History Main / ChristianityIsCatholic

7th Feb '16 10:11:55 AM nombretomado
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* TheCrusades - Roman Catholic medieval shenanigans, for which the Christendom as a whole (or even contemporary Western and/or European culture in general) is often held responsible. For reference these began shortly after the official split with the Orthodox church and ended centuries before the Protestant reformation, so for western Europe at the time Christianity really was still Catholic. The major exception was the Albigensian Crusade against the Cathar sect, which was deemed heretical.
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* TheCrusades UsefulNotes/TheCrusades - Roman Catholic medieval shenanigans, for which the Christendom as a whole (or even contemporary Western and/or European culture in general) is often held responsible. For reference these began shortly after the official split with the Orthodox church and ended centuries before the Protestant reformation, so for western Europe at the time Christianity really was still Catholic. The major exception was the Albigensian Crusade against the Cathar sect, which was deemed heretical.
6th Feb '16 8:44:29 PM MsChibi
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Compare NunsNRosaries. See also ReligiousStereotype and ChurchOfSaintGenericus.
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Compare NunsNRosaries. See also ReligiousStereotype and ChurchOfSaintGenericus. ChurchOfSaintGenericus. A character who is AmbiguouslyChristian is ''almost'' always either a Catholic or a Protestant of TheFundamentalist variety.
27th Jan '16 8:28:54 PM Mdumas43073
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This trope doesn't seem to apply to [[TheWestern Westerns]], where any minister (or "preacher") will generally be a black-coated Evangelical Lutheran or Methodist type, when he isn't a Quaker or a Mormon. However, if the film shows the padre of a [[UsefulNotes/{{Mexico}} Mexican]] village, this trope will be played straight--although frankly [[JustifiedTrope this was usually true]]. It may also appear as part of an EstablishingShot for other traditionally Catholic places such as Italy or France. Black churches are almost always depicted as Baptist or Pentecostal (although some of the earliest black Americans in colonial times were Catholic/Voodoo practitioners from the French West Indies), as are white [[DeepSouth Southern]] churches (the one exception being UsefulNotes/NewOrleans, home to the largest Catholic diocese in the US). The upper-class WhiteAngloSaxonProtestant, usually residing in the tonier precincts of HollywoodNewEngland and belonging to one of the more venerable "mainline" denominations such as the Episcopal Church, is a stock character of long standing.
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This trope doesn't seem to apply to [[TheWestern Westerns]], where any minister (or "preacher") will generally be a black-coated Evangelical Lutheran or Methodist type, when he isn't a Quaker or a Mormon. However, if the film shows the padre of a [[UsefulNotes/{{Mexico}} Mexican]] village, this trope will be played straight--although frankly [[JustifiedTrope this was usually true]]. It may also appear as part of an EstablishingShot for other traditionally Catholic places such as Italy or France. Black churches are almost always depicted as Baptist or Pentecostal (although some of the earliest black Americans in colonial times were Catholic/Voodoo practitioners from the French West Indies), as are white [[DeepSouth Southern]] churches (the one exception being UsefulNotes/NewOrleans, home to the largest Catholic diocese in the US). The And the upper-class WhiteAngloSaxonProtestant, usually residing in the tonier precincts of HollywoodNewEngland and belonging to one of the more venerable "mainline" denominations such as the Episcopal Church, is a stock character of long standing.
27th Jan '16 8:28:06 PM Mdumas43073
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Finally, note that this trope can be something of a BerserkButton for certain sects - the word ''catholic'' is in fact a common adjective (meaning universal or all-encompassing), and is often used to denote the quality of being part of the larger Christian Church,[[note]] i.e., the totality of all people calling themselves Christians[[/note]] and if they take your mistake lightly they will correct you and say you're talking about the ''Roman Catholic Church''. Indeed, it appears in most versions of the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apostle%27s_Creed Apostles' Creed]], a neat encapsulation of Christian belief. Various Orthodox and even Protestant churches also claim the quality of catholicity for themselves, and others still believe that for any one church to call itself "Catholic" is to imply that it is the ''only'' true church...which, for obvious reasons, annoys people who don't belong to it. And on the flip side, there are also extremely conservative Protestants (as well as those in Reformed theology- which grew out of the Protestant reformation) who believe Catholicism ''isn't'' Christian...
to:
Finally, note that this trope can be something of a BerserkButton for certain sects - the word ''catholic'' is in fact a common adjective (meaning universal or all-encompassing), and is often used to denote the quality of being part of the larger Christian Church,[[note]] i.e., the totality of all people calling themselves Christians[[/note]] and if they take your mistake lightly they will correct you and say you're talking about the ''Roman Catholic Church''. Indeed, it appears in most versions of the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apostle%27s_Creed Apostles' Creed]], a neat encapsulation of Christian belief. Various Orthodox and even Protestant churches also claim the quality of catholicity for themselves, and others still believe that for any one church to call itself "Catholic" is to imply that it is the ''only'' true church...which, for obvious reasons, annoys people who don't belong to it. And on the flip side, there are also extremely conservative Protestants (as well as those in Reformed theology- which grew out of the Protestant reformation) who believe that Catholicism ''isn't'' Christian...really Christianity...
