History Main / ContinuityLockout

23rd Apr '16 10:59:43 PM 10-13-2
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* ''TheWarriors'' tries to avoid this - and mostly succeeds - both by recreating the opening scenes of the 1979 film at the very beginning (although some crucial dialogue is edited out) and by making the game a prequel of sorts, beginning about a year (1978) before the events of the film and firmly establishing the personalities of the nine major characters long before the actual content of the movie becomes playable. The numerous cutscenes, heavy chunks of dialogue and constant updates on the radio (the gang has one in their training studio) by the famous lady DJ about what's happening throughout the city help a great deal.
14th Apr '16 10:29:00 PM MiinU
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* ''WebComic/EerieCuties''[=/=]''WebComic/MagickChicks'': The latter is an ongoing UrbanFantasy SpinOff of the former, which was originally meant for readers to be able to follow without it being necessary to read both comics. But between their SharedUniverse, two major [[{{crossover}} crossovers]], characters from one making appearances in the other, and certain events overlapping, they've become so intwined that it's almost required that you familiarize yourself with both comics, [[LoadsAndLoadsOfCharacters so as not to be lost on who's who]], and all the [[CallBack callbacks and references to past events.]] And this is from the guy who originally wrote the review for ''Magick Chicks''!

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* ''WebComic/EerieCuties''[=/=]''WebComic/MagickChicks'': The latter is an ongoing UrbanFantasy SpinOff of the former, which ''WebComic/EerieCuties''[=/=]''WebComic/MagickChicks'':
**It
was originally meant intended for newer readers to be able to follow ''Magick Chicks'' without it being necessary to read both comics. But between their SharedUniverse, two major [[{{crossover}} crossovers]], characters from one making appearances in the other, along with several cameos and certain events overlapping, they've become they became so intwined that it's almost required that you familiarize yourself with it was no longer possible.
**The writers eventually realized it themselves, which lead them to do [[http://www.pixietrixcomix.com/forum/viewtopic.php?p=563524#p563624 a "soft reboot"]] of
both comics, [[LoadsAndLoadsOfCharacters so as not series, to be lost on who's who]], and all the [[CallBack callbacks and references make things easier to past events.]] And this is from the guy who originally wrote the review for ''Magick Chicks''!follow.
12th Apr '16 8:46:41 AM Sapphirea2
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** In the Modern Era, the showrunners explicitly consider introductory episodes featuring new Doctors to be jumping-on points, requiring no previous knowledge of the show beyond the basic concept. The introduction of a new companion is likewise often also treated in this fashion.

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** In the Modern Era, the showrunners explicitly consider introductory episodes featuring new Doctors to be jumping-on points, requiring no previous knowledge of the show beyond the basic concept.concept (though "Deep Breath", Twelve's debut, features supporting characters introduced in Eleven's tenure and works better with foreknowledge of them). The introduction of a new companion is likewise often also treated in this fashion.
11th Apr '16 9:38:51 AM ObsidianFire
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* In ''VideoGame/{{Touhou}}'', this wasn't much of a problem during the PC-98 era and the first few games of the Windows era, since the plots of those games were largely self-contained. However, after ''Mountain of Faith'' the ContinuityCreep starts to take place, and now it's much more difficult for newcomers to understand what's going on since each game builds upon the previous one. Comments by ZUN suggest that [[TrollingCreator he feels a certain level of inaccessibility]] [[GenreSavvy is core to the]] ''[[GenreSavvy Touhou]]'' [[GenreSavvy experience]]. The various manga and {{Universe Compendium}}s don't really help either, since all the manga series assume that one is already familiar with the games and their lore and the {{Universe Compendium}}s have some [[UnreliableNarrator Unreliable Narration]] at work.

