History Main / AntiCavalry

24th Jul '17 12:41:40 PM BlackPrince1330
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* [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Infantry_square Infantry Squares,]] Although this formation dates back to the Roman era, it was successfully employed on 18th and 19th century battlefields as a defensive formation to ward off cavalry. To compensate for the slow reload of flintlock muskets, infantry could form into hollow-centred squares roughly two or more ranks deep, possibly with the front rank kneeling and bracing their weapon on the ground. This formation not only presented attacking enemy cavalry with a bristle of bayonets that would be difficult to overcome, but allowed prevented cavalry from outflanking them, while also allowing the infantry to safely fire and reload their weapons. Though this was infrequent, infantry squares could break, especially if the troops involved were poorly trained or lacking in morale, which would often result in a massive rout.

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* [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Infantry_square Infantry Squares,]] Although this formation dates back to the Roman era, it was successfully employed on 18th and 19th century battlefields as a defensive formation to ward off cavalry. To compensate for the slow reload of flintlock muskets, infantry could form into hollow-centred squares roughly two or more ranks deep, possibly with the front rank kneeling and bracing their weapon on the ground. This formation not only presented attacking enemy cavalry with a bristle of bayonets that would be difficult to overcome, but allowed also prevented cavalry from outflanking them, while also additionally allowing the infantry to safely fire and reload their weapons. Though this was infrequent, Infrequently, infantry squares could break, especially if the troops involved were poorly trained or lacking in morale, which would often result in a massive rout.



* At the battles of Crecy and Agincourt during UsefulNotes/TheHundredYearsWar, the English forces, mostly commoners with longbows, defeated numerically superior French forces, mostly nobles on horses in armor, by their use of ranged attacks from behind stakes driven into the ground.

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* At the battles of Crecy Crécy and Agincourt during UsefulNotes/TheHundredYearsWar, the English forces, mostly commoners with longbows, defeated numerically superior French forces, mostly nobles on horses in armor, by their use of ranged attacks from behind stakes driven into the ground.
29th May '17 3:59:58 PM KenMoreau
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Added DiffLines:

** Which are technically not cavalry, being simply large blocks of foot soldiers. However, in the later books, "volley guns" are introduced as groups of barrels which can all fire simultaneously and be reloaded quickly, so they put an amazing amount of projectiles into the air at once, and do it repeatedly over the range of a cavalry charge. They repeatedly break cavalry charges in various battles.
28th May '17 3:01:49 PM nombretomado
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* Bretonnian archers in ''{{Warhammer}}'' can set up stakes in front of them to prevent cavalry charges. If they panic and run, the stakes go with them.

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* Bretonnian archers in ''{{Warhammer}}'' ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer}}'' can set up stakes in front of them to prevent cavalry charges. If they panic and run, the stakes go with them.
29th Jan '17 8:24:41 PM Loekman3
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** In the spinoff ''AgeOfMythology'' anti-cavalry infantry and cavalry are available to all four civilizations.

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** In the spinoff ''AgeOfMythology'' ''VideoGame/AgeOfMythology'' anti-cavalry infantry and cavalry are available to all four civilizations.
17th Dec '16 2:21:48 PM CaptainCrawdad
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** The superiority of infantry armed with muskets and bayonet over unsupported cavalry was shown beyond all doubts in UsefulNotes/NapoleonBonaparte's campaign in Egypt. The local Ottoman forces relied heavily on the Mamluks, specialized in heavy cavalry, and every time the Mamluks (either supported or unsupported by the barely-trained Ottoman levies) faced the French it ended in such [[CurbStompBattle loopsided victories for the invaders]] that, to this day, the word ''mammalucco'' (one of the two ways to say "Mamluk" in Italian) is synonimous with "hopeless moron". Much the same goes to the Portuguese ''maluco'', a synonym for "insane"
* The [[{{BFS}} Zanbato's]] intended purpose was to kill both horse and its rider, as well as the ''Zhanmadao'', which the former is based on.
** It's ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin: Zan (斬) = Slash,[[note]]Or strike[[/note]] Ba[[note]]Normally "Uma"[[/note]] (馬) = Horse, To (刀) = Sword.