27th Jan '16 8:27:04 PM Mdumas43073
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Finally, note that this trope can be something of a BerserkButton for certain sects - the word ''catholic'' is in fact a common adjective (meaning universal or all-encompassing), and is often used to denote the quality of being part of the larger Christian Church[[note]] i.e., the totality of all people calling themselves Christians[[/note]], and if they take your mistake lightly they will correct you and say you're talking about the ''Roman Catholic Church''. Indeed, it appears in most versions of the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apostle%27s_Creed Apostles' Creed]], a neat encapsulation of Christian belief. Various Orthodox and even Protestant churches also claim the quality of catholicity for themselves, and others still believe that for any one church to call itself "Catholic" is to imply that it is the ''only'' true church...which, for obvious reasons, annoys people who don't belong to it. And on the flip side, there are also extremely conservative Protestants (as well as those in Reformed theology- which grew out of the Protestant reformation) who believe Catholicism ''isn't'' Christian...
to:
Finally, note that this trope can be something of a BerserkButton for certain sects - the word ''catholic'' is in fact a common adjective (meaning universal or all-encompassing), and is often used to denote the quality of being part of the larger Christian Church[[note]] Church,[[note]] i.e., the totality of all people calling themselves Christians[[/note]], Christians[[/note]] and if they take your mistake lightly they will correct you and say you're talking about the ''Roman Catholic Church''. Indeed, it appears in most versions of the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apostle%27s_Creed Apostles' Creed]], a neat encapsulation of Christian belief. Various Orthodox and even Protestant churches also claim the quality of catholicity for themselves, and others still believe that for any one church to call itself "Catholic" is to imply that it is the ''only'' true church...which, for obvious reasons, annoys people who don't belong to it. And on the flip side, there are also extremely conservative Protestants (as well as those in Reformed theology- which grew out of the Protestant reformation) who believe Catholicism ''isn't'' Christian...
27th Jan '16 8:26:23 PM Mdumas43073
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Note that this trope is reversed in some countries; outside the US Protestant countries tend to assume Protestantism and vice-versa. The UK default is, naturally, [[TheVicar the Church of England]] - which can variously be depicted as "Anglo-Catholic" (High Church), "Mainline Protestant" (Broad Church), or "Evangelical Protestant" (Low Church). The Russian default is, obviously, the [[UsefulNotes/OrthodoxChristianity Orthodox church]].
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Note that this trope is reversed in some doesn't apply to all countries; outside the US U.S., Protestant countries tend to assume Protestantism and vice-versa. The UK default is, naturally, [[TheVicar the Church of England]] - which can variously be depicted as "Anglo-Catholic" (High Church), "Mainline Protestant" (Broad Church), or "Evangelical Protestant" (Low Church). The Russian default is, obviously, the [[UsefulNotes/OrthodoxChristianity Orthodox church]].
27th Jan '16 8:25:23 PM Mdumas43073
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Before you worry about a DoubleStandard, keep in mind most of Catholicism featured in media is usually made up or poorly researched, and usually resembles Protestantism. For example, Purgatory and Limbo are almost always confused. [[note]]Helpful hint for the perplexed -- Purgatory, in Catholic theology, is a state of cleansing that souls undergo to cleanse or purge them of the remaining traces of repented (i.e. confessed and ceased) sin, while Limbo [[WordOfDante was never an actual Catholic doctrine]], mostly used as an attempt to answer the question "Does Buddha go to Hell despite living morally simply because he could not even hear about Jesus Christ? That's injustice". It was depicted as a mostly neutral area, but one that did not have the presence of God.[[/note]]
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Before you worry about a DoubleStandard, keep in mind most of Catholicism featured in media is usually made up or poorly researched, and usually resembles Protestantism. For example, Purgatory and Limbo are almost always confused. [[note]]Helpful hint for the perplexed -- Purgatory, in Catholic theology, is a state of cleansing that souls undergo to cleanse or purge them of the remaining traces of repented (i.e. confessed and ceased) sin, while Limbo [[WordOfDante was never an actual Catholic doctrine]], mostly used as an attempt to answer the question "Does Buddha go to Hell despite living morally simply because he could not even hear about Jesus Christ? That's injustice". It was depicted as a mostly neutral area, but one that did not have the presence of God.[[/note]]
27th Jan '16 8:24:34 PM Mdumas43073
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In much fiction, despite the portrayal of Christians as Catholics, most [[Literature/TheBible Bible]] [[AsTheGoodBookSays quotations]] will be from the King James Version, a ''Protestant'' translation. [[note]] In fact, many Catholics seem to think that the King James Bible is the ''only'' Bible used by Protestants, or that its new editions are still written in archaic language (which they aren't). [[/note]] Everything just sounds way more "[[HollywoodApocrypha biblical]]" [[YeOldeButcheredeEnglishe with thee's and thou's and ye's]] (although Catholics have the Douay-Rheims, an English translation which came at about the same time). Still, the King James renderings are much more familiar in a highly "Protestant-by-default" culture. Psalm 23, for example, is usually rendered the "KJV way" ("The Lord is my shepherd, I shall not want.") even among English-speaking Catholics.[[note]]The Douay rendering is "The Lord ruleth me: and I shall want nothing." Also, a different division of chapters makes it the twenty-''second'' psalm.[[/note]] The even more traditional Vulgate Bible will almost ''never'' be quoted, although it can happen because it's written in [[AltumVidetur Latin]].
