History Main / AndSomeOtherStuff

15th Apr '16 5:03:35 PM Doug86
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* Parodied in strip during the ''Last Laugh'' CrisisCrossover in TheDCU. The strip had SelfDemonstrating/TheJoker explaining how to make his lethal Joker venom but censored out the names of various ingredients but left in comments like "You'll need to go to the hardware store for that". The joke, of course, being that you couldn't make the entirely fictitious Joker venom even if you did know what it contained.

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* Parodied in strip during the ''Last Laugh'' CrisisCrossover in TheDCU.Franchise/TheDCU. The strip had SelfDemonstrating/TheJoker explaining how to make his lethal Joker venom but censored out the names of various ingredients but left in comments like "You'll need to go to the hardware store for that". The joke, of course, being that you couldn't make the entirely fictitious Joker venom even if you did know what it contained.
13th Apr '16 6:45:56 PM AtticusOmundson
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Added DiffLines:

[[quoteright:350:[[Series/MythBusters http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/djg5wt9.jpg]]]]
[[caption-width-right:350:"This ingredient is made of Blur.\\
And this has some Blur in it, too.\\
Blur is very dangerous;\\
you don't wanna mix Blur with Blur."]]
11th Feb '16 5:43:08 PM thatother1dude
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** Bringing the above two together, Mythbusters took a hack at some of the chemistry on Breaking Bad, proving in short order that hydrofluoric acid wasn't quite nasty enough to actually eat through a bathtub. What was? Sulfuric acid and "special sauce", which Adam and Jamie refused to elaborate on. Those who know a bit of chemistry trivia might suspect that the "special sauce" was actually [[spoiler:reagent-grade hydrogen peroxide]], which when combined with H2SO4 produces a spectacularly violent glassware cleaning product called "piranha solution".

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** Bringing the above two together, Mythbusters took a hack at some of the chemistry on Breaking Bad, proving in short order that hydrofluoric acid wasn't quite nasty enough to actually eat through a bathtub. What was? Sulfuric acid and "special sauce", which Adam and Jamie refused to elaborate on. Those who know a bit of chemistry trivia might suspect that the "special sauce" was actually [[spoiler:reagent-grade hydrogen peroxide]], which when combined with H2SO4 H[[subscript:2]]SO[[subscript:4]] produces a spectacularly violent glassware cleaning product called "piranha solution".
5th Jan '16 1:49:12 PM TheCheshireCat
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* Several levels in ''VideoGame/PAYDAY2'' feature cooking meth as one of the objectives. In game the mixture produces blue crystals as a ShoutOut to ''Series/BreakingBad''. Potential drug kingpins mixing the same ingredients in real life will be disappointed to find that all they've managed to create is salt water.
29th Nov '15 10:43:03 AM thatother1dude
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* In ''Film/SupermanIII'', a supercomputer determines the exact ingredients of kryptonite -- except that one of the ingredients is [[NotOfThisEarth categorized as "unknown."]] So Gus Gorman substitutes cigarette tar. This substitution results in what is, effectively, red kryptonite!

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* In ''Film/SupermanIII'', a supercomputer determines the exact ingredients of kryptonite -- except that one of the ingredients is [[NotOfThisEarth categorized as "unknown."]] So Gus Gorman substitutes cigarette tar. This substitution results in what is, effectively, red kryptonite!
23rd Nov '15 9:20:05 AM Prfnoff
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* In ''DriverSanFrancisco'', ammonia is correctly identified as an ingredient in the production of [[DeadlyGas hydrogen cyanide]], using platinum as a catalyst. However, the proper procedure is never identified beyond "if you knew what you were doing". They needn't have bothered, as the method for creating hydrogen cyanide is beyond the capabilities of most people.
* ''TheLastOfUs'' has survivalist training manuals (or rather, scattered torn-out pages of them), which, [[GottaCatchEmAll when collected]], provide Joel with handy-dandy information on [[YouHaveResearchedBreathing how to survive in a post-apocalyptic wasteland]]. The pages about treating injuries more effectively have some actually pretty useful information on splints, tourniquets and the like. The pages about making smoke bombs, tying knots on weapons, sharpening shivs, and improving the construction of molotov cocktails all noticeably trail off with "..."s.

