense. The usefulness of such an attack against a Metal Slime, with its insane defense but low hit points, is obvious. However, critical hits in this game could in fact still miss: "Excellent move! It is dodging!"
*** In this game, critical hits were basically the only way to kill the last boss (absent a heroic level grind), since they ignore defense and the Dragonlord has obscene amounts of defense, turning it into a LuckBasedMission for all but the grinding-est of level grinders. At level 30 he's a joke.

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** ''VideoGame/DragonQuestI'' has criticals ("A terrific blow!"), just to show how long this has been in console {{RPG}}s.[[RolePlayingGame RPGs]]. It is very useful for when fighting a MetalSlime, because a Critical Hit works by ignoring the enemy defense. The usefulness of such an attack against a Metal Slime, with its insane defense but low hit points, is obvious. However, critical hits in this game could in fact still miss: "Excellent move! It is dodging!"
*** In this game, critical hits were basically the only way to kill the last boss (absent a heroic level grind), since they ignore defense and the Dragonlord has obscene amounts of defense, turning it into a LuckBasedMission for all but the grinding-est of level grinders. At level Level 30 he's a joke.



** In addition, ever since the inclusion of "jobs" to the Dragon Quest series, there's always been a skill that allows a character to either land a critical hit or miss entirely every round.

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** In addition, ever since the inclusion of "jobs" to the Dragon Quest ''Dragon Quest'' series, there's always been a skill that allows a character to either land a critical hit or miss entirely every round.



** A couple of characters in the series can do EVEN MORE damage on a 'Trip and fall on the enemy' critical.
** At least in some of the later games, there are enemies that can get critical hits too, which the game refers to as "desperate attacks". Depending on how strong your party is, and the strength of the enemy, a desperate attack could leave you at death's door. Your best bet is to keep your party fully healed and try to disable any monsters that you know are capable of desperate attacks. ''VideoGame/DragonQuestMonsters: Joker'' features a skill, Critical Miss, which prevents the target from dealing critical hits.

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** A couple of characters in the series can do EVEN MORE damage on a 'Trip "Trip and fall on the enemy' enemy" critical.
** At least in some of the later games, there are enemies that can get critical hits too, which the game refers to as "desperate attacks". attacks." Depending on how strong your party is, and the strength of the enemy, a desperate attack could leave you at death's door. Your best bet is to keep your party fully healed and try to disable any monsters that you know are capable of desperate attacks. ''VideoGame/DragonQuestMonsters: Joker'' features a skill, Critical Miss, which prevents the target from dealing critical hits.



** Some items and skills have in their description that they can "cause a critical hit". It ''does not'' mean that their damage can be increased like in a normal critical hit, but rather that they have a chance to cause a OneHitKill.
* Any game based on ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' or d20 rulesets, such as the ''BaldursGate'' and ''KnightsOfTheOldRepublic'' series. ''Knights of the Old Republic'' includes one of the more compelex systems: generally, vibroblades, single lightsabers, and rifles can score a critical on a 19; everything else requires a 20. A few weapon upgrades make a weapon "keen", doubling the critical range, and the Sniper Shot and Critical Strike lines of feats also increase the odds of a critical. In [[VideoGame/KnightsOfTheOldRepublicIITheSithLords the sequel]], each weapon type has an keen upgrade, and disruptor weapons can score a critical on ''18''. A disruptor with an Accuracy Scope fired using Master Sniper Shot can score a critical on a ''6.''
* The ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}'' [[http://bulbapedia.bulbagarden.net/wiki/Damage_modification#Critical_hit games]].
** Besides 1.5x damage (or 2.25x with the ability Sniper), critical hits also ignore stat changes if applying them would result in less damage (except in Generation I, where they ignored them either way). Any given move that does non-fixed damage has a 1/16 chance, which can be increased by various things on a "level" system from level 1 (regular) to level 4 (100%). Such are the power of critical hits that many battles are won and lost because of them. Examples of ways to raise said chances:

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** Some items and skills have in their description that they can "cause a critical hit". hit." It ''does not'' mean that their damage can be increased like in a normal critical hit, but rather that they have a chance to cause a OneHitKill.
* Any game based on ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' or d20 rulesets, such as the ''BaldursGate'' ''VideoGame/BaldursGate'' and ''KnightsOfTheOldRepublic'' ''VideoGame/KnightsOfTheOldRepublic'' series. ''Knights of the Old Republic'' includes one of the more compelex complex systems: generally, vibroblades, single lightsabers, and rifles can score a critical on a 19; everything else requires a 20. A few weapon upgrades make a weapon "keen", doubling the critical range, and the Sniper Shot and Critical Strike lines of feats also increase the odds of a critical. In [[VideoGame/KnightsOfTheOldRepublicIITheSithLords the sequel]], each weapon type has an keen upgrade, and disruptor weapons can score a critical on ''18''. A disruptor with an Accuracy Scope fired using Master Sniper Shot can score a critical on a ''6.''
* The ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}'' [[http://bulbapedia.bulbagarden.net/wiki/Damage_modification#Critical_hit games]].
games:]]
** Besides 1.5x damage (or 2.25x with the ability Sniper), critical hits also ignore stat changes if applying them would result in less damage (except in Generation I, where they ignored them either way). Any given move that does non-fixed damage has a 1/16 chance, which can be increased by various things on a "level" system from level Level 1 (regular) to level Level 4 (100%). Such are the power of critical hits that many battles are won and lost because of them. Examples of ways to raise said chances:



** The above move-based examples apply to ''most'' Pokémon games, but Generation I (that is, Red/Blue/Yellow) works quite differently:

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** The above move-based examples apply to ''most'' Pokémon ''Pokémon'' games, but Generation I (that is, Red/Blue/Yellow) works quite differently:



*** Most bizarre, Focus Energy and Dire Hit are ''supposed'' to multiply the crit-ratio by four... but somebody in coding screwed up, so they ''[[UselessUsefulSpell divide]]'' it by four instead. Once you know this, it's fun to watch your opponent's Pokémon screw themselves over. (Stadium and all later games fixed the bug.)
** These are made especially useful in the ''VideoGame/PokemonRumble'' series, as any Pokemon who becomes a victim of one will be stunned temporarily and defeating them during this time guarantees that you'll obtain them as an ally.

