History Main / ColorCodedMultiplayer

6th Oct '17 11:03:05 AM Abodos
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* The multiplayer for ''VideoGame/MetroidPrime 2'' involves multicolored Samuses (Samii?) fighting each other.

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* The multiplayer for ''VideoGame/MetroidPrime 2'' ''VideoGame/MetroidPrime2Echoes'' involves multicolored Samuses (Samii?) fighting each other.
25th Jun '17 2:54:06 PM Hallwings
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* In ''Super Off Road'', player one controls a red truck (or dune buggy if they play the Track Pak version), player two controls a yellow truck, and player three controls a blue truck. The AI-controlled truck of "Ironman" Ivan Stewart (or "Lightning" Kevin Lydy in current re-releases) is white, though it appears gray due to graphical limitations. The NES version had a green truck in place of the white truck if four human players compete.

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* In ''Super Off Road'', player one controls a red truck (or optional dune buggy if they play the Track Pak version), player two controls a yellow truck, and player three controls a blue truck. The AI-controlled truck of "Ironman" Ivan Stewart (or "Lightning" Kevin Lydy in current re-releases) is white, though it appears gray due to graphical limitations. The NES version had a green truck in place of the white truck if four human players compete.
11th Mar '17 10:04:18 PM Saurubiker
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** In the arcade version of the original ''Gauntlet'' the four player characters were not only color-coded, but also had their classes already assigned to them: the warrior wore red, the valkyrie wore blue, the wizard wore yellow and the elf wore green. However ''Gauntlet II'', which was distributed as a conversion kit for the first game, ditched this constraint and added the option to have each player to choose their class, allowing multiple players to control the same class

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** In the arcade version of the original ''Gauntlet'' ''Gauntlet'', multiple players could not be part of the four same class - they were either, chosen by each player characters were not only color-coded, but also had their classes already at the start of the game in the 2-player version or assigned to them: by control panel in the warrior wore red, the valkyrie wore blue, the wizard wore yellow and the elf wore green. However 4-player version. This was changed in ''Gauntlet II'', which was distributed as a conversion kit for the first game, ditched this constraint and added the option to have each player to choose their class, allowing allowed multiple players to control be the same classclass if they wanted to, distinguishing each player by color-coding their characters. Incidentally, the color-coding in ''Gauntlet II'' matches how the four classes were colored and arranged in the 4-player version of the first game which goes red, blue, yellow and green in that exact order.
8th Mar '17 1:38:42 PM Saurubiker
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** ''Gauntlet Legends'' at first appears to have standard Color Coded Multiplayer, but upon closer inspection, all of the art and in-game models for each color of each character class are radically different, with each color even having something of a theme (e.g. all of the blue characters resemble Western European knights and nobility, the yellow are inspired by Ancient Egypt with a bit of Ottoman Empire, reds are the "generic fantasy barbarian" culture, and greens have a Celtic/Gaelic flair).
** Each color variation also sports differing costume styles. The reds mostly had fur and were more barbarian-looking; the blues were often more regal and medieval-like; the greens were forest-themed with leather sashes and vests, and the yellows had an Egyptian/desert-themed flair to them.
** ''Gauntlet'' and ''Gauntlet II'' differentiated the party members by coloring them red, blue, yellow and green, and made it clear on the arcade cabinet control panels which of the four players was which color. In ''Gauntlet'', each character had their own unique color: Warrior wore red, Valkyrie wore blue, Wizard wore yellow, and Elf wore green. In the sequel, multiple players could play as the same class/character, unlike in the original, so the colors now represented their player position: Player 1 wore red, Player 2 wore blue, Player 3 wore yellow, and Player 4 wore green.

to:

