History Main / BoxOfficeBomb

22nd Jun '17 11:41:07 AM FromtheWordsofBR
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* '''Poor Marketing:''' Many a bomb became so despite (or due to) being an excellent movie in general. [[NeverTrustATrailer Incorrect]] or [[MisaimedMarketing misleading]] information about them (or just plain ''[[InvisibleAdvertising lack]]'' [[InvisibleAdvertising of marketing]]) makes audiences rely exclusively on word-of-mouth, which is generally not enough for a movie to successfully perform. The internet has made this situation a bit better, but not that much. These movies almost always achieve [[CultClassic cult status]] and can later become profitable on DVD.
* '''Poor Budgeting:''' With the amount of money spent on big releases, this is an increasingly large risk. Even good movies can effectively fall down at the box-office if they cost too much to make. Tens of millions are spent on special effects that last a few minutes or sets that will inevitably be blown up, an actor's paycheck is extortionate, and if it all costs too much, you're going to reach a point where no matter how good a movie is, it just can't make back what was spent on it. The creators can only hope for good DVD sales and reviews and take home a little lesson for next time.
* '''It blows:''' Face it. For all the other reasons, sometimes a movie fails because it's just a terrible movie; the story, the editing, the acting, it all sucks. Somebody put a lot of money into it, and man, was that a bad idea! Cause it seems that [[WhatDoYouMeanItWasntMadeOnDrugs absolutely everybody involved was doing cocaine or LSD at the time]]. The movie failed, sucks to be you, better luck next time...[[CreatorKiller if there is a next time]].

to:

* '''Poor Marketing:''' marketing:''' Many a bomb became so despite (or due to) being an excellent movie in general. [[NeverTrustATrailer Incorrect]] or [[MisaimedMarketing misleading]] information about them (or just plain ''[[InvisibleAdvertising lack]]'' [[InvisibleAdvertising of marketing]]) makes audiences rely exclusively on word-of-mouth, which is generally not enough for a movie to successfully perform. The internet has made this situation a bit better, but not that much. These movies almost always achieve [[CultClassic cult status]] and can later become profitable on DVD.
* '''Poor Budgeting:''' budgeting:''' With the amount of money spent on big releases, this is an increasingly large risk. Even good movies can effectively fall down at the box-office if they cost too much to make. Tens of millions are spent on special effects that last a few minutes or sets that will inevitably be blown up, an actor's paycheck is extortionate, and if it all costs too much, you're going to reach a point where no matter how good a movie is, it just can't make back what was spent on it. The creators can only hope for good DVD sales and reviews and take home a little lesson for next time.
* '''It blows:''' Face it. For all the other reasons, sometimes a movie fails because it's just a terrible movie; the story, the editing, the acting, it all sucks. Somebody put a lot of money into it, and man, was that a bad idea! Cause Because it seems that [[WhatDoYouMeanItWasntMadeOnDrugs absolutely everybody involved was doing cocaine or LSD at the time]]. The movie failed, sucks to be you, better luck next time...[[CreatorKiller if there is a next time]].
9th Jun '17 11:22:57 PM Scabbard
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According to the TheOtherWiki, the biggest confirmed flop of all time is ''Film/CutthroatIsland'', which (along with ''Film/{{Showgirls}}'') instantly crushed Creator/CarolcoPictures as a result, though ''Film/JohnCarter'', ''Film/TheLoneRanger'' and ''Film/The13thWarrior'' may have lost more as their losses are given as a range. All of the latter three were from Creator/{{Disney}} (Though the latter most has the Touchstone Pictures label attached to it, due to its more adult content), a multibillion-dollar company that '''easily''' weathered those losses unlike Carolco.

to:

