History Main / ConLang

1st Feb '17 3:41:44 PM Milarqui
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* The ''WebOriginal/IllBethisad'' project started when someone wondered what English would look like if the British Celtic languages were supplanted by Latin, and Romano-Britons were capable of resisting the Saxon invasion? The result was Brithenig, spoken in the nation of Kemr (Cambria). Other languages included are Wenedyk (Latin-based Polish), Dalmatian (a Romance language based in the Dalmatian coast), Narbonosc (the ''lingua franca'' in southern France)... and many, many more.
27th Jan '17 6:44:53 PM Mhazard
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* ''Franchise/TheElderScrolls'' series has a modest number of languages which are referenced and occasionally shown in script (like the Falmer language), but the most notable ones would include the Daedric alphabet (just a cypher for Roman), Ayleid Elvish in ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollssIVOblivion Oblivion]]'', and, introduced with the fifth installment, ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollssVSkyrim Skyrim]]'', the Dovahzul (Dragon Language). Several words of the Dragon language are learned by the PC during the game (they're the language all the [[WordsCanBreakMyBones Shouts]] are in), and the language is even spoken by a few characters, mainly [[CaptainObvious dragons]].

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* ''Franchise/TheElderScrolls'' series has a modest number of languages which are referenced and occasionally shown in script (like the Falmer language), but the most notable ones would include the Daedric alphabet (just a cypher for Roman), Ayleid Elvish in ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollssIVOblivion ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion Oblivion]]'', and, introduced with the fifth installment, ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollssVSkyrim ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim Skyrim]]'', the Dovahzul (Dragon Language). Several words of the Dragon language are learned by the PC during the game (they're the language all the [[WordsCanBreakMyBones Shouts]] are in), and the language is even spoken by a few characters, mainly [[CaptainObvious dragons]].
27th Jan '17 6:44:37 PM Mhazard
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* ''Franchise/TheElderScrolls'' series has a modest number of languages which are referenced and occasionally shown in script (like the Falmer language), but the most notable ones would include the Daedric alphabet (just a cypher for Roman), Ayleid Elvish in ''Oblivion'', and, introduced with the fifth installment, ''Skyrim'', the dragon language. Several words of the Dragon language are learned by the PC during the game (they're the language all the [[WordsCanBreakMyBones Shouts]] are in), and the language is even spoken by a few characters, mainly [[CaptainObvious dragons]].
** The main theme song for ''Skyrim'', [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g7oUk9WizNc Dovahkiin]], is sung in it.

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* ''Franchise/TheElderScrolls'' series has a modest number of languages which are referenced and occasionally shown in script (like the Falmer language), but the most notable ones would include the Daedric alphabet (just a cypher for Roman), Ayleid Elvish in ''Oblivion'', ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollssIVOblivion Oblivion]]'', and, introduced with the fifth installment, ''Skyrim'', ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollssVSkyrim Skyrim]]'', the dragon language.Dovahzul (Dragon Language). Several words of the Dragon language are learned by the PC during the game (they're the language all the [[WordsCanBreakMyBones Shouts]] are in), and the language is even spoken by a few characters, mainly [[CaptainObvious dragons]].
** The main theme song for ''Skyrim'', [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g7oUk9WizNc Dovahkiin]], is "Dovahkiin"]], as well as the endgame theme song, [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=waEFUEHjRqQ "Sovngarde"]], are sung in it.
26th Jan '17 2:49:18 AM Jaro7788
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The complete original sort has picked up in popularity in the recent decades, and especially recent years, with the likes of linguists Mark Okrand and David J. Petersen being hired to provide a fictional language with [[ShownTheirWork completely unique grammars and writing scripts]], the target ostensibly being to make the language in question as far removed from English as possible, so expect a non-SVO word order, tons of grammatical cases, obscure tenses, postpositional adjectives and no articles. And don't even think about your "modern" left-to-right direction of writing![[note]]Even though it was used by the Sumerian cuneiform script, the oldest in the history of mankind.[[/note]]

