History Main / BizarroEpisode

26th Mar '17 2:25:37 AM NightShade96
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[[index]]
* Literature
** ''BizarroEpisode/{{Animorphs}}''
[[/index]]



* ''Literature/{{Animorphs}}'':
** It had a few examples, but a special shout-out goes to the 39th book, ''The Hidden''. The [[TheScrappy Helmacrons]] return, forcing the Animorphs to go on the run with the blue box. Along the way a buffalo and an ant acquire morphing powers, in violation of all previous continuity about how the blue box works. Thankfully, none of these events are ever mentioned again.
** The second, third, and fourth Megamorphs books. Time-Travel involving AncientAstronauts ("In the Time of the Dinosaurs"), Time-Travel involving a time machine which may be a piece of the [[BigGood Ellimist]], with Nazi who aren't Nazis and Hitler as a random jeep driver, and the ItsAWonderfulPlot episode in which the Animorphs never got their powers (and don't know what's going on until the end). And #41, which was just the author trying to see how far she could stretch suspension of disbelief before the readers snapped, with a mysterious SufficientlyAdvancedAlien or something running a test on one of the character, which we never find out the results of.
17th Mar '17 11:14:58 AM AthenaBlue
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* Over its last two seasons it became clear that Day 6 of ''Series/TwentyFour'' was a Big Lipped Alligator ''Season''. Events like [[spoiler:the detonation of a nuclear device in an American city by foreign terrorists and the attack and incapacitation of an American president while in the White House - both of which happened within ''hours'' of each other and would have deeply impacted the country's history and internal and international policies - are never mentioned or even alluded at in the following seasons. Matter of fact, President Wayne Palmer was effectively [[ChuckCunninghamSyndrome "brother Chucked"]] without as much as a throwaway line to explain what ultimately became of him. [[WordOfGod Howard Gordon]] has stated he lived, but a prop newspaper from the made-for-TV movie ''Redemption'' mentions his death, thus leaving his fate unknown]]. Day 7 has its couple of bizarro episodes in which [[spoiler:an African tin pot dictator and his five - six at most - bodyguards take the White House and everyone inside hostage - with some help from (what else in Series/TwentyFour?) moles on the inside. Jack Bauer resolves the entire situation in two hours of [[BlatantLies "Real Time"]] and the entire situation does not impact the rest of the season - the ''second half'' of it - in any significant way]]. [[SubvertedTrope With the exception of]] [[spoiler:killing off Bill Buchanan, who by that point was one of the show's main characters]]. Although the immediate fallout for that is something of a Big-Lipped Arc itself ([[spoiler:Jack is framed for trying to avenge his death and is wanted dead or alive in the cliffhanger of the following episode, only to have his name cleared ''at the very beginning'' of the episode following that, leaving those events to quickly be forgotten]]), it does later provide a motivating factor for Chloe when she returns and discovers what's happened.
* ''Series/{{Angel}}'':
** Some viewers consider "[[Recap/AngelS05E20TheGirlInQuestion The Girl in Question]]" to be this - in the middle of a tense, tragic story arc leading up to the heavily depressing series finale, we get an episode revolving around Spike and Angel gallivanting off to Italy to have wacky, {{hoyay}}-tastic adventures while trying to rescue Buffy from the mistake of dating an [[TheFaceless unseen]], vampiric [[TheCasanova sexual predator]] with whom they apparently have a [[RetCon never-before-mentioned]] complex history; this unapologetically farcical storyline is [[MoodWhiplash played against]] a bitter, tragic Los Angeles subplot in which [[EldritchAbomination Illyria]] assumes Fred's form in order to deceive her parents into believing that their daughter is alive and well, a state of affairs which nearly breaks Wesley and is difficult to watch even for the viewers.
** It also doesn't help that the B-plot indicates that Wesley didn't carry out Fred's final wish that he inform her parents of her death. And that from what we hear, Buffy has turned into TheDitz, having an affair with the evil Immortal, making it come off as a rather petty TakeThat after Creator/SarahMichelleGellar refused to appear in the show's 100th episode. Whedon later made an AuthorsSavingThrow in the ''Buffy'' comics, revealing that it was actually one of several Slayers around the world who are impersonating Buffy to confuse the bad guys.
** "[[Recap/AngelS05E10SoulPurpose Soul Purpose]]" is a better example, which mostly consists of Angel having bizarre hallucinations.
* ''Series/{{Atlanta}}'' is a pretty off-beat show to begin with, but "B.A.N" is strange even by the show's standards. It lacks any sort of plot and is essentially just a series of satirical sketches, with [[ParodyCommercial Parody Commercials]] and segments of a ShowWithinAShow entitled ''Montague'' that satirize issues relating to gender and race identity.
* ''Series/BabylonFive'' - "Grey 17 is Missing" is viewed as this by much of the audience, with no future mention of any of the primary plot ever again. J Michael Straczynski has offered to personally apologise to every fan who complains directly to him about the episode, citing it as the bastard offspring of an unholy trinity of Author Brainfart, ExecutiveMeddling, and Ran Out Of Time & Money.
* From ''Series/{{Battlestar Galactica|2003}}'':
** The episode "Black Market". Oh, where to begin? We find that Apollo has been seeing a single-mom hooker and her child regularly on Cloud Nine. This was never mentioned before or ever again. He is seeing and helping out her and her kid due to guilt over leaving his former pregnant girlfriend shortly before the Cylons attacked. This was never mentioned before or ever again. He winds up killing the black market's ringleader in a totally out-of-character manner. THEN he declares that the black market can continue because it's necessary or something. And we never hear anything more about it. It's saved from being a complete Bizarro Episode by dint of two factors: 1) [[spoiler:Commander Fisk's murder]] in this episode starts a chain reaction of events that eventually puts Lee in command of ''Pegasus'', and 2) the head of the black market is played by Bill Duke. Ron Moore later discussed ''Black Market'' very frankly both on his blog and in the episode's commentary, admitting that it was completely nonsensical and explaining the logic that went into making it that everyone ''thought'' made sense at the time, only to realize with growing horror that it just didn't work.
** Black Market has a third point of relevance: it's the episode where [[spoiler:Baltar decides to run for President when Roslin realizes he could be a thorn in her side and tries to convince him to resign]]. Obviously though, the scene where this happens has ''nothing'' to do with the plot of the episode.
** "The Woman King" came along one season later and stole "Black Market"'s crown. This episode involves a [[VillainWithGoodPublicity well-beloved but insanely racist doctor]] who sets about killing citizens of the "poorer" Colonies under the guise of a free clinic he's operating right on ''Galactica''. Helo's tasked by a woman ([[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin named King]]) to put a stop to the MadDoctor and avenge her son (who the doc allegedly killed). Helo spends much of the episode on a CassandraTruth wild goose chase because no one believes him, what with the better half of the cast coming down with a sudden case of 24-hour FantasticRacism Disease. Everyone acts OutOfCharacter, the episode just goes in circles, and everyone forgets it even happened by the next episode.
*** It doesn't help that the episode is one of the few remnants of a subplot about the Saggitarons on New Caprica that was soon abandoned (the only other really noticeable one is Baltar's mysterious whisper that causes Gaeta to try to kill him, which was eventually repurposed towards another subplot in a webisode series), and scenes in earlier episodes that would have helped explain everyone's refusal to believe Helo were all cut.
* The first-season finale of ''Series/{{Blackadder}}'' features Prince Edmund, after his latest humiliation, firing Baldrick and Percy, and deciding to gather the seven most evil men in the kingdom together to overthrow his father, only to discover that his never-before-mentioned nemesis has infiltrated his little band, resulting in him getting locked away in a prison, his plans getting subverted, and [[spoiler:the deaths of him, his entire family, and probably a good portion of their household]].
* ''Series/{{Bones}}'':
** The fourth-season finale features Booth as a nightclub owner, Brennan as his wife, Hodgins as a hard-drinking novelist, Cam as a detective, etc. [[spoiler:Of course, it's [[AllJustADream all in Booth's head as he's actually in a coma]], recovering from the removal of a brain tumor. The dream is "inspired" by a story Brennan is writing, which she is reading aloud to Booth as she sits in vigil by his bedside.]]
** The 200th episode moves all the characters to the 1950's, Booth is a jewel thief and Bones is a detective who faces gender discrimination, and her father is the chief of the L.A.P.D.
* ''Series/BreakingBad'' has the episode where Walt becomes obsessed with killing a fly that has somehow gotten into the meth lab. There are a few moments of legitimate character development and overall series value to this episode, but for the most part, it's a big steaming pile of BLAM. [[TropesAreTools It's also considered one of the best episodes of the entire series.]]
* ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'':
** The MusicalEpisode "[[Recap/BuffyTheVampireSlayerS6E7OnceMoreWithFeeling Once More With Feeling]]" is a bizarre case of a bizarro episode that '''''is''''' based on an utterly ridiculous premise, '''''is''''' important to the season's major story arcs and remains one of '''''the''''' most loved episodes of the entire series, like a Bizarro Episode and WHAMEpisode mixed together.
** The season 4 [[DenouementEpisode finale]], "Restless", starts like this. Eventually what's going on is clarified, as well as the fact that it contains large amounts of {{foreshadowing}}.
** "Superstar". Season 4, ep 17. Jonathan, a recurring ButtMonkey who'd been the butt of jokes for the past four seasons, rewrites reality to make himself a BlackHoleSue who even takes over the opening credits.
** Also, the season 3 episode "The Zeppo" can be seen as this, diverting from the building plot threads of that season to tell a completely zany, full-out self-parody of every Buffy trope in the book.
** "Normal Again" aka the episode that implies that the series may or may not be the hallucinations of a mental patient.
** All of these just go to show that [[TropesAreTools Tropes Are Not Bad]] in the hands of a skilled writer.
* The final episode of ''DarthWiki/CandleCove''. Puppets screaming and crying. For ''30 minutes''.
* ''Series/{{Columbo}}'''s episode "Last Salute to the Commodore" definitely qualifies. Not only is it a who-done-it, it also has the weirdest performance by Peter Falk ever. He just walks through without any emotions completely hamming it up. He seems high as a kite. In the bizarre ending, [[spoiler:Columbo goes around showing everyone a watch saying 'Commodore's watch' until someone eventually says 'T'isnt,' thus proving he is the killer]].



* ''Series/{{Columbo}}'''s episode "Last Salute to the Commodore" definitely qualifies. Not only is it a who-done-it, it also has the weirdest performance by Peter Falk ever. He just walks through without any emotions completely hamming it up. He seems high as a kite. In the bizarre ending, [[spoiler:Columbo goes around showing everyone a watch saying 'Commodore's watch' until someone eventually says 'T'isnt,' thus proving he is the killer]].
* ''Series/{{UFO}}'''s episode "Mindbender" had Straker hallucinate that he was an actor in a TV series about [=UFOs=]. One memorable scene had him wandering around the actual ''UFO'' soundstage, showing the HQ and moonbase sets.
* Similarly, Charlie Drake's BritCom ''The Worker'' ended its original black and white run with an episode in which Drake is confused to discover that he's actually a comedian in a BritCom. Drake seemingly liked this ending so much he used a variation of it a few years later when the show was revived in colour. There's another episode in which Drake's character gets hit on the head by a boomerang (a deliberate aversion of Drake's song "My Boomerang Won't Come Back") and suffers some weird hallucinations, ending with a trial in which he is the judge, jury, barrister and defendant.
* ''Series/LizzieMcGuire'' has the episode where Lizzie and Matt [[FreakyFridayFlip switch bodies]].
* ''Series/{{Roseanne}}'' had some of these, to the point where it may not even count anymore. To set out a brief list, there were a few {{Halloween Episode}}s that seemingly broke reality, a few episodes that were AllJustADream, and toward the end of the series, plenty of them, such as episodes where Roseanne posed for Playboy, won Miss Universe, and, well actually the entire final season was this after they won the lottery. Which is actually explained in the finale [[spoiler:as a series of stories written by Roseanne as a way to deal with her grief over losing Dan to his heart attack earlier in the series]].
* ''Wolf Lake'' did this in the episode "Leader of the Pack", in which an incident is presented as narrated to a team of investigators by Graham Greene's character [[{{Cloudcuckoolander}} Sherman Blackstone]]. To say that he's an UnreliableNarrator is an understatement; the episode is hilarious and basically told from first-looney's point of view, with Blackstone admitting to telling the investigators the kind of story he would find fun to hear. Random daydreams and FanService are inserted into the story, and salacious elements such as a [[HoYay married pair of gay]] bank robbers [[IncestSubtext who also happen to be brothers]] are included. Elements that would actually be pertinent to the story are glossed over, such as brushing off murders with comments such as "drinking problem".
-->'''Interviewer:''' According to ''my'' notes, he swallowed two ounces of sulfuric acid, mixed into a White Russian.\\
'''Blackstone:''' [[RunningGag That's the worst thing you can do to someone with a drinking problem]].
* ''Series/MysteryScienceTheater3000''
** A sixth season episode featuring ''Film/LastOfTheWildHorses'' has the first segment take place in a MirrorUniverse where Frank and Dr. Forrester are the test subjects.
** ''Film/QuestOfTheDeltaKnights'' had Pearl in the theater quipping with the bots while Mike hung out with Observer and Bobo on the planet below. A subversion, since neither changed their personalities.
** ''Film/PrinceOfSpace'' in a big way: Mike and the Bots end up in a wormhole. Shape-shifting, time displacement and general insanity ensue.
* The B-plot of the ''Series/HowIMetYourMother'' episode "The Mermaid Theory", in which Future!Ted's usually impressive memory breaks down while telling his kids about a fight Lily and Barney once had, and he starts describing things that make no sense, like a motorcycle roaring through [=McLarens=], Barney magically levitating a beer bottle, or Barney and Lily switching personalities; then going "Wait, wait, that's not right" and starting the whole story over again. This causes an unusually high degree of MediumAwareness on the parts of "Barney" and "Lily", who are shown referring to the topic of their fight in-dialogue as "something" ("I'm still mad at you because of something!") because Ted can't remember what they were upset about, and at one point they wind up suspended in limbo, casting glares at the screen and checking their watches impatiently while Future!Ted mutters "um...hang on...let me see..." to himself.
* From ''Series/{{Battlestar Galactica|2003}}'':
** The episode "Black Market". Oh, where to begin? We find that Apollo has been seeing a single-mom hooker and her child regularly on Cloud Nine. This was never mentioned before or ever again. He is seeing and helping out her and her kid due to guilt over leaving his former pregnant girlfriend shortly before the Cylons attacked. This was never mentioned before or ever again. He winds up killing the black market's ringleader in a totally out-of-character manner. THEN he declares that the black market can continue because it's necessary or something. And we never hear anything more about it. It's saved from being a complete Bizarro Episode by dint of two factors: 1) [[spoiler:Commander Fisk's murder]] in this episode starts a chain reaction of events that eventually puts Lee in command of ''Pegasus'', and 2) the head of the black market is played by Bill Duke. Ron Moore later discussed ''Black Market'' very frankly both on his blog and in the episode's commentary, admitting that it was completely nonsensical and explaining the logic that went into making it that everyone ''thought'' made sense at the time, only to realize with growing horror that it just didn't work.
** Black Market has a third point of relevance: it's the episode where [[spoiler:Baltar decides to run for President when Roslin realizes he could be a thorn in her side and tries to convince him to resign]]. Obviously though, the scene where this happens has ''nothing'' to do with the plot of the episode.
** "The Woman King" came along one season later and stole "Black Market"'s crown. This episode involves a [[VillainWithGoodPublicity well-beloved but insanely racist doctor]] who sets about killing citizens of the "poorer" Colonies under the guise of a free clinic he's operating right on ''Galactica''. Helo's tasked by a woman ([[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin named King]]) to put a stop to the MadDoctor and avenge her son (who the doc allegedly killed). Helo spends much of the episode on a CassandraTruth wild goose chase because no one believes him, what with the better half of the cast coming down with a sudden case of 24-hour FantasticRacism Disease. Everyone acts OutOfCharacter, the episode just goes in circles, and everyone forgets it even happened by the next episode.
*** It doesn't help that the episode is one of the few remnants of a subplot about the Saggitarons on New Caprica that was soon abandoned (the only other really noticeable one is Baltar's mysterious whisper that causes Gaeta to try to kill him, which was eventually repurposed towards another subplot in a webisode series), and scenes in earlier episodes that would have helped explain everyone's refusal to believe Helo were all cut.
* ''Series/BabylonFive'' - ''Grey 17 is Missing'' is viewed as this by much of the audience, with no future mention of any of the primary plot ever again. J Michael Straczynski has offered to personally apologise to every fan who complains directly to him about the episode, citing it as the bastard offspring of an unholy trinity of Author Brianfart, ExecutiveMeddling, and Ran Out Of Time & Money.

to:

* ''Series/{{Columbo}}'''s episode "Last Salute to the Commodore" definitely qualifies. Not only is it a who-done-it, it also has the weirdest performance by Peter Falk ever. He just walks through without any emotions completely hamming it up. He seems high as a kite. In the bizarre ending, [[spoiler:Columbo goes around showing everyone a watch saying 'Commodore's watch' until someone eventually says 'T'isnt,' thus proving he is the killer]].
* ''Series/{{UFO}}'''s episode "Mindbender" had Straker hallucinate that he
''Series/TheCosbyShow'':
** One [[http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0547043/ episode]]
was an actor in a TV series about [=UFOs=]. One memorable scene had him wandering around the actual ''UFO'' soundstage, showing the HQ and moonbase sets.
* Similarly, Charlie Drake's BritCom ''The Worker'' ended its original black and white run with an episode in
narrated by Rudy, which Drake is confused featured the cast as fairy-tale characters, clothed in costumes made to discover that he's actually a comedian in a BritCom. Drake seemingly liked this ending so much he used a variation of it a few years look like crayon drawings.
** A [[http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0547076/combined
later when the show was revived in colour. There's another episode in which Drake's episode]] had Cosby's character gets hit on eating a big hoagie/hero/sub before going to bed, and then dreaming that all of the head by a boomerang (a deliberate aversion of Drake's song "My Boomerang Won't Come Back") and suffers some weird hallucinations, ending with a trial in which he is the judge, jury, barrister and defendant.
* ''Series/LizzieMcGuire''
male cast were pregnant.
** Still [[http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0546981/ later]], Cosby
has the another big sandwich before going to bed. [[CallBack The above episode where Lizzie and Matt [[FreakyFridayFlip switch bodies]].
* ''Series/{{Roseanne}}'' had some of these, to the point where it may not even count anymore. To set out a brief list, there were a few {{Halloween Episode}}s that seemingly broke reality, a few episodes that were AllJustADream, and toward the end of the series, plenty of them, such as episodes where Roseanne posed for Playboy, won Miss Universe, and, well actually the entire final season was this after they won the lottery. Which
is actually explained in mentioned]]. This time, his dream involves Vanessa being a jazz musician, Denise is a firefighter, Clair is threatening to jump out of a window, and then the finale [[spoiler:as a series of stories written by Roseanne as a way to deal with her grief over losing Dan to his heart attack earlier in the series]].
* ''Wolf Lake'' did this in the episode "Leader of the Pack", in which an incident is presented as narrated to a team of investigators by Graham Greene's character [[{{Cloudcuckoolander}} Sherman Blackstone]].
Muppets show up. To say that he's an UnreliableNarrator is an understatement; the this episode makes no sense is hilarious an understatement.
** Then there's "A Nightmare on Stigwood Avenue", which explores Rudy's bad dream of Olivia holding Cliff
and basically told from first-looney's point of view, with Blackstone admitting to telling the investigators the kind of story he would find fun to hear. Random daydreams Clair completely in thrall and FanService are inserted into the story, always getting her way (with Vanessa and salacious elements such her friends as a [[HoYay married pair sort of gay]] bank robbers [[IncestSubtext who also happen to be brothers]] are included. Elements that would actually be pertinent to Muse chorus providing vocal commentary). Rudy turns the story are glossed over, such as brushing off murders with comments such as "drinking problem".
-->'''Interviewer:''' According to ''my'' notes, he swallowed two ounces of sulfuric acid, mixed into a White Russian.\\
'''Blackstone:''' [[RunningGag That's
tables on Olivia at the worst thing you can do to someone with a drinking problem]].
end--it''is'' her dream, after all.
* ''Series/MysteryScienceTheater3000''
** A sixth
''Series/CrimeStory'' was stylishly moody and gritty...then there was the 2nd season episode featuring ''Film/LastOfTheWildHorses'' has the first segment take place in a MirrorUniverse where Frank "Pauli Taglia's Dream". It did show how mobster Ray Luca and Dr. Forrester are the test subjects.
** ''Film/QuestOfTheDeltaKnights''
his goofus flunky Pauli had Pearl in the theater quipping with the bots while Mike hung out with Observer and Bobo on the planet below. A subversion, since neither changed their personalities.
** ''Film/PrinceOfSpace'' in
earlier survived a big way: Mike and the Bots end up in a wormhole. Shape-shifting, time displacement and general insanity ensue.
* The B-plot of the ''Series/HowIMetYourMother'' episode "The Mermaid Theory", in which Future!Ted's usually impressive memory breaks down while telling his kids about a fight Lily and Barney once had, and he starts describing things that make no sense, like a motorcycle roaring
nuclear bomb test, but through [=McLarens=], Barney magically levitating a beer bottle, or Barney and Lily switching personalities; then going "Wait, wait, that's not right" and starting the whole story over again. This causes an unusually high degree of MediumAwareness on the parts of "Barney" and "Lily", who are shown referring to the topic of their fight in-dialogue as "something" ("I'm still mad at you because of something!") because Ted can't remember what they were upset about, and at one Pauli's point they wind up suspended in limbo, casting glares at the screen and checking their watches impatiently while Future!Ted mutters "um...hang on...let me see..." to himself.
* From ''Series/{{Battlestar Galactica|2003}}'':
** The episode "Black Market". Oh, where to begin? We find that Apollo has been seeing a single-mom hooker and her child regularly on Cloud Nine. This was never mentioned before or ever again. He is seeing and helping out her and her kid due to guilt over leaving his former pregnant girlfriend shortly before the Cylons attacked. This was never mentioned before or ever again. He winds up killing the black market's ringleader in a totally out-of-character manner. THEN he declares that the black market can continue because it's necessary or something. And we never hear anything more about it. It's saved from being a
of view - complete Bizarro Episode by dint of two factors: 1) [[spoiler:Commander Fisk's murder]] in this episode starts a chain reaction of events that eventually puts Lee in command of ''Pegasus'', and 2) the head of the black market is played by Bill Duke. Ron Moore later discussed ''Black Market'' very frankly both on his blog and in the episode's commentary, admitting that it was completely nonsensical and explaining the logic that went into making it that everyone ''thought'' made sense at the time, only to realize with growing horror that it just didn't work.
** Black Market has a third point
cartoon sound effects, Three Stooges slapstick, and cuts of relevance: it's him lipsynching Bobby Fuller's "I Fought the Law" wearing impossibly high rockabilly hair and a radiation suit.
* There's a ''Series/DiagnosisMurder''
episode where [[spoiler:Baltar decides to run for President when Roslin realizes he could be a thorn in her side and tries to convince him to resign]]. Obviously though, the scene where this happens has ''nothing'' to do with killer is a vampire. Yes, as in the plot of the episode.
** "The Woman King" came along one season later and stole "Black Market"'s crown. This episode involves a [[VillainWithGoodPublicity well-beloved but insanely racist doctor]] who sets about killing citizens of the "poorer" Colonies under the guise of a free clinic he's operating right on ''Galactica''. Helo's tasked by a woman ([[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin named King]]) to put a stop to the MadDoctor and avenge her son (who the doc allegedly killed). Helo spends much of the episode on a CassandraTruth wild goose chase because no one believes him, what with the better half of the cast coming down with a sudden case of 24-hour FantasticRacism Disease. Everyone acts OutOfCharacter, the episode just goes in circles, and everyone forgets it even happened by the next episode.
*** It doesn't help that the episode is one of the few remnants of a subplot about the Saggitarons on New Caprica that was soon abandoned (the only other really noticeable one is Baltar's mysterious whisper that causes Gaeta to try to kill him, which was eventually repurposed towards another subplot in a webisode series), and scenes in earlier episodes that would have helped explain everyone's refusal to believe Helo were all cut.
* ''Series/BabylonFive'' - ''Grey 17 is Missing'' is viewed as this by much of the audience, with no future mention of any of the primary plot ever again. J Michael Straczynski has offered to personally apologise to every fan who complains directly to him about the episode, citing it as the bastard offspring of an unholy trinity of Author Brianfart, ExecutiveMeddling, and Ran Out Of Time & Money.
actual mythological creature.



