History Main / ChronicBackstabbingDisorder

23rd May '17 10:29:28 PM SpocktorWho
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* ''Series/{{Supernatural}}'': Every character that has ever interacted with Crowley has been subsequently backstabbed by him. It's a running trend no one seems to pick up on.
-->'''Dean''': See, here's the thing when dealing with Crowley he will ''always'' find a way to bone you.
** Castiel, of all characters, comes off as having a severe case of this. It's partly due to him being repeatedly brainwashed and partly due to him having a hard time with the 'free will' and 'doing the right thing' part of decision-making. Meta-wise, making Castiel an enemy is a good reason for him to be [[DeusExitMachina unable to help the Winchesters]].

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* ''Series/{{Supernatural}}'': Every ''Series/{{Supernatural}}'':
**Every
character that has ever interacted with Crowley has been subsequently backstabbed by him. It's a running trend no one seems to pick up on.
-->'''Dean''': --->'''Dean''': See, here's the thing when dealing with Crowley he will ''always'' find a way to bone you.
** Castiel, of all characters, comes off as having a severe case of this. It's partly due to him being repeatedly brainwashed and partly due to him having a hard time with the 'free will' and 'doing the right thing' part of decision-making. Meta-wise, making Castiel an enemy or antagonist is a good reason for him to be [[DeusExitMachina unable to help the Winchesters]].


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** [[spoiler:Metatron]] betrayed Castiel (after specifically getting chummy with him only in order to use him), and arguably betrayed the Winchesters beforehand by deliberately failing to inform them that their current project ''would'' kill one of them. He then proceeded to amass followers and betrayed a bunch of ''them'' by telling them he had a special, important job for them, which turned out to be [[spoiler:going kamikaze by exploding themselves and claiming that Castiel told them to do it]]. He also arranged for [[spoiler:Kevin's]] death, despite having healed him in a previous episode. He screwed Castiel over ''again'' the next season, and although it was blatantly obvious that he ''wasn't'' on Castiel's side at that point, the screwing over came right on the heels of repeatedly trying to convince Castiel that they could put the past behind them and be buddies.
** Although a case of this ultimately working out in the good guys' favor: [[spoiler:the angel Gadreel]] legitimately helps the Winchesters, then betrays them after becoming TheDragon to a new BigBad, then gets uncomfortable with what the [[BigBad Big Bad]]'s doing and betrays ''him'', [[HeelFaceRevolvingDoor going back to helping the good guys]].
7th May '17 3:32:42 AM Euodiachloris
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** Generally the norm amongst sellswords, many of who will take anyone's money and fight for them. Until someone else turns up who offers them more money or looks like they might win. Brown Ben Plumm, captain of a free company, is a notable example, having [[spoiler: betrayed his former employers to defect to Dany's side, and then defected right back when things stopped looking so rosy]].

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** Generally the norm amongst sellswords, many of who whom will take anyone's money and fight for them. Until someone else turns up who offers them more money or looks like they might win. Brown Ben Plumm, captain of a free company, is a notable example, having [[spoiler: betrayed his former employers to defect to Dany's side, and then defected right back when things stopped looking so rosy]].
4th May '17 2:04:22 PM Gregzilla
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* Wuya from ''WesternAnimation/XiaolinShowdown''. Once she was demoted to minion, her [[TheChessmaster Chessmaster]] boss considered her so [[ReliableTraitor reliably untrustworthy]] he incorporated her inevitable betrayal into his plans.

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* Wuya from ''WesternAnimation/XiaolinShowdown''. Once she was demoted to minion, her [[TheChessmaster Chessmaster]] boss considered her so [[ReliableTraitor reliably untrustworthy]] untrustworthy he incorporated her inevitable betrayal into his plans.
24th Apr '17 4:39:53 PM JustinCognito
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*** The Ebon Dragon has plans to break out of Hell. He's aligned with his fellow kings of Hell to get out, but plans to close the gate on them once he's out, if he can help it. However, it's said that, should he pull this off, his ''own component souls'' will fight to keep some part of him trapped in Hell, because he can't help but betray himself on the most fundamental level.
23rd Apr '17 5:37:52 PM Hjortron18
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** Like the comic book character he is based upon, Loki from ''Film/{{Thor}}'' is prone to this sort of behavior. In the first film in which he appears, he [[spoiler: lets enemies into his family's weapons' vault, attempts to kill his adoptive brother, and tricks an enemy king (who is also his biological father) into trying to kill his adoptive father, only to kill him in order to prove his loyalty to said adoptive father]]. Ironically, in that first movie he seemed to be motivated, at least in part, by [[WellIntentionedExtremist loyalty towards Asgard,]] [[WoobieDestroyerOfWorlds and desperation to prove that he was a good son.]] In ''Dark World'', Thor takes it as a given that Loki will eventually betray him and so do Lady Sif and the Warriors Three.

