History Main / AttackAttackAttack

28th Sep '16 2:42:47 PM shokoshu
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* This was the favorite mode during the "romantic" era of chess, giving us immortal games like...[[ShapedLikeItself The Immortal Game]]. With the advent of better defense techniques, the style went out of fashion. Still, any chess beginner will go through this phase.
22nd Sep '16 3:45:48 PM __Vano
Is there an issue? Send a Message


May be justified (among humans) by having their pride hurt or honor involved, having lost so much that [[GloryHound only victory can redeem them]], [[LastStand having nowhere to run to]], or having an absolutely crucial need for victory, so that flight would just be prolonging their pain, or (among monsters) by having them maddened in some way, but often enough it's just shown. Or maybe the character is simply a FearlessFool.

to:

May be justified (among humans) by having their pride hurt or [[HonorBeforeReason honor involved, involved]], having lost so much that [[GloryHound only victory can redeem them]], [[LastStand having nowhere to run to]], or having an absolutely crucial need for victory, so that flight would just be prolonging their pain, or (among monsters) by having them maddened in some way, but often enough it's just shown. Or maybe the character is simply a FearlessFool.
20th Sep '16 8:40:38 AM Willbyr
Is there an issue? Send a Message


[[folder: Anime and Manga ]]* Deconstructed/Played with in HunterXHunter. The main character Gon does this, and at first it's seen as beneficial in situations where endurance is the criteria for winning rather than physical strength. (For example, an early one-on-one fight has the condition that the opponents fight until one consciously declares defeat. Killing is not allowed. Gon is paired against a stronger opponent, with the result being torture endurance rather than an actual duel. Gon wins.) However, over time this is explored more in-depth as a character flaw, since he fights recklessly in situations where it's detrimental as well.

to:

[[folder: Anime and Manga ]]* ]]
*
Deconstructed/Played with in HunterXHunter.''Manga/HunterXHunter''. The main character Gon does this, and at first it's seen as beneficial in situations where endurance is the criteria for winning rather than physical strength. (For example, an early one-on-one fight has the condition that the opponents fight until one consciously declares defeat. Killing is not allowed. Gon is paired against a stronger opponent, with the result being torture endurance rather than an actual duel. Gon wins.) However, over time this is explored more in-depth as a character flaw, since he fights recklessly in situations where it's detrimental as well.
11th Sep '16 9:34:28 AM Silverblade2
Is there an issue? Send a Message


[[folder: Anime and Manga ]]
* Let's just say it's a common, fighting [[{{Shonen}} shounen manga]] trope. In ye ol' ''Manga/SaintSeiya'', ''Manga/DragonBall'', ''Manga/YuYuHakusho'', and others, the heroes will just keep attacking an overpowered villain despite them [[ImplacableMan shrugging off their attacks]], [[TheJuggernaut walking all over them]], [[TheReasonYouSuckSpeech explaining how pointless it is]], and more. [[{{Determinator}} They just don't stop]]. And most of the time, ''they succeed''.
** Deconstructed/Played with in HunterXHunter. The main character Gon does this, and at first it's seen as beneficial in situations where endurance is the criteria for winning rather than physical strength. (For example, an early one-on-one fight has the condition that the opponents fight until one consciously declares defeat. Killing is not allowed. Gon is paired against a stronger opponent, with the result being torture endurance rather than an actual duel. Gon wins.) However, over time this is explored more in-depth as a character flaw, since he fights recklessly in situations where it's detrimental as well.

to:

[[folder: Anime and Manga ]]
* Let's just say it's a common, fighting [[{{Shonen}} shounen manga]] trope. In ye ol' ''Manga/SaintSeiya'', ''Manga/DragonBall'', ''Manga/YuYuHakusho'', and others, the heroes will just keep attacking an overpowered villain despite them [[ImplacableMan shrugging off their attacks]], [[TheJuggernaut walking all over them]], [[TheReasonYouSuckSpeech explaining how pointless it is]], and more. [[{{Determinator}} They just don't stop]]. And most of the time, ''they succeed''.
**
]]* Deconstructed/Played with in HunterXHunter. The main character Gon does this, and at first it's seen as beneficial in situations where endurance is the criteria for winning rather than physical strength. (For example, an early one-on-one fight has the condition that the opponents fight until one consciously declares defeat. Killing is not allowed. Gon is paired against a stronger opponent, with the result being torture endurance rather than an actual duel. Gon wins.) However, over time this is explored more in-depth as a character flaw, since he fights recklessly in situations where it's detrimental as well.



* In many {{Role Playing Game}}s, especially turn-based ones, there is an "auto-battle" command that will have everyone in your party automatically use their basic attack every time their turn comes up. Sometimes the auto-battle command can be tweaked to have characters use specific skills instead, but in most cases the command amounts to "use basic attacks until the player cancels it or one side emerges victorious." Usually it's used to skip past a battle that your party has an overwhleming advantage over, but in rare cases, the player can win against a boss of reasonable challenge with auto-battle if the circumstances are just right.



* Often combined with CriticalExistenceFailure: What else should you do with 1 HP left?



