History Main / ContinuityLockout

26th Mar '17 8:36:36 AM immblueversion
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''WesternAnimation/TheAmazingWorldOfGumball'' was never a continuity driven show to begin with, but there are more than a few episodes that have some lock-out if you're not totally familiar with the series (such as "The Finale", which had just about every CallBack to all the times the Wattersons have caused some sort of damage to the city or a character in particular, and "The Shell", in which [[spoiler:Penny breaks out of her shell, reveals herself to be a shapeshifting fairly, and finally becomes Gumball's girlfriend]]).
* ''WesternAnimation/DannyPhantom'' had a bit of lock-out in it's second and third seasons, particularly in regards to Danny receiving new powers (such as his ghostly wail and cryokinesis), the introduction of new characters (like Dani Phantom and Frostbite), [[CallBack references to previous episodes]], [[AntiHero Valerie Grey]]'s story arc, and [[BigBad Vlad Masters]] becoming the mayor of Amity Park.

to:

* ''WesternAnimation/TheAmazingWorldOfGumball'' was never a continuity driven show to begin with, but there are more than a few episodes that have some lock-out if you're not totally familiar with the series (such as "The Finale", which had just about every CallBack to all the times the Wattersons have caused some sort of damage to the city or a character in particular, and "The Shell", in which [[spoiler:Penny breaks out of her shell, reveals herself to be a shapeshifting fairly, fairy, and finally becomes Gumball's girlfriend]]).
* ''WesternAnimation/DannyPhantom'' had a bit of lock-out in it's its second and third seasons, particularly in regards to Danny receiving new powers (such as his ghostly wail and cryokinesis), the introduction of new characters (like Dani Phantom and Frostbite), [[CallBack references to previous episodes]], [[AntiHero Valerie Grey]]'s story arc, and [[BigBad Vlad Masters]] becoming the mayor of Amity Park.
26th Mar '17 8:35:15 AM immblueversion
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Seems to be headed that way now, however. Six seasons in it was bound to happen. Season one had minimal continuity with the only element that wasn't self-contained after the first two episodes were the Grand Galloping Galla which was referenced on occasion and was visited at the end of the season. Things slowly grew in complexity following Discord's arrival in the second, and the third establishing clear sequel episodes that relied upon previous knowledge. Irreversible status quo altering events like [[spoiler: Discord's redemption, Twilight becoming an alicorn princess, the keys of harmony subplot in season 4, Starlight Glimmer's premier and finale two-parters in season five and her subsequent HeelFaceTurn, Twilight's house getting destroyed by Tirek who was freede thanks to a throwaway scene in season two as well as Twilight adapting to her new castle home, and episodes that follow up on recurring antagonists]]. That being said, most episodes are stand-alone, but several still require a bit of knowledge from at least the beginning of the season to make any sense.

to:

** Seems to be headed that way now, however. Six seasons in it was bound to happen. Season one had minimal continuity with the only element that wasn't self-contained after the first two episodes were the Grand Galloping Galla which was referenced on occasion and was visited at the end of the season. Things slowly grew in complexity following Discord's arrival in the second, and the third establishing clear sequel episodes that relied upon previous knowledge. Irreversible status quo altering events like [[spoiler: Discord's redemption, Twilight becoming an alicorn princess, the keys of harmony subplot in season 4, Starlight Glimmer's premier premiere and finale two-parters in season five and her subsequent HeelFaceTurn, Twilight's house getting destroyed by Tirek who was freede freed thanks to a throwaway scene in season two as well as Twilight adapting to her new castle home, and episodes that follow up on recurring antagonists]]. That being said, most episodes are stand-alone, but several still require a bit of knowledge from at least the beginning of the season to make any sense.
26th Mar '17 8:33:50 AM immblueversion
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''WesternAnimation/StarWarsTheCloneWars'' was often compromised of episode arcs rather than as a typical serial. For casual viewers, missing a new episode could lead to getting confused if they don't recover and instead choose to continue to the next episode without context. This actually ended up being a problem for the show's ratings over time in combination with the CerebusSyndrome (meaning it turned away younger viewers, who are the target audience since the show aired on Cartoon Network), which eventually led to the show's cancellation before the Disney buyout. This is why its sequel, ''WesternAnimation/StarWarsRebels'', tends to avoid arcs and seeks a balanced CerebusSyndrome that won't turn away the younger audience as time goes on.