** ''[[Recap/DoctorWhoS2E8TheChase The Chase]]''. A story where each episode takes the characters to a new location at a time where this was not the norm. There is a cameo from Music/TheBeatles. An obnoxious {{Eagleland}}er tourist spends half an episode laughing at a Dalek, and the actor playing him comes back playing a companion (!!) later in the story. They have a JourneyToTheCenterOfTheMind which turns out to be a horror theme park, in which the ComicTrio Daleks fight Dracula (and lose). The Daleks make an EvilKnockoff of the Doctor said to be indistinguishable and treated as such by the characters, and he [[ObviousStuntDouble looks nothing like him]]. A Dalek falls off a boat for no reason. Giant killer mushrooms are involved. Robots with flamethrowers try to put Barbara in a robot zoo. It's the sort of thing that [[UnintentionalPeriodPiece could only get made in 1965]] - love it or hate it, they will never make a story like this again.
** "The Feast of Steven," episode 7 of ''[[Recap/DoctorWhoS3E4TheDaleksMasterPlan The Daleks' Master Plan]]''. Our heroes have a chase through Hollywood in the 1920s, get arrested by police in the 1960s, and end up BreakingTheFourthWall.
** ''[[Recap/DoctorWhoS6E2TheMindRobber The Mind Robber]]'', in which the TARDIS materialises outside reality and then explodes, and the characters find themselves randomly interacting with fictional characters.
** "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS34E3RobotOfSherwood Robot of Sherwood]]." While comedic episodes are nothing unusual, this episode, in which the Doctor and Clara somehow manage to locate Robin Hood (even though the Doctor is certain he's a fictional character) and engage in comedic goings-on, feels out of place given its placement early in the Twelfth Doctor's first season. It doesn't help that Creator/PeterCapaldi plays the Doctor almost completely differently than he plays the character the rest of the season and the episode as a whole takes on the feeling of something that could easily be explained away as AllJustADream, though it isn't.
** "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS35E11HeavenSent Heaven Sent]]" has been pretty much described as this by the producers themselves: an episode with (for all intents and purposes), a single speaking role, the Doctor, with Creator/PeterCapaldi being tasked with keeping an episode moving and interesting virtually all on his own. Amazingly, it works and, while "bizarro episodes" tend to be head-scratchers that rarely add anything to the overall story, "Heaven Sent" ended up being one of the most dramatic episodes in the show's history, and of vital importance to the Doctor's CharacterDevelopment (as well as being the middle chapter of a trilogy, though stylistically it resembles neither of the episodes on either side, which is remarkable when one considers the same writer and director created the third episode).
* The final episode of Shaun Micallef's news parody Newstopia was a full episode of "Inspector Herring" the black and white, Russian language show within a show, about a Soviet Police inspector that happens to be a fish. The plot revolved around a plan to assassinate Andre Rieu, which succeeds.

to:

** ''[[Recap/DoctorWhoS2E8TheChase The Chase]]''.[[Recap/DoctorWhoS2E8TheChase "The Chase"]]. A story where each episode takes the characters to a new location at a time where this was not the norm. There is a cameo from Music/TheBeatles. An obnoxious {{Eagleland}}er tourist spends half an episode laughing at a Dalek, and the actor playing him comes back playing a companion (!!) later in the story. They have a JourneyToTheCenterOfTheMind which turns out to be a horror theme park, in which the ComicTrio Daleks fight Dracula (and lose). The Daleks make an EvilKnockoff of the Doctor said to be indistinguishable and treated as such by the characters, and he [[ObviousStuntDouble looks nothing like him]]. A Dalek falls off a boat for no reason. Giant killer mushrooms are involved. Robots with flamethrowers try to put Barbara in a robot zoo. It's the sort of thing that [[UnintentionalPeriodPiece could only get made in 1965]] - love it or hate it, they will never make a story like this again.
** "The Feast of Steven," Steven", episode 7 of ''[[Recap/DoctorWhoS3E4TheDaleksMasterPlan The [[Recap/DoctorWhoS3E4TheDaleksMasterPlan "The Daleks' Master Plan]]''. Plan"]]. Our heroes have a chase through Hollywood in the 1920s, get arrested by police in the 1960s, and end up BreakingTheFourthWall.
BreakingTheFourthWall. This was deliberate, as it aired on Christmas Day and, because it was the '60s, the showrunners thought that very few people would tune in, so they wrote something that had no relevance to the rest of the serial.
** ''[[Recap/DoctorWhoS6E2TheMindRobber The [[Recap/DoctorWhoS6E2TheMindRobber "The Mind Robber]]'', Robber"]], in which the TARDIS materialises outside reality and then explodes, and the characters find themselves randomly interacting with fictional characters.
** "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS34E3RobotOfSherwood Robot [[Recap/DoctorWhoS34E3RobotOfSherwood "Robot of Sherwood]]." Sherwood"]]. While comedic episodes are nothing unusual, this episode, in which the Doctor and Clara somehow manage to locate Robin Hood (even though the Doctor is certain he's a fictional character) and engage in comedic goings-on, feels out of place given its placement early in the Twelfth Doctor's first season. It doesn't help that Creator/PeterCapaldi plays the Doctor almost completely differently than he plays the character the rest of the season and the episode as a whole takes on the feeling of something that could easily be explained away as AllJustADream, though it isn't.
** "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS35E11HeavenSent Heaven Sent]]" [[Recap/DoctorWhoS35E11HeavenSent "Heaven Sent"]] has been pretty much described as this by the producers themselves: an episode with (for all intents and purposes), a single speaking role, the Doctor, with Creator/PeterCapaldi being tasked with keeping an episode moving and interesting virtually all on his own. Amazingly, it works and, while "bizarro episodes" tend to be head-scratchers that rarely add anything to the overall story, "Heaven Sent" ended up being one of the most dramatic episodes in the show's history, and of vital importance to the Doctor's CharacterDevelopment (as well as being the middle chapter of a trilogy, though stylistically it resembles neither of the episodes on either side, which is remarkable when one considers the same writer and director created the third episode).
* The final ''Series/TheDrewCareyShow'' has its annual AprilFoolsDay episode, in which blatant, bizarre goofs are deliberately inserted into the episode, and the sharp-eyed viewer who spotted the most won a prize. Other times the episode of Shaun Micallef's news parody Newstopia was a full live CrossOver with ''Series/WhoseLineIsItAnyway''. The episode of "Inspector Herring" "[=DrugCo=]" is especially odd, with an insect man on a toilet, and a Monkeypotamus.
%%* ''Series/FamilyTies'' "A’ My Name Is Alex", mentioned on [=RiffTrax=] as "that weird episode".
* At first glance, ''Series/{{Farscape}}'' seems to have a few interesting examples:
** "Crackers Don't Matter" had
the black entire crew trying to kill each other over some crackers, while "Won't Get Fooled Again" was... Well, TheDragon was wearing bright red pumps at one point. However, even ''these'' Farscape episodes have a bearing on the overall story arc, proving that a sure way to avoid Bizarro Episodes is to make the ''entire series'' bizarre.
** There is also the episode where D'Argo accidentally knocks Crichton out, causing him to hallucinate a series of Looney Tunes-type cartoons... the only plot point of which is to get D'Argo
and white, Russian language show within Crichton to stop falling out over trifles. According to the directors' commentary, they were desperate to do a show, blend of animation and live-action, but it took a long, long time to do and many of the sequences were made before they had worked out how they were going to tie them in to the main plot. The guys' feud is set up in the previous few episodes, but there's never any real reason for it. Crichton [[LampshadeHanging says]] at one point that he doesn't know why they were arguing in the first place.
%%* ''Series/{{Frasier}}'': "Freudian Sleep", the "unusual dreams" episode.
* ''Series/TheFreshPrinceOfBelAir'' has a weird episode, where Will and Carlton tell Jazz a story
about how Will testified against a Soviet Police inspector dangerous murderer, so he and the Banks family had to go into a witness protection program and live among hillbillies in the middle of nowhere.
* Similarly, many of the events of ''Series/FridayNightLights'' Season Two aren't referenced in later seasons, the most JustForFun/{{egregious}} of which would be [[spoiler:Landry KILLING a man to protect Tyra, and even confessing to it]]. Other stuff happened
that happens season, too (Matt and Grandma Saracen's nurse, Buddy raising a ward named Santiago), but the only major event to happen that season with any significant impact on future seasons is Jason Street [[spoiler:getting a woman pregnant]].
* Similar to the ''Series/MadAboutYou'' example noted below, ''Series/{{Friends}}'' had a "what if?" episode that explored the possible consequences of Joey becoming a star with Chandler as his personal assistant, Monica staying fat, Ross's ClosetedGay wife staying in the closet and keeping their marriage going, Rachel having gone through with her marriage (thus never meeting any of the friends) and Phoebe somehow becoming a stock broker.
* The ''Series/{{Fringe}}'' episode "Brown Betty", from season two. Walter Bishop smokes some special dope, and then entertains Olivia's niece Ella by telling her a story in which Olivia is a hard-boiled private detective in a world of AnachronismStew. Walter's story has obvious resonances to the main plot, but the whole episode boils down to him doing some child-minding. Made all the more jarring by coming right after some serious, dramatic episodes about Walter's relationship with his son Peter.
%%* The Series/HannahMontana Forever episode "Kiss It All Goodbye".
* ''Series/HerculesTheLegendaryJourneys''
** The 4th season episode "... And Fancy Free", in which Hercules enters a dance competition. Nothing rests on this competition other than his partner's self esteem, and a nice trophy. The town magistrate finds this competition important enough that he spends most of the episode sending assassins after Hercules and his partner to stop them from winning. No other motivation is given, he just wants his daughter to win. It guest stars Michael Hurst in drag as the dance instructor.
** "Stranger in a Strange World", which is referred to as a "Bizarro World episode" by the writer in the interviews feature on the DVD. This episode features an alternate universe with Hercules an evil tyrant marrying Aphrodite, the Xena cast in different roles, and a battle using a wedding cake. And Iolaus as a jester.
** There is a later episode featuring the same characters in struggle over fashion...which is about as pointless as "...And Fancy Free". Also no explanation is given as to why the town magistrate has apparently given up his duties to go into the world of ancient Greek fashion.
** The episode set in the present day which is all about Kevin Sorbo having gone missing, and features the memorable and hysterical [[CrowningMomentOfFunny restroom whistling scene]].
** There was another one where the cast goes on a teamwork-building retreat hosted by Sunny Day (played by Renee O'Connor; normal role Gabrielle). It leads to a Scooby Doo ending where Sunny is revealed
to be B.S. Hollinsfoffer (played by Robert Trebor, normal role Salmoneus), who is 1. a fish. lot taller than Sunny, 2. at least a hundred pounds heavier, and 3. male, and concludes with Ares ''revealing himself'' to the cast. On top of that, most of them aren't even all that surprised to learn that Greek god of war is real; one of them even claims "I find the thought rather comforting myself."
* ''Series/{{Heroes}}'':
**
The plot revolved around a plan to assassinate Andre Rieu, two-part episode "The Eclipse", in which succeeds. an eclipse randomly and inexplicably removes all the characters' powers. We never found out how or why this happened, and none of the events of those episodes were ever mentioned again.
** And this is just the most notorious example. ''Series/{{Heroes}}'' has a lot of Bizarro episodes. If you watch the previous seasons, keep track of how many new characters and storylines are introduced vs. [[KudzuPlot how many are still acknowledged in newer episodes]].



* The ''Series/TwoPintsOfLagerAndAPacketOfCrisps'' episode "When Janet Killed Jonny" is one of these. It is an episode set outside of the main continuity, and is a "horror special", featuring many parodies of the horror genre (although it does contain many moments of terror, in a [[MoodWhiplash deviation from the show's usual formula]]). The episode features the cast breaking into the deserted Archer pub to drink the leftover beer, only to fall victim to the previously unmentioned "pub curse", which causes them to be "killed by the thing they love the most". As a result, the entire cast is killed off in an assortment of highly gruesome ways, only to later return as zombies.
* ''Series/{{Angel}}'':
** Some viewers consider "[[Recap/AngelS05E20TheGirlInQuestion The Girl in Question]]" to be this - in the middle of a tense, tragic story arc leading up to the heavily depressing series finale, we get an episode revolving around Spike and Angel gallivanting off to Italy to have wacky, {{hoyay}}-tastic adventures while trying to rescue Buffy from the mistake of dating an [[TheFaceless unseen]], vampiric [[TheCasanova sexual predator]] with whom they apparently have a [[RetCon never-before-mentioned]] complex history; this unapologetically farcical storyline is [[MoodWhiplash played against]] a bitter, tragic Los Angeles subplot in which [[EldritchAbomination Illyria]] assumes Fred's form in order to deceive her parents into believing that their daughter is alive and well, a state of affairs which nearly breaks Wesley and is difficult to watch even for the viewers.
** It also doesn't help that the B-plot indicates that Wesley didn't carry out Fred's final wish that he inform her parents of her death. And that from what we hear, Buffy has turned into TheDitz, having an affair with the evil Immortal, making it come off as a rather petty TakeThat after Creator/SarahMichelleGellar refused to appear in the show's 100th episode. Whedon later made an AuthorsSavingThrow in the ''Buffy'' comics, revealing that it was actually one of several Slayers around the world who are impersonating Buffy to confuse the bad guys.
** "[[Recap/AngelS05E10SoulPurpose Soul Purpose]]" is a better example, which mostly consists of Angel having bizarre hallucinations.
* ''Series/TheYoungOnes'' could be considered to consist of little else. There are indeed plotlines within episodes, but they don't connect to other episodes, and are often derailed partway through. Sometimes they are not even resolved.
* ''Series/{{Heroes}}'':
** The two-part episode "The Eclipse", in which an eclipse randomly and inexplicably removes all the characters' powers. We never found out how or why this happened, and none of the events of those episodes were ever mentioned again.
** And this is just the most notorious example. ''Series/{{Heroes}}'' has a lot of Bizarro episodes. If you watch the previous seasons, keep track of how many new characters and storylines are introduced vs. [[KudzuPlot how many are still acknowledged in newer episodes]].
* ''Series/SeaQuestDSV'' "Knight of Shadows". It's a Halloween episode, and does at least ''try'' to give the OOC characters some excuses. But still, it was a low point for the otherwise shining season 1.
* ''Series/{{Supernatural}}'':
** Once or twice a season the series will include a comedy episode, with a ridiculous {{plot}} which is just an excuse to use situations like 'Sam and Dean are suddenly trapped on the set of this weird TV show called ''Supernatural'', and we are now going to spend 40 minutes making fun of our own premise, crew, actors, and viewing figures'.
** The PoorlyDisguisedPilot "Bloodlines" for a cancelled spin off stands out. For starter, Sam and Dean [[OutOfFocus barely appear in the episode]] and are uncharacteristically useless. The plot is about the rivalry between five monster families that are secretly running Chicago's underbelly along with an [[StarCrossedLovers impossible romance]] between [[InterspeciesRomance a male shapeshifter and a female werewolf]]. The portrayal of those monsters is drastically divergent with the show’s canon (for example: the shapeshifters can change their appearance without having to shed their skins. Only the Alpha shapeshifter had this ability). Because of the cancelation, all plotlines are LeftHanging and the fact that Chicago is secretly run by monsters is ''never'' mentioned again.
* ''Series/ThePrisoner'':
** Significantly, it did this ''twice'', in the episodes "Living In Harmony" and "The Girl Who Was Death" -- both of which massively change the entire format of the show just to fuck with TheProtagonist [[MindScrew and the audience]]. "Girl Who Was Death" wasn't even devised as a ''Prisoner'' episode but was based upon a leftover script for the predecessor series ''Series/DangerMan'' (for which it would have been a bizarro episode, too). The episode, however, isn't completely bizarro as [[spoiler: it was simply No. 6 telling a group of Village children a bedtime story. However, the presence of children in the Village (hitherto and afterwards never referenced) makes the episode a bizarro in another way]].
** There was also "Do Not Forsake Me, O My Darling," which Patrick [=McGoohan=] isn't even ''in'', where the Powers That Be basically put Number 6's brain in some other guy and send him on an errand outside of The Village for them. This was sort of a RealLifeWritesThePlot episode; Patrick [=McGoohan=] was off making IceStationZebra when this episode was filmed.
* The fifth season episode of ''Series/{{Xena|WarriorPrincess}}'' entitled "Married With Fishsticks" which mostly forgets about the story arc going on at the time to do a pointless filler episode where the feuding Aphrodite and Discord accidentally send Gabrielle into this alternate world where she's a mermaid, and is entirely populated with mer people. The whole thing is weird even by this show's standards, and ends with it apparently being AllJustADream as Gabrielle wakes up back with Xena. The people behind the show were well aware that this one wasn't their finest moment, and even did some micromanaging of the schedule to make sure it didn't get the distinction of being the show's 100th episode.
* ''Franchise/StarTrek'':
** The Mirror Universe episodes, where most of the characters are downright evil or entirely different than what is expected. Just to add to this, there is no Federation; instead, the Terran Empire exists in its place - [[spoiler:up until Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine, that is, when the Klingon-Cardassian Alliance defeats them and conquers Earth]].
** ''[[Series/StarTrekEnterprise Enterprise]]'''s "In a Mirror, Darkly" two-partner is an excellent example. While the other episodes crossover between the two universes, this one was set entirely in the Mirror Universe. [[spoiler:Except for the ''Defiant'' that had somehow ended up in the Mirror Universe. That's the Defiant from TOS episode "The Tholian Web", not the one from ''[[Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine Deep Space Nine]]''.]] The ''Enterprise'' production team went balls-to-the-wall and combined this trope with a BreatherEpisode full of {{Fanservice}} and soft-core ContinuityPorn, plus the entire cast in LargeHam mode and obviously having tremendous fun.
** Also, three episodes (one in TOS, one in TNG and another in ENT) involve a NegativeSpaceWedgie that causes the crew to do the MushroomSamba.
** The TOS episode "Plato's Stepchildren" is just so freakin' weird that were it not for the interracial kiss, most fans would probably consider it a LetUsNeverSpeakOfThisAgain episode. Notable {{plot point}}s involve alien MindRape, [[TheSpock Spock]] in a toga singing, and [[TheKirk Kirk]] being ridden by a dwarf.
** Certainly a number of first-season episodes of ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'' would count as this {{trope}}.
*** In the episode "Hide and Q", the character Q grants the characters wishes, and teenage Wesley Crusher wishes to be 10 or so years older. Then suddenly, BAAM he's transformed into a strapping, tall and exceptionally hunky man. We then cut to Geordi [=LaForge=] leering at the new Wesley and saying, "Hey, Wes. Not bad." It has been noted by several sources that [=LeVar=] Burton's character was originally supposed to be gay, but this is the only time it appears to be shown on screen, in this season one episode. Thereafter, it is NEVER EVER EVER EVER mentioned again, and the [=LaForge=] character eventually falls in love with a holodeck character then eventually an actual woman, and they live happily ever after. BLAM.
*** Similarly to "Plato's Stepchildren" mentioned above, this is {{averted|Trope}} in the case of "The Naked Now". Although it fully appears as though this is a LetUsNeverSpeakOfThisAgain episode, the fact that [[TheSpock Data]] and [[SacrificialLion Tasha Yar]] were "intimate" together and implied to have had sex ''is'' mentioned in later episodes, notably in "Measure of a Man" where it is used to help establish [[TheSpock Data's]] sentience. It even gets a CallBack much, ''much'' later in ''Film/StarTrekFirstContact'' with [[TheSpock Data]] telling the Borg Queen that he is "fully functional" in the sex department.
*** "Justice". The crew of the ''[[CoolStarship Enterprise]]'' is schmoozing with what appears to be a pre-warp culture, when [[ChildProdigy Wesley]] knocks over an outdoor decoration and is sentenced to death. And even though the [[AlienNonInterferenceClause Prime Directive]] didn't prevent them from making contact with this planet, all of a sudden it prevents [[TheCaptain Picard]] from saving Wesley. For no plot-relevant reason whatsoever, the inhabitants of this planet all dress in barely-there loincloths and have a preoccupation with sex. Rumor has it that Gene Roddenberry added this to the plot after they changed the planet from a floating military fortress housing incredibly xenophobic aliens to an idyllic paradise. Because naturally Paradise means EveryoneHasLotsOfSex.
*** "Conspiracy" is another ''[[Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration TNG]]'' example of this. Starfleet command has apparently been infiltrated by parasitic slugs that inhabit the brain of the host creature. This is obviously an event of considerable political magnitude, but it is never again referenced. However, it was {{foreshadow|ing}}ed several episodes earlier, making it a kind of AbortedArc.[[note]]The story was originally intended to have a purely human conspiracy within Starfleet, but Creator/GeneRoddenberry himself vetoed that because of how it clashed with his vision of ''Franchise/StarTrek'' as a {{utopia}} where all humans work towards a common goal in harmony. So they added mind-controlling alien infiltrators to the {{plot}}. It was intended to be the hook for the major villains of the series. The thing was, it [[ParanoiaFuel created too much paranoia]] that they wanted to avoid, so they changed the concept over to the Borg.[[/note]] It is explored a little further in the Expanded Universe.
*** The episode "Genesis". Everyone de-evolved into prehistoric creatures, Troi was amphibious, Worf was almost like a rhino-Klingon and considered her his mate, Dr Crusher was an ape, and, perhaps the most FridgeLogic-y of all, Spot the cat de-evolved into an ''iguana''.
** The ''Series/StarTrekVoyager'' episode "Threshold". So Tom Paris breaks the "transwarp barrier", right? And this results in being in ''every location in the universe at once''. Somehow this makes him [[GoalOrientedEvolution evolve into a higher order of being]]... which turns out to be a Mudkip-like lizard thing who can't breathe air. He kidnaps TheCaptain and they run away in said transwarp barrier-breaking ship. They are discovered ''within range'' and the crew find them on a beach together having just had a small litter of Mudkip ''babies''. (Repeat: Paris had children with Cap'n Janeway. While they were both Mudkips.) The babies are still out there presumably but everything else is {{reset|Button}} with "antimatter injections." Got all that? Okay, because this is the ''one'' episode out of all the ''Star Trek'' episodes ever made that is considered CanonDiscontinuity, to the point that in "Timeless", Tom Paris himself mentions that he has never traveled in transwarp before. ''Never''.
-->'''''Website/TheAgonyBooth:''''': Chakotay says, "I don't know how I'm going to enter this into the log." Preferably, by [[{{Headdesk}} pounding your head against the console.]]
** ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'' went off the rails a few times late in the series, producing such bizarro episodes as the holodeck baseball game and the ''Film/OceansEleven'' knockoff where the main cast ignored their duty in favor of pulling off a heist to save the holodeck lounge singer from a gangster. (No, it '''''doesn't''''' make sense in context.)
** ''Series/StarTrekEnterprise'' has one of the rare examples of [[TropesAreTools this trope churning out a great episode]]: over dinner, T'Pol regales [[TheCaptain Archer]] and Trip with the tale of an ancestor of hers who lived on Earth over a century before First Contact.
* The final episode of ''DarthWiki/CandleCove''. Puppets screaming and crying. For ''30 minutes''.
* ''Franchise/PowerRangers''
** ''Series/PowerRangersDinoThunder'' had a pretty big one, too: "Lost and Found in Translation", which is Conner, Ethan, and Kira watching a "Japanese show about the world-famous Power Rangers. They even dubbed it in English!" [[Series/BakuryuuSentaiAbaranger Take a wild guess on what the show really was.]]
** ''Series/PowerRangersNinjaStorm'' while surfing Tori got into a major wipe out, and wind up in a MirrorUniverse where the Rangers are the bad guys and Lothor and his goons are good guys. She eventually gets back to her own universe by getting wiped out again.
%%** ''Series/PowerRangersInSpace''. Four words. [[Series/NinjaTurtlesTheNextMutation Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles]].
* Franchise/SuperSentai has this for its ''Series/SamuraiSentaiShinkenger'' iteration in the form of its Direct to DVD movie. Released after the end of the series run, it talks of the team 'returning,' since they part at the end. The team is together for the whole movie, and then there's the content itself. There's also the now-traditional DVD shorts that both Sentai and its block-mate Kamen Rider give out yearly in Telebi-kun Magazine. A lot of these are very nonsensical even compared to other filler episodes within the series.