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*** Most bizarre, Focus Energy and Dire Hit are ''supposed'' to multiply the crit-ratio by four... but somebody in coding screwed up, so they ''[[UselessUsefulSpell divide]]'' it by four instead. Once you know this, it's fun to watch your opponent's Pokémon screw themselves over. (Stadium (''[[VideoGame/PokemonStadium Stadium]]'' and all later games fixed the bug.)
** These are made especially useful in the ''VideoGame/PokemonRumble'' series, as any Pokemon Pokémon who becomes a victim of one will be stunned temporarily and defeating them during this time guarantees that you'll obtain them as an ally.



** ''VideoGame/{{MOTHER|1}}'' is the origin of ''SMASH'' attacks for the ''VideoGame/{{MOTHER}}'' series. These critical hits ignore defense, and will cause approximately your Offense stat worth in unblockable damage. Needless to say, these attacks usually work better for your ''enemies'', since you are typically much better armored than them and they get ''SMASH'' hits at around the same rate that you do. And there are a lot more of them than you.

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** ''VideoGame/{{MOTHER|1}}'' is the origin of ''SMASH'' attacks for the ''VideoGame/{{MOTHER}}'' series. These critical hits ignore defense, and will cause approximately your Offense stat worth in unblockable damage. Needless to say, these attacks usually work better for your ''enemies'', since you are typically much better armored than them and they get ''SMASH'' hits at around the same rate that you do. And there are a lot more of them than you.



* [[http://www.perfectworld.com Perfect World]] does this with a twist. Any character's critical hit rate starts out at 1% of the time. Adding points to the Dexterity stat increases, among other things, your critical hit rate at about 1% every 20 points. [[GlassCannon Archers]], who generally need huge amounts of Dexterity to function, get critical hits [[PvP annoyingly]] [[GameBreaker often]], and are not very fun to meet while PvP mode is on.

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* [[http://www.''[[http://www.perfectworld.com Perfect World]] World]]'' does this with a twist. Any character's critical hit rate starts out at 1% of the time. Adding points to the Dexterity stat increases, among other things, your critical hit rate at about 1% every 20 points. [[GlassCannon Archers]], who generally need huge amounts of Dexterity to function, get critical hits [[PvP [[PlayerVersusPlayer annoyingly]] [[GameBreaker often]], and are not very fun to meet while PvP [=PvP=] mode is on.



** For Fallout 3 and New Vegas, the critical hit chance is solely determined by the equipped weapon, the luck stat, and any relevant perks (of which Finesse is probably the only one). In addition, landing an attack while sneaking and undetected automatically results in a "Sneak Attack Critical, which does more damage than a regular critical. Combining high-powered weapons having (ordinarily) low crit chance with stealth can become a GameBreaker. Legate Lanius can be one-shotted with the right setup.

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** For Fallout 3 ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 3}}'' and ''[[VideoGame/FalloutNewVegas New Vegas, Vegas]]'', the critical hit chance is solely determined by the equipped weapon, the luck stat, and any relevant perks (of which Finesse is probably the only one). In addition, landing an attack while sneaking and undetected automatically results in a "Sneak Attack Critical, which does more damage than a regular critical. Combining high-powered weapons having (ordinarily) low crit chance with stealth can become a GameBreaker. Legate Lanius can be one-shotted one-shot with the right setup.



* ''VideoGame/GoldenSun'' plays this one straight. Early on characters acknowledge critical hits for the most part as a power that occurs in battle without the user trying but being "there when they need it".
** After a certain point in the game, most of the weapons found are magical (psynergical?) in nature, and have unique 'Unleash' abilities that activate randomly. Criticals and Unleashes are independent - you can miss your Unleash but still get a critical hit.
** In ''[[VideoGame/GoldenSunDarkDawn Dark Dawn]]'', there aren't any lucky attacks other than weapon unleashes, but many low-level weapons have an unleash named "critical hit".
* The ''Franchise/FinalFantasy'' games often play this one straight, although some have ActionCommands. Sometimes, there will be weapons that always score critical hits, at the expense of some MP per swing (as such, those weapons are great for units that don't have a lot of magical strength, but still have MP)

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* ''VideoGame/GoldenSun'' plays this one straight. Early on characters acknowledge critical hits for the most part as a power that occurs in battle without the user trying but being "there when they need it".
it."
** After a certain point in the game, most of the weapons found are magical (psynergical?) in nature, and have unique 'Unleash' "Unleash" abilities that activate randomly. Criticals and Unleashes are independent - -- you can miss your Unleash but still get a critical hit.
** In ''[[VideoGame/GoldenSunDarkDawn Dark Dawn]]'', there aren't any lucky attacks other than weapon unleashes, but many low-level weapons have an unleash Unleash named "critical hit".
hit."
* The ''Franchise/FinalFantasy'' games often play this one straight, although some have ActionCommands. Sometimes, there will be weapons that always score critical hits, at the expense of some MP per swing (as such, those weapons are great for units that don't have a lot of magical strength, but still have MP)MP).