According to the TheOtherWiki, the biggest confirmed flop of all time is ''Film/CutthroatIsland'', which (along with ''Film/{{Showgirls}}'') instantly crushed Creator/CarolcoPictures as a result, though ''Film/JohnCarter'', ''Film/TheLoneRanger'' and ''Film/The13thWarrior'' may have lost more as their losses are given as a range. All of the latter three were from Creator/{{Disney}} (Though (though the latter most has the Touchstone Pictures label attached to it, due to its more adult content), a multibillion-dollar company that '''easily''' weathered those losses unlike Carolco.
29th Apr '17 5:28:50 PM TurtleTropes
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According to the TheOtherWiki, the biggest confirmed flop of all time is ''Film/CutthroatIsland'', which (along with ''Film/{{Showgirls}}'') instantly crushed Creator/CarolcoPictures as a result, though ''Film/JohnCarter'', ''Film/TheLoneRanger'' and ''Film/The13thWarrior'' may have lost more as their losses are given as a range. All of the latter three were from Creator/{{Disney}}, a multibillion-dollar company that '''easily''' weathered those losses unlike Carolco.

to:

According to the TheOtherWiki, the biggest confirmed flop of all time is ''Film/CutthroatIsland'', which (along with ''Film/{{Showgirls}}'') instantly crushed Creator/CarolcoPictures as a result, though ''Film/JohnCarter'', ''Film/TheLoneRanger'' and ''Film/The13thWarrior'' may have lost more as their losses are given as a range. All of the latter three were from Creator/{{Disney}}, Creator/{{Disney}} (Though the latter most has the Touchstone Pictures label attached to it, due to its more adult content), a multibillion-dollar company that '''easily''' weathered those losses unlike Carolco.
11th Apr '17 5:13:00 PM Spinosegnosaurus77
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A common objection at this point is to bring up the [[GermansLoveDavidHasselhoff international box office]]. After all, the film made several hundred million more then its budget around the world, clearly these studios just want us to think only America matters and the Hollywood press keeps buying it! Right? Well, actually… not really. Or at least, not always. While the rest of the world is a much bigger market and can rack up film returns in the billions, behind these numbers, overseas distribution is actually a lot less profitable for the studios themselves. Like with domestic theaters, foreign theaters need to make money off of ticket sales, and they're more inclined to support movies made locally as opposed to internationally-made movies. As such, films shown overseas will often see even less of a return than the domestic gross and may have additional costs like needing a local dub track. How much the international box office helps can also vary depending on the country in question. So studios still count on covering their costs domestically and judge a movie accordingly. While it's possible in practice, [[AvertedTrope aversions]] tend to be from marginal cases. Around the world, taste in American movies tends to favor the same films, and the biggest hits at home are also the biggest hits around the world.

to:

A common objection at this point is to bring up the [[GermansLoveDavidHasselhoff international box office]]. After all, the film made several hundred million more then than its budget around the world, world; clearly these studios just want us to think only America matters and the Hollywood press keeps buying it! Right? Well, actually… not really. Or at least, not always. While the rest of the world is a much bigger market and can rack up film returns in the billions, behind these numbers, overseas distribution is actually a lot less profitable for the studios themselves. Like with domestic theaters, foreign theaters need to make money off of ticket sales, and they're more inclined to support movies made locally as opposed to internationally-made movies. As such, films shown overseas will often see even less of a return than the domestic gross and may have additional costs like needing a local dub track. How much the international box office helps can also vary depending on the country in question. So studios still count on covering their costs domestically and judge a movie accordingly. While it's possible in practice, [[AvertedTrope aversions]] tend to be from marginal cases. Around the world, taste in American movies tends to favor the same films, and the biggest hits at home are also the biggest hits around the world.
4th Apr '17 4:21:48 PM Tightwire
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* '''Bad word of mouth:''' Sometimes a movie does poorly because everybody's just expecting it to be a bad movie - maybe it's a sequel to a bad film, or it's in a genre that the Director isn't known for, or it's assumed to be a rip-off of an older movie, or a remake, or a reboot, or the trailers were terrible... and sometimes people just don't want to go to see a movie that they aren't sure they'll enjoy. This doesn't mean the movie ''is'' bad.

to:

* '''Bad word of mouth:''' Sometimes a movie does poorly because everybody's just expecting it to be a bad movie - maybe it's a sequel to a bad film, or it's in a genre that the Director isn't known for, or it's assumed to be a rip-off of an older movie, or a remake, or a reboot, another ContinuityReboot, or the [[TrailersAlwaysLie trailers were terrible... terrible...]] and sometimes often people just don't want to go to see a movie that they aren't sure they'll enjoy. This doesn't mean the movie ''is'' bad.