to:

* The ''Series/TwoPintsOfLagerAndAPacketOfCrisps'' episode "When Janet Killed Jonny" is one of these. It is an episode set outside B-plot of the main continuity, and is a "horror special", featuring many parodies of the horror genre (although it does contain many moments of terror, in a [[MoodWhiplash deviation from the show's usual formula]]). The episode features the cast breaking into the deserted Archer pub to drink the leftover beer, only to fall victim to the previously unmentioned "pub curse", which causes them to be "killed by the thing they love the most". As a result, the entire cast is killed off in an assortment of highly gruesome ways, only to later return as zombies.
* ''Series/{{Angel}}'':
** Some viewers consider "[[Recap/AngelS05E20TheGirlInQuestion The Girl in Question]]" to be this - in the middle of a tense, tragic story arc leading up to the heavily depressing series finale, we get an episode revolving around Spike and Angel gallivanting off to Italy to have wacky, {{hoyay}}-tastic adventures while trying to rescue Buffy from the mistake of dating an [[TheFaceless unseen]], vampiric [[TheCasanova sexual predator]] with whom they apparently have a [[RetCon never-before-mentioned]] complex history; this unapologetically farcical storyline is [[MoodWhiplash played against]] a bitter, tragic Los Angeles subplot in which [[EldritchAbomination Illyria]] assumes Fred's form in order to deceive her parents into believing that their daughter is alive and well, a state of affairs which nearly breaks Wesley and is difficult to watch even for the viewers.
** It also doesn't help that the B-plot indicates that Wesley didn't carry out Fred's final wish that he inform her parents of her death. And that from what we hear, Buffy has turned into TheDitz, having an affair with the evil Immortal, making it come off as a rather petty TakeThat after Creator/SarahMichelleGellar refused to appear in the show's 100th episode. Whedon later made an AuthorsSavingThrow in the ''Buffy'' comics, revealing that it was actually one of several Slayers around the world who are impersonating Buffy to confuse the bad guys.
** "[[Recap/AngelS05E10SoulPurpose Soul Purpose]]" is a better example, which mostly consists of Angel having bizarre hallucinations.
* ''Series/TheYoungOnes'' could be considered to consist of little else. There are indeed plotlines within episodes, but they don't connect to other episodes, and are often derailed partway through. Sometimes they are not even resolved.
* ''Series/{{Heroes}}'':
** The two-part
''Series/HowIMetYourMother'' episode "The Eclipse", Mermaid Theory", in which an eclipse randomly and inexplicably removes all the characters' powers. We never found out how or why this happened, and none of the events of those episodes were ever mentioned again.
** And this is just the most notorious example. ''Series/{{Heroes}}'' has a lot of Bizarro episodes. If you watch the previous seasons, keep track of how many new characters and storylines are introduced vs. [[KudzuPlot how many are still acknowledged in newer episodes]].
* ''Series/SeaQuestDSV'' "Knight of Shadows". It's a Halloween episode, and does at least ''try'' to give the OOC characters some excuses. But still, it was a low point for the otherwise shining season 1.
* ''Series/{{Supernatural}}'':
** Once or twice a season the series will include a comedy episode, with a ridiculous {{plot}} which is just an excuse to use situations like 'Sam and Dean are suddenly trapped on the set of this weird TV show called ''Supernatural'', and we are now going to spend 40 minutes making fun of our own premise, crew, actors, and viewing figures'.
** The PoorlyDisguisedPilot "Bloodlines" for a cancelled spin off stands out. For starter, Sam and Dean [[OutOfFocus barely appear in the episode]] and are uncharacteristically useless. The plot is about the rivalry between five monster families that are secretly running Chicago's underbelly along with an [[StarCrossedLovers impossible romance]] between [[InterspeciesRomance a male shapeshifter and a female werewolf]]. The portrayal of those monsters is drastically divergent with the show’s canon (for example: the shapeshifters can change their appearance without having to shed their skins. Only the Alpha shapeshifter had this ability). Because of the cancelation, all plotlines are LeftHanging and the fact that Chicago is secretly run by monsters is ''never'' mentioned again.
* ''Series/ThePrisoner'':
** Significantly, it did this ''twice'', in the episodes "Living In Harmony" and "The Girl Who Was Death" -- both of which massively change the entire format of the show just to fuck with TheProtagonist [[MindScrew and the audience]]. "Girl Who Was Death" wasn't even devised as a ''Prisoner'' episode but was based upon a leftover script for the predecessor series ''Series/DangerMan'' (for which it would have been a bizarro episode, too). The episode, however, isn't completely bizarro as [[spoiler: it was simply No. 6
Future!Ted's usually impressive memory breaks down while telling his kids about a group of Village children fight Lily and Barney once had, and he starts describing things that make no sense, like a bedtime story. However, motorcycle roaring through [=McLarens=], Barney magically levitating a beer bottle, or Barney and Lily switching personalities; then going "Wait, wait, that's not right" and starting the presence whole story over again. This causes an unusually high degree of children in MediumAwareness on the Village (hitherto parts of "Barney" and afterwards never referenced) makes "Lily", who are shown referring to the topic of their fight in-dialogue as "something" ("I'm still mad at you because of something!") because Ted can't remember what they were upset about, and at one point they wind up suspended in limbo, casting glares at the screen and checking their watches impatiently while Future!Ted mutters "um...hang on...let me see..." to himself.
* "iSpace Out" from ''Series/ICarly'' has a [=BLAM=] subplot, with a random little girl wandering into the apartment when Spencer is there, and not doing anything until she walks out again; it takes up half the time of
the episode a bizarro in another way]].
** There
and literally nothing happens or is resolved. "iMake [[ChaoticNeutral Sam]] Girlier"'s entire plot was also "Do Not Forsake Me, O My Darling," which Patrick [=McGoohan=] isn't even ''in'', where the Powers That Be basically put Number 6's brain in some other guy and send him on an errand outside of The Village for them. This was sort of a RealLifeWritesThePlot episode; Patrick [=McGoohan=] was off making IceStationZebra when this episode was filmed.
* The fifth season episode of ''Series/{{Xena|WarriorPrincess}}'' entitled "Married With Fishsticks" which mostly forgets about the story arc going on at the time
[[ChaoticNeutral Sam]] wanting to do a pointless filler episode where the feuding Aphrodite and Discord accidentally send Gabrielle into this alternate world where she's a mermaid, and is entirely populated with mer people. The whole thing is weird even by this show's standards, and ends with it apparently being AllJustADream as Gabrielle wakes up back with Xena. The people behind the show were well aware that this one wasn't their finest moment, and even did some micromanaging of the schedule to make sure it didn't get the distinction of being the show's 100th episode.
* ''Franchise/StarTrek'':
** The Mirror Universe episodes, where most of the characters are downright evil or entirely different than what is expected. Just
a boyfriend; [[NoGuyWantsAnAmazon she tries to add to this, there is no Federation; instead, the Terran Empire exists in its place - [[spoiler:up until Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine, that is, when the Klingon-Cardassian Alliance defeats them and conquers Earth]].
** ''[[Series/StarTrekEnterprise Enterprise]]'''s "In a Mirror, Darkly" two-partner is an excellent example. While the other episodes crossover between the two universes, this one was set entirely
act more girly]], but in the Mirror Universe. [[spoiler:Except for the ''Defiant'' that had somehow ended up in the Mirror Universe. That's the Defiant from TOS episode "The Tholian Web", not the one from ''[[Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine Deep Space Nine]]''.]] end BeYourself wins out. The ''Enterprise'' production team went balls-to-the-wall guy vanishes and combined this trope with a BreatherEpisode full of {{Fanservice}} and soft-core ContinuityPorn, plus the entire cast in LargeHam mode and obviously having tremendous fun.
** Also, three episodes (one in TOS, one in TNG and another in ENT) involve a NegativeSpaceWedgie that causes the crew to do the MushroomSamba.
** The TOS episode "Plato's Stepchildren" is just so freakin' weird that were it not for the interracial kiss, most fans would probably consider it a LetUsNeverSpeakOfThisAgain episode. Notable {{plot point}}s involve alien MindRape, [[TheSpock Spock]] in a toga singing, and [[TheKirk Kirk]] being ridden by a dwarf.
** Certainly a number of first-season episodes of ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'' would count as this {{trope}}.
*** In the episode "Hide and Q", the character Q grants the characters wishes, and teenage Wesley Crusher wishes to be 10 or so years older. Then suddenly, BAAM he's transformed into a strapping, tall and exceptionally hunky man. We then cut to Geordi [=LaForge=] leering at the new Wesley and saying, "Hey, Wes. Not bad." It has been noted by several sources that [=LeVar=] Burton's character was originally supposed to be gay, but this is the only time it appears to be shown on screen, in this season one episode. Thereafter, it is NEVER EVER EVER EVER mentioned again, and the [=LaForge=] character eventually falls in love with a holodeck character then eventually an actual woman, and they live happily ever after. BLAM.
*** Similarly to "Plato's Stepchildren" mentioned above, this is {{averted|Trope}} in the case of "The Naked Now". Although it fully appears as though this is a LetUsNeverSpeakOfThisAgain episode, the fact that [[TheSpock Data]] and [[SacrificialLion Tasha Yar]] were "intimate" together and implied to have had sex ''is'' mentioned in later episodes, notably in "Measure of a Man" where it is used to help establish [[TheSpock Data's]] sentience. It even gets a CallBack much, ''much'' later in ''Film/StarTrekFirstContact'' with [[TheSpock Data]] telling the Borg Queen that he is "fully functional" in the sex department.
*** "Justice". The crew of the ''[[CoolStarship Enterprise]]'' is schmoozing with what appears to be a pre-warp culture, when [[ChildProdigy Wesley]] knocks over an outdoor decoration and is sentenced to death. And even though the [[AlienNonInterferenceClause Prime Directive]] didn't prevent them from making contact with this planet, all of a sudden it prevents [[TheCaptain Picard]] from saving Wesley. For no plot-relevant reason whatsoever, the inhabitants of this planet all dress in barely-there loincloths and have a preoccupation with sex. Rumor has it that Gene Roddenberry added this to the plot after they changed the planet from a floating military fortress housing incredibly xenophobic aliens to an idyllic paradise. Because naturally Paradise means EveryoneHasLotsOfSex.
*** "Conspiracy" is another ''[[Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration TNG]]'' example of this. Starfleet command has apparently been infiltrated by parasitic slugs that inhabit the brain of the host creature. This is obviously an event of considerable political magnitude, but it
is never again referenced. However, it was {{foreshadow|ing}}ed several episodes earlier, making it a kind spoken of AbortedArc.[[note]]The story was originally intended again, not even to have a purely human conspiracy within Starfleet, but Creator/GeneRoddenberry himself vetoed that because of how it clashed with his vision of ''Franchise/StarTrek'' as a {{utopia}} where all humans work towards a common goal in harmony. So they added mind-controlling alien infiltrators to explain why. Another Spencer B-Plot (to use the {{plot}}. It was intended to be term loosely) just has Spencer wandering around the hook for the major villains of the series. The thing was, it [[ParanoiaFuel created too much paranoia]] that they wanted to avoid, so they changed the concept over to the Borg.[[/note]] It is explored a little further house doing nothing in the Expanded Universe.
*** The
between other scenes.
* ''Series/ICarly'' and ''Series/{{Victorious}}'' each aired an AprilFoolsDay
episode "Genesis". Everyone de-evolved into prehistoric creatures, Troi was amphibious, Worf was almost like a rhino-Klingon and considered her his mate, Dr Crusher was an ape, and, perhaps the most FridgeLogic-y of all, Spot the cat de-evolved into an ''iguana''.
** The ''Series/StarTrekVoyager'' episode "Threshold". So Tom Paris breaks the "transwarp barrier", right? And this results in being in ''every location in the universe at once''. Somehow this makes him [[GoalOrientedEvolution evolve into a higher order of being]]... which turns out to be a Mudkip-like lizard thing who can't breathe air. He kidnaps TheCaptain and they run away in said transwarp barrier-breaking ship. They are discovered ''within range'' and the crew find them on a beach together having just had a small litter of Mudkip ''babies''. (Repeat: Paris had children with Cap'n Janeway. While they were both Mudkips.) The babies are still out there presumably but everything else is {{reset|Button}} with "antimatter injections." Got all that? Okay, because this is the ''one'' episode out of all the ''Star Trek'' episodes ever made that is considered CanonDiscontinuity, to the point that in "Timeless", Tom Paris himself mentions that he has never traveled in transwarp before. ''Never''.
-->'''''Website/TheAgonyBooth:''''': Chakotay says, "I don't know how I'm going to enter this into the log." Preferably, by [[{{Headdesk}} pounding your head against the console.]]
** ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'' went off the rails a few times late in the series, producing such bizarro episodes as the holodeck baseball game and the ''Film/OceansEleven'' knockoff where the main cast ignored their duty in favor of pulling off a heist to save the holodeck lounge singer from a gangster. (No, it '''''doesn't''''' make sense in context.)
** ''Series/StarTrekEnterprise'' has one of the rare examples of [[TropesAreTools this trope churning out a great episode]]: over dinner, T'Pol regales [[TheCaptain Archer]] and Trip with the tale of an ancestor of hers who lived on Earth over a century before First Contact.
* The final episode of ''DarthWiki/CandleCove''. Puppets screaming and crying. For ''30 minutes''.
* ''Franchise/PowerRangers''
** ''Series/PowerRangersDinoThunder'' had a pretty big one, too: "Lost and Found in Translation", which is Conner, Ethan, and Kira watching a "Japanese show about the world-famous Power Rangers. They even dubbed it in English!" [[Series/BakuryuuSentaiAbaranger Take a wild guess on what the show really was.]]
** ''Series/PowerRangersNinjaStorm'' while surfing Tori got into a major wipe out, and wind up in a MirrorUniverse where the Rangers are the bad guys and Lothor and his goons are good guys. She eventually gets
back to her own universe by getting wiped out again.
%%** ''Series/PowerRangersInSpace''. Four words. [[Series/NinjaTurtlesTheNextMutation Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles]].
* Franchise/SuperSentai has this for its ''Series/SamuraiSentaiShinkenger'' iteration in the form of its Direct to DVD movie. Released after the end of the series run, it talks of the team 'returning,' since they part at the end. The team is together for the whole movie, and then there's the content itself. There's also the now-traditional DVD shorts that both Sentai and its block-mate Kamen Rider give out yearly in Telebi-kun Magazine. A lot of these are very
back. Both were utterly nonsensical even compared to other filler episodes within the series.episodes. Nothing made sense, and it was completely random. There was NoFourthWall.



* ''Series/TheCosbyShow'':
** One [[http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0547043/ episode]] was narrated by Rudy, which featured the cast as fairy-tale characters, clothed in costumes made to look like crayon drawings.
** A [[http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0547076/combined later episode]] had Cosby's character eating a big hoagie/hero/sub before going to bed, and then dreaming that all of the male cast were pregnant.
** Still [[http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0546981/ later]], Cosby has another big sandwich before going to bed. [[CallBack The above episode is actually mentioned]]. This time, his dream involves Vanessa being a jazz musician, Denise is a firefighter, Clair is threatening to jump out of a window, and then the Muppets show up. To say that this episode makes no sense is an understatement.
** Then there's "A Nightmare on Stigwood Avenue," which explores Rudy's bad dream of Olivia holding Cliff and Clair completely in thrall and always getting her way (with Vanessa and her friends as a sort of Muse chorus providing vocal commentary). Rudy turns the tables on Olivia at the end--it''is'' her dream, after all.
* ''Series/{{Bones}}'':
** The fourth-season finale features Booth as a nightclub owner, Brennan as his wife, Hodgins as a hard-drinking novelist, Cam as a detective, etc. [[spoiler:Of course, it's [[AllJustADream all in Booth's head as he's actually in a coma]], recovering from the removal of a brain tumor. The dream is "inspired" by a story Brennan is writing, which she is reading aloud to Booth as she sits in vigil by his bedside.]]
** The 200th episode moves all the characters to the 1950's, Booth is a jewel thief and Bones is a detective who faces gender discrimination, and her father is the chief of the L.A.P.D.
* ''Series/TheMaryTylerMooreShow'' had an episode where each of the major male characters imagined what it would be like if they were married to Mary.
* At first glance, ''Series/{{Farscape}}'' seems to have a few interesting examples:
** "Crackers Don't Matter" had the entire crew trying to kill each other over some crackers, while "Won't Get Fooled Again" was... Well, TheDragon was wearing bright red pumps at one point. However, even ''these'' Farscape episodes have a bearing on the overall story arc, proving that a sure way to avoid Bizarro Episodes is to make the ''entire series'' bizarre.
** There is also the episode where D'Argo accidentally knocks Crichton out, causing him to hallucinate a series of Looney Tunes-type cartoons... the only plot point of which is to get D'Argo and Crichton to stop falling out over trifles. According to the directors' commentary, they were desperate to do a blend of animation and live-action, but it took a long, long time to do and many of the sequences were made before they had worked out how they were going to tie them in to the main plot. The guys' feud is set up in the previous few episodes, but there's never any real reason for it. Crichton [[LampshadeHanging says]] at one point that he doesn't know why they were arguing in the first place.

to:

* ''Series/TheCosbyShow'':
** One [[http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0547043/ episode]] was narrated by Rudy, which featured the cast as fairy-tale characters, clothed in costumes made to look like crayon drawings.
** A [[http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0547076/combined later episode]] had Cosby's character eating a big hoagie/hero/sub before going to bed, and then dreaming that all of the male cast were pregnant.
** Still [[http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0546981/ later]], Cosby has another big sandwich before going to bed. [[CallBack The above
''Series/TheKidsInTheHall'' episode is actually mentioned]]. This time, his dream involves Vanessa being a jazz musician, Denise is a firefighter, Clair is threatening to jump out of a window, and then the Muppets show up. To say that this episode makes no sense is an understatement.
** Then there's "A Nightmare on Stigwood Avenue," which explores Rudy's bad dream of Olivia holding Cliff and Clair completely in thrall and always getting her way
"Chalet 2000" was one long Buddy Cole sketch (with Vanessa and her friends as a sort of Muse chorus providing vocal commentary). Rudy turns the tables on Olivia at the end--it''is'' her dream, after all.
* ''Series/{{Bones}}'':
** The fourth-season finale features Booth as a nightclub owner, Brennan as his wife, Hodgins as a hard-drinking novelist, Cam as a detective, etc. [[spoiler:Of course,
it's [[AllJustADream all in Booth's head as he's actually in a coma]], recovering from the removal of a brain tumor. The dream is "inspired" by a story Brennan is writing, which she is reading aloud to Booth as she sits in vigil by his bedside.]]
** The 200th episode moves all the characters to the 1950's, Booth is a jewel thief
own credit sequence), and Bones is a detective who faces gender discrimination, to top it off, Queen Elizabeth appears and her father is the chief of the L.A.P.D.
* ''Series/TheMaryTylerMooreShow'' had an episode where each of the major male characters imagined what it would be like if they were married to Mary.
* At first glance, ''Series/{{Farscape}}'' seems to have a few interesting examples:
** "Crackers Don't Matter" had the entire crew trying to kill each other over some crackers, while "Won't Get Fooled Again" was... Well, TheDragon was wearing bright red pumps at one point. However, even ''these'' Farscape episodes have a bearing on the overall story arc, proving that a sure way to avoid Bizarro Episodes is to make the ''entire series'' bizarre.
** There is also the episode where D'Argo accidentally knocks Crichton out, causing him to hallucinate a series of Looney Tunes-type cartoons... the only plot point of which is to get D'Argo and Crichton to stop falling out over trifles. According to the directors' commentary, they were desperate to do a blend of animation and live-action, but it took a long, long time to do and many of the sequences were made before they had worked out how they were going to tie them in to the main plot. The guys' feud is set
ends up in the previous few episodes, but there's never any real reason for it. Crichton [[LampshadeHanging says]] at one point that he doesn't know why they were arguing in the first place.sleeping with a talking beaver.