* This is how pressuring tactics tend to work in fighting games, especially rushdowns. Essentially attacking incessantly and thus keeping the opponent on the defensive at all times, so that they have no choice but to either block constantly (and suffer a slow loss by chip damage) or try finding a place to strike back and risk being hit instead - though just as important as keeping up the attack is knowing ''how'' to attack, in order to do so without opening oneself up to a counterattack. If done right, a good rush strategy can be dangerously effective at keeping the opponent from doing ''anything,'' though modern games tend to have mechanics that prevent this (such as special blocks which knock the opponent away, or parries).



** In fact, just about any objective-based FPS will have players whose strategy consists of "run directly to the objective," rather than [[VideoGame/{{Counter-Strike}} hanging back to snipe]], or [[VideoGame/ReturnToCastleWolfenstein running away from the airstrike marker between them and the flag]], or [[VideoGame/{{Battlefield}} sitting on an ammo box tossing grenades down a hallway]], or whatever. These players are handy for breaking those stalemates that occur because neither team can commit to an attack--they'll be happy to disarm traps, respawn, break the lines of the defenders, respawn, and then charge in with their inspired teammates.
8th Sep '16 10:53:35 AM Pinkbeast
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** Nelson most notably tried this at the 1797 Battle of St Vincent; commanding the 74-gun HMS Captain, he disobeyed orders to attack the Spanish van consisting of the 80-gun San Nicolas, the 112-gun San Josef, and the 130-gun Santisima Trinidad (the largest warship afloat), supported only by one other British 74-gun ship. After exchanging fire for an hour, Nelson grappled and boarded the San Nicolas; when the San Josef came to her aid, Nelson boarded the San Josef over the decks of the San Nicolas, capturing both ships.
** In 1801 Royal Navy officer Thomas Cochrane, commanding HMS Speedy (a tiny sloop) encountered the Spanish El Gamo frigate, around four times the size of the Speedy with six times the crew. Cochrane attacked, eventually taking El Gamo by boarding. Cochrane's exploits were the inspiration for fictional naval captains such as Horatio Hornblower - generally toned down, because no-one would believe them in fiction.
7th Sep '16 6:10:54 PM lalalei2001
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* In ''VideoGame/YuGiOhDuelLinks'', early opponents will continually set monsters in attack position even if they know theirs are weaker than yours.
1st Sep '16 12:36:43 PM Morgenthaler
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In ''WorldInConflict'', the final mission has the exhausted and heavily outnumbered Americans attacking the Soviet-held Seattle head on. This is mostly because they cannot afford to have the Soviets use the city as a beachhead for Chinese reinforcements, but partly because their commanding officer, Colonel Sawyer, feels it is necessary to redeem his failure in a previous mission. The fact that the city would be nuked by the US if Sawyer failed probably acted as a motivator too. And if the nuke hits the city, the afternotes tell that it led to an all-out nuclear war. Pretty good reasons to throw everything you got.

to:

* In ''WorldInConflict'', ''VideoGame/WorldInConflict'', the final mission has the exhausted and heavily outnumbered Americans attacking the Soviet-held Seattle head on. This is mostly because they cannot afford to have the Soviets use the city as a beachhead for Chinese reinforcements, but partly because their commanding officer, Colonel Sawyer, feels it is necessary to redeem his failure in a previous mission. The fact that the city would be nuked by the US if Sawyer failed probably acted as a motivator too. And if the nuke hits the city, the afternotes tell that it led to an all-out nuclear war. Pretty good reasons to throw everything you got.
16th Aug '16 8:54:47 PM elemt
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* In ''Literature/TheStormlightArchive'' while Parshendi will retreat, if no escape is available they never surrender and fight to the last no matter how overwhelming the odds. This turns out to be pretty much entirely the fault of [[BloodKnight Highprince Sadeas]], because early in the war when a group did try to surrender, their scouts observed him personally slaughtering them all for the "insult" of denying him battle.
14th Aug '16 5:29:36 AM Morgenthaler
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* A [[FinnsWithFearsomeForests Finnish Army]] guide for young officers: ''If you do not know what to do, attack. If you do not know where to attack, outflank the enemy. If you don't know where to outflank, do it from your right side.''

to:

* A [[FinnsWithFearsomeForests [[UsefulNotes/FinnsWithFearsomeForests Finnish Army]] guide for young officers: ''If you do not know what to do, attack. If you do not know where to attack, outflank the enemy. If you don't know where to outflank, do it from your right side.''
13th Aug '16 11:05:19 AM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The exorcists of ''DGrayMan'' don't know the meaning of the word "retreat". All of them will fight until they can no longer move, and even that won't be enough to stop some of them. As his teammates point out, Allen fights twice as many Akuma as everyone else, and will continue to attack head-on no matter how much shit is getting beat out of him (usually a lot). The fact that his EmpathicWeapon is specially tailored to allow him to fight long after he should be physically capable isn't doing him many favors.

to:

* The exorcists of ''DGrayMan'' ''Manga/DGrayMan'' don't know the meaning of the word "retreat". All of them will fight until they can no longer move, and even that won't be enough to stop some of them. As his teammates point out, Allen fights twice as many Akuma as everyone else, and will continue to attack head-on no matter how much shit is getting beat out of him (usually a lot). The fact that his EmpathicWeapon is specially tailored to allow him to fight long after he should be physically capable isn't doing him many favors.
This list shows the last 10 events of 462. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.AttackAttackAttack