** In the arcade version of the original ''Gauntlet'' the four player characters were not only color-coded, but also had their classes already assigned to them: the warrior wore red, the valkyrie wore blue, the wizard wore yellow and the elf wore green. However ''Gauntlet II'', which was distributed as a conversion kit for the first game, ditched this constraint and added the option to have each player to choose their class, allowing multiple players to control the same class
** ''Gauntlet Legends'' at first appears to have standard Color Coded Multiplayer, but upon closer inspection, all of the art and in-game models for each color of each character class are radically different, with each color even having something of a theme (e.g. all of the blue characters resemble Western European knights and nobility, the yellow are inspired by Ancient Egypt with a bit of Ottoman Empire, reds are the "generic fantasy barbarian" culture, and greens have a Celtic/Gaelic flair).
**
flair). Each color variation also sports differing costume styles. The reds mostly had fur and were more barbarian-looking; the blues were often more regal and medieval-like; the greens were forest-themed with leather sashes and vests, and the yellows had an Egyptian/desert-themed flair to them.
** ''Gauntlet'' and ''Gauntlet II'' differentiated the party members by coloring them red, blue, yellow and green, and made it clear on the arcade cabinet control panels which of the four players was which color. In ''Gauntlet'', each character had their own unique color: Warrior wore red, Valkyrie wore blue, Wizard wore yellow, and Elf wore green. In the sequel, multiple players could play as the same class/character, unlike in the original, so the colors now represented their player position: Player 1 wore red, Player 2 wore blue, Player 3 wore yellow, and Player 4 wore green.
them.
1st Feb '17 6:49:48 PM Prfnoff
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In early days, certain players were forcibly assigned certain character colors with no way to choose a different color (ex: P1 blue, P2 red, P3 green, P4 yellow). Nowadays, games will often allow players to choose colors.

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In early days, certain players were forcibly assigned certain character colors with no way to choose a different color (ex: P1 blue, P2 red, P3 green, P4 yellow).yellow); this was most useful in arcades, where the preassigned colors were often painted onto the controls and/or the surrounding area of the cabinet. Nowadays, games will often allow players to choose colors.
24th Jan '17 10:34:57 AM Hallwings
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* In ''Super Off Road'', player one controls a red truck (or dune buggy if they play the Track Pak version), player two controls a yellow truck, and player three controls a blue truck. The AI-controlled truck of "Ironman" Ivan Stewart (or "Lightning" Kevin Lydy in current re-releases) is white, though it appears gray due to graphical limitations. The NES version had a green truck in place of the white truck if four human players compete.
31st Dec '16 12:31:50 PM CorahsUncle
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* In Creator/{{Konami}}'s ''Escape Kids'', the players are coded not only by color, but also by nationality. Player 1 is Syd Jones from the United States, Player 2 is Dio Vitale from Italy, Player 3 is Jya Aziz from India, and Player 4 is Ken Kosugi from Japan.

to:

* In Creator/{{Konami}}'s ''Escape Kids'', the players are coded not only by color, but also by nationality. Player 1 (blue) is Syd Jones from the United States, Player 2 (yellow) is Dio Vitale from Italy, Player 3 (green) is Jya Aziz from India, and Player 4 (red) is Ken Kosugi from Japan.
31st Dec '16 12:28:36 PM CorahsUncle
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Video game sprites or polygon models of different colors to tell otherwise identical {{Player Character}}s apart. This was especially prevalent in games up to [[TheEighties the mid 80s]], where [[UsefulNotes/ReadOnlyMemory ROM size]] meant even different sprites for them would take up too much space. In later years storage capacity has grown bigger, allowing game designers to give each player character a different design, but this trope lives on as a way for players to tell each other apart when they are both [[MirrorMatch playing as the same character]].

In early days, certain players were forcefully assigned certain character colors with no way to choose a different color (ex: P1 blue, P2 red, P3 green, P4 yellow). Nowadays, games will often allow players to choose colors.

This trope can apply whether the multiplayer is cooperative or competitive. It can also apply to a MirrorMatch with a computer controlled opponent as long as it is using the same character as the player.

In two player games, you typically see Red and Blue; four-player games almost always add Yellow and Green. Red and Blue have historically been used, such as the Red and Blue Corners in Boxing, whereas the other two are included for ChromaticArrangement.