* ''Series/LizzieMcGuire'' has the episode where Lizzie and Matt [[FreakyFridayFlip switch bodies]].
* ''Series/TheMaryTylerMooreShow'' had an episode where each of the major male characters imagined what it would be like if they were married to Mary.



* "iSpace Out" from ''Series/ICarly'' has a [=BLAM=] subplot, with a random little girl wandering into the apartment when Spencer is there, and not doing anything until she walks out again; it takes up half the time of the episode and literally nothing happens or is resolved. "iMake [[ChaoticNeutral Sam]] Girlier"'s entire plot was [[ChaoticNeutral Sam]] wanting to get a boyfriend; [[NoGuyWantsAnAmazon she tries to act more girly]], but in the end BeYourself wins out. The guy vanishes and is never spoken of again, not even to explain why. Another Spencer B-Plot (to use the term loosely) just has Spencer wandering around the house doing nothing in between other scenes.
* ''Series/ICarly'' and ''Series/{{Victorious}}'' each aired an AprilFoolsDay episode back to back. Both were utterly nonsensical episodes. Nothing made sense, and it was completely random. There was NoFourthWall.

to:

* "iSpace Out" from ''Series/ICarly'' has ''Series/TheMuppetShow'' had a [=BLAM=] subplot, with a random little girl wandering into few episodes where both the apartment when Spencer is there, skits and not doing anything until she walks out again; it takes up half the time of the episode and literally nothing happens or is resolved. "iMake [[ChaoticNeutral Sam]] Girlier"'s entire main plot was [[ChaoticNeutral Sam]] wanting to get a boyfriend; [[NoGuyWantsAnAmazon she tries to act more girly]], had the same theme (the Creator/VincentPrice and Music/AliceCooper episodes were both themed around spooky things, for instance), but in those weren't nearly as bizarre as episodes where the end BeYourself wins out. The guy vanishes plot and is never spoken of again, not even to explain why. Another Spencer B-Plot (to use the term loosely) just has Spencer wandering skits revolved around the house doing nothing in between other scenes.
* ''Series/ICarly''
Muppets acting out a story as different characters, such as the Liza Minelli (a murder mystery with Kermit as a detective, Liza as his romantic interest, Fozzie as Patrol Bear, most of the Muppet cast as ''[[spoiler: murder victims]]'', and ''Series/{{Victorious}}'' each aired an AprilFoolsDay episode back to back. Both were utterly nonsensical [[spoiler: JustForFun/StatlerAndWaldorf as the murderers]]), Brooke Shields (a re-telling of ''Alice in Wonderland''), and Lynn Redgrave (a re-telling of ''Robin Hood'') episodes. Nothing made sense, Especially weird about the first and it last is that the plot continues to play out backstage, when nobody in the Muppet Theater's audience could see what was completely random. There going on.
* ''Series/MysteryScienceTheater3000''
** A sixth season episode featuring ''Film/LastOfTheWildHorses'' has the first segment take place in a MirrorUniverse where Frank and Dr. Forrester are the test subjects.
** ''Film/QuestOfTheDeltaKnights'' had Pearl in the theater quipping with the bots while Mike hung out with Observer and Bobo on the planet below. A subversion, since neither changed their personalities.
** ''Film/PrinceOfSpace'' in a big way: Mike and the Bots end up in a wormhole. Shape-shifting, time displacement and general insanity ensue.
* ''Series/NewsRadio'' had two special episodes that were set out of continuity: one featuring the staff of a radio station in space, and another where they run a radio station on the ''Titanic''.
* The final episode of Shaun Micallef's news parody ''Series/{{Newstopia}}''
was NoFourthWall.a full episode of "Inspector Herring" the black and white, Russian language show within a show, about a Soviet Police inspector that happens to be a fish. The plot revolved around a plan to assassinate Andre Rieu, which succeeds.
* ''Theatre/TheOddCouple'' had a flashback episode that parodied the James Bond films and featured Felix and Oscar's fathers.



* ''Series/HerculesTheLegendaryJourneys''
** The 4th season episode "... And Fancy Free", in which Hercules enters a dance competition. Nothing rests on this competition other than his partner's self esteem, and a nice trophy. The town magistrate finds this competition important enough that he spends most of the episode sending assassins after Hercules and his partner to stop them from winning. No other motivation is given, he just wants his daughter to win. It guest stars Michael Hurst in drag as the dance instructor.
** "Stranger in a Strange World", which is referred to as a "Bizarro World episode" by the writer in the interviews feature on the DVD. This episode features an alternate universe with Hercules an evil tyrant marrying Aphrodite, the Xena cast in different roles, and a battle using a wedding cake. And Iolaus as a jester.
** There is a later episode featuring the same characters in struggle over fashion...which is about as pointless as "...And Fancy Free". Also no explanation is given as to why the town magistrate has apparently given up his duties to go into the world of ancient Greek fashion.
** The episode set in the present day which is all about Kevin Sorbo having gone missing, and features the memorable and hysterical [[CrowningMomentOfFunny restroom whistling scene]].
** There was another one where the cast goes on a teamwork-building retreat hosted by Sunny Day (played by Renee O'Connor; normal role Gabrielle). It leads to a Scooby Doo ending where Sunny is revealed to be B.S. Hollinsfoffer (played by Robert Trebor, normal role Salmoneus), who is 1. a lot taller than Sunny, 2. at least a hundred pounds heavier, and 3. male, and concludes with Ares ''revealing himself'' to the cast. On top of that, most of them aren't even all that surprised to learn that Greek god of war is real; one of them even claims "I find the thought rather comforting myself."
%%* The Series/HannahMontana Forever episode "Kiss It All Goodbye".
* Similar to the ''Series/MadAboutYou'' example noted above, ''Series/{{Friends}}'' had a "what if?" episode that explored the possible consequences of Joey becoming a star with Chandler as his personal assistant, Monica staying fat, Ross's ClosetedGay wife staying in the closet and keeping their marriage going, Rachel having gone through with her marriage (thus never meeting any of the friends) and Phoebe somehow becoming a stock broker.
* ''Series/TheXFiles'' did this a few times, most notably in its RashomonStyle episodes "[[Recap/TheXFilesS03E20JoseChungsFromOuterSpace Jose Chung's from Outer Space]]" and "[[Recap/TheXFilesS05E12BadBlood Bad Blood]]". Then there's "[[Recap/TheXFilesS05E05ThePostModernPrometheus Post-Modern Prometheus]]", which is filmed entirely in black and white and ends with a song-and-dance number featuring a Cher lookalike (after Mulder had effectively broken the fourth wall because he decided the original ending sucked). And [[Series/TheJerrySpringerShow Jerry Springer]] was in it, too.
* ''Series/NewsRadio'' had two special episodes that were set out of continuity: one featuring the staff of a radio station in space, and another where they run a radio station on the ''Titanic''.

to:

* ''Series/HerculesTheLegendaryJourneys''
''Franchise/PowerRangers''
** The 4th season ''Series/PowerRangersDinoThunder'' had a pretty big one, too: "Lost and Found in Translation", which is Conner, Ethan, and Kira watching a "Japanese show about the world-famous Power Rangers. They even dubbed it in English!" [[Series/BakuryuuSentaiAbaranger Take a wild guess on what the show really was.]]
** ''Series/PowerRangersNinjaStorm'' while surfing Tori got into a major wipe out, and wind up in a MirrorUniverse where the Rangers are the bad guys and Lothor and his goons are good guys. She eventually gets back to her own universe by getting wiped out again.
%%** ''Series/PowerRangersInSpace''. Four words. [[Series/NinjaTurtlesTheNextMutation Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles]].
* ''Series/ThePrisoner'':
** Significantly, it did this ''twice'', in the episodes "Living In Harmony" and "The Girl Who Was Death" -- both of which massively change the entire format of the show just to fuck with TheProtagonist [[MindScrew and the audience]]. "Girl Who Was Death" wasn't even devised as a ''Prisoner''
episode "... And Fancy Free", in but was based upon a leftover script for the predecessor series ''Series/DangerMan'' (for which Hercules enters it would have been a dance competition. Nothing rests on this competition other than his partner's self esteem, bizarro episode, too). The episode, however, isn't completely bizarro as [[spoiler: it was simply No. 6 telling a group of Village children a bedtime story. However, the presence of children in the Village (hitherto and a nice trophy. The town magistrate finds this competition important enough that he spends most of afterwards never referenced) makes the episode sending assassins after Hercules and his partner to stop them from winning. No other motivation is given, he just wants his daughter to win. It guest stars Michael Hurst a bizarro in drag as the dance instructor.
** "Stranger in a Strange World", which is referred to as a "Bizarro World episode" by the writer in the interviews feature on the DVD. This episode features an alternate universe with Hercules an evil tyrant marrying Aphrodite, the Xena cast in different roles, and a battle using a wedding cake. And Iolaus as a jester.
** There is a later episode featuring the same characters in struggle over fashion...which is about as pointless as "...And Fancy Free". Also no explanation is given as to why the town magistrate has apparently given up his duties to go into the world of ancient Greek fashion.
** The episode set in the present day which is all about Kevin Sorbo having gone missing, and features the memorable and hysterical [[CrowningMomentOfFunny restroom whistling scene]].
another way]].
** There was another one also "Do Not Forsake Me, O My Darling," which Patrick [=McGoohan=] isn't even ''in'', where the cast goes on a teamwork-building retreat hosted by Sunny Day (played by Renee O'Connor; normal role Gabrielle). It leads to a Scooby Doo ending where Sunny is revealed to be B.S. Hollinsfoffer (played by Robert Trebor, normal role Salmoneus), who is 1. a lot taller than Sunny, 2. at least a hundred pounds heavier, Powers That Be basically put Number 6's brain in some other guy and 3. male, and concludes with Ares ''revealing himself'' to the cast. On top send him on an errand outside of that, most of them aren't even all that surprised to learn that Greek god of war is real; one of them even claims "I find the thought rather comforting myself."
%%*
The Series/HannahMontana Forever Village for them. This was sort of a RealLifeWritesThePlot episode; Patrick [=McGoohan=] was off making ''Film/IceStationZebra'' when this episode "Kiss It All Goodbye".
was filmed.
* Similar ''Series/{{Roseanne}}'' had some of these, to the ''Series/MadAboutYou'' example noted above, ''Series/{{Friends}}'' had point where it may not even count anymore. To set out a "what if?" episode that explored the possible consequences of Joey becoming a star with Chandler as his personal assistant, Monica staying fat, Ross's ClosetedGay wife staying in the closet and keeping their marriage going, Rachel having gone through with her marriage (thus never meeting any of the friends) and Phoebe somehow becoming a stock broker.
* ''Series/TheXFiles'' did this
brief list, there were a few times, most notably in its RashomonStyle episodes "[[Recap/TheXFilesS03E20JoseChungsFromOuterSpace Jose Chung's from Outer Space]]" and "[[Recap/TheXFilesS05E12BadBlood Bad Blood]]". Then there's "[[Recap/TheXFilesS05E05ThePostModernPrometheus Post-Modern Prometheus]]", which is filmed entirely in black and white and ends with {{Halloween Episode}}s that seemingly broke reality, a song-and-dance number featuring a Cher lookalike (after Mulder had effectively broken the fourth wall because he decided the original ending sucked). And [[Series/TheJerrySpringerShow Jerry Springer]] was in it, too.
* ''Series/NewsRadio'' had two special
few episodes that were set out of continuity: one featuring AllJustADream, and toward the staff end of a radio station in space, and another the series, plenty of them, such as episodes where Roseanne posed for Playboy, won Miss Universe, and, well actually the entire final season was this after they run a radio station on won the ''Titanic''.lottery. Which is actually explained in the finale [[spoiler:as a series of stories written by Roseanne as a way to deal with her grief over losing Dan to his heart attack earlier in the series]].
* ''Series/SeaQuestDSV'' "Knight of Shadows". It's a Halloween episode, and does at least ''try'' to give the OOC characters some excuses. But still, it was a low point for the otherwise shining season 1.
* ''Series/{{Seinfeld}}'':
** Virtually the trope-namer: the season eight episode "The Bizarro Jerry" posited an alternative world where the show's male characters are re-imagined as sensitive, enlightened and supportive.
** "The Chinese Restaurant" and "The Parking Garage", which place the central characters in an unfamiliar setting from which they spend the full 22 minutes struggling to free themselves.
** "The Opposite", where George takes a vow to suppress all his usual instincts and finds that his life is transformed into an unqualified success. To redress the cosmic balance, Elaine, whose life had always been somewhat successful is suddenly beset by a sequence of failures. She soon realises, "I've become George!"
** "The Chicken Roaster", where Jerry and Kramer switch apartments and, as a result, temporarily develop each others' personality traits.
** "The Butter Shave", where all three main male characters begin the episode with incongruous mustaches.
** "The Merv Griffin Show", where Kramer installs the set from the eponymous talk show in his apartment. As a result, the show's discussion scenes, which usually take place in Jerry's apartment or the coffee shop, follow the formula of a talk show with Kramer as the host.
** "The Betrayal" (also known as "The Backwards Episode"), in which the episode's scenes are played in reverse order.
** And, of course, "The Finale", in which many of the show's past characters are summoned to court to testify against the main group. At the end of the episode, the typical "coffee shop" conversation takes place in a prison lock-up. In the final credits, the show's characteristic "stand-up" set now takes place in a prison rec-room (with a VERY hostile audience).
* ''Series/SesameStreet'' also enters this territory when the main plots are about characters starring in a story. At least two or three episodes from the '90s framed these as the Muppets and humans putting on a play.
* ''Series/{{Smallville}}'': "[[Recap/SmallvilleS08E17Hex Hex]]" and "[[Recap/SmallvilleS10E15Fortune Fortune]]", both episodes involving, essentially, ComicBook/{{Zatanna}} screwing with the main cast; the first time is at least largely unintentional and just trying to make them happier. The second, she's flat out trolling them. Both are rather insane, running on RuleOfFun, and provide a great deal of hilarity. "Fortune" does, however, write out Chloe, marrying her to [[Comicbook/GreenArrow Oliver]], so it does connect to the season's plot. Given how important Chloe is to the show previously, it also counts as a WHAMEpisode.



* ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'':
** The MusicalEpisode "[[Recap/BuffyTheVampireSlayerS6E7OnceMoreWithFeeling Once More With Feeling]]" is a bizarre case of a bizarro episode that '''''is''''' based on an utterly ridiculous premise, '''''is''''' important to the season's major story arcs and remains one of '''''the''''' most loved episodes of the entire series, like a Bizarro Episode and WHAMEpisode mixed together.
** The season 4 [[DenouementEpisode finale]], "Restless", starts like this. Eventually what's going on is clarified, as well as the fact that it contains large amounts of {{foreshadowing}}.
** "Superstar". Season 4, ep 17. Jonathan, a recurring ButtMonkey who'd been the butt of jokes for the past four seasons, rewrites reality to make himself a BlackHoleSue who even takes over the opening credits.
** Also, the season 3 episode "The Zeppo" can be seen as this, diverting from the building plot threads of that season to tell a completely zany, full-out self-parody of every Buffy trope in the book.
** "Normal Again" aka the episode that implies that the series may or may not be the hallucinations of a mental patient.
** All of these just go to show that [[TropesAreTools Tropes Are Not Bad]] in the hands of a skilled writer.
* ''Series/CrimeStory'' was stylishly moody and gritty...then there was the 2nd season episode "Pauli Taglia's Dream". It did show how mobster Ray Luca and his goofus flunky Pauli had earlier survived a nuclear bomb test, but through Pauli's point of view - complete with cartoon sound effects, Three Stooges slapstick, and cuts of him lipsynching Bobby Fuller's "I Fought the Law" wearing impossibly high rockabilly hair and a radiation suit.
* Over its last two seasons it became clear that Day 6 of ''Series/TwentyFour'' was a Big Lipped Alligator ''Season''. Events like [[spoiler:the detonation of a nuclear device in an American city by foreign terrorists and the attack and incapacitation of an American president while in the White House - both of which happened within ''hours'' of each other and would have deeply impacted the country's history and internal and international policies - are never mentioned or even alluded at in the following seasons. Matter of fact, President Wayne Palmer was effectively [[ChuckCunninghamSyndrome "brother Chucked"]] without as much as a throwaway line to explain what ultimately became of him. [[WordOfGod Howard Gordon]] has stated he lived, but a prop newspaper from the made-for-TV movie ''Redemption'' mentions his death, thus leaving his fate unknown]]. Day 7 has its couple of bizarro episodes in which [[spoiler:an African tin pot dictator and his five - six at most - bodyguards take the White House and everyone inside hostage - with some help from (what else in Series/TwentyFour?) moles on the inside. Jack Bauer resolves the entire situation in two hours of [[BlatantLies "Real Time"]] and the entire situation does not impact the rest of the season - the ''second half'' of it - in any significant way]]. [[SubvertedTrope With the exception of]] [[spoiler:killing off Bill Buchanan, who by that point was one of the show's main characters]]. Although the immediate fallout for that is something of a Big-Lipped Arc itself ([[spoiler:Jack is framed for trying to avenge his death and is wanted dead or alive in the cliffhanger of the following episode, only to have his name cleared ''at the very beginning'' of the episode following that, leaving those events to quickly be forgotten]]), it does later provide a motivating factor for Chloe when she returns and discovers what's happened.
* Similarly, many of the events of ''Series/FridayNightLights'' Season Two aren't referenced in later seasons, the most JustForFun/{{egregious}} of which would be [[spoiler:Landry KILLING a man to protect Tyra, and even confessing to it]]. Other stuff happened that season, too (Matt and Grandma Saracen's nurse, Buddy raising a ward named Santiago), but the only major event to happen that season with any significant impact on future seasons is Jason Street [[spoiler:getting a woman pregnant]].
* ''Series/BreakingBad'' has the episode where Walt becomes obsessed with killing a fly that has somehow gotten into the meth lab. There are a few moments of legitimate character development and overall series value to this episode, but for the most part, it's a big steaming pile of BLAM. [[TropesAreTools It's also considered one of the best episodes of the entire series.]]
* The 1980s ''Series/WarOfTheWorlds'' episode "Candle In The Night". This is a show that thrived on an overarching conspiracy by aliens to overthrow the Earth, interpersonal conflict between the cast and gratuitous violence that pushed the limits of what syndicated television could show...and someone decided that an entire episode should be focused on a supporting character ''having a birthday party''. The plot follows one of the team members, Debi, who sneaks out of the Blackwood Project's headquarters to have a birthday party with a bunch of random kids she meets. There's no real tension or drama in the episode, and none of the characters or events are mentioned again.
* ''Series/TerminatorTheSarahConnorChronicles'' had a surreal, cyborg-free episode where Sarah is in a sleep clinic and is haunted by nightmares [[spoiler:which are actually real, while the clinic is a hallucination caused by a one-off villain probing her mind]].
* ''Theatre/TheOddCouple'' had a flashback episode that parodied the James Bond films and featured Felix and Oscar's fathers.
* ''Series/TheKidsInTheHall'' episode "Chalet 2000" was one long Buddy Cole sketch (with it's own credit sequence), and to top it off, Queen Elizabeth appears and ends up sleeping with a talking beaver.

to:

* ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'':
''Franchise/StarTrek'':
** The MusicalEpisode "[[Recap/BuffyTheVampireSlayerS6E7OnceMoreWithFeeling Once More With Feeling]]" Mirror Universe episodes, where most of the characters are downright evil or entirely different than what is a bizarre case of a bizarro episode expected. Just to add to this, there is no Federation; instead, the Terran Empire exists in its place - [[spoiler:up until Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine, that '''''is''''' based on an utterly ridiculous premise, '''''is''''' important to is, when the season's major story arcs Klingon-Cardassian Alliance defeats them and remains one of '''''the''''' most loved conquers Earth]].
** ''[[Series/StarTrekEnterprise Enterprise]]'''s "In a Mirror, Darkly" two-partner is an excellent example. While the other
episodes of crossover between the entire series, like a Bizarro Episode and WHAMEpisode mixed together.
** The season 4 [[DenouementEpisode finale]], "Restless", starts like this. Eventually what's going on is clarified, as well as
two universes, this one was set entirely in the fact that it contains large amounts of {{foreshadowing}}.
** "Superstar". Season 4, ep 17. Jonathan, a recurring ButtMonkey who'd been the butt of jokes
Mirror Universe. [[spoiler:Except for the past four seasons, rewrites reality to make himself a BlackHoleSue who even takes over ''Defiant'' that had somehow ended up in the opening credits.
** Also,
Mirror Universe. That's the season 3 Defiant from TOS episode "The Zeppo" can be seen as this, diverting Tholian Web", not the one from the building plot threads of that season to tell a completely zany, full-out self-parody of every Buffy ''[[Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine Deep Space Nine]]''.]] The ''Enterprise'' production team went balls-to-the-wall and combined this trope in with a BreatherEpisode full of {{Fanservice}} and soft-core ContinuityPorn, plus the book.
entire cast in LargeHam mode and obviously having tremendous fun.
** "Normal Again" aka Also, three episodes (one in TOS, one in TNG and another in ENT) involve a NegativeSpaceWedgie that causes the crew to do the MushroomSamba.
** The TOS episode "Plato's Stepchildren" is just so freakin' weird that were it not for the interracial kiss, most fans would probably consider it a LetUsNeverSpeakOfThisAgain episode. Notable {{plot point}}s involve alien MindRape, [[TheSpock Spock]] in a toga singing, and [[TheKirk Kirk]] being ridden by a dwarf.
** Certainly a number of first-season episodes of ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'' would count as this {{trope}}.
*** In
the episode "Hide and Q", the character Q grants the characters wishes, and teenage Wesley Crusher wishes to be 10 or so years older. Then suddenly, BAAM he's transformed into a strapping, tall and exceptionally hunky man. We then cut to Geordi [=LaForge=] leering at the new Wesley and saying, "Hey, Wes. Not bad." It has been noted by several sources that implies that [=LeVar=] Burton's character was originally supposed to be gay, but this is the series may or may not only time it appears to be the hallucinations of a mental patient.
** All of these just go to show that [[TropesAreTools Tropes Are Not Bad]]
shown on screen, in the hands of a skilled writer.
* ''Series/CrimeStory'' was stylishly moody and gritty...then there was the 2nd
this season episode "Pauli Taglia's Dream". It did show how mobster Ray Luca and his goofus flunky Pauli had earlier survived a nuclear bomb test, but through Pauli's point of view - complete with cartoon sound effects, Three Stooges slapstick, and cuts of him lipsynching Bobby Fuller's "I Fought the Law" wearing impossibly high rockabilly hair and a radiation suit.
* Over its last two seasons
one episode. Thereafter, it became clear that Day 6 of ''Series/TwentyFour'' was a Big Lipped Alligator ''Season''. Events like [[spoiler:the detonation of a nuclear device in an American city by foreign terrorists and the attack and incapacitation of an American president while in the White House - both of which happened within ''hours'' of each other and would have deeply impacted the country's history and internal and international policies - are never is NEVER EVER EVER EVER mentioned or even alluded at in the following seasons. Matter of fact, President Wayne Palmer was effectively [[ChuckCunninghamSyndrome "brother Chucked"]] without as much as a throwaway line to explain what ultimately became of him. [[WordOfGod Howard Gordon]] has stated he lived, but a prop newspaper from the made-for-TV movie ''Redemption'' mentions his death, thus leaving his fate unknown]]. Day 7 has its couple of bizarro episodes in which [[spoiler:an African tin pot dictator and his five - six at most - bodyguards take the White House and everyone inside hostage - with some help from (what else in Series/TwentyFour?) moles on the inside. Jack Bauer resolves the entire situation in two hours of [[BlatantLies "Real Time"]] again, and the entire situation does not impact the rest of the season - the ''second half'' of it - in any significant way]]. [[SubvertedTrope With the exception of]] [[spoiler:killing off Bill Buchanan, who by that point was one of the show's main characters]]. Although the immediate fallout for that is something of a Big-Lipped Arc itself ([[spoiler:Jack is framed for trying to avenge his death and is wanted dead or alive in the cliffhanger of the following episode, only to have his name cleared ''at the very beginning'' of the episode following that, leaving those events to quickly be forgotten]]), it does later provide a motivating factor for Chloe when she returns and discovers what's happened.
* Similarly, many of the events of ''Series/FridayNightLights'' Season Two aren't referenced in later seasons, the most JustForFun/{{egregious}} of which would be [[spoiler:Landry KILLING a man to protect Tyra, and even confessing to it]]. Other stuff happened that season, too (Matt and Grandma Saracen's nurse, Buddy raising a ward named Santiago), but the only major event to happen that season with any significant impact on future seasons is Jason Street [[spoiler:getting a woman pregnant]].
* ''Series/BreakingBad'' has the episode where Walt becomes obsessed with killing a fly that has somehow gotten into the meth lab. There are a few moments of legitimate
[=LaForge=] character development eventually falls in love with a holodeck character then eventually an actual woman, and overall series value they live happily ever after. BLAM.
*** Similarly
to "Plato's Stepchildren" mentioned above, this is {{averted|Trope}} in the case of "The Naked Now". Although it fully appears as though this is a LetUsNeverSpeakOfThisAgain episode, the fact that [[TheSpock Data]] and [[SacrificialLion Tasha Yar]] were "intimate" together and implied to have had sex ''is'' mentioned in later episodes, notably in "Measure of a Man" where it is used to help establish [[TheSpock Data's]] sentience. It even gets a CallBack much, ''much'' later in ''Film/StarTrekFirstContact'' with [[TheSpock Data]] telling the Borg Queen that he is "fully functional" in the sex department.
*** "Justice". The crew of the ''[[CoolStarship Enterprise]]'' is schmoozing with what appears to be a pre-warp culture, when [[ChildProdigy Wesley]] knocks over an outdoor decoration and is sentenced to death. And even though the [[AlienNonInterferenceClause Prime Directive]] didn't prevent them from making contact with this planet, all of a sudden it prevents [[TheCaptain Picard]] from saving Wesley. For no plot-relevant reason whatsoever, the inhabitants of this planet all dress in barely-there loincloths and have a preoccupation with sex. Rumor has it that Gene Roddenberry added this to the plot after they changed the planet from a floating military fortress housing incredibly xenophobic aliens to an idyllic paradise. Because naturally Paradise means EveryoneHasLotsOfSex.
*** "Conspiracy" is another ''[[Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration TNG]]'' example of this. Starfleet command has apparently been infiltrated by parasitic slugs that inhabit the brain of the host creature. This is obviously an event of considerable political magnitude,
but it is never again referenced. However, it was {{foreshadow|ing}}ed several episodes earlier, making it a kind of AbortedArc.[[note]]The story was originally intended to have a purely human conspiracy within Starfleet, but Creator/GeneRoddenberry himself vetoed that because of how it clashed with his vision of ''Franchise/StarTrek'' as a {{utopia}} where all humans work towards a common goal in harmony. So they added mind-controlling alien infiltrators to the {{plot}}. It was intended to be the hook for the most part, it's a big steaming pile major villains of BLAM. [[TropesAreTools It's also the series. The thing was, it [[ParanoiaFuel created too much paranoia]] that they wanted to avoid, so they changed the concept over to the Borg.[[/note]] It is explored a little further in the Expanded Universe.
*** The episode "Genesis". Everyone de-evolved into prehistoric creatures, Troi was amphibious, Worf was almost like a rhino-Klingon and
considered one of her his mate, Dr Crusher was an ape, and, perhaps the best most FridgeLogic-y of all, Spot the cat de-evolved into an ''iguana''.
** The ''Series/StarTrekVoyager'' episode "Threshold". So Tom Paris breaks the "transwarp barrier", right? And this results in being in ''every location in the universe at once''. Somehow this makes him [[GoalOrientedEvolution evolve into a higher order of being]]... which turns out to be a Mudkip-like lizard thing who can't breathe air. He kidnaps TheCaptain and they run away in said transwarp barrier-breaking ship. They are discovered ''within range'' and the crew find them on a beach together having just had a small litter of Mudkip ''babies''. (Repeat: Paris had children with Cap'n Janeway. While they were both Mudkips.) The babies are still out there presumably but everything else is {{reset|Button}} with "antimatter injections." Got all that? Okay, because this is the ''one'' episode out of all the ''Star Trek''
episodes of ever made that is considered CanonDiscontinuity, to the entire series.point that in "Timeless", Tom Paris himself mentions that he has never traveled in transwarp before. ''Never''.
-->'''''Website/TheAgonyBooth:''''': Chakotay says, "I don't know how I'm going to enter this into the log." Preferably, by [[{{Headdesk}} pounding your head against the console.
]]
* The 1980s ''Series/WarOfTheWorlds'' episode "Candle In The Night". This is a show that thrived on an overarching conspiracy by aliens to overthrow ** ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'' went off the Earth, interpersonal conflict between rails a few times late in the series, producing such bizarro episodes as the holodeck baseball game and the ''Film/OceansEleven'' knockoff where the main cast and gratuitous violence that pushed ignored their duty in favor of pulling off a heist to save the limits of what syndicated television could show...and someone decided that an entire episode should be focused on holodeck lounge singer from a supporting character ''having a birthday party''. The plot follows gangster. (No, it '''''doesn't''''' make sense in context.)
** ''Series/StarTrekEnterprise'' has
one of the team members, Debi, who sneaks rare examples of [[TropesAreTools this trope churning out of the Blackwood Project's headquarters to have a birthday party great episode]]: over dinner, T'Pol regales [[TheCaptain Archer]] and Trip with a bunch of random kids she meets. There's no real tension or drama in the episode, and none tale of the characters or events are mentioned again.
* ''Series/TerminatorTheSarahConnorChronicles'' had
an ancestor of hers who lived on Earth over a surreal, cyborg-free episode where Sarah is in a sleep clinic and is haunted by nightmares [[spoiler:which are actually real, while the clinic is a hallucination caused by a one-off villain probing her mind]].
* ''Theatre/TheOddCouple'' had a flashback episode that parodied the James Bond films and featured Felix and Oscar's fathers.
* ''Series/TheKidsInTheHall'' episode "Chalet 2000" was one long Buddy Cole sketch (with it's own credit sequence), and to top it off, Queen Elizabeth appears and ends up sleeping with a talking beaver.
century before First Contact.



* There's a ''Series/DiagnosisMurder'' episode where the killer is a vampire. Yes, as in the actual mythological creature.
* ''Series/{{Smallville}}'': "[[Recap/SmallvilleS08E17Hex Hex]]" and "[[Recap/SmallvilleS10E15Fortune Fortune]]", both episodes involving, essentially, ComicBook/{{Zatanna}} screwing with the main cast; the first time is at least largely unintentional and just trying to make them happier. The second, she's flat out trolling them. Both are rather insane, running on RuleOfFun, and provide a great deal of hilarity. "Fortune" does, however, write out Chloe, marrying her to [[Comicbook/GreenArrow Oliver]], so it does connect to the season's plot. Given how important Chloe is to the show previously, it also counts as a WHAMEpisode.
%%* ''Series/{{Frasier}}'': "Freudian Sleep", the "unusual dreams" episode.
* ''Series/{{Seinfeld}}'':
** Virtually the trope-namer: the season eight episode "The Bizarro Jerry" posited an alternative world where the show's male characters are re-imagined as sensitive, enlightened and supportive.
** "The Chinese Restaurant" and "The Parking Garage", which place the central characters in an unfamiliar setting from which they spend the full 22 minutes struggling to free themselves.
** "The Opposite", where George takes a vow to suppress all his usual instincts and finds that his life is transformed into an unqualified success. To redress the cosmic balance, Elaine, whose life had always been somewhat successful is suddenly beset by a sequence of failures. She soon realises, "I've become George!"
** "The Chicken Roaster", where Jerry and Kramer switch apartments and, as a result, temporarily develop each others' personality traits.
** "The Butter Shave", where all three main male characters begin the episode with incongruous mustaches.
** "The Merv Griffin Show", where Kramer installs the set from the eponymous talk show in his apartment. As a result, the show's discussion scenes, which usually take place in Jerry's apartment or the coffee shop, follow the formula of a talk show with Kramer as the host.
** "The Betrayal" (also known as "The Backwards Episode"), in which the episode's scenes are played in reverse order.
** And, of course, "The Finale", in which many of the show's past characters are summoned to court to testify against the main group. At the end of the episode, the typical "coffee shop" conversation takes place in a prison lock-up. In the final credits, the show's characteristic "stand-up" set now takes place in a prison rec-room (with a VERY hostile audience).
* The ''Series/{{Fringe}}'' episode "Brown Betty," from season two. Walter Bishop smokes some special dope, and then entertains Olivia's niece Ella by telling her a story in which Olivia is a hard-boiled private detective in a world of AnachronismStew. Walter's story has obvious resonances to the main plot, but the whole episode boils down to him doing some child-minding. Made all the more jarring by coming right after some serious, dramatic episodes about Walter's relationship with his son Peter.
* ''Series/TheFreshPrinceOfBelAir'' has a weird episode, where Will and Carlton tell Jazz a story about how Will testified against a dangerous murderer, so he and the Banks family had to go into a witness protection program and live among hillbillies in the middle of nowhere.
* ''Series/TheDrewCareyShow'' has its annual AprilFoolsDay episode, in which blatant, bizarre goofs are deliberately inserted into the episode, and the sharp-eyed viewer who spotted the most won a prize. Other times the episode was a live CrossOver with ''Series/WhoseLineIsItAnyway''. The episode "[=DrugCo=]" is especially odd, with an insect man on a toilet, and a Monkeypotamus.
* The first-season finale of ''Series/{{Blackadder}}'' features Prince Edmund, after his latest humiliation, firing Baldrick and Percy, and deciding to gather the seven most evil men in the kingdom together to overthrow his father, only to discover that his never-before-mentioned nemesis has infiltrated his little band, resulting in him getting locked away in a prison, his plans getting subverted, and [[spoiler:the deaths of him, his entire family, and probably a good portion of their household]].
* ''Series/FamilyTies'' "A’ My Name Is Alex", mentioned on [=RiffTrax=] as "that weird episode."

to:

* ''Series/{{Supernatural}}'':
** Once or twice a season the series will include a comedy episode, with a ridiculous {{plot}} which is just an excuse to use situations like 'Sam and Dean are suddenly trapped on the set of this weird TV show called ''Supernatural'', and we are now going to spend 40 minutes making fun of our own premise, crew, actors, and viewing figures'.
** The PoorlyDisguisedPilot "Bloodlines" for a cancelled spinoff stands out. For starter, Sam and Dean [[OutOfFocus barely appear in the episode]] and are uncharacteristically useless. The plot is about the rivalry between five monster families that are secretly running Chicago's underbelly along with an [[StarCrossedLovers impossible romance]] between [[InterspeciesRomance a male shapeshifter and a female werewolf]]. The portrayal of those monsters is drastically divergent with the show’s canon (for example: the shapeshifters can change their appearance without having to shed their skins. Only the Alpha shapeshifter had this ability). Because of the cancellation, all plotlines are LeftHanging and the fact that Chicago is secretly run by monsters is ''never'' mentioned again.
* Franchise/SuperSentai has this for its ''Series/SamuraiSentaiShinkenger'' iteration in the form of its Direct to DVD movie. Released after the end of the series run, it talks of the team 'returning,' since they part at the end. The team is together for the whole movie, and then there's the content itself.
There's also the now-traditional DVD shorts that both Sentai and its block-mate Kamen Rider give out yearly in Telebi-kun Magazine. A lot of these are very nonsensical even compared to other filler episodes within the series.
* ''Series/TerminatorTheSarahConnorChronicles'' had
a ''Series/DiagnosisMurder'' surreal, cyborg-free episode where Sarah is in a sleep clinic and is haunted by nightmares [[spoiler:which are actually real, while the killer clinic is a vampire. Yes, as in the actual mythological creature.
hallucination caused by a one-off villain probing her mind]].
* ''Series/{{Smallville}}'': "[[Recap/SmallvilleS08E17Hex Hex]]" and "[[Recap/SmallvilleS10E15Fortune Fortune]]", both episodes involving, essentially, ComicBook/{{Zatanna}} screwing with The ''Series/TwoPintsOfLagerAndAPacketOfCrisps'' episode "When Janet Killed Jonny" is one of these. It is an episode set outside of the main cast; continuity, and is a "horror special", featuring many parodies of the first time is at least largely unintentional and just trying to make them happier. The second, she's flat out trolling them. Both are rather insane, running on RuleOfFun, and provide a great deal of hilarity. "Fortune" does, however, write out Chloe, marrying her to [[Comicbook/GreenArrow Oliver]], so horror genre (although it does connect to the season's plot. Given how important Chloe is to the show previously, it also counts as contain many moments of terror, in a WHAMEpisode.
%%* ''Series/{{Frasier}}'': "Freudian Sleep", the "unusual dreams" episode.
* ''Series/{{Seinfeld}}'':
** Virtually the trope-namer: the season eight episode "The Bizarro Jerry" posited an alternative world where
[[MoodWhiplash deviation from the show's male characters are re-imagined as sensitive, enlightened and supportive.
** "The Chinese Restaurant" and "The Parking Garage", which place the central characters in an unfamiliar setting from which they spend the full 22 minutes struggling to free themselves.
** "The Opposite", where George takes a vow to suppress all his
usual instincts and finds that his life is transformed into an unqualified success. To redress the cosmic balance, Elaine, whose life had always been somewhat successful is suddenly beset by a sequence of failures. She soon realises, "I've become George!"
** "The Chicken Roaster", where Jerry and Kramer switch apartments and, as a result, temporarily develop each others' personality traits.
** "The Butter Shave", where all three main male characters begin the
formula]]). The episode with incongruous mustaches.
** "The Merv Griffin Show", where Kramer installs
features the set from cast breaking into the eponymous talk show in his apartment. deserted Archer pub to drink the leftover beer, only to fall victim to the previously unmentioned "pub curse", which causes them to be "killed by the thing they love the most". As a result, the show's discussion scenes, which usually take place entire cast is killed off in Jerry's apartment or the coffee shop, follow the formula an assortment of a talk show with Kramer highly gruesome ways, only to later return as the host.
** "The Betrayal" (also known as "The Backwards Episode"), in which the episode's scenes are played in reverse order.
** And, of course, "The Finale", in which many of the show's past characters are summoned to court to testify against the main group. At the end of the episode, the typical "coffee shop" conversation takes place in a prison lock-up. In the final credits, the show's characteristic "stand-up" set now takes place in a prison rec-room (with a VERY hostile audience).
zombies.
* The ''Series/{{Fringe}}'' ''Series/{{UFO}}'''s episode "Brown Betty," from season two. Walter Bishop smokes some special dope, and then entertains Olivia's niece Ella by telling her a story in which Olivia is a hard-boiled private detective "Mindbender" had Straker hallucinate that he was an actor in a world of AnachronismStew. Walter's story has obvious resonances to the main plot, but the whole episode boils down to him doing some child-minding. Made all the more jarring by coming right after some serious, dramatic episodes TV series about Walter's relationship with his son Peter.
* ''Series/TheFreshPrinceOfBelAir'' has a weird episode, where Will
[=UFOs=]. One memorable scene had him wandering around the actual ''UFO'' soundstage, showing the HQ and Carlton tell Jazz a story about how Will testified against a dangerous murderer, so he and the Banks family had to go into a witness protection program and live among hillbillies in the middle of nowhere.
* ''Series/TheDrewCareyShow'' has its annual AprilFoolsDay episode, in which blatant, bizarre goofs are deliberately inserted into the episode, and the sharp-eyed viewer who spotted the most won a prize. Other times the episode was a live CrossOver with ''Series/WhoseLineIsItAnyway''. The episode "[=DrugCo=]" is especially odd, with an insect man on a toilet, and a Monkeypotamus.
* The first-season finale of ''Series/{{Blackadder}}'' features Prince Edmund, after his latest humiliation, firing Baldrick and Percy, and deciding to gather the seven most evil men in the kingdom together to overthrow his father, only to discover that his never-before-mentioned nemesis has infiltrated his little band, resulting in him getting locked away in a prison, his plans getting subverted, and [[spoiler:the deaths of him, his entire family, and probably a good portion of their household]].
* ''Series/FamilyTies'' "A’ My Name Is Alex", mentioned on [=RiffTrax=] as "that weird episode."
moonbase sets.



* ''Series/TheMuppetShow'' had a few episodes where both the skits and main plot had the same theme (the Creator/VincentPrice and Music/AliceCooper episodes were both themed around spooky things, for instance), but those weren't nearly as bizarre as episodes where the plot and skits revolved around the Muppets acting out a story as different characters, such as the Liza Minelli (a murder mystery with Kermit as a detective, Liza as his romantic interest, Fozzie as Patrol Bear, most of the Muppet cast as ''[[spoiler: murder victims]]'', and [[spoiler: JustForFun/StatlerAndWaldorf as the murderers]]), Brooke Shields (a re-telling of ''Alice in Wonderland''), and Lynn Redgrave (a re-telling of ''Robin Hood'') episodes. Especially weird about the first and last is that the plot continues to play out backstage, when nobody in the Muppet Theater's audience could see what was going on.
* ''Series/SesameStreet'' also enters this territory when the main plots are about characters starring in a story. At least two or three episodes from the '90s framed these as the Muppets and humans putting on a play.
* ''Series/{{Atlanta}}'' is a pretty off-beat show to begin with, but "B.A.N" is strange even by the show's standards. It lacks any sort of plot and is essentially just a series of satirical sketches, with [[ParodyCommercial Parody Commercials]] and segments of a ShowWithinAShow entitled ''Montague'' that satirize issues relating to gender and race identity.

to:

* ''Series/TheMuppetShow'' had The 1980s ''Series/WarOfTheWorlds'' episode "Candle In The Night". This is a few episodes where both show that thrived on an overarching conspiracy by aliens to overthrow the skits Earth, interpersonal conflict between the cast and main gratuitous violence that pushed the limits of what syndicated television could show...and someone decided that an entire episode should be focused on a supporting character ''having a birthday party''. The plot had the same theme (the Creator/VincentPrice and Music/AliceCooper episodes were both themed around spooky things, for instance), but those weren't nearly as bizarre as episodes where the plot and skits revolved around the Muppets acting out a story as different characters, such as the Liza Minelli (a murder mystery with Kermit as a detective, Liza as his romantic interest, Fozzie as Patrol Bear, most follows one of the Muppet cast as ''[[spoiler: murder victims]]'', and [[spoiler: JustForFun/StatlerAndWaldorf as team members, Debi, who sneaks out of the murderers]]), Brooke Shields (a re-telling Blackwood Project's headquarters to have a birthday party with a bunch of ''Alice in Wonderland''), and Lynn Redgrave (a re-telling of ''Robin Hood'') episodes. Especially weird about the first and last is that the plot continues to play out backstage, when nobody random kids she meets. There's no real tension or drama in the Muppet Theater's audience could see what was going on.
* ''Series/SesameStreet'' also enters this territory when
episode, and none of the main plots are about characters starring or events are mentioned again.
* ''Series/WolfLake'' did this in the episode "Leader of the Pack", in which an incident is presented as narrated to a team of investigators by Graham Greene's character [[{{Cloudcuckoolander}} Sherman Blackstone]]. To say that he's an UnreliableNarrator is an understatement; the episode is hilarious and basically told from first-looney's point of view, with Blackstone admitting to telling the investigators the kind of story he would find fun to hear. Random daydreams and FanService are inserted into the story, and salacious elements such as a [[HoYay married pair of gay]] bank robbers [[IncestSubtext who also happen to be brothers]] are included. Elements that would actually be pertinent to the story are glossed over, such as brushing off murders with comments such as "drinking problem".
-->'''Interviewer:''' According to ''my'' notes, he swallowed two ounces of sulfuric acid, mixed into a White Russian.\\
'''Blackstone:''' [[RunningGag That's the worst thing you can do to someone with a drinking problem]].
* Similarly, Charlie Drake's BritCom ''The Worker'' ended its original black and white run with an episode in which Drake is confused to discover that he's actually a comedian
in a story. At least two or three episodes from BritCom. Drake seemingly liked this ending so much he used a variation of it a few years later when the '90s framed these as the Muppets and humans putting on a play.
* ''Series/{{Atlanta}}'' is a pretty off-beat
show was revived in colour. There's another episode in which Drake's character gets hit on the head by a boomerang (a deliberate aversion of Drake's song "My Boomerang Won't Come Back") and suffers some weird hallucinations, ending with a trial in which he is the judge, jury, barrister and defendant.
* The fifth season episode of ''Series/{{Xena|WarriorPrincess}}'' entitled "Married With Fishsticks" which mostly forgets about the story arc going on at the time
to begin with, but "B.A.N" do a pointless filler episode where the feuding Aphrodite and Discord accidentally send Gabrielle into this alternate world where she's a mermaid, and is strange entirely populated with mer people. The whole thing is weird even by this show's standards, and ends with it apparently being AllJustADream as Gabrielle wakes up back with Xena. The people behind the show were well aware that this one wasn't their finest moment, and even did some micromanaging of the schedule to make sure it didn't get the distinction of being the show's standards. It lacks any sort of plot 100th episode.
* ''Series/TheXFiles'' did this a few times, most notably in its RashomonStyle episodes "[[Recap/TheXFilesS03E20JoseChungsFromOuterSpace Jose Chung's from Outer Space]]"
and "[[Recap/TheXFilesS05E12BadBlood Bad Blood]]". Then there's "[[Recap/TheXFilesS05E05ThePostModernPrometheus Post-Modern Prometheus]]", which is essentially just a series of satirical sketches, filmed entirely in black and white and ends with [[ParodyCommercial Parody Commercials]] a song-and-dance number featuring a Cher lookalike (after Mulder had effectively broken the fourth wall because he decided the original ending sucked). And [[Series/TheJerrySpringerShow Jerry Springer]] was in it, too.
* ''Series/TheYoungOnes'' could be considered to consist of little else. There are indeed plotlines within episodes, but they don't connect to other episodes,
and segments of a ShowWithinAShow entitled ''Montague'' that satirize issues relating to gender and race identity.are often derailed partway through. Sometimes they are not even resolved.



