History Main / CharacterLevel

30th Dec '16 3:50:34 PM radams
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* The UrExamples: when a pawn reaches the eighth rank in [[Chess]] it is promoted to a queen (or, rarely, another officer). When a piece in [[Checkers]] reaches the eighth rank, it is promoted to a king and gains the ability move backwards.

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* The UrExamples: when a pawn reaches the eighth rank in [[Chess]] {{Chess}} it is promoted to a queen (or, rarely, another officer). When a piece in [[Checkers]] {{Checkers}} reaches the eighth rank, it is promoted to a king and gains the ability move backwards.
30th Dec '16 3:49:31 PM radams
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* The UrExamples: when a pawn reaches the eighth rank in [[Chess]] it is promoted to a queen (or, rarely, another officer). When a piece in [[Checkers]] reaches the eighth rank, it is promoted to a king and gains the ability move backwards.
25th Nov '16 9:21:15 PM nombretomado
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* ''[[TabletopGame/{{Fatal}} FATAL]]'' apparently has levels too...although your character is supposed to die before level 20. The author considers this a ''good thing''.
* Dwellers in ''[[{{TabletopGame/FateOfTheNornsRagnarok}} Fate of the Norns: Ragnarok]]'' earn whole levels, usually one per campaign, that allow them to draw a new rune of power from their pool during combat, or gain a new rune imbued with more powers in said pool.
* HERO System games like ''{{Champions}}'' don't use Character Levels or even a typical class progression. Rather, your {{Experience Points}} function in a manner identical to the points given at character creation, creating a smoother curve of progression than the typical "staircase" style of level-based systems. (In other words, characters tend to end up improving more often but in correspondingly smaller steps...barring cases like saving up to buy a complete new major superpower or the like.)
* ''MutantsAndMasterminds'': First edition had levels the character earned after every 15 power points. These levels in turn acted as a cap on how much a character could invest in certain attributes. Second edition loosened this up a bit, and level simply became a cap on all players power point expenditures (the cap only applies to certain categories) that could be changed any time the GM felt like it.
* ''[[TabletopGame/{{PoniesAndParasprites}} Ponies and Parasprites]]'' averts this in much the same way [[TabletopGame/{{OldWorldofDarkness}} the World of Darkness]] does. It allows players to improve certain aspects of their characters with experience points instead of giving them a rigid 'class' to play as.

to:

* ''[[TabletopGame/{{Fatal}} FATAL]]'' ''TabletopGame/{{Fatal}}'' apparently has levels too...although your character is supposed to die before level 20. The author considers this a ''good thing''.
* Dwellers in ''[[{{TabletopGame/FateOfTheNornsRagnarok}} Fate of the Norns: Ragnarok]]'' ''TabletopGame/FateOfTheNornsRagnarok'' earn whole levels, usually one per campaign, that allow them to draw a new rune of power from their pool during combat, or gain a new rune imbued with more powers in said pool.
* HERO System games like ''{{Champions}}'' ''TabletopGame/{{Champions}}'' don't use Character Levels or even a typical class progression. Rather, your {{Experience Points}} function in a manner identical to the points given at character creation, creating a smoother curve of progression than the typical "staircase" style of level-based systems. (In other words, characters tend to end up improving more often but in correspondingly smaller steps...barring cases like saving up to buy a complete new major superpower or the like.)
* ''MutantsAndMasterminds'': ''TabletopGame/MutantsAndMasterminds'': First edition had levels the character earned after every 15 power points. These levels in turn acted as a cap on how much a character could invest in certain attributes. Second edition loosened this up a bit, and level simply became a cap on all players power point expenditures (the cap only applies to certain categories) that could be changed any time the GM felt like it.
* ''[[TabletopGame/{{PoniesAndParasprites}} Ponies and Parasprites]]'' ''TabletopGame/PoniesAndParasprites'' averts this in much the same way [[TabletopGame/{{OldWorldofDarkness}} [[TabletopGame/OldWorldofDarkness the World of Darkness]] does. It allows players to improve certain aspects of their characters with experience points instead of giving them a rigid 'class' to play as.



* ''[[{{TabletopGame/Forsooth}} Forsooth!]]'' has Fate score that can be used to resolve character conflicts in those rare instances when players don't agree on the outcome. Players usually have multiple characters, the highest Fate character being the Protagonist.