** Some units also have special attacks that trigger randomly and may qualify as Critical Hits, but most of them aren't straight multipliers. One, such as the Dread Knight's death strike in [=III=], is straight double damage...meaning quad damage if they're also lucky. Dread Knights being a high-level unit, such can get vicious. It's a good thing that, as undead, they can't be affected by morale and be allowed to attack again the same turn...
* ''Franchise/FireEmblem'' ''lives'' by this trope. The series even has special animations for each unit when they do this. And they do ''obscene'' amounts of damage, thrice as much as normal. And from the third installment onward, they [[AlwaysAccurateAttack can't miss.]] (Of course, this is because crit checks are made after hit checks; attacks have to be able to connect before critical hits are even considered.)
** Except in ''The Genealogy Of The Holy War'' and ''Thracia 776''. In those games, criticals double the user's attack stat before damage calculation instead. This actually means that criticals in ''Genealogy'' and ''Thracia'' are ''more'' powerful, unless you totally outclass your enemy (in which case he's going down anyway). Oh, and one family gets a skill that grants automatic criticals if the character is below 50% health.
*** Thracia 776 had a hidden stat that affect criticals dubbed the ''Pursuit Critical Coefficient'' (PCC), which is basically a crit chance ''multiplier'' (between x1 and x5) that is set for that character and can never be altered outside hacking. Also unlike any other installment, Thracia 776 had a critical hit chance cap of 25% for the unit's initial attack; any following strikes do not have that cap and will also factor the unit's PCC into the random number algorithms. That Swordmaster of yours with a 30% crit rate and a PCC of 3? Basically, his first attack only have a 25% chance of being a critical, but any and all extra attacks made after the opponent's(or that unit's second round of combat if the enemy attacked first) will have a whopping ''90% chance of critting''. This is why characters like Mareeta, Carion, and Fergus seem to have that nasty habit of getting crits on any of their sequential attacks.
*** ''Super Smash Bros. Brawl'' plays with this, giving Marth the Final Smash "Critical Hit" which does a ridiculous amount of damage (60%) and is the most likely attack to KO an opponent in one hit, aside from an attack used by the {{SNK Boss}}. When it hits, they even show a ''Fire Emblem'' health counter going from full to zero.
** An offshoot of this is the Lethality/Silence skill that Assassins have, which is even less likely than a Critical Hit, which just kills the opponent regardless of how much more damage would be needed. The Assassin might only be able to do 1 natural damage per hit, but if they pull this out the enemy even at full health just drops.
** In some games every class has a mastery skill based on other stats than luck that mimics this (note: these games still have critical hits based on the luck-stat, so you have TWO obscene luck based attacks), which will generally include beyond just increased damage regaining an equal count of health, eliminating the opponent's Defensive stats, paralyzing them (if they survive) or attacking multiple times. And the best mix of all this is Ike, AKA [[Memes/VideoGames He Who Fights For His Friends]], in ''Path of Radiance'' and ''Radiant Dawn'', his Aether skill does two consecutive strikes, one healing him equal to the damage and the other eliminating defensive stats. Due to his own stats this is generally ten new kinds of overkill.

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** Some units also have special attacks that trigger randomly and may qualify as Critical Hits, but most of them aren't straight multipliers. One, such as the Dread Knight's death strike in [=III=], ''III'', is straight double damage...damage... meaning quad damage if they're also lucky. Dread Knights being a high-level unit, such can get vicious. It's a good thing that, as undead, they can't be affected by morale and be allowed to attack again the same turn...
* ''Franchise/FireEmblem'' ''lives'' by this trope. The series even has special animations for each unit when they do this. And they do ''obscene'' amounts of damage, thrice as much as normal. And from the third installment onward, they [[AlwaysAccurateAttack can't miss.]] miss]]. (Of course, this is because crit checks are made after hit checks; attacks have to be able to connect before critical hits are even considered.)
** Except in ''The ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemJugdral Genealogy Of The of the Holy War'' War]]'' and ''Thracia 776''.''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemJugdral Thracia 776]]''. In those games, criticals double the user's attack stat before damage calculation instead. This actually means that criticals in ''Genealogy'' and ''Thracia'' are ''more'' powerful, unless you totally outclass your enemy (in which case he's going down anyway). Oh, and one family gets a skill Skill that grants automatic criticals if the character is below 50% health.
*** Thracia 776 ''Thracia 776'' had a hidden stat that affect criticals dubbed the ''Pursuit "Pursuit Critical Coefficient'' Coefficient" (PCC), which is basically a crit chance ''multiplier'' (between x1 and x5) that is set for that character and can never be altered outside hacking. Also unlike any other installment, Thracia 776 ''Thracia 776'' had a critical hit chance cap of 25% for the unit's initial attack; any following strikes do not have that cap and will also factor the unit's PCC into the random number algorithms. That Swordmaster of yours with a 30% crit rate and a PCC of 3? Basically, his first attack only have a 25% chance of being a critical, but any and all extra attacks made after the opponent's(or opponent's (or that unit's second round of combat if the enemy attacked first) will have a whopping ''90% chance of critting''. This is why characters like Mareeta, Carion, and Fergus seem to have that nasty habit of getting crits on any of their sequential attacks.
*** ''Super Smash Bros. Brawl'' ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBros'' from ''Brawl'' onward plays with this, giving [[VideoGame/FireEmblemAkaneia Marth the Final Smash "Critical Hit" which does a ridiculous amount of damage (60%) and is the most likely attack to KO an opponent in one hit, aside from an attack used by the {{SNK Boss}}.SNKBoss. When it hits, they even show a ''Fire Emblem'' health counter going from full to zero.
** An offshoot of this is the Lethality/Silence Lethality/Silencer skill that Assassins have, have from ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemElibe Blazing Sword]]'' onward (with the exception of ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemFates Fates]]'', where it's associated with the similar Master Ninja class), which is even less likely than a Critical Hit, Hit (unit's critical rate/2 up until in ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemTellius Radiant Dawn]]'', where it is instead determined by the unit's Skill stat divided by 2 or 4 depending on the game), which just kills the opponent regardless of how much more damage would be needed. The Assassin might only be able to do 1 natural damage per hit, but if they pull this out out, the enemy even enemy--even at full health just drops.
health--just drops. As a counterbalance, the activation rate is halved against normal bosses in ''Blazing Sword'' and ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemTheSacredStones The Sacred Stones]]'', the final bosses of both games nullify its use, and ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemAwakening Awakening]]'' and ''Fates'' have rarely seen, enemy-exclusive Skills that prevent Lethality from triggering. The Tellius duology went a step further by making ''all'' bosses are outright immune to Lethality... [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JBC7t-6knhE unless your name is Volke, that is.]] The Iron Rune item in ''Blazing Sword'' and the functionally-identical Hoplon's Guard in ''The Sacred Stones'', which negate criticals, also guard against Lethality.
** In some games every class has a mastery skill Mastery Skill based on other stats than luck Luck that mimics this (note: these games still have critical hits based on the luck-stat, so you have TWO obscene luck based attacks), which will generally include beyond just increased damage regaining an equal count of health, eliminating the opponent's Defensive stats, paralyzing them (if they survive) or attacking multiple times. And the best mix of all this is Ike, AKA [[Memes/VideoGames [[Memes/SuperSmashBros He Who Fights For His Friends]], in ''Path of Radiance'' and ''Radiant Dawn'', Dawn'': his Aether skill Skill does two consecutive strikes, one healing him equal to the damage and the other eliminating defensive stats. Due to his own stats stats, this is generally ten new kinds of overkill.



