History Main / ArtisticLicenseLaw

18th Aug '16 11:33:35 AM KeithM
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** The preceding is true ''[[EaglelandOsmosis in the United States]]''. In Canada, for example, when police place you under arrest they must immediately (or as soon as possible) inform you why you are being arrested, your Charter rights to silence, your right to immediately contact counsel, and how to contact legal aid if you don't happen to have a lawyer.
16th Aug '16 9:47:00 PM Nicoaln
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* Trademarks - Whenever there is a FanworkBan, most people assume it's because of greedy corporate executives who are out of touch with reality wanting to just quash peoples' fun ForTheEvilulz. Except that some of these are done ''reluctantly'' - Law in most countries requires that trademarks be protected otherwise they are capable of losing that trademark in that country. Most companies who produce media are ''ordered'' to avoid things like fanfiction or intentionally look the other way because very few of these can threaten their brand. Additionally, this is to avoid some cases wherein a fan creates something, something made by the company is similar, and the fan insists that they ripped them off.
16th Aug '16 9:10:11 AM megarockman
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*** The poster child of insanity defense in the US, John Hinkley (who shot President Reagan), is still in custody after having successfully used the insanity defense. It is most likely that he would have long since been paroled or released had he been convicted criminally.

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*** The poster child of insanity defense in the US, John Hinkley Hinckley Jr. (who shot President Reagan), is still Reagan in March 1981), was only released from hospital custody in August 2016 after having successfully used the insanity defense.defense - he's still restricted to a 50-mile radius around Williamsburg, VA (where his mother lives) and cannot contact either the Reagan family or Jodie Foster. It is most likely that he would have long since been paroled or released had he been convicted criminally.
13th Aug '16 7:11:49 PM marcoasalazarm
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*** Let's just say that it's a good thing fictional investigations end up finding some actual physical evidence or triggers the crook into providing a full, iron-clad confession, because in RealLife a case would have a hard time so much as getting to court (or would end up being laughed right out of court, or end with everybody involved getting a severe counter-sue) if the defense had to point out that the reason the accused is being given [[PoliceBrutality such a hard time]] [[TheLopsidedArmOfTheLaw by the police]] is "[[GrammarNazi suspicious]]" use of ''bad grammar''.
6th Aug '16 1:45:03 AM marcoasalazarm
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* InsuranceFraud and RealEstateScam: While they are TruthInTelevision, people who attempt them in Fiction-land more often than not utilize tactics that would be best described as flat-out terrorism and in RealLife would land them in ''very'' hot water if any evidence connecting them to these acts came to light (''especially'' [[UsefulNotes/TheWarOnTerror nowadays]]). Also, many examples of said people make it so blatant that they wish to perform this act (say for example, deliberately botching a wiring job so as to cause a short circuit or taking out an insurance policy on an item that will pay back several times more than its actual estimated monetary value) that it would draw the attention of ''any'' investigator and would probably create issues (in the "it's obvious he is trying to be too clever" sense) if taken to court.

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* InsuranceFraud and RealEstateScam: While they are TruthInTelevision, people who attempt them in Fiction-land more often than not utilize tactics that would be best described as flat-out terrorism and in RealLife would land them in ''very'' hot water if any evidence connecting them to these acts came to light (''especially'' [[UsefulNotes/TheWarOnTerror nowadays]]). Also, many examples of said people make it so blatant that they wish to perform this act (say for example, deliberately botching a wiring job so as to cause a short circuit or circuit, baiting a homicidal maniac into going into the building and wrecking the place, using goons to strong-arm people into leaving a place (in the blatantly violent, "it's obvious ''someone'' made these people leave" sense) and/or taking out an insurance policy on an item that will pay back several times more than its actual estimated monetary value) that it would draw the attention of ''any'' investigator and would probably create issues (in the "it's "[[TooCleverByHalf it's obvious he is trying to be too clever" clever]]" sense) if taken to court.
5th Aug '16 10:56:25 AM HasturHasturHastur
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** Appeals courts also don't have to hear an appeal, and will rarely do so unless there is a legal issue. If an appeals court accepts an appeal based on evidence there was almost certainly a gross miscarriage of justice.

