History Main / ContinuityLockout

19th Feb '17 4:09:59 PM bt8257
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The writers have let the mythos they have generated get so [[ContinuitySnarl thick and convoluted]] that a newcomer has very little chance of understanding the significance of ''anything''. They are 'locked out' of understanding the story by all the continuity.

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The writers have let the mythos they have they've generated get so [[ContinuitySnarl thick and convoluted]] that a newcomer has very little chance of understanding the significance of ''anything''. They are 'locked out' of understanding the story by all the continuity.
17th Feb '17 3:57:37 PM alphamale2k14
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* {{UltimateMarvel}} was created starting with [[ComicBook/UltimateSpiderman]] in 2000 to avert this very trope offering a clean slate for new readers who otherwise couldn't be bothered to dig through decades of continuity in the regular universe to get the gist of certain characters and stories. Nonetheless however, the UltimateUniverse eventually fell victim to this trope despite a few efforts to relaunch it in its later years following the much reviled [[ComicBook/Ultimatum]] (which curiously was its own attempt to provide a clean slate for the Ultimate Universe). Namely why certain characters were dead and why [[the Reed Richards of this universe went crazy and became an outright villain known as "The Maker"]]
13th Feb '17 8:19:30 PM CommanderVisor
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* ''WesternAnimation/StarWarsTheCloneWars'' was often compromised of episode arcs rather than as a typical serial. For casual viewers, missing a new episode could lead to getting confused if they don't recover and instead choose to continue to the next episode without context. This actually ended up being a problem for the show's ratings over time in combination with the CerberusSyndrome (meaning it turned away younger viewers, who are the target audience since the show aired on Cartoon Network), which eventually led to the show's cancellation before the Disney buyout. This is why its sequel, ''WesternAnimation/StarWarsRebels'', tends to avoid arcs and seeks a balanced CerberusSyndrome that won't turn away the younger audience as time goes on.

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* ''WesternAnimation/StarWarsTheCloneWars'' was often compromised of episode arcs rather than as a typical serial. For casual viewers, missing a new episode could lead to getting confused if they don't recover and instead choose to continue to the next episode without context. This actually ended up being a problem for the show's ratings over time in combination with the CerberusSyndrome CerebusSyndrome (meaning it turned away younger viewers, who are the target audience since the show aired on Cartoon Network), which eventually led to the show's cancellation before the Disney buyout. This is why its sequel, ''WesternAnimation/StarWarsRebels'', tends to avoid arcs and seeks a balanced CerberusSyndrome CerebusSyndrome that won't turn away the younger audience as time goes on.
13th Feb '17 8:16:05 PM CommanderVisor
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Added DiffLines:

* ''WesternAnimation/StarWarsTheCloneWars'' was often compromised of episode arcs rather than as a typical serial. For casual viewers, missing a new episode could lead to getting confused if they don't recover and instead choose to continue to the next episode without context. This actually ended up being a problem for the show's ratings over time in combination with the CerberusSyndrome (meaning it turned away younger viewers, who are the target audience since the show aired on Cartoon Network), which eventually led to the show's cancellation before the Disney buyout. This is why its sequel, ''WesternAnimation/StarWarsRebels'', tends to avoid arcs and seeks a balanced CerberusSyndrome that won't turn away the younger audience as time goes on.
** You may still be locked out of ''Rebels'' however, especially if you've never watched ''The Clone Wars'' due to continuing off of characters and plots from that. Also, ''Rebels'' is also similar to its predecessor in that ''every'' episode counts towards [[ChekhovsGun something later on]], no matter how how small or big the impact is.
1st Feb '17 1:13:33 PM dmcreif
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* ''Series/AgentsOfSHIELD''. Although it's not mandatory to have seen all of the Franchise/MarvelCinematicUniverse movies, there's quite a bit in this series (Coulson's resurrection, the events of the episode "Turn, Turn, Turn", etc) that makes a lot more sense if you've seen the movies. Also, if you do plan on watching the movies, do that first, otherwise they'll be spoiled (especially ''Film/CaptainAmericaTheWinterSoldier'').
** This trope is why Whedon says the actual agents themselves have yet to appear in any of the films. He claimed that providing a satisfactory storyline featuring the Avengers learning that Coulson is still alive and running S.H.I.E.L.D. would essentially hijack the story and distract from the ''actual'' plot.


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**''Series/AgentsOfSHIELD''. Although it's not mandatory to have seen all of the Franchise/MarvelCinematicUniverse movies, there's quite a bit in this series (Coulson's resurrection, the events of the episode "Turn, Turn, Turn", etc) that makes a lot more sense if you've seen the movies. Also, if you do plan on watching the movies, do that first, otherwise they'll be spoiled (especially ''Film/CaptainAmericaTheWinterSoldier'').
***This trope is why Whedon says the actual agents themselves have yet to appear in any of the films. He claimed that providing a satisfactory storyline featuring the Avengers learning that Coulson is still alive and running S.H.I.E.L.D. would essentially hijack the story and distract from the ''actual'' plot.
** Likewise, the Netflix shows are independent of the movies, but it's important to consider that the events of ''Film/TheAvengers2012'' are responsible for a number of things happening in them (like Wilson Fisk profiting off the reconstruction contracts in ''Series/Daredevil2015'', or an "Incident" survivor in ''Series/JessicaJones2015'' becoming a fantastic racist who tries to kill Jessica just because she's gifted).
1st Feb '17 1:09:49 PM dmcreif
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* MarvelCinematicUniverse:
**''Series/Daredevil2015'' season 2 requires watching season 1 as a prerequisite.
**The first season of ''Series/LukeCage2016'' essentially requires watching season 1 of ''Series/JessicaJones2015'' as that show introduced Luke and many plot points that are of relevance in Luke's own show (such as Reva's death and his past). To a lesser extent, the first two seasons of ''Series/Daredevil2015'' are also a prerequisite, if one is to make sense of Blake Tower's appearance during Diamondback's hostage situation or a number of references to Wilson Fisk's downfall.
1st Feb '17 1:05:10 PM dmcreif
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** This is the general explanation for why none of the characters from the present day TV shows (''Series/AgentsOfSHIELD'', ''Series/{{Daredevil}}'', ''Series/JessicaJones'' and ''Series/LukeCage'') appear in the movies, even the ones involving {{Crisis Crossover}}s. The movies generally have a wider audience than the TV shows (and are released in certain countries where the shows don't even air), and the creators don't want to have to spend time explaining who the hell these people are for the benefit of audience members who might not be familiar with them.