It should be noted, however, that in an example of {{The Coconut Effect}}, a sufficiently "exotic" language doesn't need to differ from English in every possible way just to seem more plausible. Contrary to the popular belief, a language's complexity (or lack thereof) hasn't been proven to be linked to a society's level of civilizational advancement,[[note]]In Europe alone, the nightmarishly complex Finnish did not hold back Finland from becoming a welfare state on a par with its Swedish neighbor and Romanian, arguably the most regular of the languages used in Eastern Europe, happens to be used in Moldova, the poorest country on the continent.[[/note]] and many languages which linguistically are not related to English in any way, such as Hebrew or Chinese, might turn out to be much more familiar in structure to speakers of English than even some of their fellow Indo-European languages, such as Slavic ones.

to:

The complete original sort has picked up in popularity in the recent decades, and especially recent years, with the likes of linguists Mark Okrand and David J. Petersen being hired to provide a fictional language with [[ShownTheirWork completely unique grammars and writing scripts]], the target ostensibly being to make the language in question as far removed from English as possible, so expect a non-SVO word order, tons of grammatical cases, obscure tenses, postpositional adjectives and no articles. And don't even think about your "modern" left-to-right direction of writing![[note]]Even writing! [[note]]Even though it was used by the Sumerian cuneiform script, the oldest in the history of mankind.[[/note]]

It should be noted, however, that in an example of {{The Coconut Effect}}, a sufficiently "exotic" language doesn't need to differ from English in every possible way just to seem more plausible. Contrary to the popular belief, a language's complexity (or lack thereof) hasn't been proven to be linked to a society's level of civilizational advancement,[[note]]In Europe alone, the nightmarishly complex Finnish did not hold back Finland from becoming a welfare state on a par with its Swedish neighbor and Romanian, arguably the most regular of the languages used in Eastern Europe, happens to be used in Moldova, the poorest country on the continent. [[/note]] and many languages which linguistically are not related to English in any way, such as Hebrew or Chinese, might turn out to be much more familiar in structure to speakers of English than even some of their fellow Indo-European languages, such as Slavic ones.
26th Jan '17 2:47:41 AM Jaro7788
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The complete original sort has picked up in popularity in the recent decades, and especially recent years, with the likes of linguists Mark Okrand and David J. Petersen being hired to provide a fictional language with [[ShownTheirWork completely unique grammars and writing scripts]], the target ostensibly being to make the language in question as far removed from English as possible, so expect a non-SVO word order, tons of grammatical cases, obscure tenses, postpositional adjectives and no articles.

to:

The complete original sort has picked up in popularity in the recent decades, and especially recent years, with the likes of linguists Mark Okrand and David J. Petersen being hired to provide a fictional language with [[ShownTheirWork completely unique grammars and writing scripts]], the target ostensibly being to make the language in question as far removed from English as possible, so expect a non-SVO word order, tons of grammatical cases, obscure tenses, postpositional adjectives and no articles.
articles. And don't even think about your "modern" left-to-right direction of writing![[note]]Even though it was used by the Sumerian cuneiform script, the oldest in the history of mankind.[[/note]]
26th Jan '17 2:38:17 AM Jaro7788
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The complete original sort has picked up in popularity in the recent decades, and especially recent years, with the likes of linguists Mark Okrand and David J. Petersen being hired to provide a fictional language with [[ShownTheirWork completely unique grammars and writing scripts]], the target ostensibly being to make the language in question as far removed from English as possible, so expect a non-SVO word order, tons of grammatical cases, obscure tenses, postpositional adjectives and no articles. It should be noted, however, that in an example of {{The Coconut Effect}}, a sufficiently "exotic" language doesn't need to differ from English in every possible way just to seem more plausible. Contrary to the popular belief, a language's complexity (or lack thereof) hasn't been proven to be linked to a society's level of civilizational advancement,[[note]]In Europe alone, the nightmarishly complex Finnish did not hold back Finland from becoming a welfare state on a par with its Swedish neighbor and Romanian, arguably the most regular of the languages used in Eastern Europe, happens to be used in Moldova, the poorest country on the continent.[[/note]] and many languages which linguistically are not related to English in any way, such as Hebrew or Chinese, might turn out to be much more familiar in structure to speakers of English than even some of their fellow Indo-European languages, such as Slavic ones.

to:

The complete original sort has picked up in popularity in the recent decades, and especially recent years, with the likes of linguists Mark Okrand and David J. Petersen being hired to provide a fictional language with [[ShownTheirWork completely unique grammars and writing scripts]], the target ostensibly being to make the language in question as far removed from English as possible, so expect a non-SVO word order, tons of grammatical cases, obscure tenses, postpositional adjectives and no articles. articles.