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Video game sprites or polygon models of different colors to tell otherwise identical {{Player Character}}s apart. This was especially prevalent in games up to [[TheEighties the mid 80s]], mid-1980s]], where [[UsefulNotes/ReadOnlyMemory ROM size]] meant that even different sprites for them would take up too much space. In later years years, storage capacity has grown bigger, allowing game designers to give each player character a different design, but this trope lives on as a way for players to tell each other apart when they are both [[MirrorMatch playing as the same character]].

In early days, certain players were forcefully forcibly assigned certain character colors with no way to choose a different color (ex: P1 blue, P2 red, P3 green, P4 yellow). Nowadays, games will often allow players to choose colors.

This trope can apply whether the multiplayer is cooperative or competitive. It can also apply to a MirrorMatch with a computer controlled computer-controlled opponent as long as it is using the same character as the player.

In two player two-player games, you typically see Red and Blue; four-player games almost always add Yellow and Green. Red and Blue have historically been used, such as the Red red and Blue Corners blue corners in Boxing, boxing, whereas the other two are included for ChromaticArrangement.



Compare GoodColorsEvilColors, ColorCodedPatrician, ColorCodedArmies.

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Compare GoodColorsEvilColors, ColorCodedPatrician, GoodColorsEvilColors; ColorCodedPatrician; ColorCodedArmies.



* ''VideoGame/DissidiaFinalFantasy'', the interesting part is that the alt colors make sense if you've played the other FF games or are otherwise a ''Franchise/FinalFantasy'' nerd--some of the alts are based on original concept art of the character that didn't make the final cut for the original game ([[VideoGame/FinalFantasyIV Cecil]], [[VideoGame/FinalFantasyII Firion, The Emperor]]), some are versions of the character as they appeared in their actual game, their default Dissidia design having changed that (Golbez, [[VideoGame/FinalFantasyX Tidus]], [[VideoGame/FinalFantasyVI Terra]]), and others make references more complicated than that (''VideoGame/FinalFantasyIII'' was originally a game of four {{AFGNCAAP}} [[HeroicMime Heroic Mimes]], while the remake did away with that and gave the characters all personalities, back stories, unique appearances, and [[CanonName names]]; Dissidia references this by basing the FFIII representative on the Onion Knight of the original game, while having his alt look like Luneth, the "hero" of the remake). And yet others are outfits the characters actually wore ([[VideoGame/FinalFantasyVII Cloud's]] [[Anime/FinalFantasyVIIAdventChildren AC]] outfit or [[VideoGame/FinalFantasyVIII Squall's]] Seed Uniform). And others are a referance to OTHER characters (Ultimecia and Jecht).

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* ''VideoGame/DissidiaFinalFantasy'', the interesting part is that the alt colors make sense if you've played the other FF games or are otherwise a ''Franchise/FinalFantasy'' nerd--some of the alts are based on original concept art of the character that didn't make the final cut for the original game ([[VideoGame/FinalFantasyIV Cecil]], [[VideoGame/FinalFantasyII Firion, The Emperor]]), some are versions of the character as they appeared in their actual game, their default Dissidia design having changed that (Golbez, [[VideoGame/FinalFantasyX Tidus]], [[VideoGame/FinalFantasyVI Terra]]), and others make references more complicated than that (''VideoGame/FinalFantasyIII'' was originally a game of four {{AFGNCAAP}} [[HeroicMime Heroic Mimes]], while the remake did away with that and gave the characters all personalities, back stories, unique appearances, and [[CanonName names]]; Dissidia references this by basing the FFIII representative on the Onion Knight of the original game, while having his alt look like Luneth, the "hero" of the remake). And yet others are outfits the characters actually wore ([[VideoGame/FinalFantasyVII Cloud's]] [[Anime/FinalFantasyVIIAdventChildren AC]] outfit or [[VideoGame/FinalFantasyVIII Squall's]] Seed Uniform). And others are a referance to OTHER ''other'' characters (Ultimecia and Jecht).