to:
In much fiction, despite the portrayal of Christians as Catholics, most [[Literature/TheBible Bible]] [[AsTheGoodBookSays quotations]] will be from the King James Version, a ''Protestant'' translation. [[note]] In fact, many Catholics seem to think that the King James Bible is the ''only'' Bible used by Protestants, or that its new editions are still written in archaic language (which they aren't). [[/note]] Everything just sounds way more "[[HollywoodApocrypha biblical]]" [[YeOldeButcheredeEnglishe with thee's and thou's and ye's]] (although Catholics have the Douay-Rheims, an English translation which came at about the same time). Still, the King James renderings are much more familiar in a highly "Protestant-by-default" culture. Psalm 23, for example, is usually rendered the "KJV way" ("The Lord is my shepherd, I shall not want.") even among English-speaking Catholics.[[note]]The Douay rendering is "The Lord ruleth me: and I shall want nothing." Also, a different division of chapters makes it the twenty-''second'' psalm.[[/note]] The even more traditional Vulgate Bible will almost ''never'' be quoted, although it can happen because it's written in [[AltumVidetur Latin]].
27th Jan '16 8:23:43 PM Mdumas43073
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Historically, the US has been predominantly Protestant. Most of the original thirteen colonies were composed of Protestant groups (Maryland being the sole exception), but you'd never know this from any of the media we cover.
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Historically, the US United States has been predominantly Protestant. Most of the original thirteen colonies were composed of Protestant groups (Maryland being the sole exception), but you'd never know this from any of the media we cover.
22nd Jan '16 11:39:06 PM 10-13-2
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In much fiction, despite the portrayal of Christians as Catholics, most [[Literature/TheBible Bible]] [[AsTheGoodBookSays quotations]] will be from the King James Version, a ''Protestant'' translation. Everything just sounds way more "[[HollywoodApocrypha biblical]]" [[YeOldeButcheredeEnglishe with thee's and thou's and ye's]] (although Catholics have the Douay-Rheims, an English translation which came at about the same time). Still, the King James renderings are much more familiar in a highly "Protestant-by-default" culture. Psalm 23, for example, is usually rendered the "KJV way" ("The Lord is my shepherd, I shall not want.") even among English-speaking Catholics.[[note]]The Douay rendering is "The Lord ruleth me: and I shall want nothing." Also, a different division of chapters makes it the twenty-''second'' psalm.[[/note]] The even more traditional Vulgate Bible will almost ''never'' be quoted, although it can happen because it's written in [[AltumVidetur Latin]].
to:
In much fiction, despite the portrayal of Christians as Catholics, most [[Literature/TheBible Bible]] [[AsTheGoodBookSays quotations]] will be from the King James Version, a ''Protestant'' translation. [[note]] In fact, many Catholics seem to think that the King James Bible is the ''only'' Bible used by Protestants, or that its new editions are still written in archaic language (which they aren't). [[/note]] Everything just sounds way more "[[HollywoodApocrypha biblical]]" [[YeOldeButcheredeEnglishe with thee's and thou's and ye's]] (although Catholics have the Douay-Rheims, an English translation which came at about the same time). Still, the King James renderings are much more familiar in a highly "Protestant-by-default" culture. Psalm 23, for example, is usually rendered the "KJV way" ("The Lord is my shepherd, I shall not want.") even among English-speaking Catholics.[[note]]The Douay rendering is "The Lord ruleth me: and I shall want nothing." Also, a different division of chapters makes it the twenty-''second'' psalm.[[/note]] The even more traditional Vulgate Bible will almost ''never'' be quoted, although it can happen because it's written in [[AltumVidetur Latin]].
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