*** The most lethal of them all is the Black Knight's mastery skill in ''Radiant Dawn'', Eclipse: it does ''quintuple'' damage and negates defense, so if he's wielding Alondite, he does a grand total of ''280'' damage. NO character in the series, player character, final boss, or otherwise, has more than ''120'' HP. Hell, roughly 90% of those characters won't even break ''45 HP'' normally.
** [[FragileSpeedster Swordmasters]] and Berserkers are [[AnAdventurerIsYou designed]] to score lots of criticals. With the right kind of weapons they can raise this ability even further.
*** Not to mention that most criticals ([[http://images1.wikia.nocookie.net/__cb20120101043343/fireemblem/images/9/93/Carlyle_swordmaster_sword_critical.gif Swordmasters especially]]) are [[RuleOfCool just plain awesome to watch.]]
** The FE series relies so much in this trope that [[http://fireemblem.wikia.com/wiki/Killer_weapons there is a whole branch of weapons]] built around it. As a con, they're fairly rare and expensive to buy. As a pro, when an unit wields one of them they increase said unit's critical attack rate ''anywhere from 20% to 30%''. If given to a character with high Luck... wow.
** In ''VideoGame/FireEmblemFates'', several personal skills revolve about critical hits. i.e, [[BlitheSpirit Crimson]]'s ''Victory Conviction'' raises her Critical Ratio a whooping ''+30 '' if she has less than 1/4 of health, and [[SoreLoser Luna's]] ''Competitive'' can grant her an unavoidable Critical hit in certain circumstances.
* FruitNinja gives random criticals.

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*** The most lethal of them all is the Black Knight's mastery skill Mastery Skill in ''Radiant Dawn'', Eclipse: it does ''quintuple'' damage and negates defense, so if he's wielding Alondite, he does a grand total of ''280'' damage. NO character in the series, player character, final boss, or otherwise, has more than ''120'' HP. Hell, roughly 90% of those characters won't even break ''45 HP'' normally.
** [[FragileSpeedster Swordmasters]] and Berserkers [[GlassCannon Berserkers]] are [[AnAdventurerIsYou designed]] [[CriticalHitClass to score lots of criticals. criticals]]. With the right kind of weapons weapons, they can raise this ability even further.
*** Not to mention that most criticals ([[http://images1.wikia.nocookie.net/__cb20120101043343/fireemblem/images/9/93/Carlyle_swordmaster_sword_critical.gif Swordmasters especially]]) are [[RuleOfCool just plain awesome to watch.]]
watch]].
** The FE ''FE'' series relies so much in this trope that [[http://fireemblem.wikia.com/wiki/Killer_weapons there is a whole branch of weapons]] built around it. As a con, they're fairly rare and expensive to buy. As a pro, when an unit wields one of them they increase said unit's critical attack rate ''anywhere from 20% to 30%''. If given to a character with high Luck... wow.
** In ''VideoGame/FireEmblemFates'', several personal skills Personal Skills revolve about around critical hits. i.e, For example, [[BlitheSpirit Crimson]]'s ''Victory Conviction'' Scarlet]]'s ''In Extremis'' raises her Critical Ratio a whooping ''+30 '' if she has less than 1/4 of health, and [[SoreLoser Luna's]] ''Competitive'' Selena]]'s ''Fierce Rival'' can grant her an unavoidable Critical critical hit in certain circumstances.
as a follow-up attack provided the unit she's supporting landed a crit themselves.
* FruitNinja ''VideoGame/FruitNinja'' gives random criticals.



** In the DS version, Robo has a weapon that works like a max level Ayla's, except that it has an attack power of zero, so its damage is well below average when it doesn't hit a critical. Crono gets an Infinity Plus ''Two'' Sword that has a '''''90% chance'''''. Finally, there's the Dragon's Tear, which raises critical ratio like the Hero's Badge, except it works for any character and any weapon. Can we say "Murder In a Can"?

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** In the DS version, Robo has a weapon that works like a max level Ayla's, except that it has an attack power of zero, so its damage is well below average when it doesn't hit a critical. Crono gets an Infinity Plus ''Two'' +'''2''' Sword that has a '''''90% chance'''''. Finally, there's the Dragon's Tear, which raises critical ratio like the Hero's Badge, except it works for any character and any weapon. Can we say "Murder In a Can"?



* The ''VideoGame/MarioAndLuigi'' games, confusingly, use the word "Critical" to denote a hit that is [[ElementalRockPaperScissors elementally effective]], but also have real critical hits as well, calling them "Lucky".
* In ''KnightsOfTheOldRepublic'' there is actually a feat the player can learn called "critical strike". In this scenario however, the feat may temporarily paralyse the enemy rather than do more damage.
** Since the KOTOR games are based off the [=DnD=] dice system, there is a critical hit range for each weapon. If the game rolls within a certain range on an attack, the damage is increased (Power Attack feats also make this increase larger). It is also possible to upgrade weapons with Massive Criticals - added damage upon critical hits. Abusing this system can make the game obscenely easy, since you're essentially able to make a One Hit Kill ''anything''.