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* In ''DriverSanFrancisco'', ''VideoGame/DriverSanFrancisco'', ammonia is correctly identified as an ingredient in the production of [[DeadlyGas hydrogen cyanide]], using platinum as a catalyst. However, the proper procedure is never identified beyond "if you knew what you were doing". They needn't have bothered, as the method for creating hydrogen cyanide is beyond the capabilities of most people.
* ''TheLastOfUs'' ''VideoGame/TheLastOfUs'' has survivalist training manuals (or rather, scattered torn-out pages of them), which, [[GottaCatchEmAll when collected]], provide Joel with handy-dandy information on [[YouHaveResearchedBreathing how to survive in a post-apocalyptic wasteland]]. The pages about treating injuries more effectively have some actually pretty useful information on splints, tourniquets and the like. The pages about making smoke bombs, tying knots on weapons, sharpening shivs, and improving the construction of molotov cocktails all noticeably trail off with "..."s.
22nd Nov '15 5:50:14 PM nombretomado
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* The author of ''TheSalvationWar'' intentionally fudged the workings of nuclear weapons, and when one of his readers pointed out the error, he said it was standard procedure.

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* The author of ''TheSalvationWar'' ''Literature/TheSalvationWar'' intentionally fudged the workings of nuclear weapons, and when one of his readers pointed out the error, he said it was standard procedure.
8th Oct '15 2:08:04 PM kknizaa
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So, to avoid liability issues and criminal charges, some critical ingredient for the explosive is removed, replaced (with something less volatile) or referred to [[UnusualEuphemism vaguely]] (as "stuff", "my secret ingredient", or similar) to prevent disasters like YourHeadASplode or ApocalypseHow.

Occasionally happens with other types of weapons of mass destruction.

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So, to avoid liability issues and criminal charges, some critical ingredient for the explosive is removed, replaced (with something less volatile) or referred to [[UnusualEuphemism vaguely]] (as "stuff", "my secret ingredient", or similar) to prevent disasters like YourHeadASplode or ApocalypseHow.

Occasionally happens with other types of weapons of mass destruction.
similar.)
8th Oct '15 2:07:08 PM kknizaa
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As long as there are books, movies, television, and video games, people will always [[DontTryThisAtHome try to recreate everything in their favorite work]].

Unfortunately, many works contain explosives, including homemade varieties. Even if the viewer could be trusted to recreate those without blowing themselves up, society is highly against people ''using'' homemade explosives. (We've had some bad experiences.) High-profile media, after a certain date, must respect this or gain the wrath of MoralGuardians or worse.

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As long as there are books, movies, television, and video games, people will always [[DontTryThisAtHome try Writers don't want to recreate everything in teach their favorite work]].

Unfortunately, many works contain explosives, including homemade varieties. Even if
audience how to make bombs. Something about "not wanting to be responsible for the viewer could be trusted to recreate those without blowing themselves up, society is highly against people ''using'' homemade explosives. (We've had some bad experiences.) High-profile media, after a certain date, must respect this or gain the wrath deaths of MoralGuardians or worse.
hundreds of innocent souls." Wimps.
8th Oct '15 12:44:44 AM kknizaa
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* In ''Film/{{Excalibur}}'' Guinevere prepares a "healing" cake for Arthur. When he asks what's in in, she coyly replies, "Fresh, unborn grain, flavored with rose petals. The rest is secret."

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* In ''Film/{{Excalibur}}'' Guinevere prepares a "healing" cake for Arthur. When he asks what's in in, she coyly replies, "Fresh, unborn grain, flavored with rose petals. The rest is secret."



* In-universe example: Victor {{Literature/Frankenstein}} refuses to explain how he brought the monster to life [[FramingDevice to the Arctic sailors]], for fear that somebody would imitate him.



* Averted (especially if things go wrong!) in ''Literature/AnarchistCookbook''.
** If you believe the ConspiracyTheory that says it's a plot to get anarchists to kill themselves, it's actually an inversion.
*** There are multiple versions of the Cookbook floating around, particularly on the internet - some authentic, some this. One excerpt from the latter involved telling people that in order to create a homemade rocket launcher,y ou just need to stuff explosives into a shotgun with a stick then fire. Not particularly subtle.
* One of Chris Ryan's books contains an aversion - he tells the reader exactly how to make and arm deadly petrol bombs, using nothing but soapsuds, petrol, orange juice and fuse.



* It's not explosive, but it is dangerous: "moon tea" in ''ASongOfIceAndFire'' is based on natural abortifacients such as tansy and pennyroyal, which were historically used, but produced nasty side effects at best and would straight-up kill a woman if the mixture was even slightly off. George R R Martin [[http://www.westeros.org/Citadel/SSM/Entry/A_Myriad_of_Questions/ "added a few fantasy touches"]] because he didn't want anybody trying this at home. In-universe, using moon tea is a last resort, and [[spoiler:Hoster Tully]]'s use of it to end [[spoiler:Lysa's premarital pregnancy]] is subtly implied to be responsible for her lifelong fertility problems.