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** Like the comic book character he is based upon, Loki from ''Film/{{Thor}}'' is prone to this sort of behavior. In the first film in which he appears, he [[spoiler: lets enemies into his family's weapons' vault, attempts to kill his adoptive brother, and tricks an enemy king (who is also his biological father) into trying to kill his adoptive father, only to kill him in order to prove his loyalty to said adoptive father]]. Ironically, in that first movie he seemed to be motivated, at least in part, by [[WellIntentionedExtremist loyalty towards Asgard,]] [[WoobieDestroyerOfWorlds and desperation to prove that he was a good son.]] In ''Dark World'', ''[[Film/ThorTheDarkWorld The Dark World]]'', Thor takes it as a given that Loki will eventually betray him and so do Lady Sif and the Warriors Three.
22nd Apr '17 3:42:42 PM babyhenchy1
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* Scar from ''Disney/TheLionKing'' is a classic case of this. He has his own brother killed, tricks his own trusting nephew into blaming himself, tries to have that nephew killed, drives the hyenas (who helped him kill his brother) nearly to starvation, and then when confronted by his previously self-blaming nephew, (who finally saw Scar for the backstabber he is) Scar tries to blame everything on the hyenas to save his own hide. Even though all this lying and backstabbing is what got him into the situation he is in to begin with.

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* Scar from ''Disney/TheLionKing'' is a classic case of this. He has his own brother killed, tricks his own trusting nephew into blaming himself, tries to have that nephew killed, drives the hyenas (who helped him kill his brother) nearly to starvation, and then when confronted by his previously self-blaming nephew, (who finally saw Scar for the backstabber he is) Scar tries to blame everything on the hyenas to save his own hide. Even though all this lying and backstabbing is what got him into the situation he is in to begin with. [[TheDogBitesBack The last backstab proves to be the final straw for the now enraged and starving hyenas.]]
17th Apr '17 12:55:50 PM PF
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In fiction, it is common for characters on either the heroic or villainous side to betray their superiors or comrades. Chronic Backstabbing Disorder is when a specific character constantly and ''successfully'' betrays his apparent allegiances, only to move on to a new group and repeat the pattern. The character may be doing it for a higher purpose (making them TheChessmaster) or their own selfish betterment (making them a WildCard), or they could just be AxCrazy. Different from the HeelFaceRevolvingDoor in that it's not always a hero/villain swap, and in fact is usually switching between [[EnemyCivilWar different groups of antagonists]].

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In fiction, it is common for characters on either the heroic or villainous side to betray their superiors or comrades. Chronic Backstabbing Disorder is when a specific character constantly and ''successfully'' betrays his their apparent allegiances, only to move on to a new group and repeat the pattern. The character may be doing it for a higher purpose (making them TheChessmaster) or their own selfish betterment (making them a WildCard), or they could just be AxCrazy. Different from the HeelFaceRevolvingDoor in that it's not always a hero/villain swap, and in fact is usually switching between [[EnemyCivilWar different groups of antagonists]].
17th Apr '17 10:26:40 AM Jgamer
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** Whenever the Cybermen make a bargain, they never hold up their end of it. Eleven ruefully lampshades this in ''Nightmare in Silver'' when he's engaged with a game of chess with the Cyberplanner [[spoiler: who's hijacking his mind]]. If the Cyberplanner wins, [[spoiler: he'll hijack the rest of the Doctor's mind and with it gain the secrets of TimeTravel]]. If The Doctor wins, they'll just try to do it anyway. Thus, the game is more of a stalling tactic until The Doctor comes up with an idea.
30th Mar '17 2:02:27 PM ChaoticNovelist
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** Like the comic book character he is based upon, Loki from ''Film/{{Thor}}'' is prone to this sort of behavior. In the first film in which he appears, he [[spoiler: lets enemies into his family's weapons' vault, attempts to kill his adoptive brother, and tricks an enemy king (who is also his biological father) into trying to kill his adoptive father, only to kill him in order to prove his loyalty to said adoptive father]]. Ironically, in that first movie he seemed to be motivated, at least in part, by [[WellIntentionedExtremist loyalty towards Asgard,]] [[WoobieDestroyerOfWorlds and desperation to prove that he was a good son.]]