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* The ''VideoGame/MarioAndLuigi'' games, confusingly, use the word "Critical" to denote a hit that is [[ElementalRockPaperScissors elementally effective]], but also have real critical hits as well, calling them "Lucky".
"Lucky."
* In ''KnightsOfTheOldRepublic'' ''VideoGame/KnightsOfTheOldRepublic'' there is actually a feat the player can learn called "critical strike". "Critical Strike." In this scenario however, the feat may temporarily paralyse the enemy rather than do more damage.
** Since the KOTOR ''KOTOR'' games are based off the [=DnD=] ''[=DnD=]'' dice system, system (see above), there is a critical hit range for each weapon. If the game rolls within a certain range on an attack, the damage is increased (Power Attack feats also make this increase larger). It is also possible to upgrade weapons with Massive Criticals - -- added damage upon critical hits. Abusing this system can make the game obscenely easy, since you're essentially able to make a One Hit One-Hit Kill ''anything''.



* The ''Manga/MagicKnightRayearth'' RPG for the SNES had two levels of critical - a "Crushing attack!" for 2x damage and a "Greatest attack!" for 3x. It was quite amusing when cannon fodder enemies pulled these off for a whopping 3HP damage.

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* The ''Manga/MagicKnightRayearth'' RPG for the SNES had two levels of critical - -- a "Crushing attack!" for 2x damage and a "Greatest attack!" for 3x. It was quite amusing when cannon fodder enemies pulled these off for a whopping 3HP damage.



** Melee weapons are also far more likely to get {{Critical Hit}}s. Depending on how much damage you've done in the last 20 seconds, ranged weapons have a crit rate between 2% and 12% (formerly 20%). Melee weapons ''started'' at 15% and max out at a whopping ''65%''. When you take into account that a single melee crit will give you 1/4 of that damage cap, you will hit the cap very, very quickly.
** A particularly devastating weapon when it comes to crits is the Soldier's rocket launcher, since its base damage is held in check by getting less extra damage from close-range use, while crits still do triple base damage at all ranges. The fan nickname for such an instance is "crocket", a portmanteau of "crit" and "rocket". Killing three players with one earns the Soldier an achievement. The only class that can withstand a direct hit from a crocket from a stock bazoooka (while not overhealed) is the Heavy, and surviving a crocket grants the player an achievement as well. Note that surviving a NON direct hit from a crocket is no easy task in itself.
** Much like ''Dungeons and Dragons'', buildings are completely immune to all critical hits and mini-crits.

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** Melee weapons are also far more likely to get {{Critical Hit}}s.Critical Hits. Depending on how much damage you've done in the last 20 seconds, ranged weapons have a crit rate between 2% and 12% (formerly 20%). Melee weapons ''started'' at 15% and max out at a whopping ''65%''. When you take into account that a single melee crit will give you 1/4 of that damage cap, you will hit the cap very, very quickly.
** A particularly devastating weapon when it comes to crits is the Soldier's rocket launcher, since its base damage is held in check by getting less extra damage from close-range use, while crits still do triple base damage at all ranges. The fan nickname for such an instance is "crocket", "crocket," a portmanteau of "crit" and "rocket". "rocket." Killing three players with one earns the Soldier an achievement. The only class that can withstand a direct hit from a crocket from a stock bazoooka (while not overhealed) is the Heavy, and surviving a crocket grants the player an achievement as well. Note that surviving a NON direct hit from a crocket is no easy task in itself.
** Much like ''Dungeons and & Dragons'', buildings are completely immune to all critical hits and mini-crits.



** A lot of weapons actually have conditional crits that can be activated in the right circumstances. Just to name a [[RuleofThree few]], the Axengiusher will deal a crit against any burning player, the Flying Guilitine will crit any stunned player, and the Jarate will cover the enemy with "Jar based Karate," causing the enemy to receive mini-crits instead of normal damage. The Reserve Shooter delivers a mini-crit against any player that is in the air, and the Market Gardener - a favorite among "troldiers" delivers critical damage if the player is currently rocket jumping.
** In Mann Vs. Machine, some of the robots are perpetually crit-boosted and any bomb carrier is once they hold the bomb for so long. To make up for this, one of cheapest upgrades you can get includes reducing the damage from crits. Humorously, at its highest level (three) the crit-boosting will significantly ''reduce'' damage[[note]]Depending on distance a crit for most weapons does between 2 and 6 times normal damage and max resistance reduces damage from crits by 90%, so most attacks will do between 20% and 60% of the damage they would normally do.[[/note]]

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** A lot of weapons actually have conditional crits that can be activated in the right circumstances. Just to name a [[RuleofThree [[RuleOfThree few]], the Axengiusher will deal a crit against any burning player, the Flying Guilitine will crit any stunned player, and the Jarate will cover the enemy with "Jar based Karate," causing the enemy to receive mini-crits instead of normal damage. The Reserve Shooter delivers a mini-crit against any player that is in the air, and the Market Gardener - a favorite among "troldiers" delivers critical damage if the player is currently rocket jumping.
** In Mann ''Mann Vs. Machine, Machine'', some of the robots are perpetually crit-boosted and any bomb carrier is once they hold the bomb for so long. To make up for this, one of cheapest upgrades you can get includes reducing the damage from crits. Humorously, at its highest level (three) the crit-boosting will significantly ''reduce'' damage[[note]]Depending on distance a crit for most weapons does between 2 and 6 times normal damage and max resistance reduces damage from crits by 90%, so most attacks will do between 20% and 60% of the damage they would normally do.[[/note]]



* The story-mode only hero Kenji of ''VideoGame/BattleRealms'' has the Battle Gear ''Critical Strike'' which does a great amount of damage at the cost of some stamina.
** Werewolves of the Wolf Clan also has a Wolf Bite Battle Gear, which acts as a critical strike, and can convert enemies into regular, tamable wolves.