It should be noted, however, that in an example of {{The Coconut Effect}}, a sufficiently "exotic" language doesn't need to differ from English in every possible way just to seem more plausible. Contrary to the popular belief, a language's complexity (or lack thereof) hasn't been proven to be linked to a society's level of civilizational advancement,[[note]]In Europe alone, the nightmarishly complex Finnish did not hold back Finland from becoming a welfare state on a par with its Swedish neighbor and Romanian, arguably the most regular of the languages used in Eastern Europe, happens to be used in Moldova, the poorest country on the continent.[[/note]] and many languages which linguistically are not related to English in any way, such as Hebrew or Chinese, might turn out to be much more familiar in structure to speakers of English than even some of their fellow Indo-European languages, such as Slavic ones.
ones.

It's just as ungrounded to expect every "ancient" language to be much more complex than any that is to be found in the modern world. While it's partly true that isolation might contribute to a language retaining its original form largely intact (such as is the case with Icelandic), some of the areas in which extremely archaic languages are spoken (most notably the Baltic ones) have been anything but isolated throughout the last centuries. And even though the general trend does seem to be towards simplification of a language over a period of time, there have been instances in which the opposite was true; in some aspects that even happened to English, whose pronunciation just a few centuries ago could have been guessed based on the ortography alone, something which is no longer possible.
26th Jan '17 12:09:57 AM Jaro7788
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Added DiffLines:

The complete original sort has picked up in popularity in the recent decades, and especially recent years, with the likes of linguists Mark Okrand and David J. Petersen being hired to provide a fictional language with [[ShownTheirWork completely unique grammars and writing scripts]], the target ostensibly being to make the language in question as far removed from English as possible, so expect a non-SVO word order, tons of grammatical cases, obscure tenses, postpositional adjectives and no articles. It should be noted, however, that in an example of {{The Coconut Effect}}, a sufficiently "exotic" language doesn't need to differ from English in every possible way just to seem more plausible. Contrary to the popular belief, a language's complexity (or lack thereof) hasn't been proven to be linked to a society's level of civilizational advancement,[[note]]In Europe alone, the nightmarishly complex Finnish did not hold back Finland from becoming a welfare state on a par with its Swedish neighbor and Romanian, arguably the most regular of the languages used in Eastern Europe, happens to be used in Moldova, the poorest country on the continent.[[/note]] and many languages which linguistically are not related to English in any way, such as Hebrew or Chinese, might turn out to be much more familiar in structure to speakers of English than even some of their fellow Indo-European languages, such as Slavic ones.
25th Jan '17 6:28:31 PM KagSwirby
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* Planet Turo's Tantalog language from ''Disney/LiloAndStitch'' would also count as this, as practically every writing not on Earth is composed of it.
19th Jan '17 8:37:54 PM Anddrix
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** For ''Series/EmeraldCity'' he created Munja’kin, spoken by the show's counterpart to the Munchkins and Inha, the language of the witches.

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** For ''Series/EmeraldCity'' he created Munja’kin, the Munja'kin language spoken by the show's counterpart to people of the Munchkins same name, and Inha, the language of tongue the witches.witches use to cast their spells.
17th Jan '17 12:51:18 AM Luppercus
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* Elizabethan astrologyst John Dee developed the Enochian Language with assistance of Edward Kelly. It was allegedly dictated by Angels using a CrystalBall and it's supposed to be the language of both Angels and Demons and also that of Adam and Eve before they were cast out of the Eden. The language is still use mostly in Esoteric Orders and Western Magick Traditions. The language has its own alphabet and grammar and can be learn, but it’s very basic so its use outside of ritual purposes is limited.

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* Elizabethan astrologyst astrologist John Dee developed the Enochian Language with assistance of Edward Kelly. It was allegedly dictated by Angels using a CrystalBall and it's supposed to be the language of both Angels and Demons and also that of Adam and Eve before they were cast out of the Eden. The language is still use mostly in Esoteric Orders and Western Magick Traditions. The language has its own alphabet and grammar and can be learn, but it’s very basic so its use outside of ritual purposes is limited.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.ConLang