** Season 3 has the Mortis trilogy of episodes. The basic plot is that Obi-Wan, Anakin and Ahsoka get stranded on a surreal planet whose only three inhabitants -- Father, Son and Daughter -- are the living embodiments/avatars/personifications of the Balance of the Force, the Dark Side and the Light Side, respectively. [[spoiler:During the course of the episodes Father, Son and Daughter either kill each other, or arrange for the Jedi to do so on their behalf.]] Unsurprisingly it is never referred back to and, aside from the anvilicious hints that Anakin has more sympathy for the Dark Side than is strictly healthy, comes off as extreme padding. It later gets tied into the story of ''Literature/FateOfTheJedi'''s EldritchAbomination BigBad Abeloth. With mixed results. It gets referenced back to again in the last story arc of "The Lost Missions", when Yoda asks Anakin about his encounter with Qui-Gon Jinn on Mortis after he himself has been hearing Qui-Gon's voice.

to:

** Season 3 has the Mortis trilogy of episodes. The basic plot is that Obi-Wan, Anakin and Ahsoka get stranded on a surreal planet whose only three inhabitants -- Father, Son and Daughter -- are the living embodiments/avatars/personifications of the Balance of the Force, the Dark Side and the Light Side, respectively. [[spoiler:During the course of the episodes Father, Son and Daughter either kill each other, or arrange for the Jedi to do so on their behalf.]] Unsurprisingly it is never referred back to and, aside Aside from the anvilicious hints that Anakin has more sympathy for the Dark Side than is strictly healthy, it comes off as extreme padding. It later gets tied into the story of ''Literature/FateOfTheJedi'''s EldritchAbomination BigBad Abeloth. With mixed results.padding. It gets referenced back to again in the last story arc of "The Lost Missions", when Yoda asks Anakin about his encounter with Qui-Gon Jinn on Mortis after he himself has been hearing Qui-Gon's voice.
10th Mar '17 12:18:11 PM mariofan1000
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%%
%% Quote is simply restating the trope name and does nothing else.
%% Consensus to remove per thread: http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/posts.php?discussion=1327331003042025100&page=136#3378
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%%

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%%
%% Quote is simply restating the trope name and does nothing else.
%% Consensus to remove per thread: http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/posts.php?discussion=1327331003042025100&page=136#3378
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->''"Has there been some kind of chemical leak today? 'Cause right now, everyone's acting like total psychos."''
-->-- '''Darwin''', ''WesternAnimation/TheAmazingWorldOfGumball'', "[[Recap/TheAmazingWorldOfGumballS2E36TheSweaters The Sweaters]]"
26th Feb '17 9:16:49 AM nombretomado
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%%* The HannahMontana Forever episode "Kiss It All Goodbye".

to:

%%* The HannahMontana Series/HannahMontana Forever episode "Kiss It All Goodbye".
25th Feb '17 5:31:24 AM Vir
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* The ''WesternAnimation/OneHundredAndOneDalmatiansTheSeries'' episode "[=DeVil=]-Age Elder", where the Dearlys, the main pups, and Cruella stumble upon "[=DeVil=] Ville", a Renaissance-era town cursed 1000 years ago by a witch (Who resembles Nanny), to make the town only appear every 1000 years a la ''Theatre/{{Brigadoon}}''.

to:

* The ''WesternAnimation/OneHundredAndOneDalmatiansTheSeries'' episode "[=DeVil=]-Age Elder", where the Dearlys, the main pups, and Cruella stumble upon "[=DeVil=] Ville", a Renaissance-era town cursed 1000 years ago by a witch (Who (who resembles Nanny), to make the town only appear every 1000 years a la ''Theatre/{{Brigadoon}}''.



** "Hot Water" (a MusicalEpisode where a murderous hot tub kills off everyone in the cast. In that episode's defense, it was supposed to be the last episode of the entire series because the writers were afraid FOX was going to cancel the show. When they discovered that FOX wasn't going to cancel ''American Dad'', the episode was put on as a season seven premiere and the deaths were written off as non-canon),
** "Blood Crieth Unto Heaven" (an ''American Dad'' episode set up like a stage play, featuring Patrick Stewart in live-action)

to:

** "Hot Water" (a MusicalEpisode where a murderous hot tub kills off everyone in the cast. In that episode's defense, it was supposed to be the last episode of the entire series because the writers were afraid FOX was going to cancel the show. When they discovered that FOX wasn't going to cancel ''American Dad'', the episode was put on as a season seven premiere and the deaths were written off as non-canon),
non-canon)
** "Blood Crieth Unto Heaven" (an ''American Dad'' Dad!'' episode set up like a stage play, featuring Patrick Stewart in live-action)



** "Blagsnarst: A Love Story": The final episode on FOX, where the whole story (and possibly the series) turns out to be a story told by Stan about how Creator/KimKardashian was born (which, in the ''WesternAnimation/AmericanDad'' world, depicts Kardashian as a furry, pink alien being whose hair burned off in a car accident after Roger tried to get rid of her).
** "American Fung": The show begins with a live-action ColdOpening depicting Asian billionaire Fung Wah saying that Creator/SethMacFarlane sold ''American Dad!'' to him, and the episode features several moments depicting him in animated form and shilling himself and his products, culminating in him taking over the B-plot, doing the voices of Steve, Hayley and Roger, and hastily making up an ending for the A-plot. The [[GainaxEnding ending]] involves Fung selling the show to another Asian billionaire who transplants the show to China, and the new ''American Chinese Dad!'' show has the family meeting WesternAnimation/MickeyMouse and dancing [[ComicStrip/{{Peanuts}} Snoopy]]-style. ''Yeah'', there's a reason why people cite this episode as a sign that ''American Dad'' is becoming ''WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy''-esque (read: going downhill in a blaze of forced absurdity and vulgarity).

to:

** "Blagsnarst: A Love Story": The final episode on FOX, where the whole story (and possibly the series) turns out to be a story told by Stan about how Creator/KimKardashian was born (which, in the ''WesternAnimation/AmericanDad'' ''American Dad!'' world, depicts Kardashian as a furry, pink alien being whose hair burned off in a car accident after Roger tried to get rid of her).
** "American Fung": The show begins with a live-action ColdOpening depicting Asian billionaire Fung Wah saying that Creator/SethMacFarlane sold ''American Dad!'' to him, and the episode features several moments depicting him in animated form and shilling himself and his products, culminating in him taking over the B-plot, doing the voices of Steve, Hayley and Roger, and hastily making up an ending for the A-plot. The [[GainaxEnding ending]] involves Fung selling the show to another Asian billionaire who transplants the show to China, and the new ''American Chinese Dad!'' show has the family meeting WesternAnimation/MickeyMouse and dancing [[ComicStrip/{{Peanuts}} Snoopy]]-style. ''Yeah'', there's a reason why people cite this episode as a sign that ''American Dad'' Dad!'' is becoming ''WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy''-esque (read: going downhill in a blaze of forced absurdity and vulgarity).



** Much of "Just Desserts" takes place in [[AcidRefluxNightmare Acid Reflux Nightmares]] being had by Arthur after eating too much cake for dessert, featuring such strange goings-on as a cake version of Grandma Thora forcing herself down Arthur's throat, malls made out of candy, D.W. getting abducted by seven Tibble twins who claim she is "Dough White", and Arthur in a parody of Jack and the Beanstalk where the giant is made of all the foods Arthur has ever eaten. Even among episodes of the show that are primarily taken up by the kids' [[ImagineSpot Imagine Spots]], it's an especially strange one.

to:

** Much of "Just Desserts" takes place in [[AcidRefluxNightmare Acid {{Acid Reflux Nightmares]] Nightmare}}s being had by Arthur after eating too much cake for dessert, featuring such strange goings-on as a cake version of Grandma Thora forcing herself down Arthur's throat, malls made out of candy, D.W. getting abducted by seven Tibble twins who claim she is "Dough White", "[[Literature/SnowWhiteAndTheSevenDwarfs Dough White]]", and Arthur in a parody of Jack and the Beanstalk ''Literature/JackAndTheBeanstalk'' where the giant is made of all the foods Arthur has ever eaten. Even among episodes of the show that are primarily taken up by the kids' [[ImagineSpot Imagine Spots]], {{Imagine Spot}}s, it's an especially strange one.



* There is a version of the ''WesternAnimation/{{Archer}}'' pilot where Archer is a Velociraptor. The pilot is otherwise identical. No reason is given.

to:

* There is a version of the ''WesternAnimation/{{Archer}}'' pilot where Archer is a Velociraptor.velociraptor. The pilot is otherwise identical. No reason is given.



* ''WesternAnimation/{{Ben 10}}'':
** "Gwen 10". In that episode, they were all back to the first day of summer and Ben was the only person remembering the previous episode's events. As the title episode suggested, Gwen was the one to find the Omnitrix this time. At the end, it got detached from her and Ben thought he'd finally have it like in the original timeline but it went to Max instead. It becomes HilariousInHindsight when it's revealed in a later episode that the person who sent the Omnitrix to Earth expected '''Max''' to have it in the first place. The next episode had Ben with the Omnitrix again with no explanation and "Gwen 10" events were never mentioned in any other episodes of the series.

to:

* ''WesternAnimation/{{Ben 10}}'':
''WesternAnimation/Ben10'':
** "Gwen 10". In that episode, they were all back to the first day of summer and Ben was the only person remembering the previous episode's events. As the title episode suggested, Gwen was the one to find the Omnitrix this time. At the end, it got detached from her and Ben thought he'd finally have it like in the original timeline but it went to Max instead. It becomes HilariousInHindsight when it's revealed in a later episode that the person who sent the Omnitrix to Earth expected '''Max''' to have it in the first place. The next episode had Ben with the Omnitrix again with no explanation and "Gwen 10" 10"'s events were never mentioned in any other episodes of the series.



** This was subtly referenced in the "Ultimate Alien" episode "Ben 10,000 Returns" where paradox mentions a timeline where Gwen got the Omnitrix.

to:

** This was subtly referenced in the "Ultimate Alien" ''[[WesternAnimation/Ben10UltimateAlien Ultimate Alien]]'' episode "Ben 10,000 Returns" where paradox Paradox mentions a timeline where Gwen got the Omnitrix.Omnitrix. That Gwen later appears in the ''[[WesternAnimation/Ben10Omniverse Omniverse]]'' two-parter "And Then There Was Ben" to help battle Vilgax and Eon's band of evil Bens.



* The GrandFinale of ''WesternAnimation/CampLazlo''. The episode starts fairly "normally" with Lumpus deciding to replace clothing with body paint and becomes famous because of it, but the end is where the weirdness ensues. Two men from the future tell Lumpus of the utopia created as a result and show the scoutmaster a statue of himself that contains the world's last dirty laundry. Then [[DiabolusExMachina it rains]] and everyone ends up naked with their paint washed off. This causes the statue to revert to a pile of dirty laundry and the time travellers become thin from starvation, before deciding to go back home. Suddenley, as everyone mobs Lumpus, wearing dirty clothes, a police car comes in and a cop steps out accompanied by...[[MythologyGag an older]] [[WesternAnimation/RockosModernLife Heffer]]! Heffer tells everyone that Lumpus is actually a psycho impersonating the real scoutmaster (Heffer) and Lumpus is dragged away. Cut to the Bean Scouts standing around baffled. Samson then sums up why it's the last episode.
--> '''Samson:''' It's official. Things can't get any weirder around here.

to:

* The GrandFinale of ''WesternAnimation/CampLazlo''. The episode starts fairly "normally" with Lumpus deciding to replace clothing with body paint and becomes famous because of it, but the end is where the weirdness ensues. Two men from the future tell Lumpus of the utopia created as a result and show the scoutmaster a statue of himself that contains the world's last dirty laundry. Then [[DiabolusExMachina it rains]] and everyone ends up naked with their paint washed off. This causes the statue to revert to a pile of dirty laundry and the time travellers become thin from starvation, before deciding to go back home. Suddenley, Suddenly, as everyone mobs Lumpus, wearing dirty clothes, a police car comes in and a cop steps out accompanied by...[[MythologyGag an older]] [[WesternAnimation/RockosModernLife Heffer]]! Heffer tells everyone that Lumpus is actually a psycho impersonating the real scoutmaster (Heffer) and Lumpus is dragged away. Cut to the Bean Scouts standing around baffled. Samson then sums up why it's the last episode.
--> '''Samson:''' It's official. Things I think we've reached the point where things can't get any weirder around here.weirder.



* ''WesternAnimation/{{Clarence}}'': "Rough Riders Elementary" starts off innocently enough, with Clarence's school getting a sponsorship from the InUniverse fast-food joint Rough Riders Chicken, but then things suddenly take a turn for the bizarre when it turns out the restaurant is a cult that manages to brainwash everyone with their cinnamon ranch dressing except Clarence[[note]] who hates the dressing[[/note]] and Sumo[[note]] who was rescued by Clarence at the last minute[[/note]]. Chaos ensues, and it ends with the school [[EverythingExplodesEnding exploding]]. [[spoiler: [[AllJustADream Fortunately, it was just a crazy story written by Clarence]].]]

to:

* ''WesternAnimation/{{Clarence}}'': "Rough Riders Elementary" starts off innocently enough, with Clarence's school getting a sponsorship from the InUniverse fast-food joint Rough Riders Chicken, but then things suddenly take a turn for the bizarre when it turns out the restaurant is a cult that manages to brainwash everyone with their cinnamon ranch dressing except Clarence[[note]] who Clarence [[note]]who hates the dressing[[/note]] and Sumo[[note]] who Sumo [[note]]who was rescued by Clarence at the last minute[[/note]]. Chaos ensues, and it ends with the school [[EverythingExplodesEnding exploding]]. [[spoiler: [[AllJustADream Fortunately, it was just a crazy story written by Clarence]].]]



** Operation: R.E.P.O.R.T. set entirely in the character's parody rich imagination's... Numbuh 4 turns into a [[Manga/DragonBall Super Saiyan]].
** Operation: W.H.I.T.E.H.O.U.S.E. which was also AllJustADream did make self-contained sense until the very end when Numbuh 1 turns into a big monster for no explained reason.
* ''WesternAnimation/{{Daria}}'' was generally based on reality, except with its eccentricities taken UpToEleven. The plot of "[[Recap/DariaS3E04 Depth Takes a Holiday]]," however, begins when [[TheSnarkKnight Daria]] randomly meets the AnthropomorphicPersonifications of St. Patrick's Day and Valentine's Day, who need her help to get Christmas, Halloween and Guy Fawkes' Day back to "Holiday Island." An uncharacteristically whimsical plot, to say the least, but Daria manages it the same way she does everything else: through [[DeadpanSnarker sarcasm]].

to:

** Operation: R.E.P.O.R.T. , set entirely in the character's parody rich imagination's... characters' parody-rich imaginations. Numbuh 4 turns into a [[Manga/DragonBall [[Anime/DragonBallZ Super Saiyan]].
** Operation: W.H.I.T.E.H.O.U.S.E. , which was also AllJustADream AllJustADream, did make self-contained sense until the very end when Numbuh 1 turns into a big monster an {{expy}} of the ComicBook/IncredibleHulk for no explained reason.
* ''WesternAnimation/{{Daria}}'' was generally based on reality, except with its eccentricities taken UpToEleven. The plot of "[[Recap/DariaS3E04 Depth Takes a Holiday]]," however, begins when [[TheSnarkKnight Daria]] randomly meets the AnthropomorphicPersonifications {{Anthropomorphic Personification}}s of St. Patrick's Day and Valentine's Day, who need her help to get Christmas, Halloween and Guy Fawkes' Day back to "Holiday Island." An uncharacteristically whimsical plot, to say the least, but Daria manages it the same way she does everything else: through [[DeadpanSnarker sarcasm]].



* The final two or three episodes of the ''{{WesternAnimation/Darkstalkers}}'' cartoon. It seems the writers knew ahead of time the show had been cancelled and decided to just go wild, because these episodes violently shift from the fairly straight-laced, UrbanFantasy action cartoon it had been to an absurd, screwball comedy that lampshades and mocks everything about the show. The result is things like [[EvilOverlord Pyron]] and [[TheDragon Ship]] turning into a bickering married couple, Dmitri and Morrigan going on a daytime talk show, Lord Raptor trying to become an actor, a dragon with a posh-British accent saving the day, a ridiculous piss-take rap scene, a wacky sitcom-esque plot involving the heroes and villains pretending to like each other, and Pyron being "defeated" by sheer accidental coincidence. Doubles as a GainaxEnding.

to:

* The final two or three episodes of the ''{{WesternAnimation/Darkstalkers}}'' cartoon. It seems the writers knew ahead of time the show had been cancelled and decided to just go wild, because these episodes violently shift from the fairly straight-laced, UrbanFantasy action cartoon it had been to an absurd, screwball comedy that lampshades and mocks everything about the show. The result is things like [[EvilOverlord Pyron]] and [[TheDragon Ship]] turning into a bickering married couple, Dmitri and Morrigan going on a daytime talk show, Lord Raptor trying to become an actor, a dragon with a posh-British accent saving the day, a ridiculous piss-take rap PissTakeRap scene, a wacky sitcom-esque plot involving the heroes and villains pretending to like each other, and Pyron being "defeated" by sheer accidental coincidence. Doubles as a GainaxEnding.



* While WesternAnimation/ToonPhysics are practically nonexistent as a rule to begin with, ''WesternAnimation/DuckAmuck'' shatters any conception of the fourth wall by having Daffy Duck arguing with and being screwed around with by the animator [[spoiler:who turns out to be Bugs Bunny.]] [[spoiler:Bugs later]] got a taste of his own medicine in ''Rabbit Rampage'', with the animator being [[spoiler:Elmer Fudd.]]

to:

* While WesternAnimation/ToonPhysics ToonPhysics are practically nonexistent as a rule to begin with, ''WesternAnimation/DuckAmuck'' shatters any conception of the fourth wall by having Daffy Duck arguing with and being screwed around with by the animator [[spoiler:who turns out to be Bugs Bunny.]] [[spoiler:Bugs later]] got a taste of his own medicine in ''Rabbit Rampage'', with the animator being [[spoiler:Elmer Fudd.]]



** "1 + 1 = Ed", otherwise known as the episode where Ed asks Double-D a bunch of questions, the questions become increasingly philosophical, reality and imagination begin to melt into each other, existential crisis manifests itself into abstract surrealism, and everyone and everything around them becomes horribly deformed and absurd.
--->'''Rolf:''' Hello, Ed-Boys! [[ArcWords Many doors, yes?]]
--->'''[[MultipleHeadCase Rolf's Second Head]]:''' Too much for...
--->'''Rolf's Third Head:''' ... Couch-potato Ed-Boys like yourselves?
--->'''Eddy:''' A three-headed Rolf. [[UnusuallyUninterestingSight Yawn.]]
** The aforementioned UnusuallyUninterestingSight is after Ed created a PortableHole (which Eddy promptly fell through in a VideoGame/{{Portal}}-esque fashion) and after Eddy '''''ate the sun.''''' Although is subverted since [[spoiler: It was just the kids' imagination]].

to:

** "1 + 1 = Ed", otherwise known as the episode where Ed asks Double-D Edd a bunch of questions, the questions become increasingly philosophical, reality and imagination begin to melt into each other, existential crisis manifests itself into abstract surrealism, and everyone and everything around them becomes horribly deformed and absurd.
--->'''Rolf:''' Hello, Ed-Boys! [[ArcWords Many doors, yes?]]
--->'''[[MultipleHeadCase
yes?]]\\
'''[[MultipleHeadCase
Rolf's Second Head]]:''' Too much for...
--->'''Rolf's
for...\\
'''Rolf's
Third Head:''' ... Couch-potato Ed-Boys like yourselves?
--->'''Eddy:'''
yourselves?\\
'''Eddy:'''
A three-headed Rolf. [[UnusuallyUninterestingSight Yawn.]]
** The aforementioned UnusuallyUninterestingSight is after Ed created a PortableHole (which Eddy promptly fell through in a VideoGame/{{Portal}}-esque ''VideoGame/{{Portal}}''-esque fashion) and after Eddy '''''ate the sun.''''' Although is subverted since [[spoiler: It was just the kids' imagination]].