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* The story-mode only Story Mode-only hero Kenji of ''VideoGame/BattleRealms'' has the Battle Gear ''Critical Strike'' which does a great amount of damage at the cost of some stamina.
** Werewolves of the Wolf Clan also has have a Wolf Bite Battle Gear, which acts as a critical strike, and can convert enemies into regular, tamable wolves.



* When Shingo Yabuki first showed up in ''VideoGame/TheKingOfFighters'', he was a JokeCharacter with one benefit - his attacks randomly dealt a lot more damage and knocked the enemy a far distance back. The game showed the words "Critical Hit" when this happened. By ''KOF XI'', Shingo had gained more power to balance him with the rest of the cast, so this ability went away.

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* When Shingo Yabuki first showed up in ''VideoGame/TheKingOfFighters'', he was a JokeCharacter with one benefit - -- his attacks randomly dealt a lot more damage and knocked the enemy a far distance back. The game showed the words "Critical Hit" when this happened. By ''KOF XI'', Shingo had gained more power to balance him with the rest of the cast, so this ability went away.



* VideoGame/SuperSmashBros also had one even before Marth got his aptly named Final Smash: Mr. Game&Watch has a move where he whacks the target while holding up a number ranging from 1 to 9. The damage and sideeffects vary, but the nine is a hard hitting attack that certainly qualifies as a Critical Hit.
** Also, while not necessarily determined by luck (just good spacing), some characters' attacks are more powerful at particular points in their attacks' hitboxes (areas of effect for attacks). For instance, Marth's attacks are most powerful at the very tip of his blade; one well-placed forward smash can kill opponents as early as 50% or so, depending on the attack's position on the stage. Another prominent one is [[LightningBruiser Captain Falcon's]] "[[FanNickname Knee of Justice]]", his forward-A aerial. These are called "sweet spots" by fans.

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* VideoGame/SuperSmashBros ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBros'' also had one even before Marth got his aptly named Final Smash: [[VideoGame/GameAndWatch Mr. Game&Watch Game & Watch]] has a move where he whacks the target while holding up a number ranging from 1 to 9. The damage and sideeffects side-effects vary, but the nine is a hard hitting hard-hitting attack that certainly qualifies as a Critical Hit.
** Also, while not necessarily determined by luck (just good spacing), some characters' attacks are more powerful at particular points in their attacks' hitboxes (areas of effect for attacks). For instance, Marth's attacks are most powerful at the very tip of his blade; one well-placed forward smash Smash can kill opponents as early as 50% or so, depending on the attack's position on the stage. Another prominent one is [[LightningBruiser Captain Falcon's]] "[[FanNickname Knee of Justice]]", his forward-A aerial. These are called "sweet spots" by fans.



* In ''FatalFrame'', you can snap weak photos of hostile ghosts at will. Letting the camera build up spiritual power yields stronger attacks, and waiting for the enemy to attack you first and ''then'' snapping them, mid-animation and at point-blank range, would yield the critical-hit Zero Shot.

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* In ''FatalFrame'', ''Franchise/FatalFrame'', you can snap weak photos of hostile ghosts at will. Letting the camera build up spiritual power yields stronger attacks, and waiting for the enemy to attack you first and ''then'' snapping them, mid-animation and at point-blank range, would yield the critical-hit Zero Shot.



** ''Diablo II'' has both Critical and Deadly strikes. They serve the same "you do double damage" purpose, but come from difference sources- Critical Strike bonuses come from skills, while Deadly Strike bonuses come from items. However, success on one cancels the other (so there's no 4x damage). You can also get a chance of Crushing Blow from an item, which directly takes off a large percentage of the target's HP; gaining high crushing blow chances and a fast attack is how the Paladin "smiter" and Assassin's Kicksin archetypes function (they tend be a bit of CripplingOverspecialization, only worthwhile on bosses/duels).

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** ''Diablo II'' ''VideoGame/DiabloII'' has both Critical and Deadly strikes. They serve the same "you do double damage" purpose, but come from difference sources- Critical Strike bonuses come from skills, while Deadly Strike bonuses come from items. However, success on one cancels the other (so there's no 4x damage). You can also get a chance of Crushing Blow from an item, which directly takes off a large percentage of the target's HP; gaining high crushing blow chances and a fast attack is how the Paladin "smiter" and Assassin's Kicksin archetypes function (they tend be a bit of CripplingOverspecialization, only worthwhile on bosses/duels).



* ''VideoGame/SuperMarioRPG'' features timed hits, which is a guaranteed critical hit as long as you press A again at the right time (usually upon the impact of the first hit) during an attack - when Mario's punch lands, when Mallow's cymbals come together, etc. Justified in most cases by adding an extra strike to the attack, making Mario punch more than once, for example.
** Note that these aren't ''actual'' critical hits - the game does feature traditional critical hits, which may or may not overlap with this.

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* ''VideoGame/SuperMarioRPG'' features timed hits, which is a guaranteed critical hit as long as you press A again at the right time (usually upon the impact of the first hit) during an attack - -- when Mario's punch lands, when Mallow's cymbals come together, etc. Justified in most cases by adding an extra strike to the attack, making Mario punch more than once, for example.
** Note that these aren't ''actual'' critical hits - -- the game does feature traditional critical hits, which may or may not overlap with this.



*** In ''VideoGame/{{Persona 3}}'', each characacter has a condition with four possible states: Great, Good, Tired, and Sick, determined by how much a character spent time in Tartarus in the past few nights, as well as random factors for non-protagonist characters. Characters in Great condition have a higher chance of nailing critical hits (it's not uncommon to nail two or even ''three'' criticals in a row), while characters in Tired or Sick condition will be more likely to get whacked with critical hits. The Distress status effect can also increase one's suspectability to a critical.
* ''VideoGame/{{Borderlands}}'' has attacks that hit [[AttackItsWeakpoint an enemy's weakpoint]] cause CriticalHit to appear in big red letters... for massive damage. Otherwise, it is not statistically based, though there are methods to increase the damage bonus of said {{CriticalHit}}s.