to:

* ''WesternAnimation/StarWarsTheCloneWars'' was often compromised comprised of episode arcs rather than as a typical serial. For casual viewers, missing a new episode could lead to getting confused if they don't recover and instead choose to continue to the next episode without context. This actually ended up being a problem for the show's ratings over time in combination with the CerebusSyndrome (meaning it turned away younger viewers, who are the target audience since the show aired on Cartoon Network), which eventually led to the show's cancellation before the Disney buyout. This is why its sequel, ''WesternAnimation/StarWarsRebels'', tends to avoid arcs and seeks a balanced CerebusSyndrome that won't turn away the younger audience as time goes on.



-->'''Homer''': [[spoiler:What, I'm not allowed to get one right?]]

to:

-->'''Homer''': [[spoiler:What, What, I'm not allowed to get one right?]]right?
22nd Mar '17 7:23:44 AM Sapphirea2
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** After several seasons' worth of this trope the Series 10 premiere -- actually titled "The Pilot" -- is specifically intended as a fresh start for new or lapsed viewers after Series 9 tied up or paused some ongoing storylines. It introduces the first new "traditional" companion since Series 7 and much of it is devoted to her learning who the Doctor is and how his adventures work. The first teaser for the season even had the tagline "See the world anew".

to:

** After several seasons' worth of this trope the Series 10 premiere -- actually titled "The Pilot" -- is specifically intended as a fresh start for new or lapsed viewers after Series 9 tied up or paused some ongoing storylines. It introduces the first new "traditional" companion since Series 7 and much of it is devoted to her learning who the Doctor is and how his adventures work. The first teaser for the season even had the tagline "See the world universe anew".
22nd Mar '17 7:22:19 AM Sapphirea2
Is there an issue? Send a Message


*** "Deep Breath", Twelve's first story and the Series 8 opener, not only carries over Eleven's companion Clara Oswald but also the Paternoster Gang: a motley trio of a Silurian woman, her human wife, and a {{Cloudcuckoolander}} Sontaran who becomes their butler, who all live together in Victorian England where the Silurian is a consulting detective for the police! BBC America realized this might be confusing for newbies, so when they reran this episode as part of a 2015 retrospective of key revival-era stories, the first commercial break bumper had the hostess summarize their history with the Eleventh Doctor and Clara. Early Series 8 is problematic for a ''Who'' newbie because this Doctor is one of the [[GrumpyOldMan grouchier]], [[NoSocialSkills less socially skilled ones]]; those unaware of Clara's past with the amiable Eleven may well ask why she travels with Twelve. However, Episode 3 ("Robot of Sherwood") is a BreatherEpisode where his more whimsical, likable side is first seen at length and the opening scene sums up the show's core premise to boot.

to:

*** "Deep Breath", Twelve's first story and the Series 8 opener, not only carries over Eleven's companion Clara Oswald but also the Paternoster Gang: a motley trio of a Silurian woman, her human wife, and a {{Cloudcuckoolander}} Sontaran who becomes their butler, who all live together in Victorian England where the Silurian is a consulting detective for the police! BBC America realized this might be confusing for newbies, so when they reran this This and the next episode as part of a 2015 retrospective of key revival-era stories, ("Into the first commercial break bumper had the hostess summarize their history with the Eleventh Doctor and Clara. Early Series 8 is Dalek") are also problematic for a ''Who'' newbie newbies because this Doctor is one of the [[GrumpyOldMan grouchier]], [[NoSocialSkills less socially skilled ones]]; those unaware of Clara's past with the amiable Eleven may well ask why she travels with Twelve. However, Episode 3 ("Robot of Sherwood") is a BreatherEpisode where his more whimsical, likable side is first seen at length and the opening scene sums up the show's core premise to boot.