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* In ''VideoGame/{{Touhou}}'', this wasn't much of a problem during the PC-98 era and the first few games of the Windows era, since the plots of those games were largely self-contained. However, after ''Mountain of Faith'' the ContinuityCreep starts to take place, and now it's much more difficult for newcomers to understand what's going on since each game builds upon the previous one. Comments by ZUN suggest that [[TrollingCreator he feels a certain level of inaccessibility]] [[GenreSavvy is core to the]] ''[[GenreSavvy Touhou]]'' [[GenreSavvy experience]].the ''Touhou'' experience. The various manga and {{Universe Compendium}}s don't really help either, since all the manga series assume that one is already familiar with the games and their lore and the {{Universe Compendium}}s have some [[UnreliableNarrator Unreliable Narration]] at work.
4th Apr '16 4:18:44 PM bweb
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** [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O13nhFS4nDo This video of fan reactions]] during the 50th anniversary can demonstrate this beautifully. Long time fans recognized the voice of TomBaker almost immediately, while newcomers mistook him initially for PeterCapaldi until they saw the face.
4th Apr '16 4:11:50 PM bweb
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** In another episode, Sarah Jane hacks a probe on Mars to redirect it just as a pyramid was about to come into view. The only explanation Sarah offers viewers and her sidekicks is that there are some things man wasn't meant to find. Only someone familiar with "The Pyramids of Mars" during the days of the 4th Doctor would know about Sutekh the Destroyer.
18th Mar '16 8:49:36 AM skidoo23
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** This trope is often blamed as one of the contributing factors to the cancellation of the original series. Amongst a lot of other issues that the show was facing at the time, the fact that a fairly large portion of the stories broadcast during the 1980s seemed to hinge upon the audience being aware of characters, events and storylines which hadn't been seen for upwards of ten or even twenty years didn't make the show any easier to watch. Matters weren't helped by the fact that this was well before VHS and DVD was prominent enough to allow [[BetterOnDVD people to catch up on the old stuff]], ''and'' that a lot of this old stuff had been deleted from the archives anyway, meaning that even if the technology had existed, the original material didn't.
** In the new series of ''Series/DoctorWho'', the later into any given series an episode occurs, the lower the likelihood of a casual viewer having any clue who the characters are or what is going on, at least in terms of ongoing story arcs (individual episodes tend to remain stand alone). Some episodes also make references to events/characters from the classic series.

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** This trope is often blamed as one of the contributing factors to the cancellation of the original series. Amongst a lot of other issues that the show was facing at the time, the fact that a fairly large portion of the stories broadcast during the 1980s seemed to hinge upon the audience being aware of characters, events and storylines which hadn't been seen for upwards of ten or even twenty years didn't make the show any easier to watch. Matters weren't helped by the fact that this was well before VHS and DVD was prominent enough to allow [[BetterOnDVD people to catch up on the old stuff]], ''and'' that a lot of this old stuff had been deleted from the archives anyway, meaning that even if the technology had existed, the original material didn't.
didn't. (An examination of the final seasons of the original series reveals much of this to be unfounded as other than one story - "Remembrance of the Daleks" - that is set around the time of the very first episode, there is actually very little in the last five seasons of the original series that requires viewer knowledge of older stories.)
** In the new series of ''Series/DoctorWho'', the later into any given series an episode occurs, the lower the likelihood of a casual viewer having any clue who the characters are or what is going on, at least in terms of ongoing story arcs (individual episodes tend to remain stand alone). Some episodes also make references to events/characters from the classic series.series, though rarely in any fashion that would "lock out" first-time or casual viewers.



** Back in the early days where the story format was the multi-part serial, showing up in the middle after having skipped a couple of episodes often meant you would have no idea at all what was going on. This got a lot easier to deal with as the writers (starting from around the Pertwee era) became better at structuring serials and having characters quickly and organically recap events.