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*** In ''VideoGame/{{Persona 3}}'', ''Persona 3'', each characacter character has a condition with four possible states: Great, Good, Tired, and Sick, determined by how much a character spent time in Tartarus in the past few nights, as well as random factors for non-protagonist characters. Characters in Great condition have a higher chance of nailing critical hits (it's not uncommon to nail two or even ''three'' criticals in a row), while characters in Tired or Sick condition will be more likely to get whacked with critical hits. The Distress status effect can also increase one's suspectability to a critical.
* ''VideoGame/{{Borderlands}}'' has attacks that hit [[AttackItsWeakpoint an enemy's weakpoint]] cause CriticalHit "Critical Hit" to appear in big red letters... for {{for massive damage. damage}}. Otherwise, it is not statistically based, though there are methods to increase the damage bonus of said {{CriticalHit}}s.critical hits.



* ''VideoGame/{{Ys}}: The Ark of Napishtim'' and other 3D games in the series have [[LuckStat luck-based]] critical attacks(which the enemies can also do on [[HarderThanHard Nightmare difficulty]]), obtaining a certain item increases the frequency of these.

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* ''VideoGame/{{Ys}}: ''Franchise/{{Ys}}: The Ark of Napishtim'' and other 3D games in the series have [[LuckStat luck-based]] critical attacks(which the enemies can also do on [[HarderThanHard Nightmare difficulty]]), obtaining a certain item increases the frequency of these.



* The [[MassivelyMultiplayerOnlineRolePlayingGame MMORPG]] ''VideoGame/RagnarokOnline'' features critical hits, but it makes you work for them. Unlike some [[MassivelyMultiplayerOnlineRolePlayingGame MMOs]], you select your stat increases on levelup. The game features a pile of useful stats, and a single barely-worthwhile LUK (luck) stat. The sole things this stat covers are critical hit chances, and "perfect dodge" (normal dodging can be overwhelmed by numbers, but LUK dodging is set). The problem is that you have to pump large amounts of LUK every level to get any appreciable crit rating. Further, these are points that are NOT spent on bread-and-butter damage stats. The only ones who can really get any use out of it are Assassins, who can equip crit-chance-doubling katars. For everyone else it's a controversial and generally weak stat, and even for Assassins, auto-attack-reliant "Crit Builds" have fallen out of favor given the absurd burst damage that player skills have

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* The [[MassivelyMultiplayerOnlineRolePlayingGame MMORPG]] ''VideoGame/RagnarokOnline'' features critical hits, but it makes you work for them. Unlike some [[MassivelyMultiplayerOnlineRolePlayingGame MMOs]], [=MMOs=], you select your stat increases on levelup.upon leveling up. The game features a pile of useful stats, and a single barely-worthwhile LUK (luck) stat. The sole things this stat covers are critical hit chances, and "perfect dodge" (normal dodging can be overwhelmed by numbers, but LUK dodging is set). The problem is that you have to pump large amounts of LUK every level to get any appreciable crit rating. Further, these are points that are NOT spent on bread-and-butter damage stats. The only ones who can really get any use out of it are Assassins, who can equip crit-chance-doubling katars. For everyone else it's a controversial and generally weak stat, and even for Assassins, auto-attack-reliant "Crit Builds" have fallen out of favor given the absurd burst damage that player skills have



* Every ''Franchise/WildARMs'' game uses critical hits in some way or another, but the [[VideoGame/WildARMs4 fourth]] and [[VideoGame/WildARMs5 fifth]] games take it further with Finest Arts. These require a Punching Glove or [[InfinityPlusOneSword Sheriff]] [[GameBreaker Star]] badge to be equipped and do significantly more damage than a critical hit. In ''5'', they replaced critical hits all together, and were still buffed by the main character's ability "Double Critical".

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* Every ''Franchise/WildARMs'' game uses critical hits in some way or another, but the [[VideoGame/WildARMs4 fourth]] and [[VideoGame/WildARMs5 fifth]] games take it further with Finest Arts. These require a Punching Glove or [[InfinityPlusOneSword Sheriff]] [[GameBreaker Star]] badge to be equipped and do significantly more damage than a critical hit. In ''5'', they replaced critical hits all together, and were still buffed by the main character's ability "Double Critical".Critical."



* In ''ShiningForce'', there are three damage modifiers: the enemy evades the attack, the chance for a second attack, and the CriticalHit. Critical hits give off a special sound and are not evaded (otherwise how would you tell?). They also increase the damage from attacks, generally anywhere between 1.5 and 2.0 times the damage. As it's independent from the chance for a second attack, ''rare'' luck could result in 4 times the damage. As it is damage and ''not'' attack power, an attack that only inflicts ScratchDamage will still only inflict 1 HP of damage. This is a useful for the first game's LightningBruiser, Domingo, who attracts a lot of attacks due to being a magician.

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* In ''ShiningForce'', ''VideoGame/ShiningForce'', there are three damage modifiers: the enemy evades the attack, the chance for a second attack, and the CriticalHit. Critical hits give off a special sound and are not evaded (otherwise how would you tell?). They also increase the damage from attacks, generally anywhere between 1.5 and 2.0 times the damage. As it's independent from the chance for a second attack, ''rare'' luck could result in 4 times the damage. As it is damage and ''not'' attack power, an attack that only inflicts ScratchDamage will still only inflict 1 HP of damage. This is a useful for the first game's LightningBruiser, Domingo, who attracts a lot of attacks due to being a magician.



* Happens on occasion in ''VideoGame/Rockman4MinusInfinity''. Get the Super Star from any Shadow Man encounter by finishing him off with a Recycle Inhaler, and the chances of this increases. [[spoiler:His final appearance, unlocked by doing a NoDamageRun up through Wily 4, drops the ?Dagger, which makes ''every'' hit critical.]]

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* Happens on occasion in ''VideoGame/Rockman4MinusInfinity''. Get the Super Star from any [[VideoGame/MegaMan3 Shadow Man Man]] encounter by finishing him off with a Recycle Inhaler, and the chances of this increases. [[spoiler:His final appearance, unlocked by doing a NoDamageRun up through Wily 4, drops the ?Dagger, which makes ''every'' hit critical.]]