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* ''[[{{TabletopGame/Forsooth}} Forsooth!]]'' ''{{TabletopGame/Forsooth}}'' has Fate score that can be used to resolve character conflicts in those rare instances when players don't agree on the outcome. Players usually have multiple characters, the highest Fate character being the Protagonist.
30th Oct '16 9:40:42 AM nombretomado
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* The ''VideoGame/{{Fallout}}'' series has a fairly generic level-up system similar to ''{{GURPS}}'' (which it was originally slated to use), in which each level-up is primarily focused on allocating skill points. Base attributes do not change upon level-up, but every third level grants a perk for further customization of the player character. Your {{NPC}}s level up as well, and, as the page quote shows, they will throw in some funny lines when they do. Fallout's level system is notable for not holding the player back from wielding powerful weapons in an open game, allowing people in later playthroughs to pick up [[GameBreaker devastating weapons and armor]] early on with the proper know-how. This is marginally balanced by the fact that most low-level characters won't be able to pick up enough ammo or even hit anything with an energy weapon at 20% skill with it.

to:

* The ''VideoGame/{{Fallout}}'' series has a fairly generic level-up system similar to ''{{GURPS}}'' ''TabletopGame/{{GURPS}}'' (which it was originally slated to use), in which each level-up is primarily focused on allocating skill points. Base attributes do not change upon level-up, but every third level grants a perk for further customization of the player character. Your {{NPC}}s level up as well, and, as the page quote shows, they will throw in some funny lines when they do. Fallout's level system is notable for not holding the player back from wielding powerful weapons in an open game, allowing people in later playthroughs to pick up [[GameBreaker devastating weapons and armor]] early on with the proper know-how. This is marginally balanced by the fact that most low-level characters won't be able to pick up enough ammo or even hit anything with an energy weapon at 20% skill with it.
19th Oct '16 5:16:48 PM nombretomado
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* The only thing that increases when Caim levels up in ''{{Drakengard}}'' is the amount of HitPoints he has. In order to increase his damage or his magic meter, you have to level up the various weapons that are found in the game.

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* The only thing that increases when Caim levels up in ''{{Drakengard}}'' ''VideoGame/{{Drakengard}}'' is the amount of HitPoints he has. In order to increase his damage or his magic meter, you have to level up the various weapons that are found in the game.
16th Oct '16 9:45:03 AM nombretomado
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* In ''{{Final Fantasy Tactics}}'' characters get experience and ability points for every successful action taken (meaning attacks that ''hit'' not missed etc.), which could result in possible grinding by hitting your ''allies'', while having some unfortunate enemy surrounded or running off to the distant corners of the field.

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* In ''{{Final ''VideoGame/{{Final Fantasy Tactics}}'' characters get experience and ability points for every successful action taken (meaning attacks that ''hit'' not missed etc.), which could result in possible grinding by hitting your ''allies'', while having some unfortunate enemy surrounded or running off to the distant corners of the field.
18th Sep '16 12:02:48 PM nombretomado
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* In the first ''ASDFMovie'' a character levels up after randomly punching another character in the face.

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* In the first ''ASDFMovie'' ''WebAnimation/ASDFMovie'' a character levels up after randomly punching another character in the face.
24th Aug '16 9:10:11 AM Valen
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* ''VideoGame/DragonFable'' plays it straight. Due to the [[NoFourthWall self-referential nature of the game,]] it's often used for meta jokes.
--->'''Dragon:''' I should probably just eat this hero now. [[GenreSavvy It will save me a lot of trouble in 30 levels or so.]]
23rd Aug '16 1:27:44 PM blackmage0
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Added DiffLines:

[[folder: Literature ]]
* ''Literature/TheGam3'': Each player in the Game has a level, gaining levels grants points to spend on abilities or stats. The main character's starting level is 3. The average and median levels of publicly listed players is given as 3460 and 1337. There is no level cap.
[[/folder]]
24th Jun '16 12:35:05 PM IamTheCaligula
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* In ''VideoGame/{{Undertale}}'', levels, abbrevated as LV, are called LOVE. As is typical for this trope, you increase your LOVE by gaining EXP from killing enemies. [[spoiler: At the end of the game, it is revealed that EXP and LOVE are acronyms; [[WhamLine EXP stands for "EXecution Points"]] and is a way of measuring how much of a [[YouBastard ruthless murderer you've been]] while [[KarmaMeter LOVE stands for "Level Of ViolencE"]] and is a way of measuring how much of an [[VillainProtagonist unfeeling sociopath]] you've become. [[ItGetsEasier The more you kill, the easier it becomes to distance yourself.]] [[DeconstructedTrope The more you distance yourself, the less you will hurt.]] [[GainingTheWillToKill The more easily you can bring yourself to hurt others]].]]

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* In ''VideoGame/{{Undertale}}'', levels, abbrevated abbreviated as LV, are called LOVE. As is typical for this trope, you increase your LOVE by gaining EXP from killing enemies. [[spoiler: At the end of the game, it is revealed that EXP and LOVE are acronyms; [[WhamLine EXP stands for "EXecution Points"]] and is a way of measuring how much of a [[YouBastard ruthless murderer you've been]] while [[KarmaMeter LOVE stands for "Level Of ViolencE"]] and is a way of measuring how much of an [[VillainProtagonist unfeeling sociopath]] you've become. [[ItGetsEasier The more you kill, the easier it becomes to distance yourself.]] [[DeconstructedTrope The more you distance yourself, the less you will hurt.]] [[GainingTheWillToKill The more easily you can bring yourself to hurt others]].]]
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