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** Back in the early days where the story format was the multi-part serial, showing up in the middle after having skipped a couple of episodes often meant you would have no idea at all what was going on. This got a lot easier to deal with as the writers (starting from around the Pertwee era) became better at structuring serials and having characters quickly and organically recap events. Initial US syndication of the series got around this by having a narrator provide recaps before every episode.
** In the Modern Era, the showrunners explicitly consider introductory episodes featuring new Doctors to be jumping-on points, requiring no previous knowledge of the show beyond the basic concept. The introduction of a new companion is likewise often also treated in this fashion.
** Occasionally, mid-Doctor-run episodes feature content that avoids continuity lock-out by organically incorporating dialogue and scenes that help explain the show without stopping the story. A recent example is the 2015 two-part story "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS35E3UnderTheLake Under the Lake]]" and "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS35E4BeforeTheFlood Before the Flood]]" which covers off most of the concepts of the series ranging from why the TARDIS is bigger on the inside and the relationship dynamic between the Doctor and his companion, to discussions about paradoxes and fixed points in time.
22nd Feb '16 11:59:27 AM rjd1922
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* The ''Franchise/AceAttorney'' series goes out of its way to avoid this, to the point of characters avoiding references to other games even when it would make sense to do so. See: Miles Edgeworth in ''VisualNovel/AceAttorneyInvestigations'' constantly mentioning that he no longer follows the von Karma way without mentioning the fact that [[spoiler:von Karma murdered his father and raised him that way as revenge for a small courtroom slight...at least until the second ''Investigations'' game, which features Gregory Edgeworth's last case as a playable segment, but that was only released in Japanese and many Western fans haven't played it.]] He also refuses to ever refer to Phoenix Wright (who doesn't appear in the spinoffs) by name, which gets pretty hilarious after a while.

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* The ''Franchise/AceAttorney'' series goes out of its way to avoid this, to the point of characters avoiding references to other games even when it would make sense to do so. See: Miles Edgeworth in ''VisualNovel/AceAttorneyInvestigations'' constantly mentioning that he no longer follows the von Karma way without mentioning the fact that [[spoiler:von Karma murdered his father and raised him that way as revenge for a small courtroom slight...at least until the second ''Investigations'' game, which features Gregory Edgeworth's last case as a playable segment, but that was only released in Japanese and many Western fans haven't played it.]] He also refuses to ever refer to Phoenix Wright (who doesn't appear in the spinoffs) spinoffs outside of two hidden cameos) by name, which gets pretty hilarious after a while.
19th Feb '16 2:17:31 PM StarSword
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* ''Series/{{Quantico}}'' relies heavily on plot twists and serialization, not to mention tracking two time periods (the past, where Alex Parrish and the other characters are training at the FBI Academy, and the present, where Alex has been accused of [[Post911TerrorismMovie blowing up Grand Central Terminal]]) that trade off every twenty minutes or so, and the OpeningNarration mostly only introduces the premise. Good luck keeping track of what's going on if you miss an episode.
19th Feb '16 2:08:45 PM StarSword
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* David Lynch's adaptation of ''Film/{{Dune}}'' is nigh-impossible to comprehend without reading the book, particularly its last forty minutes or so which are an incredibly rushed depiction of ''two-thirds'' of the book's length. Especially bad is the scene where Paul decides he needs to ride a sandworm to properly lead his new army, despite the fact that the Fremen ride the worms never having been referenced. In 1984 audiences were even handed ''playbills'' before entering the film to explain the plot they were missing.

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* David Lynch's adaptation of ''Film/{{Dune}}'' is nigh-impossible to comprehend without reading the book, particularly its last forty minutes or so which are an incredibly rushed depiction of ''two-thirds'' of the book's length. Especially bad is the scene where Paul decides he needs to ride a sandworm to properly lead his new army, despite the fact that the Fremen ride the worms never having been referenced. In 1984 audiences were even handed ''playbills'' before entering the film to explain the plot they were missing. The extended cut DVD release restored several missing scenes and pieces of exposition and is considerably easier to follow.
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