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** Appeals courts also don't have to hear an appeal, and will rarely do so unless there is a legal issue. appeals solely deal with matters of law, ''not'' fact. If an appeals court accepts an appeal based on evidence evidence, there was almost certainly a gross miscarriage of justice.justice by way of an error of law that allowed in certain evidence that should not have made it in ''and'' also proved to be unduly prejudicial. You won't get an appeal just because someone fucked up and allowed in something that should have been rejected, it ''has'' to have had some sort of tangible effect on the case that resulted in a verdict that, but for that item of evidence, probably would not have been reached otherwise.
5th Aug '16 9:51:48 AM HasturHasturHastur
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* InsuranceFraud and RealEstateScam: While they are TruthInTelevision, people who attempt them in Fiction-land more often than not utilize tactics that would be best described as flat-out terrorism and in RealLife would land them in ''very'' hot water if any evidence connecting them to these acts came to light (''especially'' [[UsefulNotes/TheWarOnTerror nowadays]]). Also, many examples of said people make it so blatant that they wish to perform this act (say for example, clearly setting up entrapment of a homicidal maniac so he will destroy their place or putting an insurance on an item that will pay back several times more than its actual estimated monetary value) that it would draw the attention of ''any'' investigator and would probably create issues (in the "it's obvious he is trying to be too clever" sense) if taken to a court.

to:

* InsuranceFraud and RealEstateScam: While they are TruthInTelevision, people who attempt them in Fiction-land more often than not utilize tactics that would be best described as flat-out terrorism and in RealLife would land them in ''very'' hot water if any evidence connecting them to these acts came to light (''especially'' [[UsefulNotes/TheWarOnTerror nowadays]]). Also, many examples of said people make it so blatant that they wish to perform this act (say for example, clearly setting up entrapment of deliberately botching a homicidal maniac wiring job so he will destroy their place as to cause a short circuit or putting taking out an insurance policy on an item that will pay back several times more than its actual estimated monetary value) that it would draw the attention of ''any'' investigator and would probably create issues (in the "it's obvious he is trying to be too clever" sense) if taken to a court.
2nd Aug '16 11:12:49 AM marcoasalazarm
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* InsuranceFraud and RealEstateScam: While they are TruthInTelevision, people who attempt them in Fiction-land more often than not utilize tactics that would be best described as flat-out terrorism and in RealLife would land them in ''very'' hot water if any evidence connecting them to these acts came to light (''especially'' [[UsefulNotes/TheWarOnTerror nowadays]]).

to:

* InsuranceFraud and RealEstateScam: While they are TruthInTelevision, people who attempt them in Fiction-land more often than not utilize tactics that would be best described as flat-out terrorism and in RealLife would land them in ''very'' hot water if any evidence connecting them to these acts came to light (''especially'' [[UsefulNotes/TheWarOnTerror nowadays]]). Also, many examples of said people make it so blatant that they wish to perform this act (say for example, clearly setting up entrapment of a homicidal maniac so he will destroy their place or putting an insurance on an item that will pay back several times more than its actual estimated monetary value) that it would draw the attention of ''any'' investigator and would probably create issues (in the "it's obvious he is trying to be too clever" sense) if taken to a court.
2nd Aug '16 10:58:37 AM marcoasalazarm
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Added DiffLines:

* InsuranceFraud and RealEstateScam: While they are TruthInTelevision, people who attempt them in Fiction-land more often than not utilize tactics that would be best described as flat-out terrorism and in RealLife would land them in ''very'' hot water if any evidence connecting them to these acts came to light (''especially'' [[UsefulNotes/TheWarOnTerror nowadays]]).
30th Jul '16 5:32:04 PM nombretomado
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** The US does allow defendants to plead "no contest" (''nolo contendere''), or "Without admitting guilt, I do not wish to contest the prosecution's argument," but the judge has to accept the plea. It's often used to dispense with trivial matters (it's a common plea for [[TheTroubleWithTickets traffic courts]]--DaveBarry joked that ''nolo contendere'' is actually Latin for "Can I pay by check?"), and where the potential damages in a potential civil suit are more damaging than the criminal sanctions, as it allows the accused to plea bargain while maintaining innocence. This often happens in business-related cases: for instance, you'll often see someone accused of fraud on pretty sound evidence plead no-contest because as bad as the criminal penalties might be, the consequences for his/her company in the civil suit are more far-reaching (and expensive). There is also the related "Alford plea," which is treated as a guilty plea, but otherwise the same as pleading no contest.

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** The US does allow defendants to plead "no contest" (''nolo contendere''), or "Without admitting guilt, I do not wish to contest the prosecution's argument," but the judge has to accept the plea. It's often used to dispense with trivial matters (it's a common plea for [[TheTroubleWithTickets traffic courts]]--DaveBarry courts]]--Creator/DaveBarry joked that ''nolo contendere'' is actually Latin for "Can I pay by check?"), and where the potential damages in a potential civil suit are more damaging than the criminal sanctions, as it allows the accused to plea bargain while maintaining innocence. This often happens in business-related cases: for instance, you'll often see someone accused of fraud on pretty sound evidence plead no-contest because as bad as the criminal penalties might be, the consequences for his/her company in the civil suit are more far-reaching (and expensive). There is also the related "Alford plea," which is treated as a guilty plea, but otherwise the same as pleading no contest.
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