* In ''VideoGame/WiiSports'', Player 1 is colored blue, Player 2 is red, Player 3 green, and 4 yellow.

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* In ''VideoGame/WiiSports'', Player 1 is colored blue, Player 2 is red, Player 3 green, and Player 4 yellow.



* In Creator/{{Konami}}'s ''Escape Kids'', the players are coded not only by color, but also by nationality. Player 1 is Syd Jones from the United States, Player 2 is Dio Vitale from Italy, Player 3 is Jya Aziz from India, and Player 4 is Ken Kosugi from Japan.



* The pieces in just about any board game by Milton Bradley or Parker Brothers with have players coded Red, Blue, Green, Yellow
** Trouble
** Sorry
** Mouse Trap
** CandyLand
** etc.

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* The pieces in just about any board game by Milton Bradley or Parker Brothers with will have players coded Red, Blue, Green, Yellow
Yellow:
** Trouble
''Trouble''
** Sorry
''Sorry!''
** Mouse Trap
''Mouse Trap''
** CandyLand
** etc.
''TabletopGame/CandyLand''



* TabletopGame/{{Go}} has an inversion of chess's color-coding: the leading player is the ''black'' side instead.

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* The color coding in TabletopGame/{{Go}} has an inversion is inverted from that of chess's color-coding: the chess: The leading player is the ''black'' side instead.



** This distinction carried over to Byzantine chariot races. The supporters of Blue and Green--the biggest teams--eventually got mixed up in political, religious, and social disputes, and their ''demes'' (fan clubs, basically) became, in effect, street gangs-cum-political parties. Tying fully into this trope, each ''deme'' wore the colors of its team (Blue supporters wore blue and Green supporters wore green). This led to the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nika_riots Nika riots]] of 532, when the Blues and Greens teamed up in protest of the Emperor's actions to keep their roiling culture in check.
* In RealLife sports, if two teams have primary jerseys with the same colors, one is forced to use the secondary kit. In most American sports, the issue is avoided entirely as the home team traditionally wears its colored uniform while the road team wears its white uniform. There are a few exceptions to the color-at-home rule:
** In basketball the home team wears white while the road team wears a dark color. The most famous exception to this rule is the Los Angeles Lakers, who traditionally wear gold at home, except for Sunday games when they wear white.
** In baseball the home team wears white while the road team wears gray, which can get even more complicated because baseball teams also wear colored jerseys. However, even when wearing colored jerseys, one constant remains: the home team wears white pants while the road team wears gray pants.

to:

** This distinction carried over to Byzantine chariot races. The supporters of Blue and Green--the biggest teams--eventually got mixed up in political, religious, and social disputes, and their ''demes'' (fan clubs, basically) became, in effect, street gangs-cum-political parties. Tying fully into this trope, each ''deme'' wore the colors of its team (Blue supporters wore blue and Green supporters wore green). This led to the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nika_riots Nika riots]] of 532, when the Blues and Greens teamed up in protest of the Emperor's emperor's actions to keep their roiling culture in check.
* In RealLife sports, if two teams have primary jerseys with the same colors, one is forced to use the secondary kit. In most North American sports, the issue is avoided entirely as the home team traditionally wears its colored uniform while the road team wears its white uniform. There are a few exceptions to the color-at-home rule:
** In basketball basketball, the home team wears white while the road team wears a dark color. The most famous exception to this rule is the Los Angeles Lakers, who traditionally wear gold at home, except for Sunday games when they wear white.
** In baseball baseball, the home team wears white while the road team wears gray, which can get even more complicated because baseball teams also wear colored jerseys. However, even when wearing colored jerseys, one constant remains: the The home team wears white pants while the road team wears gray pants.