* An early version of ''Series/TheSarahJaneAdventures'' story "Secrets Of The Stars" would have featured aliens named the Mandragora who had last apppeared on ''Series/DoctorWho'' in the 70s. This was one of the reasons why they were replaced with the Ancient Lights in the final product; the story would have been relying too much on one from around 30 years ago and thus locked out the young target audience.
** Though that didn't stop episodes being produced that featured characters like the Brigadier and Jo Grant, in particular Jo, who hadn't even been mentioned on ''Doctor Who'' for ''nearly 40 years'', yet much of the episode ''Death of the Doctor'' required familiarization with the character to truly appreciate, though short of not doing the story at all this is unavoidable.
** In another episode, Sarah Jane hacks a probe on Mars to redirect it just as a pyramid was about to come into view. The only explanation Sarah offers viewers and her sidekicks is that there are some things man wasn't meant to find. Only someone familiar with "The Pyramids of Mars" during the days of the 4th Doctor would know about Sutekh the Destroyer.

to:

** After several seasons' worth of this trope the Series 10 premiere -- actually titled "The Pilot" -- is specifically intended as a fresh start for new or lapsed viewers after Series 9 tied up or paused some ongoing storylines. It introduces the first new "traditional" companion since Series 7 and much of it is devoted to her learning who the Doctor is and how his adventures work. The first teaser for the season even had the tagline "See the world anew".
* An early version of ''Series/TheSarahJaneAdventures'' story "Secrets Of of The Stars" would have featured aliens named the Mandragora who had last apppeared on ''Series/DoctorWho'' in the 70s.1970s. This was one of the reasons why they were replaced with the Ancient Lights in the final product; the story would have been relying too much on one from around 30 years ago and thus locked out the young target audience.
** Though that didn't stop episodes being produced that featured characters like the Brigadier and Jo Grant, in particular Jo, who hadn't even been mentioned on ''Doctor Who'' for ''nearly 40 years'', yet much of the episode ''Death "Death of the Doctor'' Doctor" required familiarization with the character to truly appreciate, appreciate -- though short of not doing the story at all all, this is unavoidable.
** In another episode, Sarah Jane hacks a probe on Mars to redirect it just as a pyramid was about to come into view. The only explanation Sarah offers viewers and her sidekicks is that there are some things man wasn't meant to find. Only someone familiar with "The Pyramids "Pyramids of Mars" during the days of the 4th Doctor would know about Sutekh the Destroyer.
20th Mar '17 3:16:55 PM jtierney50
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* A comparatively minor example in ''VideoGame/FalloutNewVegas'', but the Courier will have a hard time answering the questions to prove you're an NCR citizen without having played ''{{Fallout}}'' and ''{{Fallout2}}''. The only question you can answer based on what's in ''New Vegas'' is the one that asks what's on the NCR's flag. The answers to the other two questions, which ask what the NCR's original capital city and its most popular president are, are not found in game.
** The villainous nature of the Enclave in ''[[VideoGame/Fallout3]]'' can seem odd without having played the previous game, ''Fallout 2''. To a new player, the Enclave is simply the remnants of the American government who provides patriotic music and occasional radio broadcasts on their radio station (at least until they [[spoiler:kill your father and take control of Project Purity]]). However, ''Fallout 2'' revealed that the Enclave is the descendants of an elite billionaire class secretly running the American government, incredibly human-supremacist, and wants to eradicate all radioactively mutated beings from the Wasteland, which in ''Fallout 2'' includes most of the people living in the Wastes, but is relegated to just Super Mutants and Ghouls in ''Fallout 3''. (Knowing this also explains the psychopathic experiments of the Vaults - Vault-Tec was run by members of the Enclave, and was intended as a proof of concept that humans could survive under various, often torturous conditions (including isolation, radiation, artificially created caste systems, and so on) to later be used for space flight. Without this knowledge, however, most Vaults and their experiments will seem more like mad science run rampant than for an actual, if not completely justified, cause.) However, this backfires, as it's never really explained how the Enclave could exist in D.C. if they'd all been evacuated to an oil rig off the coast of California soon before the bombs fell.
** The sudden appearance of the Prydwen and the Brotherhood of Steel in ''[[VideoGame/Fallout4]]'' can appear as a DuesExMachina without having played ''Fallout 3''. They're only mentioned in the game before this if you manage to listen to the easy-to-miss military signal and rescue Danse and his squadron at the Cambridge Police Station, and the Power Armor helmet on the front is implied to be the player's Power Armor, not belonging to the Brotherhood like on the covers of ''Fallout'' and ''Fallout 3''. Then, after completing Act 1's boss battle, the Sole Survivor emerges from Fort Hagen to see a giant airship and several Vertibirds flying around, announcing the Brotherhood of Steel's presence to the Commonwealth. While most companions are at least familiar with the Brotherhood (Danse and MacCready the most), Codsworth, the Sole Survivor, and any new player will be thoroughly confused.