* ''WesternAnimation/GIJoeARealAmericanHero'' had "Once Upon A Joe," featuring a rather bizarre fairy tale (full of Joes and Cobras of course) being told by Shipwreck to an orphan. The animation style for the tale was totally different. Even the MAIN plot was weird, with the episodes Macguffin actually being called a Macguffin and Zandar beating up on other Dreadknocks WITH AN ALLIGATOR.

to:

* ''WesternAnimation/GIJoeARealAmericanHero'' had "Once Upon A Joe," featuring a rather bizarre fairy tale (full of Joes and Cobras of course) being told by Shipwreck to an orphan. The animation style for the tale was totally different. Even the MAIN plot was weird, with the episodes Macguffin episode's MacGuffin actually being called a Macguffin [=MacGuffin=] and Zandar beating up on other Dreadknocks WITH AN ALLIGATOR.''with an alligator''.



* The ''WesternAnimation/GravityFalls'' episode "Little Gift Shop of Horrors" is a collection of three stories openly admitted to be made up by Stan, Soos inexplicably turns into clay near the end of the last one, the plots are odd even by the show's standards (and compared to the previous three shorts episode "Bottomless Pit!"), and [[GainaxEnding it ends with Stan]] [[spoiler:''drugging the viewer'' and making them into an exhibit of the Mystery Shack, which is pretty cold even for him and Dipper and Mabel don't seem to care about saving them]]. To clear some things up, the "key" for this episode[[note]]All episodes of season two so far have had a message in the credits that can be decoded by a method involving a key word. This word is hidden in the episode, and can be recognized by a symbol by it shaped like a key.[[/note]] is "NONCANON," implying that the whole thing didn't happen.

to:

* The ''WesternAnimation/GravityFalls'' episode "Little Gift Shop of Horrors" is a collection of three stories openly admitted to be made up by Stan, Soos inexplicably turns into clay near the end of the last one, the plots are odd even by the show's standards (and compared to the previous three shorts episode "Bottomless Pit!"), and [[GainaxEnding it ends with Stan]] [[spoiler:''drugging the viewer'' and making them into an exhibit of the Mystery Shack, which is pretty cold even for him and Dipper and Mabel don't seem to care about saving them]]. To clear some things up, the "key" for this episode[[note]]All episodes of season two so far have 2 had a message in the credits that can be decoded by a method involving a key word. This word is hidden in the episode, and can be recognized by a symbol by it shaped like a key.[[/note]] is "NONCANON," implying that the whole thing didn't happen.



** "Going Green". Okay, so Lucius tells the people of Miseryville to deliver their suggestions of how to run Miseryville to Jimmy's house. Jimmy gets a ton of suggestions from a guy named Thorn, who is all about the environment. When Jimmy and Beezy meet Thorn, they notice he looks like a green Beezy. Thorn then splashes himself with tomato juice, impersonates Beezy, and tells the people of Miseryville to be more green, but Lucius tries to cove up the environmentalism by telling the people it was the new TV show. Then Thorn's dad appears and he's a green Lucius with a mustache and drags Thorn away. [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=io4G84M163E It's probably better if you just see it yourself.]]
** [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kx_cjzXZD-Y "My So-Called Loaf"]] which [[TwoShorts aired alongside "Going Green"]] is just as weird. When Jimmy makes the perfect sandwich, an anthropomorphic sandwich cowboy (Bizarre for a setting populated by demons and monsters) named Cowboy Stackhouse who wants to take it out for a date and eventually marry. For some reason, the bow tie that Jimmy put on the sandwich like one does with a present is the only reason why Stackhouse doesn't see an inanimate object. Heloise is also mistaken for a boy by Stackhouse and the episode ends with Stackhouse being attacked by birds that [[DisproportionateRetribution Heloise sent for the spite]] while Beezy tries to eat Stackhouse's bride. In a nutshell Episode 220 is strange even for the show's standards.

to:

** "Going Green". Okay, so Lucius tells the people of Miseryville to deliver their suggestions of how to run Miseryville to Jimmy's house. Jimmy gets a ton of suggestions from a guy named Thorn, who is all about the environment. When Jimmy and Beezy meet Thorn, they notice he looks like a green Beezy. Thorn then splashes himself with tomato juice, impersonates Beezy, and tells the people of Miseryville to be more green, but Lucius tries to cove up the environmentalism by telling the people it was the a new TV show. Then Thorn's dad appears and he's a green Lucius with a mustache and drags Thorn away. [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=io4G84M163E It's probably better if you just see it yourself.]]
** [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kx_cjzXZD-Y "My So-Called Loaf"]] which [[TwoShorts aired alongside "Going Green"]] is just as weird. When Jimmy makes the perfect sandwich, an anthropomorphic sandwich cowboy (Bizarre (bizarre for a setting populated by demons and monsters) named Cowboy Stackhouse who wants to take it out for a date and eventually marry. For some reason, the bow tie that Jimmy put on the sandwich like one does with a present is the only reason why Stackhouse doesn't see an inanimate object. Heloise is also mistaken for a boy by Stackhouse and the episode ends with Stackhouse being attacked by birds that [[DisproportionateRetribution Heloise sent for the spite]] while Beezy tries to eat Stackhouse's bride. In a nutshell Episode 220 is strange even for the show's standards.



* ''WesternAnimation/TheLoudHouse'': In "Butterfly Effect", Lincoln accidentally breaks Lisa's science equipment with a yo-yo. He decides to not tell her, which results in the family slowly tearing apart. This includes, but not limited to, [[BrainlessBeauty Leni]] suddenly becoming a genius, Luna leaving the family to go on world tour with a rock star, Luan becoming an activist, Lucy becoming a vampire and Lori breaking up with Bobby to start dating Clyde, Lincoln's best friend. Fortunately, [[ALlJustADream the episode is revealed to be a hallucination due to Lisa's spilled chemicals]].

to:

* ''WesternAnimation/TheLoudHouse'': In "Butterfly "The Butterfly Effect", Lincoln accidentally breaks Lisa's science equipment with a yo-yo. He decides to not tell her, which results in the family slowly tearing apart. This includes, but not limited to, [[BrainlessBeauty Leni]] suddenly becoming a genius, Luna leaving the family to go on world tour with a rock star, Luan becoming an activist, Lucy becoming a vampire and Lori breaking up with Bobby to start dating Clyde, Lincoln's best friend. Fortunately, [[ALlJustADream the episode is revealed to be a hallucination due to Lisa's spilled chemicals]].



-->'''Jake''': Adam?
-->'''Adam''': Yeah Jake?
-->'''Jake''': [[BreakingTheFourthWall Remember when this show used to be about a human kid going to an animal school?]]

to:

-->'''Jake''': Adam?
-->'''Adam''': Yeah Jake?
-->'''Jake''': [[BreakingTheFourthWall
Adam?\\
'''Adam''': Yeah, Jake?\\
'''Jake''': [[MediumAwareness
Remember when this show used to be about a human kid going to an animal school?]]



** When the show became so unexpectedly popular, there were worries that the [[PanderingToTheBase show would change to please their new demographic]]. It therefore comes off as HilariousInHindsight that the third episode of season 2 was the truly nuts "[[MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicS2E3LessonZero Lesson Zero]]," which dials up the [[ZanyCartoon zany]] [[UpToEleven to 11]], features some staggeringly violent scenes (Fluttershy kills a bear by breaking its neck![[note]]Which is revealed to actually be a massage[[/note]] ), and gives Twilight Sparkle one of the [[SanitySlippage scariest mental breakdowns on the show]].

to:

** When the show became so unexpectedly popular, there were worries that the [[PanderingToTheBase the show would change to please their new demographic]]. It therefore comes off as HilariousInHindsight that the third episode of season 2 was the truly nuts "[[MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicS2E3LessonZero "[[Recap/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicS2E3LessonZero Lesson Zero]]," which dials up the [[ZanyCartoon zany]] [[UpToEleven to 11]], features some staggeringly violent scenes (Fluttershy kills a bear by breaking its neck![[note]]Which is revealed to actually be a massage[[/note]] ), massage[[/note]]), and gives Twilight Sparkle one of the [[SanitySlippage scariest mental breakdowns on the show]].



** "Slice of Life", the 100th episode, amounts to a [[CrowningMomentOfAwesome completely awesome]] batshit-insane [[FandomNod Fandom Nod-Riddled]] [[AscendedFanon Fanon Ascending]] [[ShipTease Ship Teasing]] wild ride... for the PeripheryDemographic. As even members of the show's crew have even pointed out, the intended audience who aren't familiar with the Brony Fanbase were probably confused and terrified, though admittedly still entertained. Best part: It was ''Creator/{{Hasbro}} themselves'' who demanded this amount of fan-pandering.

to:

** "Slice of Life", the 100th episode, amounts to a [[CrowningMomentOfAwesome [[SugarWiki/MomentOfAwesome completely awesome]] batshit-insane [[FandomNod Fandom Nod-Riddled]] [[AscendedFanon Fanon Ascending]] [[ShipTease Ship Teasing]] wild ride... for the PeripheryDemographic. As even members of the show's crew have even pointed out, the intended audience who aren't familiar with the Brony Fanbase brony fanbase were probably confused and terrified, though admittedly still entertained. Best part: It was ''Creator/{{Hasbro}} themselves'' who demanded this amount of fan-pandering.



** "Rollercoaster: The Musical". It's essentially a MusicalEpisode version of the pilot. But there's random stuff going on, and most of the songs and scenes are never mentioned after they occur, and the barrage of Cameos in the final song, which itself is a BLAM.
*** It's very self aware about its Bizarro Episode status. The episode constantly {{Lampshade|Hanging}}s its repeating of the original episode, as well as the fact that it's incredibly weird even by the standards of the show.

to:

** "Rollercoaster: The Musical". It's essentially a MusicalEpisode version of the pilot. But there's random stuff going on, and most of the songs and scenes are never mentioned after they occur, and the barrage of Cameos cameos in the final song, which itself is a BLAM.
*** It's very self aware about its Bizarro Episode status. The episode constantly {{Lampshade|Hanging}}s {{lampshade|Hanging}}s its repeating of the original episode, as well as the fact that it's incredibly weird even by the standards of the show.



** "The Remains of the Platypus" opens with Perry running on a hamster wheel surrounded by artificial lightning, a box filled with a bunch of Buckingham guards and a midget dressed up as an alien dancing to techno music landing on Doofenshmirtz's apartment building saying "joy located", Carl in a cage dressed up as a squirrel, a swelled-up Major Monogram running saying "gimme a high-five! Don't leave me hanging!" It gradually [[MindScrewdriver drives its own screw]] though. And that episode ran backwards like the Seinfield episode.
** [[spoiler:"Lost in Danville"]] didn't seem to be one at first, but the ending revealed that everything happened in an alternate dimension, being observed by our Phineas and Ferb. Observant viewers might have noted the subtle clue[[note]]Phineas's shirt has a single extra orange stripe[[/note]] in the episode that points that out, and is lampshaded at the end of the episode.
** All of the Time Shift Weekend episodes [[note]]Tri-Stone Area, Doof Dynasty, Excaliferb, and Phineas and Ferb and the Temple of Juatchadoon[[/note]] as well as Steampunx, The Monster of Phineas and Ferbenstein, and Phineas and Ferb Star Wars all count as this for starring alternate dimensions and/or time periods of Phineas and Ferb. But bonus points go to Tri-Stone Area for having no discernible dialogue, and having stop motion of Dan and Swampy explaining/critiquing the episode.
** Mission Marvel establishes them as being part of one of the Marvelverses. Like any true bizarro episode, this is never mentioned again.
* ''WesternAnimation/PinkyAndTheBrain'' has "Plan Brain from Outer Space," where Brain has a pen-pal named Zalgar, who turns out to be a [[HongKongDub badly dubbed]] space-man who chases Pinky and the Brain through Area 51 so he can eat their brains. It's ''exactly'' as [[DenserAndWackier bizarre]] as it sounds. [[note]]The character actually originated from an entirely different show; when it was scraped, some animation was re-used, explaining the (intentionally?) bad dubbing[[/note]]
%%* Several of the later post-SeasonalRot ''PowerpuffGirls'' episodes like "Mizzen In Action" and "West In Pieces".

to:

** "The Remains of the Platypus" opens with Perry running on a hamster wheel surrounded by artificial lightning, a box filled with a bunch of Buckingham guards and a midget dressed up as an alien dancing to techno music landing on Doofenshmirtz's apartment building saying "joy located", Carl in a cage dressed up as a squirrel, a swelled-up Major Monogram running saying "gimme a high-five! Don't leave me hanging!" It gradually [[MindScrewdriver drives its own screw]] though. And that episode ran backwards like the Seinfield ''Seinfeld'' episode.
** [[spoiler:"Lost "Lost in Danville"]] Danville" didn't seem to be one at first, but the ending revealed that everything happened in an alternate dimension, being observed by our Phineas and Ferb. Observant viewers might have noted the subtle clue[[note]]Phineas's shirt has a single extra orange stripe[[/note]] in the episode that points that out, and is lampshaded at the end of the episode.
** All of the Time Shift Weekend episodes [[note]]Tri-Stone Area, Doof Dynasty, Excaliferb, [[note]]"Tri-Stone Area", "Doof Dynasty", "Excaliferb", and Phineas "Phineas and Ferb and the Temple of Juatchadoon[[/note]] Juatchadoon"[[/note]] as well as Steampunx, The "Steampunx", "The Monster of Phineas and Ferbenstein, Ferbenstein", and Phineas "Phineas and Ferb Star Wars Wars" all count as this for starring alternate dimensions and/or time periods of Phineas and Ferb. But bonus points go to Tri-Stone Area "Tri-Stone Area" for having no discernible dialogue, and having stop motion of Dan and Swampy explaining/critiquing the episode.
** Mission Marvel "Mission Marvel" establishes them as being part of one of the Marvelverses. Like any true bizarro episode, this is never mentioned again.
* ''WesternAnimation/PinkyAndTheBrain'' has "Plan Brain from Outer Space," where Brain has a pen-pal named Zalgar, who turns out to be a [[HongKongDub badly dubbed]] space-man who chases Pinky and the Brain through Area 51 so he can eat their brains. It's ''exactly'' as [[DenserAndWackier bizarre]] as it sounds. [[note]]The sounds[[note]]The character actually originated from an entirely different show; when it was scraped, scrapped, some animation was re-used, explaining the (intentionally?) bad dubbing[[/note]]
dubbing[[/note]].
%%* Several of the later post-SeasonalRot ''PowerpuffGirls'' ''[[WesternAnimation/ThePowerpuffGirls Powerpuff Girls]]'' episodes like "Mizzen In Action" and "West In Pieces".



** The second act of "Cruisin'", where Rocko and Heffer get stuck on a senior's cruise that accidentally travels into the Bermuda Triangle, which turns them old and all the seniors young.

to:

** The second act of "Cruisin'", where Rocko and Heffer get stuck on a senior's cruise that accidentally travels into the Bermuda Triangle, TheBermudaTriangle, which turns them old and all the seniors young.



** The ''WesternAnimation/ScoobyDooMysteryIncorporated'' episode "Mystery Solvers Club State Finals." It's a bit of a throwback to the original Scooby Doo series and also features several other Creator/HannaBarbera characters such as WesternAnimation/SpeedBuggy, WesternAnimation/JabberJaw, WesternAnimation/TheFunkyPhantom and [[WesternAnimation/CaptainCavemanAndTheTeenAngels Captain Caveman]]. It also features an ArtShift and is a bit goofier in this DarkerAndEdgier series. Granted, the episode is AllJustADream, but even during the beginning and ending, it doesn't seem to connect to the show's main storyline (Velma is notably nicer to Scooby).
** "The Punk Rock Scooby" Short from the second ''[[WesternAnimation/TheScoobyDooAndScrappyDooShow Scooby-Doo And Scrappy-Doo]]'' series. It starts out normally enough, with Scooby, Shaggy and Scrappy auditioning in a Battle Of The Bands contest. Then an alien spaceship comes out of nowhere full of aliens that inexplicably look and act exactly like Scrappy and assume that he is one of their own and has been kidnapped by Scooby and Shaggy. And that's only the beginning.

to:

** The ''WesternAnimation/ScoobyDooMysteryIncorporated'' episode "Mystery Solvers Club State Finals." It's a bit of a throwback to the original Scooby Doo series ''WesternAnimation/ScoobyDooWhereAreYou'' and also features several other Creator/HannaBarbera characters such as WesternAnimation/SpeedBuggy, WesternAnimation/JabberJaw, WesternAnimation/{{Jabberjaw}}, WesternAnimation/TheFunkyPhantom and [[WesternAnimation/CaptainCavemanAndTheTeenAngels Captain Caveman]]. It also features an ArtShift and is a bit goofier in this DarkerAndEdgier series. Granted, the episode is AllJustADream, but even during the beginning and ending, it doesn't seem to connect to the show's main storyline (Velma is notably nicer to Scooby).
** "The Punk Rock Scooby" Short short from the second ''[[WesternAnimation/TheScoobyDooAndScrappyDooShow Scooby-Doo And and Scrappy-Doo]]'' series. It starts out normally enough, with Scooby, Shaggy and Scrappy auditioning in a Battle Of The of the Bands contest. Then an alien spaceship comes out of nowhere full of aliens that inexplicably look and act exactly like Scrappy and assume that he is one of their own and has been kidnapped by Scooby and Shaggy. And that's only the beginning.



* ''WesternAnimation/{{Sealab 2021}}'' had a couple that were strange even by that show's standards. "Waking Quinn" involved Dr. Quinn getting repeatedly electrocuted into unconsciousness, leading to really bizarre dreams. Another episode is actually titled "Bizarro" and involves the crew being kidnapped by Bizarro versions of themselves (which is where the page image comes from), but that's par for the course on Sealab. And still another ''subverts'' the trope by being a line-for-line remake of one of the original ''WesternAnimation/{{Sealab 2020}}'' shows, with all the melodrama that implies.

to:

* ''WesternAnimation/{{Sealab 2021}}'' ''WesternAnimation/Sealab2021'' had a couple that were strange even by that show's standards. "Waking Quinn" involved Dr. Quinn getting repeatedly electrocuted into unconsciousness, leading to really bizarre dreams. Another episode is actually titled "Bizarro" and involves the crew being kidnapped by Bizarro versions of themselves (which is where the previous page image comes came from), but that's par for the course on Sealab. And still another ''subverts'' the trope by being a line-for-line remake of one of the original ''WesternAnimation/{{Sealab 2020}}'' ''WesternAnimation/Sealab2020'' shows, with all the melodrama that implies.



** "[[Recap/TheSimpsonsS12E6TheComputerWoreMenaceShoes The Computer Wore Menace Shoes]]": Homer starts a website that reveals peoples' secrets, but when nobody wants to get near him when they find out he, he makes up lies. However, one of those lies turns out to be true and he gets sent to a ''[[Series/ThePrisoner Prisoner]]''-esque island for it. He escapes and fights with a German lookalike of him, but he ends up back on the island, this time with his family accompanying him.

to:

** "[[Recap/TheSimpsonsS12E6TheComputerWoreMenaceShoes The Computer Wore Menace Shoes]]": Homer starts a website that reveals peoples' secrets, but when nobody wants to get near him when they find out he, out, he makes up lies. However, one of those lies turns out to be true and he gets sent to a ''[[Series/ThePrisoner Prisoner]]''-esque island for it. He escapes and fights with a German lookalike of him, but he ends up back on the island, this time with his family accompanying him.



** "[[Recap/TheSimpsonsS11E13SaddlesoreGalactica Saddlesore Galatica]]": Homer and Bart train a horse to become a racer with Bart as its jockey. However, the other jockeys turn out to be ''elves'' (complete with underground kingdom) and force Homer to throw the race. The episode even calls itself out on being a weird, derivative episode (in the form of The Comic Book Guy being an audience surrogate), which led to a lot of real fans branding the episode as the worst ever and some claiming that it's a brilliant work of surrealism and post-modernism.

to:

** "[[Recap/TheSimpsonsS11E13SaddlesoreGalactica Saddlesore Galatica]]": Homer and Bart train a horse to become a racer with Bart as its jockey. However, the other jockeys turn out to be ''elves'' (complete with underground kingdom) and force Homer to throw the race. The episode even calls itself out on being a weird, derivative episode (in the form of The Comic Book Guy being an audience surrogate), which led to a lot of real fans branding the episode as the worst ever and some claiming that it's a brilliant work of surrealism and post-modernism.



** "[[Recap/TheSimpsonsS23E12MoeGoesFromRagsToRiches Moe Goes From Rags To Riches]]": The main plot revolves around a talking rag voiced by JeremyIrons telling its story. The rag's sentience is given no explanation, the episode hops time periods with almost no connectivity between segments, and some of the plot points have no basis in reality, but were played perfectly straight. Much like ''Saddlesore Galactia'', the episode has been panned by critics.

to:

** "[[Recap/TheSimpsonsS23E12MoeGoesFromRagsToRiches Moe Goes From Rags To Riches]]": The main plot revolves around a talking rag voiced by JeremyIrons Creator/JeremyIrons telling its story. The rag's sentience is given no explanation, the episode hops time periods with almost no connectivity between segments, and some of the plot points have no basis in reality, but were played perfectly straight. Much like ''Saddlesore Galactia'', "Saddlesore Galactica", the episode has been panned by critics.



** In season four there's "Mercy Mission" and "Nomad Droids" - episodes that focus on R2-D2 and C-3PO in their own misadventures when they get separated from the army. The episodes pay homages to various works like ''Literature/AliceInWonderland'', ''Literature/TheLordOfTheRings'', ''Literature/GulliversTravels'', ''Literature/TheWonderfulWizardOfOz'', and ''Film/RealSteel''.
** Also possibly an homage to the 1980s ''Star Wars: Droids'' cartoon, which contained many BLAM moments if not entire episodes (C-3PO blinking and sprinting, R2-D2's hammerspace gadgets and breakdancing).

to:

** In season four 4 there's "Mercy Mission" and "Nomad Droids" - episodes that focus on R2-D2 and C-3PO in their own misadventures when they get separated from the army. The episodes pay homages to various works like ''Literature/AliceInWonderland'', ''Literature/TheLordOfTheRings'', ''Literature/GulliversTravels'', ''Literature/TheWonderfulWizardOfOz'', and ''Film/RealSteel''.
** Also possibly an homage to the 1980s ''Star Wars: Droids'' cartoon, which contained many BLAM moments [=BLAMs=] if not entire episodes (C-3PO blinking and sprinting, R2-D2's hammerspace gadgets and breakdancing).