** Variants in casual sports include single color\multicolor (if the other team doesn't have an uniform - though it's asked for everyone who is wearing the same color as the adversary to get another shirt), and shirtless\shirt on.
* Boxing, Professional Wrestling and other Ring sports typically have competitors in the Red Corner and the Blue Corner.
** For martial arts, the competitors wear different colors: Olympic (Greco-Roman) wrestling has red or blue singlets, Judo has white or blue ''dōgi'', and Taekwondo red or blue helmets/pads over white ''dobok''.
* While not related to ''uniforms'', several game shows have seated their contestants behind red, yellow, and blue podiums. A notable example is ''Series/WheelOfFortune''. Some have red and blue podiums like Series/CardSharks, for example.

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** Variants in casual sports include single color\multicolor (if the other team doesn't have an a uniform - though it's asked for everyone who is wearing the same color as the adversary to get another shirt), and shirtless\shirt on.
* Boxing, Professional Wrestling professional wrestling and other Ring ring sports typically have competitors in the Red Corner and the Blue Corner.
** For martial arts, the competitors wear different colors: Olympic (Greco-Roman) wrestling has red or blue singlets, Judo has white or blue ''dōgi'', and Taekwondo has red or blue helmets/pads over white ''dobok''.
* While not related to ''uniforms'', several game shows have seated their contestants behind red, yellow, and blue podiums. A notable example is ''Series/WheelOfFortune''. Some have red and blue podiums podiums, like Series/CardSharks, ''Series/CardSharks'', for example.
31st Dec '16 12:09:29 PM Prfnoff
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Added DiffLines:

[[folder:Maze Game]]
* In ''VideoGame/{{Trog}}'', the four players (in the four-player version) control Rex the Red Dino, Bloop the Blue Dino, Spike the Yellow Dino and Gwen the Pink Dino; their respective buttons and joysticks are thus color-coded on the dedicated cabinet.
[[/folder]]
28th Dec '16 10:32:51 AM Morgenthaler
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* ''{{Starcraft}}'' has this too. There are eight colors available, and you can be any of those colors (race does not matter). Color coding also happens for single player.

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* ''{{Starcraft}}'' ''VideoGame/{{Starcraft}}'' has this too. There are eight colors available, and you can be any of those colors (race does not matter). Color coding also happens for single player.



* While ''TransformersWarForCybertron'' didn't use this, having players choose separate models and colors for the Autobot and Decepticon versions of their classes, the sequel ''[[TransformersFallOfCybertron Fall of Cybertron]]'' does use this; one creates just one model for a class and differentiates the Autobot and Decepticon versions of it by picking from different pools of palette options. Also, the game automatically swaps voices and TronLines colors based on faction, with there being an option to use player-relative colors (blue = allies, red = enemies, regardless of faction) or absolute colors (red = Autobots, purple = Decepticons, regardless of which team the player is on).

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* While ''TransformersWarForCybertron'' ''VideoGame/TransformersWarForCybertron'' didn't use this, having players choose separate models and colors for the Autobot and Decepticon versions of their classes, the sequel ''[[TransformersFallOfCybertron ''[[VideoGame/TransformersFallOfCybertron Fall of Cybertron]]'' does use this; one creates just one model for a class and differentiates the Autobot and Decepticon versions of it by picking from different pools of palette options. Also, the game automatically swaps voices and TronLines colors based on faction, with there being an option to use player-relative colors (blue = allies, red = enemies, regardless of faction) or absolute colors (red = Autobots, purple = Decepticons, regardless of which team the player is on).



* ''CtrlAltDel''[='s=] "Players": [[OnlySaneMan One]] is blue, [[FieryRedhead Two]] is red, [[NonActionGuy Three]] is yellow, and [[PsychopathicManchild Four]] (the [[TheChick lone girl]]) is green.

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* ''CtrlAltDel''[='s=] ''Webcomic/CtrlAltDel''[='s=] "Players": [[OnlySaneMan One]] is blue, [[FieryRedhead Two]] is red, [[NonActionGuy Three]] is yellow, and [[PsychopathicManchild Four]] (the [[TheChick lone girl]]) is green.
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