to:

** The superiority of infantry armed with muskets and bayonet over unsupported cavalry was shown beyond all doubts in UsefulNotes/NapoleonBonaparte's campaign in Egypt. The local Ottoman forces relied heavily on the Mamluks, specialized in heavy cavalry, and every time the Mamluks (either supported or unsupported by the barely-trained Ottoman levies) faced the French it ended in such [[CurbStompBattle loopsided victories for the invaders]] that, to this day, the word ''mammalucco'' (one of the two ways to say "Mamluk" in Italian) is synonimous with "hopeless moron". Much the same goes to the Portuguese ''maluco'', a synonym for "insane"
* The [[{{BFS}} Zanbato's]] intended purpose was to kill both horse and its rider, as well as the ''Zhanmadao'', which the former is based on.
**
on. It's ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin: Zan (斬) = Slash,[[note]]Or strike[[/note]] Ba[[note]]Normally "Uma"[[/note]] (馬) = Horse, To (刀) = Sword.



** Could be averted when the cavalry forces had lances and effective projectile weapons (e. g. composite bows or pistols) of their own, as the Romans found against the Parthians at Carrhae.
** Squares also could get into trouble because of their lower mobility, especially after the introduction of horse artillery to accompany the cavalry, since the square's close formation made it an ideal target for cannonballs and especially canister/grapeshot. This could give cavalry the option to play a waiting game, forcing the infantry into a square, then have the artillery punch a hole in it and then charging home and cutting them to pieces.
*** In the Battle of Salamanca, in the Peninsular War, this was turned [[UpToEleven up to eleven]]: British infantry came over to ridge to engage the French, who deployed in line to receive the expected bayonet charge. Then, suddenly, the British heavy cavalry appeared before them, and the hurried to form square. The cavalry withdrew, the infantry advanced, and the French once more deployed in line, but not before taking quite some damage from the British volleys without being able to respond. Then, when the French were in line again, the cavalry charged and routed the French. Repeat three or four times all over the French left flank, and one realises why it was said that [[UsefulNotes/TheDukeOfWellington Wellington]] "defeated an army of 40,000 men in 40 minutes".
*** The wars between England and Scotland provided some good examples. The Scottish spearmen gained some notable victories when attacked by cavalry alone, but also suffered some massive defeats when forced to face English armies where cavalry and archers worked together on their own.
** In the days before percussion locks, heavy rain could make it harder or impossible to fire muskets, making squares vulnerable to lance-armed cavalry, as happened e. g. at the battle of Dresden in 1813. There were also instances where a dying horse crashed into a square, creating a gap that was then exploited by the cavalry to break the square.



* At the battles of Crecy and Agincourt during UsefulNotes/TheHundredYearsWar, the English forces, mostly commoners with longbows, defeated numerically superior French forces, mostly nobles on horses in armor, by the power of MoreDakka and the French [[WhatAnIdiot trying to charge through a swamp]].
** You forgot the Battle of Poitiers, where the [[TooDumbToLive the French did it again]]. A band of commoners ended the day by [[CrowningMomentOfAwesome capturing the King of France.]]
** Longbows were not the AntiCavalry component in these battles, but the stakes (aka long pointy sticks) the longbowmen drove into the ground prior to battle. When they did not get time to set up stakes, like at Patay (1429), it inevitably ended with a brutal massacre of longbowmen by heavy cavalry.

to:

* At the battles of Crecy and Agincourt during UsefulNotes/TheHundredYearsWar, the English forces, mostly commoners with longbows, defeated numerically superior French forces, mostly nobles on horses in armor, by the power their use of MoreDakka and the French [[WhatAnIdiot trying to charge through a swamp]].
** You forgot the Battle of Poitiers, where the [[TooDumbToLive the French did it again]]. A band of commoners ended the day by [[CrowningMomentOfAwesome capturing the King of France.]]
** Longbows were not the AntiCavalry component in these battles, but the
ranged attacks from behind stakes (aka long pointy sticks) the longbowmen drove driven into the ground prior to battle. When they did not get time to set up stakes, like at Patay (1429), it inevitably ended with a brutal massacre of longbowmen by heavy cavalry.ground.