* The ''WesternAnimation/StevenUniverse'' and ''WesternAnimation/UncleGrandpa'' AprilFoolsDay CrossOver "Say Uncle" is this (at least for the former show, this kind of stuff is mostly normal for the latter). It [[BreakingTheFourthWall breaks the fourth wall]], has lots of ZanyCartoon gags, and is non-{{Canon}} (Uncle Grandpa even tells that to the audience and says to "not worry," probably referencing the ''Steven Universe'' {{Fandom}}'s worries). The episode includes Pearl, Amethyst, and Garnet all getting stuck in a VoidBetweenTheWorlds, with Steven going to Uncle Grandpa's world. It ends with Uncle Grandpa reading a check-list of classic Creator/CartoonNetwork characters (such as those from ''WesternAnimation/ThePowerpuffGirls'' and ''WesternAnimation/EdEddNEddy'') he has visited, with the only one unchecked being "WesternAnimation/{{Clarence}}," possibly {{Foreshadowing}} to another Bizarro {{Crossover}}. And to add more weirdness into the mix, UG's checklist contains one show that predates everything else on the list and [[UnexpectedCharacter nobody expected would show up]]- ''WesternAnimation/SwatKats''.

to:

* The ''WesternAnimation/StevenUniverse'' and ''WesternAnimation/UncleGrandpa'' AprilFoolsDay CrossOver "Say Uncle" is this (at least for the former show, this kind of stuff is mostly normal for the latter). It [[BreakingTheFourthWall breaks the fourth wall]], has lots of ZanyCartoon gags, and is non-{{Canon}} non-{{canon}} (Uncle Grandpa even tells that to the audience and says to "not worry," probably referencing the ''Steven Universe'' {{Fandom}}'s {{fandom}}'s worries). The episode includes Pearl, Amethyst, and Garnet all getting stuck in a VoidBetweenTheWorlds, with Steven going to Uncle Grandpa's world. It ends with Uncle Grandpa reading a check-list of classic Creator/CartoonNetwork characters (such as those from ''WesternAnimation/ThePowerpuffGirls'' and ''WesternAnimation/EdEddNEddy'') he has visited, with the only one unchecked being "WesternAnimation/{{Clarence}}," possibly {{Foreshadowing}} {{foreshadowing}} to another Bizarro {{Crossover}}.bizarro crossover. And to add more weirdness into the mix, UG's checklist contains one show that predates everything else on the list and [[UnexpectedCharacter nobody expected would show up]]- ''WesternAnimation/SwatKats''.



** As funny and clever as it may be, the episode "[[Recap/TeenTitansS2E11Fractured Fractured]]" feels like that. We learn that there's a whole dimension that exists just for Robin and then the Robin from that dimension (Larry) breaks his finger and everything becomes chaotic. It's hard to believe that no one talks about that ever again. It's possible that [[GreatGazoo he's supposed to be from the 5th dimension]], like other DC characters such as Mister Mxyzptlk and Bat-Mite. Apparently, that episode was called back to in ''ComicBook/TeenTitansGo'', and there was an issue where Larry brings along the Larry Versions of the rest of the Titans.
** ''WesternAnimation/TeenTitans'' had at least one completely insane episode per season, and the tone of the average episode wasn't much less wacky. If anything the episodes which focused on continuity and drama were the ones out of place. "Fractured", "[[Recap/TeenTitansS1E10MadMod Mad Mod]]", "[[Recap/TeenTitansS3E11BunnyRaven Bunny Raven/How To Make a Titanimal Disappear]]", "[[Recap/TeenTitansS4E10MotherMaeEye Mother Mae Eye]]", and "[[Recap/TeenTitansS4E1Episode297494 Episode 257-494]]", the episode where Control Freak causes the Titans to become TrappedInTVLand. Well, the last one was referenced in the big Finale, when Control Freak was using the Lightsabers he got from TV Land. Oddly enough, most Bizarro Episodes are right before the season finale. Going from a deranged Hansel and Gretel WholePlotReference to Raven fulfilling her destiny and ending the world, or from the aforementioned Larry episode to Terra picking off the team one by one led to some absolutely beautiful MoodWhiplash and gave the show its signature schizophrenic tone.

to:

** As funny and clever as it may be, the episode "[[Recap/TeenTitansS2E11Fractured Fractured]]" feels like that.this. We learn that there's a whole dimension that exists just for Robin and then the Robin from that dimension (Larry) breaks his finger and everything becomes chaotic. It's hard to believe that no one talks about that ever again. It's possible that [[GreatGazoo he's supposed to be from the 5th dimension]], like other DC characters such as Mister Mxyzptlk and Bat-Mite. Apparently, that episode was called back to in ''ComicBook/TeenTitansGo'', and there was an issue where Larry brings along the Larry Versions versions of the rest of the Titans.
** ''WesternAnimation/TeenTitans'' had at least one completely insane episode per season, and the tone of the average episode wasn't much less wacky. If anything the episodes which focused on continuity and drama were the ones out of place. "Fractured", "[[Recap/TeenTitansS1E10MadMod Mad Mod]]", "[[Recap/TeenTitansS3E11BunnyRaven Bunny Raven/How To Make a Titanimal Disappear]]", "[[Recap/TeenTitansS4E10MotherMaeEye Mother Mae Eye]]", and "[[Recap/TeenTitansS4E1Episode297494 Episode 257-494]]", the episode where Control Freak causes the Titans to become TrappedInTVLand. Well, the last one was referenced in the big Finale, finale, when Control Freak was using the Lightsabers lightsabers he got from TV Land. Oddly enough, most Bizarro Episodes are right before the season finale. Going from a deranged Hansel and Gretel Literature/HanselAndGretel WholePlotReference to Raven fulfilling her destiny and ending the world, or from the aforementioned Larry episode to Terra picking off the team one by one led to some absolutely beautiful MoodWhiplash and gave the show its signature schizophrenic tone.



** "Puppets, Whaaaaat?": Robin gets so mad at the other Titans he turns them into puppets....and things just get weirder after that.

to:

** "Puppets, Whaaaaat?": Robin gets so mad at the other Titans he turns them into puppets....puppets...and things just get weirder after that.



** "Kicking A Ball And Pretending To Be Hurt": The Titans discover that all the soccer balls in the world are, in fact, inhabited by soccer trolls that use their magic to make the game of soccer interesting, because nobody would care about it otherwise. [[spoiler:At the end of the show, it's revealed that bowling balls contain magical turkies for the same reason.]]

to:

** "Kicking A a Ball And and Pretending To to Be Hurt": The Titans discover that all the soccer balls in the world are, in fact, inhabited by soccer trolls that use their magic to make the game of soccer interesting, because nobody would care about it otherwise. [[spoiler:At At the end of the show, it's revealed that bowling balls contain magical turkies turkeys for the same reason.]]



** Two episodes ("Sea Change" and "A Decepticon Raider In King Arthur's Court") randomly feature fantasy concepts like magic and dragons in what is otherwise an exclusively sci-fi cartoon. "Sea Change" counts especially, given it's bizarre plot involving Seaspray falling in love with a shapeshifting mermaid. The events in both episodes are never referenced or alluded to ever again, in the show itself or in any supplementary material.
** "Prime Target", in which Optimus [[HuntingTheMostDangerousGame gets hunted]] by an outlandish billionaire GreatWhiteHunter who inexplicably has access to technology beyond anything anyone else on Earth at the time, including the Autobots. Highlights include a giant lizard and robot spider, the Autobots watching a soap opera on TV, Astrotrain and Blitzwing turning into a pair of bumbling goofballs, and [[TheLastOfTheseIsNotLikeTheOthers Optimus Prime saying boobies]] in what is possibly [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r7IJ8QJITGI the greatest moment in television history]].
** Less extreme than the previous examples is "The Girl Who Loved Powerglide", in which Powerglide falls in love with a human woman, the Decepticons evil scheme is foiled by jewelry, and a bizarre ending shows Powerglide with an LED heart in his chest. Not only is it never mentioned again, but if taken as canon the episode accidentally turns Powerglide into a borderline adulterer, as a previous episode had established him as being in a committed relationship with Moonracer.
* The ''WesternAnimation/TwoStupidDogs'' short "Cartoon Canines" sees Big Dog and Little Dog getting drafted into some sort of training camp for cartoon characters, complete with a feline FunnyAnimal DrillSergeantNasty ordering them into stereotypical cartoon personae and then into a series of training scenarios. Little Dog (AKA "Hammy") is pestered by a giant cat, and eventually defeats him by [[HulkingOut going Incredible-Hulk on him]] and [[RumpRoast throwing him onto a working toaster]]. Big Dog (AKA "Loafy") finds himself tormented by a feline AbhorrentAdmirer, and after some slapstick he tricks her into kissing her own butt. The woman goes into a rage, then suddenly splits in half to reveal... some kind of energy being shaped like an atom, and a monkey in a dress named Sasha who is apparently the energy being's girlfriend. MissionControl and the dogs are presumably just as confused as the audience as the energy being flies away with Sasha, shouting "We're free! ''Free!''"
* ''WesternAnimation/TheVentureBrothers'' has this in the form of "Escape to the House of Mummies! Part II." While Doctor Venture and Orpheus have an argument over whether [[MagicVersusScience science or magic]] is better and fill out MadLibs to pass the time. Meanwhile, Brock and the boys are trapped in Egypt with Edgar Allan Poe, Sigmund Freud, and an alternate-timeline Brock in scuba gear. The episode ends in the Arctic as one Brock slices [[Film/TheEmpireStrikesBack open Poe's carcass and puts the freezing Dean inside for warmth]]. Also, Caligula was there too. And no, none of that makes even the slightest bit of sense. Yes, that title is right. There was no "Escape to the House of Mummies! Part I", and just a preview for "Escape to the House of Mummies! Part III". The point of the episode was to parody instances of one multi-part episode being aired independently as a rerun, leaving viewers with little idea of what is going on.
* ''WesternAnimation/WanderOverYonder'' has "The Void", in which Wander and Sylvia visit a white space (think Michael Crichton's [[Literature/{{Sphere}} Sphere]]) where anything either of them dream up comes immediately true, and the rules of logic and common sense do not apply. It's non-stop insanity from start to finish.

to:

** Two episodes ("Sea Change" and "A Decepticon Raider In in King Arthur's Court") randomly feature fantasy concepts like magic and dragons in what is otherwise an exclusively sci-fi cartoon. "Sea Change" counts especially, given it's its bizarre plot involving Seaspray falling in love with a shapeshifting mermaid. The events in both episodes are never referenced or alluded to ever again, in the show itself or in any supplementary material.
** "Prime Target", in which Optimus [[HuntingTheMostDangerousGame gets hunted]] by an outlandish billionaire GreatWhiteHunter who inexplicably has access to technology beyond anything anyone else on Earth had at the time, including the Autobots. Highlights include a giant lizard and robot spider, the Autobots watching a soap opera on TV, Astrotrain and Blitzwing turning into a pair of bumbling goofballs, and [[TheLastOfTheseIsNotLikeTheOthers Optimus Prime saying boobies]] in what is possibly [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r7IJ8QJITGI the greatest moment in television history]].
** Less extreme than the previous examples is "The Girl Who Loved Powerglide", in which Powerglide falls in love with a human woman, the Decepticons Decepticons' evil scheme is foiled by jewelry, and a bizarre ending shows Powerglide with an LED heart in his chest. Not only is it never mentioned again, but if taken as canon the episode accidentally turns Powerglide into a borderline adulterer, as a previous episode had established him as being in a committed relationship with Moonracer.
* The ''WesternAnimation/TwoStupidDogs'' short "Cartoon Canines" sees Big Dog and Little Dog getting drafted into some sort of training camp for cartoon characters, complete with a feline FunnyAnimal DrillSergeantNasty ordering them into stereotypical cartoon personae and then into a series of training scenarios. Little Dog (AKA "Hammy") is pestered by a giant cat, and eventually defeats him by [[HulkingOut going Incredible-Hulk Incredible Hulk on him]] and [[RumpRoast throwing him onto a working toaster]]. Big Dog (AKA "Loafy") finds himself tormented by a feline AbhorrentAdmirer, and after some slapstick he tricks her into kissing her own butt. The woman goes into a rage, then suddenly splits in half to reveal... some kind of energy being shaped like an atom, and a monkey in a dress named Sasha who is apparently the energy being's girlfriend. MissionControl and the dogs are presumably just as confused as the audience as the energy being flies away with Sasha, shouting "We're free! ''Free!''"
* ''WesternAnimation/TheVentureBrothers'' has this in the form of "Escape to the House of Mummies! Part II." While II". Doctor Venture and Orpheus have an argument over whether [[MagicVersusScience science or magic]] is better and fill out MadLibs to pass the time. Meanwhile, Brock and the boys are trapped in Egypt with Edgar Allan Poe, Sigmund Freud, and an alternate-timeline alternate timeline Brock in scuba gear. The episode ends in the Arctic as one Brock slices [[Film/TheEmpireStrikesBack open Poe's carcass and puts the freezing Dean inside for warmth]]. Also, Caligula was there too. And no, none of that makes even the slightest bit of sense. Yes, that title is right. There was no "Escape to the House of Mummies! Part I", and just a preview for "Escape to the House of Mummies! Part III". The point of the episode was to parody instances of one multi-part episode being aired independently as a rerun, leaving viewers with little idea of what is going on.
* ''WesternAnimation/WanderOverYonder'' has "The Void", in which Wander and Sylvia visit a white space (think Michael Crichton's [[Literature/{{Sphere}} Sphere]]) ''Literature/{{Sphere}}'') where anything either of them dream up comes immediately true, and the rules of logic and common sense do not apply. It's non-stop insanity from start to finish.
25th Feb '17 1:09:25 AM Vir
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** "App Development and Condiments" has an app beta test turn the school into a '70s sci-fi-movie-esque dystopia, in which people with 5 "MeowMeowBeenz" rule the school and people with only 1 get exiled to the Outlands.

to:

** "App Development and Condiments" has an app beta test turn the school into a '70s sci-fi-movie-esque dystopia, in which people with 5 "MeowMeowBeenz" "[=MeowMeowBeenz=]" rule the school and people with only 1 get exiled to the Outlands.
23rd Feb '17 9:30:09 PM Laevatein
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Added DiffLines:

* ''ChouKuseNiNarisou'' episode 12 is a VerySpecialEpisode (or a parody of one) about discarded alligators, which left Viga confused when she reviewed the show for WebVideo/IdolsOfAnime:
--> '''Viga:''' Is this a PSA for keeping alligators as pets? Was this ever a problem in Japan? What? There's a message about discarding idols as well? Old waifu pushed away for your new waifu? Remember, keep your idols spayed and neutered.
15th Feb '17 3:29:52 PM Unicorndance
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Everything in the episode seems completely against continuity, the characters act like they're on tranquilizers, and nothing makes sense within the pre-established context. If the show has a continuity, this episode will probably [[LetUsNeverSpeakOfThisAgain never be mentioned again]], save perhaps as a MythologyGag, and none of the likely wild events will ever be repeated.

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Everything in the episode seems completely [[NegativeContinuity against continuity, continuity]], the characters [[IdiotBall act like they're on tranquilizers, tranquilizers]], and [[FridgeLogic nothing makes sense within the pre-established context.context]]. If the show has a continuity, this episode will probably [[LetUsNeverSpeakOfThisAgain never be mentioned again]], save perhaps as a MythologyGag, and none of the likely wild events will ever be repeated.



** ''[[Series/StarTrekEnterprise Enterprise]]'''s "In a Mirror, Darkly" two-partner is an excellent example. While the other episodes crossover between the two universes, this one was set entirely in the Mirror Universe. [[spoiler:Except for the ''Defiant'' that had somehow ended up in the Mirror Universe. That's the Defiant from TOS episode "The Tholian Web", not the one from ''[[Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine Deep Space Nine]]''.]] The ''Enterprise'' production team went balls-to-the-wall and combined this trope with a BreatherEpisode full of {{Fanservice}} and soft-core ContinuityPorn, plus the entire cast in LargeHam mode and obviously having tremendous fun; it's one of the most entertaining episodes in the series.

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** ''[[Series/StarTrekEnterprise Enterprise]]'''s "In a Mirror, Darkly" two-partner is an excellent example. While the other episodes crossover between the two universes, this one was set entirely in the Mirror Universe. [[spoiler:Except for the ''Defiant'' that had somehow ended up in the Mirror Universe. That's the Defiant from TOS episode "The Tholian Web", not the one from ''[[Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine Deep Space Nine]]''.]] The ''Enterprise'' production team went balls-to-the-wall and combined this trope with a BreatherEpisode full of {{Fanservice}} and soft-core ContinuityPorn, plus the entire cast in LargeHam mode and obviously having tremendous fun; it's one of the most entertaining episodes in the series.fun.



*** Similarly to "Plato's Stepchildren" mentioned above, this is {{averted|Trope}} in the case of "The Naked Now". Although it fully appears as though this is a LetUsNeverSpeakOfThisAgain episode, albeit an absolutely hilarious one, what with [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hih2THljVjw Data getting drunk and Dr. Crusher grabbing Picard's crotch just offscreen]], the fact that [[TheSpock Data]] and [[SacrificialLion Tasha Yar]] had intercourse ''is'' mentioned in later episodes, notably in "Measure of a Man" where it is used to help establish [[TheSpock Data's]] sentience. It even gets a CallBack much, ''much'' later in ''Film/StarTrekFirstContact'' with [[TheSpock Data]] telling the Borg Queen that he is "fully functional" in the sex department.
*** "Justice". The crew of the ''[[CoolStarship Enterprise]]'' is schmoozing with what appears to be a pre-warp culture, when [[CreatorsPet Wesley]] knocks over an outdoor decoration and is sentenced to death. And even though the [[AlienNonInterferenceClause Prime Directive]] didn't prevent them from making contact with this planet, all of a sudden it prevents [[TheCaptain Picard]] from saving Wesley. For no plot-relevant reason whatsoever, the inhabitants of this planet all dress in barely-there loincloths and have a preoccupation with sex. Rumor has it that Gene Roddenberry added this to the plot after they changed the planet from a floating military fortress housing incredibly xenophobic aliens to an idyllic paradise. Because naturally Paradise means EveryoneHasLotsOfSex.
*** "Conspiracy" is another ''[[Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration TNG]]'' example of this. Starfleet command has apparently been infiltrated by parasitic slugs that inhabit the brain of the host creature. This is obviously an event of considerable political magnitude, but it is never again referenced. However, it was {{foreshadow|ing}}ed several episodes earlier, making it a kind of AbortedArc.[[note]]The story was originally intended to have a purely human conspiracy within Starfleet, but Creator/GeneRoddenberry himself vetoed that because of how it clashed with his vision of ''Franchise/StarTrek'' as a {{utopia}} where all humans work towards a common goal in harmony. So they added mind-controlling alien infiltrators to the {{plot}}. It was intended to be the hook for the major villains of the series. The thing was, it created too much paranoia that they wanted to avoid, so they changed the concept over to the Borg.[[/note]] It is explored a little further in the Expanded Universe.
*** ''[[Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration TNG]]'' has a number of oddball episodes that qualify for this, most notably some of the truly god-awful episodes of the final season. There are plots like [[TheMedic Beverly's]] inherited ghost lover and everyone on the ''[[CoolStarship Enterprise]]'' "devolving" into things [[ArtisticLicenseBiology that make absolutely no fucking sense]].

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*** Similarly to "Plato's Stepchildren" mentioned above, this is {{averted|Trope}} in the case of "The Naked Now". Although it fully appears as though this is a LetUsNeverSpeakOfThisAgain episode, albeit an absolutely hilarious one, what with [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hih2THljVjw Data getting drunk and Dr. Crusher grabbing Picard's crotch just offscreen]], the fact that [[TheSpock Data]] and [[SacrificialLion Tasha Yar]] were "intimate" together and implied to have had intercourse sex ''is'' mentioned in later episodes, notably in "Measure of a Man" where it is used to help establish [[TheSpock Data's]] sentience. It even gets a CallBack much, ''much'' later in ''Film/StarTrekFirstContact'' with [[TheSpock Data]] telling the Borg Queen that he is "fully functional" in the sex department.
*** "Justice". The crew of the ''[[CoolStarship Enterprise]]'' is schmoozing with what appears to be a pre-warp culture, when [[CreatorsPet [[ChildProdigy Wesley]] knocks over an outdoor decoration and is sentenced to death. And even though the [[AlienNonInterferenceClause Prime Directive]] didn't prevent them from making contact with this planet, all of a sudden it prevents [[TheCaptain Picard]] from saving Wesley. For no plot-relevant reason whatsoever, the inhabitants of this planet all dress in barely-there loincloths and have a preoccupation with sex. Rumor has it that Gene Roddenberry added this to the plot after they changed the planet from a floating military fortress housing incredibly xenophobic aliens to an idyllic paradise. Because naturally Paradise means EveryoneHasLotsOfSex.
*** "Conspiracy" is another ''[[Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration TNG]]'' example of this. Starfleet command has apparently been infiltrated by parasitic slugs that inhabit the brain of the host creature. This is obviously an event of considerable political magnitude, but it is never again referenced. However, it was {{foreshadow|ing}}ed several episodes earlier, making it a kind of AbortedArc.[[note]]The story was originally intended to have a purely human conspiracy within Starfleet, but Creator/GeneRoddenberry himself vetoed that because of how it clashed with his vision of ''Franchise/StarTrek'' as a {{utopia}} where all humans work towards a common goal in harmony. So they added mind-controlling alien infiltrators to the {{plot}}. It was intended to be the hook for the major villains of the series. The thing was, it [[ParanoiaFuel created too much paranoia paranoia]] that they wanted to avoid, so they changed the concept over to the Borg.[[/note]] It is explored a little further in the Expanded Universe.
*** ''[[Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration TNG]]'' has The episode "Genesis". Everyone de-evolved into prehistoric creatures, Troi was amphibious, Worf was almost like a number of oddball episodes that qualify for this, rhino-Klingon and considered her his mate, Dr Crusher was an ape, and, perhaps the most notably some FridgeLogic-y of all, Spot the truly god-awful episodes of the final season. There are plots like [[TheMedic Beverly's]] inherited ghost lover and everyone on the ''[[CoolStarship Enterprise]]'' "devolving" cat de-evolved into things [[ArtisticLicenseBiology that make absolutely no fucking sense]].an ''iguana''.
13th Feb '17 4:24:25 AM Troperinik
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* ''WesternAnimation/{{Kaeloo}}'' is already a weird show, but Episode 76 is really, really weird: it's basically about Quack Quack, Olaf and a bunch of talking yogurts waging war against each other.

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* ''WesternAnimation/{{Kaeloo}}'' is already a weird show, but Episode 76 66 is really, really weird: it's basically about Quack Quack, Olaf and a bunch of talking yogurts waging war against each other.
4th Feb '17 9:06:36 PM RandomnessUnlimited
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* ''WesternAnimation/{{Kaeloo}}'' is already a weird show, but Episode 76 is really, really weird: it's basically about Quack Quack, Olaf and a bunch of talking yogurts waging war against each other.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.BizarroEpisode