* '''Poor Budgeting:''' With the amount of money spent on big releases, this is an increasingly large risk. Even good movies can effectively fall down at the box-office if they cost too much to make. Tens of millions are spent on special effects that last a few minutes or sets that will inevitably be blown up, an actor's paycheck is almost extortionate, and if it all costs too much, you're going to reach a point where no matter how good a movie is, it just can't make back what was spent on it. The creators can only hope for good DVD sales and reviews and take home a little lesson for next time.

to:

* '''Poor Budgeting:''' With the amount of money spent on big releases, this is an increasingly large risk. Even good movies can effectively fall down at the box-office if they cost too much to make. Tens of millions are spent on special effects that last a few minutes or sets that will inevitably be blown up, an actor's paycheck is almost extortionate, and if it all costs too much, you're going to reach a point where no matter how good a movie is, it just can't make back what was spent on it. The creators can only hope for good DVD sales and reviews and take home a little lesson for next time.



Because of so many flops, the pages have been separated into four sections:

to:

Because of there are so many flops, instances of this happening, the pages have been separated into four sections:
4th Apr '17 4:16:31 PM Tightwire
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* '''Bad word of mouth:''' The movie just happened to be so bad that people avoided it (see "it blows" below). Those who enjoy [[SoBadItsGood cheesy fun]] usually buy it on [[UsefulNotes/{{VCR}} VHS]][=/=]{{DVD}}, or simply pirate it later. The importance of this factor has only been increased by [[NewMediaAreEvil the Internet]], which has drastically increased the speed at which word of mouth (good or bad) spreads, and led to the present day emphasis on opening weekends as an indicator of performance.

to:

* '''Bad word of mouth:''' The Sometimes a movie does poorly because everybody's just happened expecting it to be so a bad movie - maybe it's a sequel to a bad film, or it's in a genre that the Director isn't known for, or it's assumed to be a rip-off of an older movie, or a remake, or a reboot, or the trailers were terrible... and sometimes people avoided it (see "it blows" below). Those who enjoy [[SoBadItsGood cheesy fun]] usually buy it on [[UsefulNotes/{{VCR}} VHS]][=/=]{{DVD}}, or simply pirate it later. The importance of this factor has only been increased by [[NewMediaAreEvil just don't want to go to see a movie that they aren't sure they'll enjoy. This doesn't mean the Internet]], which has drastically increased the speed at which word of mouth (good or bad) spreads, and led to the present day emphasis on opening weekends as an indicator of performance.movie ''is'' bad.



* '''Poor marketing:''' Many a bomb became so despite (or due to) being an excellent movie in general. [[NeverTrustATrailer Incorrect]] or [[MisaimedMarketing misleading]] information about them (or just plain ''[[InvisibleAdvertising lack]]'' [[InvisibleAdvertising of marketing]]) makes audiences rely exclusively on word-of-mouth, which is generally not enough for a movie to successfully perform. The internet has made this situation a bit better, but not that much. These movies almost always achieve [[CultClassic cult status]] and can later become profitable on DVD.
* '''It blows:''' Face it. For all the other reasons, sometimes a movie fails because it's a terrible movie; the story, the editing, the acting, it all sucks (see "bad word of mouth" above). Somebody put a lot of money into it, and man, was that a bad idea! Cause it seems that [[WhatDoYouMeanItWasntMadeOnDrugs absolutely everybody involved was doing cocaine or LSD at the time]]. The movie failed, sucks to be you, better luck next time...[[CreatorKiller if there is a next time]].
* '''Other circumstances:''' Sometimes movies flop due to something that's not directly related to the movie itself or the movie industry as a whole. For example, the first film to lose over a million dollars, ''Film/{{Intolerance}}'', came out at a time when its antiwar sentiments (which were widely held just months earlier) were going against the popular pro-war wave of late 1916. {{Funny Aneurysm Moment}}s and TooSoon tend to hit {{disaster movie}}s' sales very hard when bad timing happens; the September 11th attacks and the Indian Ocean tsunami, for example, killed a lot of those even though they were obviously filmed prior to the catastrophe. Maybe your headlining actor make a derogatory comment that leads to a boycott of the film. The same effect involves comedies lampooning airports, airlines, and the security process, which all brought down the film adaptation of ''Literature/BigTrouble'', which was bumped to the DumpMonths from its original position ten days after the 11th. Another example of unfortunate timing is if a movie's [[GenreKiller genre is killed]] prior to release.