* The [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pike_and_shot Pike and Shot]] formation was invented expressly to deal with armored knight charges. It was so successful that [[GenreKiller it killed armored cavalry forever]].
** Not quite, as non-noble armoured cavalry (i. e. cuirassiers) continued to exist until World War I and was used to devastating effect e. g. in the Thirty Years, Seven Years and Napoleonic Wars. The latter actually saw a resurgence of cavalry armour and the reintroduction of backplates in some armies.

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* The [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pike_and_shot Pike and Shot]] formation was invented expressly to deal with armored knight charges. It was so successful that [[GenreKiller it killed armored cavalry forever]].\n** Not quite, as non-noble armoured cavalry (i. e. cuirassiers) continued to exist until World War I and was used to devastating effect e. g. in the Thirty Years, Seven Years and Napoleonic Wars. The latter actually saw a resurgence of cavalry armour and the reintroduction of backplates in some armies.



** Roman use of the caltrops [[GenreKiller murdered chariot warfare]]: after encountering [[SpikedWheels scythed chariots]] in their wars against the Hellenistic Kingdoms, Roman infantry started throwing caltrops and wait for the horses to step on them and stop in pain, at which point the legionaires would walk over them with (they wore thick-soled sandals that protected them from their caltrops) and calmly slaughter horses and charioteers. At least when they didn't get creative and pulled things like [[RefugeInAudacity coming so close to the chariots they couldn't build up speed and would]] ''[[NoSell bounce on the Roman shield wall]]''...
*** The Romans already had the caltrops ready due the Gauls also using a different kind of chariots, a fast one from which a warrior could lob javelins before closing in to jump on the enemy. While the javelins could be easily countered with the ''testudo'' (tortoise) formation (basically a shield wall where those behind the front ranks would place their trademark tower shields overhead to block projectiles), Gaulish warriors could still come in close and personal on their chariots... Hence the caltrops, that stopped these chariots just as well. By Caesar's time, [[GenreKiller Gaulish chariots had been abandoned]], and the only Celtic peoples who still used them were the Bretons, who hadn't meet the Romans yet.
** In later generations, these same weapons also proved to be useful against modern vehicles. Smaller ones could puncture tires. Larger ones could hinder the progress of tanks or other larger vehicles. They've even been dropped from airplanes. [[ObviousRulePatch And they are banned from the infantry barracks at Fort Benning, Georgia.]]
17th Dec '16 2:18:20 PM CaptainCrawdad
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* Averted in the ''[[Film/LordOfTheRings The Two Towers]]'' at the battle of Helm's Deep: The orcs await TheCavalry's charge with raised pikes, but the rising sun (and/or Gandalf) starts shining so brightly that they can't see, and the charge breaks their lines.
** While CueTheSun doesn't cause them to break their lines like it does at Helm's Deep, the "pikes" used by the Orcs at Minis Tirith are shown to be pretty much useless against the [[TheCavalry Rohirrim]] when they charge. Whether this is just how fast the horses were going or due to the poor quality of the Mordor weaponry (pretty much every orc wore what looked like leather armor and their pikes were a ragged, messily-cobbled-together hedge rather than the long iron professional-looking pikes of the Isengard Uruk-hai) is a matter of debate. The fact that the orcs didn't have the discipline needed to hold formation like the Uruk-Hai did at Helm's Deep didn't help.
9th Oct '16 6:39:24 PM WillKeaton
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* In the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guldensporenslag Battle of the Golden Spurs (1302)]], the Flemish forces managed to [[CurbStompBattle thoroughly trounce]] and demoralize the French cavalry thanks to several tactical advantages:

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* In the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guldensporenslag Battle of the Golden Spurs (1302)]], (1302),]] the Flemish forces managed to [[CurbStompBattle thoroughly trounce]] and demoralize the French cavalry thanks to several tactical advantages:
9th Oct '16 6:38:52 PM WillKeaton
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** It's ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin: Zan (斬) = Slash[[note]]Or strike[[/note]], Ba[[note]]Normally "Uma"[[/note]] (馬) = Horse, To (刀) = Sword.

to:

** It's ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin: Zan (斬) = Slash[[note]]Or strike[[/note]], Slash,[[note]]Or strike[[/note]] Ba[[note]]Normally "Uma"[[/note]] (馬) = Horse, To (刀) = Sword.



* [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Infantry_square Infantry Squares]]. Although this formation dates back to the Roman era, it was successfully employed on 18th and 19th century battlefields as a defensive formation to ward off cavalry. To compensate for the slow reload of flintlock muskets, infantry could form into hollow-centred squares roughly two or more ranks deep, possibly with the front rank kneeling and bracing their weapon on the ground. This formation not only presented attacking enemy cavalry with a bristle of bayonets that would be difficult to overcome, but allowed prevented cavalry from outflanking them, while also allowing the infantry to safely fire and reload their weapons. Though this was infrequent, infantry squares could break, especially if the troops involved were poorly trained or lacking in morale, which would often result in a massive rout.

to:

* [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Infantry_square Infantry Squares]]. Squares,]] Although this formation dates back to the Roman era, it was successfully employed on 18th and 19th century battlefields as a defensive formation to ward off cavalry. To compensate for the slow reload of flintlock muskets, infantry could form into hollow-centred squares roughly two or more ranks deep, possibly with the front rank kneeling and bracing their weapon on the ground. This formation not only presented attacking enemy cavalry with a bristle of bayonets that would be difficult to overcome, but allowed prevented cavalry from outflanking them, while also allowing the infantry to safely fire and reload their weapons. Though this was infrequent, infantry squares could break, especially if the troops involved were poorly trained or lacking in morale, which would often result in a massive rout.
5th Sep '16 10:22:43 AM REV6Pilot
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** The superiority of infantry armed with muskets and bayonet over unsupported cavalry was shown beyond all doubts in UsefulNotes/NapoleonBonaparte's campaign in Egypt. The local Ottoman forces relied heavily on the Mamluks, specialized in heavy cavalry, and every time the Mamluks (either supported or unsupported by the barely-trained Ottoman levies) faced the French it ended in such [[CurbStompBattle loopsided victories for the invaders]] that, to this day, the word ''mammalucco'' (one of the two ways to say "Mamluk" in Italian) is synonimous with "hopeless moron".

to:

** The superiority of infantry armed with muskets and bayonet over unsupported cavalry was shown beyond all doubts in UsefulNotes/NapoleonBonaparte's campaign in Egypt. The local Ottoman forces relied heavily on the Mamluks, specialized in heavy cavalry, and every time the Mamluks (either supported or unsupported by the barely-trained Ottoman levies) faced the French it ended in such [[CurbStompBattle loopsided victories for the invaders]] that, to this day, the word ''mammalucco'' (one of the two ways to say "Mamluk" in Italian) is synonimous with "hopeless moron". Much the same goes to the Portuguese ''maluco'', a synonym for "insane"
17th Jun '16 10:18:07 PM nombretomado
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* The ability to explicitly set spears and similar weapons against a charge (typically for double damage) in ''TabletopGames/DungeonsAndDragons'' hails all the way back to its early editions, sometimes treated as a special fighter maneuver, sometimes more as a property of the weapon itself. While many monsters may simply make charge attacks on their own without needing to mount up first, the inspiration is still obvious enough.

to:

* The ability to explicitly set spears and similar weapons against a charge (typically for double damage) in ''TabletopGames/DungeonsAndDragons'' ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' hails all the way back to its early editions, sometimes treated as a special fighter maneuver, sometimes more as a property of the weapon itself. While many monsters may simply make charge attacks on their own without needing to mount up first, the inspiration is still obvious enough.
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