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** This is the general explanation for why none of the characters from the present day TV shows (''Series/AgentsOfSHIELD'', ''Series/{{Daredevil}}'', ''Series/JessicaJones'' ''Series/Daredevil2015'', ''Series/JessicaJones2015'', ''Series/LukeCage2016'' and ''Series/LukeCage'') ''Series/IronFist2017'') appear in the movies, even the ones involving {{Crisis Crossover}}s. The movies generally have a wider audience than the TV shows (and are released in certain countries where the shows don't even air), and the creators don't want to have to spend time explaining who the hell these people are for the benefit of audience members who might not be familiar with them.
28th Jan '17 11:37:40 PM RoarkTenjouin
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** Speaking of ''Kamen Rider'', there's ''Series/KamenRiderDecade'', which has the titular rider visit alternate versions of the 9 past Rider Worlds. This might not sound so bad, except key plot details are kept the same - while the main rider in the alternate version of a world is not the main rider from the world represented by that series, chances are that if you've seen an AR version of one of the 9 previous Kamen Rider series, you can figure out what was the plot twist in the original version.
27th Jan '17 5:01:02 PM Ramona122003
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** ''Anime/DragonBallSuper'', has a minor case of this since the show starts on the assumption that the viewer is aware of the events of the Buu Saga. This has caused much confusion for many newer English fans who grew up watching ''Dragon Ball Kai'' which only went up to the Cell Games and ''Buu Kai'' didn't get an English premier until ''Super'' was airing at the same time on Adultswim Toonami. Also, since the show runs on nostalgia, all the {{Continuity Nod}}s and {{Call Back}}s can be hard to follow, especially the Future Trunks Saga that mixed important plot points from both the Cell and Buu Sagas. The show also assumes the viewers read ''Manga/JacoTheGalacticPatrolman'', since it doesn't bother to explain where Jaco came from, how he knows the Briefs, and when did Bulma get a sister. Toei attempted to [[{{Averted}} avert]] some of this by retelling the movies written by Toriyama, so people didn't have to go out and buy the [=DVDs=] to catch up with the latest events. You can even skipped the retellings and jumped to Episode 28, the start of the Champa Saga, since Episode 30 is a RecapEpisode of everything that has happened up to the point. And though the Resurrection 'F' Saga draws a lot of parallels and plot points from the Namek/Frieza Saga, it's easy enough to follow since it is a basic revenge plot.

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** ''Anime/DragonBallSuper'', has a minor case of this since the show starts on the assumption that the viewer is aware of the events of the Buu Saga. This has caused much confusion for many newer English fans who grew up watching ''Dragon Ball Kai'' which only went up to the Cell Games and ''Buu Kai'' didn't get an English premier until ''Super'' was airing at the same time on Adultswim Toonami. Also, since the show runs on nostalgia, all the {{Continuity Nod}}s and {{Call Back}}s can be hard to follow, especially the Future Trunks Saga that mixed important plot points from both the Cell and Buu Sagas. The show also assumes the viewers viewer read or at least have passing knowledge of ''Manga/JacoTheGalacticPatrolman'', since it doesn't bother to explain where Jaco came from, how he knows the Briefs, and when did Bulma get a sister.sister, or who are the Galactic Patrol. Toei attempted to [[{{Averted}} avert]] some of this by retelling the movies written by Toriyama, so people didn't have to go out and buy the [=DVDs=] to catch up with the latest events. You can even skipped the retellings and jumped to Episode 28, the start of the Champa Saga, since Episode 30 is a RecapEpisode of everything that has happened up to the point. And though the Resurrection 'F' Saga draws a lot of parallels and plot points from the Namek/Frieza Saga, it's easy enough to follow since it is a basic revenge plot.story.
27th Jan '17 2:29:43 AM DoctorNemesis
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* ''Series/{{Community}}'' can fall into a sort-of meta-example of this trope; something of a TroubledProduction, its tendency towards meta-humor meant that it often referenced the behind-the-scenes issues it faced in the form of {{Take That}}s and BitingTheHandHumor. However, since it ''also'' had a tendency to lay the meta-humor on a little thick and really go to down with OTT and out-there plots and jokes, this could all become a little overwhelming and off-putting for viewers who weren't aware of and[=/=]or didn't care about Dan Harmon's various issues with the network he was working for and just wanted to watch a half-hour sitcom.

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* ''Series/{{Community}}'' can sometimes fall into a sort-of meta-example of this trope; something of a TroubledProduction, its tendency towards meta-humor LeaningOnTheFourthWall meant that it often referenced the behind-the-scenes issues it faced in the form of {{Take That}}s and BitingTheHandHumor. However, since it ''also'' had a tendency to lay the meta-humor on a little thick and really go to down with OTT and out-there plots and jokes, this could all become a little overwhelming and off-putting for viewers who weren't aware of and[=/=]or didn't care about Dan Harmon's various issues with the network he was working for and just wanted to watch a half-hour sitcom.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.ContinuityLockout