to:

* A comparatively minor example in ''VideoGame/FalloutNewVegas'', but the Courier will have a hard time answering the questions to prove you're an NCR citizen without having played ''{{Fallout}}'' and ''{{Fallout2}}''.''VideoGame/{{Fallout 2}}''. The only question you can answer based on what's in ''New Vegas'' is the one that asks what's on the NCR's flag. The answers to the other two questions, which ask what the NCR's original capital city and its most popular president are, are not found in game.
** The villainous nature of the Enclave in ''[[VideoGame/Fallout3]]'' ''VideoGame/Fallout3'' can seem odd without having played the previous game, ''Fallout 2''. To a new player, the Enclave is simply the remnants of the American government who provides patriotic music and occasional radio broadcasts on their radio station (at least until they [[spoiler:kill your father and take control of Project Purity]]). However, ''Fallout 2'' revealed that the Enclave is the descendants of an elite billionaire class secretly running the American government, incredibly human-supremacist, and wants to eradicate all radioactively mutated beings from the Wasteland, which in ''Fallout 2'' includes most of the people living in the Wastes, but is relegated to just Super Mutants and Ghouls in ''Fallout 3''. (Knowing this also explains the psychopathic experiments of the Vaults - Vault-Tec was run by members of the Enclave, and was intended as a proof of concept that humans could survive under various, often torturous conditions (including isolation, radiation, artificially created caste systems, and so on) to later be used for space flight. Without this knowledge, however, most Vaults and their experiments will seem more like mad science run rampant than for an actual, if not completely justified, cause.) However, this backfires, as it's never really explained how the Enclave could exist in D.C. if they'd all been evacuated to an oil rig off the coast of California soon before the bombs fell.
** The sudden appearance of the Prydwen and the Brotherhood of Steel in ''[[VideoGame/Fallout4]]'' ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 4}}'' can appear as a DuesExMachina DeusExMachina without having played ''Fallout 3''. They're only mentioned in the game before this if you manage to listen to the easy-to-miss military signal and rescue Danse and his squadron at the Cambridge Police Station, and the Power Armor helmet on the front is implied to be the player's Power Armor, not belonging to the Brotherhood like on the covers of ''Fallout'' and ''Fallout 3''. Then, after completing Act 1's boss battle, the Sole Survivor emerges from Fort Hagen to see a giant airship and several Vertibirds flying around, announcing the Brotherhood of Steel's presence to the Commonwealth. While most companions are at least familiar with the Brotherhood (Danse and MacCready the most), Codsworth, the Sole Survivor, and any new player will be thoroughly confused.
20th Mar '17 3:13:36 PM jtierney50
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* A comparatively minor example in ''VideoGame/FalloutNewVegas'', but the Courier will have a hard time answering the questions to prove you're an NCR citizen without having played ''{{Fallout}}'' and ''{{Fallout2}}''. The only question you can answer based on what's in ''New Vegas'' is the one that asks what's on the NCR's flag. The answers to the other two questions, which ask what the NCR's original capital city and its most popular president are, are not found in game.
** The villainous nature of the Enclave in ''[[VideoGame/Fallout3]]'' can seem odd without having played the previous game, ''Fallout 2''. To a new player, the Enclave is simply the remnants of the American government who provides patriotic music and occasional radio broadcasts on their radio station (at least until they [[spoiler:kill your father and take control of Project Purity]]). However, ''Fallout 2'' revealed that the Enclave is the descendants of an elite billionaire class secretly running the American government, incredibly human-supremacist, and wants to eradicate all radioactively mutated beings from the Wasteland, which in ''Fallout 2'' includes most of the people living in the Wastes, but is relegated to just Super Mutants and Ghouls in ''Fallout 3''. (Knowing this also explains the psychopathic experiments of the Vaults - Vault-Tec was run by members of the Enclave, and was intended as a proof of concept that humans could survive under various, often torturous conditions (including isolation, radiation, artificially created caste systems, and so on) to later be used for space flight. Without this knowledge, however, most Vaults and their experiments will seem more like mad science run rampant than for an actual, if not completely justified, cause.) However, this backfires, as it's never really explained how the Enclave could exist in D.C. if they'd all been evacuated to an oil rig off the coast of California soon before the bombs fell.
** The sudden appearance of the Prydwen and the Brotherhood of Steel in ''[[VideoGame/Fallout4]]'' can appear as a DuesExMachina without having played ''Fallout 3''. They're only mentioned in the game before this if you manage to listen to the easy-to-miss military signal and rescue Danse and his squadron at the Cambridge Police Station, and the Power Armor helmet on the front is implied to be the player's Power Armor, not belonging to the Brotherhood like on the covers of ''Fallout'' and ''Fallout 3''. Then, after completing Act 1's boss battle, the Sole Survivor emerges from Fort Hagen to see a giant airship and several Vertibirds flying around, announcing the Brotherhood of Steel's presence to the Commonwealth. While most companions are at least familiar with the Brotherhood (Danse and MacCready the most), Codsworth, the Sole Survivor, and any new player will be thoroughly confused.
*** Similarly, Madison Li's side quest to rejoin the Brotherhood of Steel is rather nonsensical without playing ''Fallout 3''. In ''Fallout 3'', she works with the Brotherhood of Steel to finish Project Purity. However, in the 10 years between games, she makes her way to the Commonwealth and eventually joins the Institute, which is where the Sole Survivor finds her. The Brotherhood's motivations for wanting her back hinges on the player's knowledge of this - otherwise, it seems like they threw a dart at a board of Institute scientists and chose her.
15th Mar '17 8:08:38 AM DeisTheAlcano
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* {{UltimateMarvel}} was created starting with [[ComicBook/UltimateSpiderman]] in 2000 to avert this very trope offering a clean slate for new readers who otherwise couldn't be bothered to dig through decades of continuity in the regular universe to get the gist of certain characters and stories. Nonetheless however, the UltimateUniverse eventually fell victim to this trope despite a few efforts to relaunch it in its later years following the much reviled ''ComicBook/{{Ultimatum}}'' (which curiously was its own attempt to provide a clean slate for the Ultimate Universe). Namely why certain characters were dead and why [[spoiler:the Reed Richards of this universe went crazy and became an outright villain known as "The Maker"]]

