History Main / CheatedAngle

21st Aug '16 12:09:10 PM MrMediaGuy2
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* In ''ComicStrip/PhoebeAndHerUnicorn'', no matter which way Marigold the unicorn is turned, the mane on the top of her head is always behind her horn ([[http://www.gocomics.com/heavenly-nostrils/2013/03/09 e.g. here]]). [[http://pedantia.deviantart.com/art/How-to-draw-Marigold-453999231 Lampshaded by the author as "it's magic".]]



* In ''Webcomic/PhoebeAndHerUnicorn'', no matter which way Marigold the unicorn is turned, the mane on the top of her head is always behind her horn ([[http://www.gocomics.com/heavenly-nostrils/2013/03/09 e.g. here]]). [[http://pedantia.deviantart.com/art/How-to-draw-Marigold-453999231 Lampshaded by the author as "it's magic".]]
17th Jul '16 12:13:07 PM ThePocket
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Added DiffLines:

* Look up some fan art of Alphys from ''VideoGame/{{Undertale}}'' and compare it to the official sprites from the game. It's clear that her head was not designed to work three-dimensionally, and that fan artists almost universally take liberties to turn it into something that will.


Added DiffLines:

** Strong Sad and Bubs exhibit this as well -- their heads are always placed partly in front of their bodies, which means that showing them from a full side angle would be pretty much impossible to make look right. This is demonstrated by some unfortunate camera angles in the video game.
15th Jul '16 8:31:58 AM TotemicHero
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* Mike Warner of ''Webcomic/ItsWalky'' and ''Webcomic/{{Shortpacked}}'' has hair that juts outwards at the same angle at all times. In fact, this ended up posing a problem for the artist when Mike figurines were in pre-production and he needed to find out how to angle the hair in the third dimension.

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* Mike Warner of ''Webcomic/ItsWalky'' ''Webcomic/ItsWalky'', the sequel comic ''Webcomic/{{Shortpacked}}'', and ''Webcomic/{{Shortpacked}}'' their AU spinoff ''Webcomic/DumbingOfAge'', has hair that juts outwards at the same angle at all times. In fact, this ended up posing a problem for the artist when Mike figurines were in pre-production and he needed to find out how to angle the hair in the third dimension.
14th Jul '16 10:12:06 PM ElectricBoogaloo
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Added DiffLines:

** Speaking of Simpsons, Lisa and Maggie's signature star-shaped hairdo looks pretty much exactly the same regardless of angle.
18th Jun '16 9:24:35 PM JamesAustin
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In VideoGames and CGI animation, this trope is usually [[{{EnforcedTrope}} enforced]] with sprites. Sprites are two-dimensional images, so they have to always be facing the camera because they look paper-thin when viewed from any other angle. However, sometimes sprites are used in that fashion to make something look sharp, particularly in older games and ones which don't have much processing power.

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In VideoGames and CGI animation, this trope is usually [[{{EnforcedTrope}} enforced]] {{enforced|Trope}} with sprites. Sprites are two-dimensional images, so they have to always be facing the camera because they look paper-thin when viewed from any other angle. However, sometimes sprites are used in that fashion to make something look sharp, particularly in older games and ones which don't have much processing power.



OTropesAreTools; sometimes cheating angles is preferable -- be it to keep that distinctive feature visible, or to avoid a distracting tangent (having to tell the audience what's happening because they can't see for sure for example) that would be caused by drawing it "correctly". In addition, this happens all the time even in live action. Visual storytelling requires reality to bend in order to tell the story with all the important information. Individuals will stand unusually close together so that no one is cut off by the frame, give enough room for the camera to follow them into a confined space and [[ScullyBox actors will stand on boxes]] so they don't disappear behind the tall people.