* In ''Videogame/YuGiOhMonsterCapsuleGB'', rolling a 10 or above means a critical hit, with 00 giving you the highest damage possible for one.

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* In ''Videogame/YuGiOhMonsterCapsuleGB'', ''VideoGame/YuGiOhMonsterCapsuleGB'', rolling a 10 or above means a critical hit, with 00 giving you the highest damage possible for one.



* In ''VideoGame/SilentStorm'' (as well as Hammer and Sickle, the officially sanctioned [=RPG=] mod) these can range from causing the character to bleed, go blind and/or deaf, all the way up to [[ChunkySalsaRule instant death]]. Some of the classes have perks that affect these, whether inflicted on or by the enemy. The Sniper has a very popular perk that always causes critical hits with ''all'' shots from ''any'' ranged weapon, up to and including [[MoreDakka machine guns fired on long burst]].

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* In ''VideoGame/SilentStorm'' (as well as Hammer and Sickle, the officially sanctioned [=RPG=] RPG mod) these can range from causing the character to bleed, go blind and/or deaf, all the way up to [[ChunkySalsaRule instant death]]. Some of the classes have perks that affect these, whether inflicted on or by the enemy. The Sniper has a very popular perk that always causes critical hits with ''all'' shots from ''any'' ranged weapon, up to and including [[MoreDakka machine guns fired on long burst]].



* In ''Videogame/{{Warframe}}'', every weapon has an innate critical hit chance per shot, ranging from 0% to 50%, along with a critical damage multiplier. Weapon modifications can increase the chance and multiplier, and certain Warframe abilities can increase it as well. A weapon with a crit chance over 100% can inflict "red" crits for massive damage when it rolls two crits on the same bullet. A separate statistic governs the status chance, which can inflict StandardStatusEffects such as bleeding or freezing. Several Warframes and weapons are [[CriticalHitClass built specifically for critical hits]].

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* In ''Videogame/{{Warframe}}'', ''VideoGame/{{Warframe}}'', every weapon has an innate critical hit chance per shot, ranging from 0% to 50%, along with a critical damage multiplier. Weapon modifications can increase the chance and multiplier, and certain Warframe abilities can increase it as well. A weapon with a crit chance over 100% can inflict "red" crits for massive damage when it rolls two crits on the same bullet. A separate statistic governs the status chance, which can inflict StandardStatusEffects such as bleeding or freezing. Several Warframes and weapons are [[CriticalHitClass built specifically for critical hits]].


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* The various Organization XIII members in ''VideoGame/KingdomHearts358DaysOver2''[='s=] Mission Mode not named [[JackOfAllStats Roxas or Xion (or Axel, to a slightly lesser extent)]] fall into various RPG-styled roles, owing to [[Franchise/KingdomHearts the series']] ties to ''Franchise/FinalFantasy''. Saïx's stats [[CriticalHitClass are geared towards scoring critical hits]], which is rather fitting considering [[TheBerserker his fighting style]].
18th Mar '16 11:08:30 PM MadCat221
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** Also, a 'Mech's head is generally its weakest spot. A big enough gun can amputate it in one shot regardless of the target's weight class because heads are "one size fits all" and rather thinly armored[[note]]It's not so much the "head" but the "cockpit canopy glass"[[/note]]. Such weapons that can reliably focus enough damage to take a mech head off in one shot are known as [[BoomHeadshot headchoppers]]. Even lesser, non-penetrating hits will hurt and potentially knock out (or sometimes even kill) the pilot. This doesn't quite fall under the BoomHeadshot trope because the game goes out of its way to make actually ''aiming'' at the head hard at the best of times and flat-out impossible at others -- but it can still come up as a random result on the hit location table.

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** Also, a 'Mech's head is generally its weakest spot. A big enough gun can amputate it in one shot regardless of the target's weight class because heads are "one size fits all" and rather thinly armored[[note]]It's not so much the "head" but the "cockpit canopy glass"[[/note]]. Such weapons that can reliably focus enough damage to take a mech head off in one shot are known as [[BoomHeadshot headchoppers]]. Even lesser, non-penetrating hits are nothing to scoff at: ''any'' head hit will hurt injure and potentially knock out (or sometimes even kill) the pilot.pilot, and blasts off some of the already scant armor on the head. This doesn't quite fall under the BoomHeadshot trope because the game goes out of its way to make actually ''aiming'' at the head hard at the best of times and flat-out impossible at others -- but it can still come up as a random result on the hit location table.
13th Mar '16 11:56:39 AM IndirectActiveTransport
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[[folder:Professional Wrestling]]
* One of Leva Bates's finishing moves is a front cracker she calls "[[NameOfPower critical confirmation]]", a concept she tried to explain in Ring Warriors to Sienna Duvall using ''Tabletopgame/DungeonsAndDragons''.[[/folder]]



* In his book ''Have a Nice Day: A Tale of Blood and Sweatsocks'', [[ProfessionalWrestling professional wrestler]] MickFoley talks about all his injuries. This is a guy who has been cut, burned, blown up, and had pieces of him removed with ropes. Yet he says the worst injury he ever had was a pinched nerve that caused so much pain it was hard to move.

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* In his book ''Have a Nice Day: A Tale of Blood and Sweatsocks'', [[ProfessionalWrestling professional wrestler]] MickFoley Wrestling/MickFoley talks about all his injuries. This is a guy who has been cut, burned, blown up, and had pieces of him removed with ropes. Yet he says the worst injury he ever had was a pinched nerve that caused so much pain it was hard to move.
1st Mar '16 1:40:06 PM SneaselSawashiro
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** Ralf also previous had this mechanic for his Ralf Kick move.

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** [[VideoGame/IkariWarriors Ralf Jones]] also previous previously had this mechanic for his Ralf Kick move.move, before it of course went away like with Shingo's case. Arguably though, his case was supposedly much more obscure (especially in later games).
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