to:

* {{UltimateMarvel}} ComicBook/UltimateMarvel was created starting with [[ComicBook/UltimateSpiderman]] ''ComicBook/UltimateSpiderman'' in 2000 to avert this very trope offering a clean slate for new readers who otherwise couldn't be bothered to dig through decades of continuity in the regular universe to get the gist of certain characters and stories. Nonetheless however, the UltimateUniverse eventually fell victim to this trope despite a few efforts to relaunch it in its later years following the much reviled ''ComicBook/{{Ultimatum}}'' (which curiously was its own attempt to provide a clean slate for the Ultimate Universe). Namely why certain characters were dead and why [[spoiler:the Reed Richards of this universe went crazy and became an outright villain known as "The Maker"]]Maker"]].
14th Mar '17 4:52:24 PM DeisTheAlcano
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* {{UltimateMarvel}} was created starting with [[ComicBook/UltimateSpiderman]] in 2000 to avert this very trope offering a clean slate for new readers who otherwise couldn't be bothered to dig through decades of continuity in the regular universe to get the gist of certain characters and stories. Nonetheless however, the UltimateUniverse eventually fell victim to this trope despite a few efforts to relaunch it in its later years following the much reviled [[ComicBook/Ultimatum]] (which curiously was its own attempt to provide a clean slate for the Ultimate Universe). Namely why certain characters were dead and why [[the Reed Richards of this universe went crazy and became an outright villain known as "The Maker"]]

to:

* {{UltimateMarvel}} was created starting with [[ComicBook/UltimateSpiderman]] in 2000 to avert this very trope offering a clean slate for new readers who otherwise couldn't be bothered to dig through decades of continuity in the regular universe to get the gist of certain characters and stories. Nonetheless however, the UltimateUniverse eventually fell victim to this trope despite a few efforts to relaunch it in its later years following the much reviled [[ComicBook/Ultimatum]] ''ComicBook/{{Ultimatum}}'' (which curiously was its own attempt to provide a clean slate for the Ultimate Universe). Namely why certain characters were dead and why [[the [[spoiler:the Reed Richards of this universe went crazy and became an outright villain known as "The Maker"]]
28th Feb '17 9:59:51 AM EpicLinkSam
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Worse still, there is an exorbitant amount of [[AllThereInTheManual side materials]] which all manage to tie into the main plot. Whereas you could largely get by in ''VideoGame/GuiltyGear'', ''[=BlazBlue=]''[='s=] predecessor, without these, they are ''crucial'' to understanding the ''[=BlazBlue=]'' universe. For starters, if you want to know why Hakumen is the man he is today and how [[spoiler:Hazama is able to prey on Tsubaki's jealousy of Noel]], that's where ''The Wheel of Fortune'' [[AudioAdaptation drama CD]] comes in. The ''Phase Shift'' light novels build up the underlying story of the Six Heroes and details the exploits of the Dark War's unsung hero, [[spoiler:a time-displaced Ragna the]] Bloodedge, not to mention that the fifth novel throws in [[SequelHook a hook]] for [[VideoGame/BlazBlueChronoPhantasma the third game]]. Even the overly {{fanservice}}y ''Remix Heart'' manga might end up influencing things down the road given the main character's friendship with three of the games' more prominent females, her status as [[spoiler:one of the Duodecim (the twelve families Jin, Tsubaki, and ''CP'' newcomer Kagura belong to)]], and [[spoiler:some rather MindScrew-laden visions of the future in later chapters]]. Luckily, members of the fandom have managed to translate and give synopses of these works, but if you don't bother doing your homework, you're going to have a hard time making sense of some of the more cryptic allusions.

to:

Worse still, there is an exorbitant amount of [[AllThereInTheManual side materials]] which all manage to tie into the main plot. Whereas you could largely get by in ''VideoGame/GuiltyGear'', ''[=BlazBlue=]''[='s=] predecessor, without these, they are ''crucial'' to understanding the ''[=BlazBlue=]'' universe. For starters, if you want to know why Hakumen is the man he is today and how [[spoiler:Hazama is able to prey on Tsubaki's jealousy of Noel]], that's where ''The Wheel of Fortune'' [[AudioAdaptation drama CD]] comes in. The ''Phase Shift'' light novels build up the underlying story of the Six Heroes and details the exploits of the Dark War's unsung hero, [[spoiler:a time-displaced Ragna the]] Bloodedge, not to mention that the fifth novel throws in [[SequelHook a hook]] for [[VideoGame/BlazBlueChronoPhantasma the third game]]. Even the overly {{fanservice}}y ''Remix Heart'' manga might end up influencing things down the road given the main character's friendship with three of the games' more prominent females, her status as [[spoiler:one of the Duodecim (the twelve families Jin, Tsubaki, and ''CP'' newcomer Kagura belong to)]], and [[spoiler:some rather MindScrew-laden visions of the future in later chapters]]. Luckily, members of the fandom have managed to translate and give synopses of these works, but if you don't bother doing your homework, you're going to have a hard time making sense of some of the more cryptic allusions. Central Fiction adds Naoto Kurogane, who was in the Bloodedge Experience light novels, Es from the XBlaze games, and Mai Natsume from the BlazBlue Remix Heart manga. If you haven't read Naoto or Mai's stories (most likely not, as they were Japan-only) or played XBlaze light novel games, you won't realize why they're in the game.
This list shows the last 10 events of 367. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.ContinuityLockout