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OTropesAreTools; Of course, TropesAreTools; sometimes cheating angles is preferable -- be it to keep that distinctive feature visible, or to avoid a distracting tangent (having to tell the audience what's happening because they can't see for sure for example) that would be caused by drawing it "correctly". In addition, this happens all the time even in live action. Visual storytelling requires reality to bend in order to tell the story with all the important information. Individuals will stand unusually close together so that no one is cut off by the frame, give enough room for the camera to follow them into a confined space and [[ScullyBox actors will stand on boxes]] so they don't disappear behind the tall people.
17th Jun '16 7:23:21 AM ChaoticNovelist
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Of course TropesAreTools. Sometimes cheating angles is preferable -- be it to keep that distinctive feature visible, or to avoid a distracting tangent (having to tell the audience what's happening because they can't see for sure for example) that would be caused by drawing it "correctly". In addition, this happens all the time even in live action. Visual storytelling requires reality to bend in order to tell the story with all the important information. Individuals will stand unusually close together so that no one is cut off by the frame, give enough room for the camera to follow them into a confined space and [[ScullyBox actors will stand on boxes]] so they don't disappear behind the tall people.

to:

Of course TropesAreTools. Sometimes OTropesAreTools; sometimes cheating angles is preferable -- be it to keep that distinctive feature visible, or to avoid a distracting tangent (having to tell the audience what's happening because they can't see for sure for example) that would be caused by drawing it "correctly". In addition, this happens all the time even in live action. Visual storytelling requires reality to bend in order to tell the story with all the important information. Individuals will stand unusually close together so that no one is cut off by the frame, give enough room for the camera to follow them into a confined space and [[ScullyBox actors will stand on boxes]] so they don't disappear behind the tall people.



*** This is an interesting example of an in-universe manifestation of this trope: as it was revealed in one of the latest ''Anime/DragonBallSuper'' manga chapters, looking the same no matter what angles you look at them from is an intrinsic property of Dragonballs, and therefore part of their magical nature. That must make them freaky as hell to actually handle.

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*** This is an interesting example of an in-universe manifestation of this trope: as it was revealed in one of the latest ''Anime/DragonBallSuper'' manga chapters, looking the same no matter what angles you look at them from is an intrinsic property of Dragonballs, and therefore part of their magical nature. That must make them freaky as hell to actually handle.
14th Jun '16 8:04:55 PM Gamermaster
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Added DiffLines:

* The Master Stars in ''WebComic/LsEmpire'' are per WordOfGod always seen from the same angle and are unaffected by changes in lighting. [[spoiler: The fact that Dark Star is able to change their angle is treated as a case of BeyondTheImpossible.]]
6th Jun '16 1:00:20 PM nighttrainfm
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*** This is an interesting example of an in-universe manifestation of this trope: as it was revealed in one of the latest Dragon Ball Super manga chapters, looking the same no matter what angles you look at them from is an intrinsic property of Dragonballs, and therefore part of their magical nature. That must make them freaky as hell to actually handle.

to:

*** This is an interesting example of an in-universe manifestation of this trope: as it was revealed in one of the latest Dragon Ball Super ''Anime/DragonBallSuper'' manga chapters, looking the same no matter what angles you look at them from is an intrinsic property of Dragonballs, and therefore part of their magical nature. That must make them freaky as hell to actually handle.
23rd May '16 2:47:43 PM LimeTH
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* WesternAnimation/SpongeBobSquarePants, despite being one of those rare characters whose design lends itself well to unique angles, is rarely, if ever shown from the side. The few times he is, it's probably to demonstrate why: his face literally disappears from the audience's view from that angle. Other times, his face IS visible from the side, where it's awkwardly jutting out from the side view, making it look like he has a beak.

to:

* WesternAnimation/SpongeBobSquarePants, despite being one of those rare characters whose design lends itself well to unique angles, is rarely, if ever shown from the side. The few times he is, it's probably to demonstrate why: his face literally disappears from the audience's view from that angle. Other times, his face IS visible from the side, where it's [[https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/736x/19/2b/7e/192b7e7c997278d9f6bce24d0377585c.jpg awkwardly jutting out from the side view, making it look like he has a beak.view.]]
23rd May '16 2:44:18 PM LimeTH
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* WesternAnimation/SpongeBobSquarePants, despite being one of those rare characters whose design lends itself well to unique angles, is rarely, if ever shown from the side. The few times he is, it's probably to demonstrate why: his face literally disappears from the audience's view from that angle.

to:

* WesternAnimation/SpongeBobSquarePants, despite being one of those rare characters whose design lends itself well to unique angles, is rarely, if ever shown from the side. The few times he is, it's probably to demonstrate why: his face literally disappears from the audience's view from that angle. Other times, his face IS visible from the side, where it's awkwardly jutting out from the side view, making it look like he has a beak.
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