to:

** Like the comic book character he is based upon, Loki from ''Film/{{Thor}}'' is prone to this sort of behavior. In the first film in which he appears, he [[spoiler: lets enemies into his family's weapons' vault, attempts to kill his adoptive brother, and tricks an enemy king (who is also his biological father) into trying to kill his adoptive father, only to kill him in order to prove his loyalty to said adoptive father]]. Ironically, in that first movie he seemed to be motivated, at least in part, by [[WellIntentionedExtremist loyalty towards Asgard,]] [[WoobieDestroyerOfWorlds and desperation to prove that he was a good son.]] In ''Dark World'', Thor takes it as a given that Loki will eventually betray him and so do Lady Sif and the Warriors Three.



* In ''Film/XMenDaysOfFuturePast'', '70s Magneto turns on both Xavier and Mystique the second it's convenient, trying to [[spoiler:kill Mystique for her part in setting up the BadFuture]]. He then tries to [[spoiler:use the Sentinels to kill Nixon]], making a potentially ''worse'' future until he's stopped.

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* In ''Film/XMenDaysOfFuturePast'', '70s Magneto turns on both Xavier and Mystique the second it's convenient, trying to [[spoiler:kill Mystique Mystique, his former lover and NumberTwo, for her part in setting up the BadFuture]]. He then tries to [[spoiler:use the Sentinels to kill Nixon]], making a potentially ''worse'' future until he's stopped.



* [[Film/{{War}} Rogue Assassin]] is doing this. [[spoiler:Subverted as it turns out he is not actually Rogue.]]

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* [[Film/{{War}} ''Film/{{War}}'': Rogue Assassin]] Assassin is doing this.betraying everyone he works with. That must be how he got the name. [[spoiler:Subverted as it turns out he is not actually Rogue.]]



* Lu Bu of ''Literature/RomanceOfTheThreeKingdoms'' manages this in truly appalling fashion. The Reader's Digest version would go: murdered his master for a horse, murdered his next master for a 16 year old girl, became a rebellious warlord, betrayed his friend Liu Bei, and finally tried to sell his services to his sworn enemy Cao Cao. Cao, being a MagnificentBastard, said simply, "Strangle and expose."
** Actually a more ambiguous character than the standard case; it's ambiguous whether he's [[NeutralEvil naturally treacherous]], or just [[TheCorruptible really easy to persuade]]. Notably, his betrayal of Liu Bei was after saving the man's life and came as a result of multiple conflicting obligations, and was followed by Liu Bei advising Cao Cao to have him RewardedAsATraitorDeserves.
** And Liu Bei himself is an ambiguous case. He's talked up as a great hero, but everyone he ever works for dies, normally after willing their entire empire to him, you start to wonder [[UnreliableNarrator just how reliable the narrator is]].

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* ''Literature/RomanceOfTheThreeKingdoms'':
**
Lu Bu of ''Literature/RomanceOfTheThreeKingdoms'' manages this in truly appalling fashion. The Reader's Digest version would go: murdered his master for a horse, murdered his next master for a 16 year old girl, became a rebellious warlord, betrayed his friend Liu Bei, and finally tried to sell his services to his sworn enemy Cao Cao. Cao, being a MagnificentBastard, said simply, "Strangle and expose."
** Actually a more ambiguous character than the standard case; it's ambiguous whether he's [[NeutralEvil naturally treacherous]], or just [[TheCorruptible really easy to persuade]]. Notably, his betrayal of Liu Bei was after saving the man's life and came as a result of multiple conflicting obligations, and was followed by Liu Bei advising Cao Cao to have him RewardedAsATraitorDeserves.
** And
Liu Bei himself is an ambiguous case. He's talked up as a great hero, but everyone he ever works for dies, normally after willing their entire empire to him, you him. You start to wonder [[UnreliableNarrator just how reliable the narrator is]].


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*''Literature/JourneyToChaos'': Dengel is known for switching sides when advantageous. In his own words, " Unlike my brethren, I know when to make deals. [[spoiler: This is why the BigBad knew that his WeCanRuleTogether attempt would succeed in the climax.]]
24th Mar '17 8:54:41 PM iowaforever
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* Aku from ''WesternAnimation/SamuraiJack'' loves to spread misery and pain, and what better way than to betray a close ally at an inopportune moment? A standout example is "Jack and the Ultra-Robots"; Aku forces a scientist to build a new line of killbots in exchange for the safety of his village, but as soon as they are finished he orders the Ultra-Robots to destroy the village as a "test run".
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