to:

* '''Poor marketing:''' Marketing:''' Many a bomb became so despite (or due to) being an excellent movie in general. [[NeverTrustATrailer Incorrect]] or [[MisaimedMarketing misleading]] information about them (or just plain ''[[InvisibleAdvertising lack]]'' [[InvisibleAdvertising of marketing]]) makes audiences rely exclusively on word-of-mouth, which is generally not enough for a movie to successfully perform. The internet has made this situation a bit better, but not that much. These movies almost always achieve [[CultClassic cult status]] and can later become profitable on DVD.
* '''Poor Budgeting:''' With the amount of money spent on big releases, this is an increasingly large risk. Even good movies can effectively fall down at the box-office if they cost too much to make. Tens of millions are spent on special effects that last a few minutes or sets that will inevitably be blown up, an actor's paycheck is almost extortionate, and if it all costs too much, you're going to reach a point where no matter how good a movie is, it just can't make back what was spent on it. The creators can only hope for good DVD sales and reviews and take home a little lesson for next time.
* '''It blows:''' Face it. For all the other reasons, sometimes a movie fails because it's just a terrible movie; the story, the editing, the acting, it all sucks (see "bad word of mouth" above).sucks. Somebody put a lot of money into it, and man, was that a bad idea! Cause it seems that [[WhatDoYouMeanItWasntMadeOnDrugs absolutely everybody involved was doing cocaine or LSD at the time]]. The movie failed, sucks to be you, better luck next time...[[CreatorKiller if there is a next time]].
* '''Other circumstances:''' Sometimes movies flop due to something that's not directly related to the movie itself or the movie industry as a whole. For example, the first film to lose over a million dollars, ''Film/{{Intolerance}}'', came out at a time when its antiwar sentiments (which were widely held just months earlier) were going against the popular pro-war wave of late 1916. {{Funny Aneurysm Moment}}s and TooSoon tend to hit {{disaster movie}}s' sales very hard when bad timing happens; the September 11th attacks and the Indian Ocean tsunami, for example, killed a lot of those even though they were obviously filmed prior to the catastrophe.catastrophes. Maybe your headlining actor make a derogatory comment that leads to a boycott of the film. The same effect involves comedies lampooning airports, airlines, and the security process, which all brought down the film adaptation of ''Literature/BigTrouble'', which was bumped to the DumpMonths from its original position ten days after the 11th. Another example of unfortunate timing is if a movie's [[GenreKiller genre is killed]] prior to release.
24th Feb '17 7:47:59 AM NightShade96
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Because of so many flops, the pages have been separated into three sections:

to:

Because of so many flops, the pages have been separated into three four sections:
23rd Feb '17 7:40:31 PM hello86
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* [[BoxOfficeBomb/NumbersThroughH #–H]]
23rd Feb '17 7:36:54 PM hello86
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23rd Feb '17 7:31:01 PM hello86
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Added DiffLines:

* [[BoxOfficeBomb/NumbersThroughD #–D]]
* [[BoxOfficeBomb/EThroughH E–H]]
This list shows the last 10 events of 1953. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.BoxOfficeBomb