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* It's not explosive, but it is dangerous: "moon tea" in ''ASongOfIceAndFire'' is based on natural abortifacients such as tansy and pennyroyal, which were historically used, but produced nasty side effects at best and would straight-up kill a woman if the mixture was even slightly off. George R R Martin [[http://www.westeros.org/Citadel/SSM/Entry/A_Myriad_of_Questions/ "added a few fantasy touches"]] because he didn't want anybody trying this at home. In-universe, using moon tea is a last resort, and [[spoiler:Hoster Tully]]'s use of it to end [[spoiler:Lysa's premarital pregnancy]] is subtly implied to be responsible for her lifelong fertility problems.



* Some have argued that the infamous ''ThePoorMansJamesBond'' by Kurt Saxon falls under this category, as it consists of badly photocopied and inaccurate pages about how to make your own explosives and other home-made devices of mayhem.



* ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'':
** "It's made of apples. Well, mainly apples." The substance in question? [[GargleBlaster Scumble.]]
** ''Nanny Ogg's Cookbook'' contains a number of recipes which Nanny notes have had "some of what you might call the more ''active'' ingredients" taken out. (Anyone who's read ''Discworld/{{Maskerade}}'' will understand why.)

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* ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'':
** "It's made of apples. Well, mainly apples." The substance in question? [[GargleBlaster Scumble.]]
**
''Literature/{{Discworld}}'': ''Nanny Ogg's Cookbook'' contains a number of recipes which Nanny notes have had "some of what you might call the more ''active'' ingredients" taken out. (Anyone who's read ''Discworld/{{Maskerade}}'' will understand why.)



* Another InUniverse example is the formula for rocket fuel in ''Literature/GravitysRainbow'' - much to the protagonist's confusion, since he can't understand why anyone would make [[WarForFunAndProfit corporate secrets of national security issues in a time of war]].
* The hacking in ''Literature/TheCasualVacancy'' is simply described as "SQL injection", which is a real hacking method, but the details of how one actually does SQL injection are not explained. (However, anyone who reads [[http://xkcd.com/327/ xkcd]] already knows how to do that.)



* In AmericanGods Mr Wednesday manages to scam money out of a cashier by constantly switching between credit cards and cash. In his notes Creator/NeilGaiman says what Wednesday did ''is'' do-able, but he deliberately fuzzed the edges so that readers wouldn't be able to figure out exactly how he did it and thus pull their own scams. (Although that didn't stop someone from using another scam featured in the book to actually rob a bank.)

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* In AmericanGods ''AmericanGods'' Mr Wednesday manages to scam money out of a cashier by constantly switching between credit cards and cash. In his notes Creator/NeilGaiman says what Wednesday did ''is'' do-able, but he deliberately fuzzed the edges so that readers wouldn't be able to figure out exactly how he did it and thus pull their own scams. (Although that didn't stop someone from using another scam featured in the book to actually rob a bank.)



* ''Series/BurnNotice'' has main character Michael blur out unpleasant precision with the TropeNamer.
** Interestingly, the show averts or ignores this trope for the most part. In fact, the commentary for the episode "Lesser Evil", containing the trope naming line, says the line was only added because the explosion was too big for the stated ingredient to produce, and not to prevent others from duplicating the explosive.
** For a straight example, there was the time in "Family Business" when Fiona made homemade explosives that looked and acted like C-4 using "spackle, petroleum jelly, and a bunch of other things I don't even wanna know about."
* Back in TheEighties, Series/MacGyver himself was omitting steps for his explosive solutions.
* The ''Series/BlueHeelers'' episode "Kicking Over the Traces" refers to an online guide to, essentially, being a terrorist, from guides to bombs and how to make weapons to how to be the giggest anarchist you possibly can. PJ doesn't call it by its real name, instead he calls it the Anarchist's Handbook. Several times (such as when Tahni and Ryan torch Tom's car) it's described how it was done...with omissions.

to:

* ''Series/BurnNotice'' has main character Michael blur out unpleasant precision with the TropeNamer.
** Interestingly, the show averts or ignores this trope for the most part.
In fact, the commentary for the episode "Lesser Evil", containing the trope naming line, says the line was only added because the explosion was too big for the stated ingredient to produce, and not to prevent others from duplicating the explosive.
** For a straight example,
''Series/BurnNotice'', there was the time in "Family Business" when Fiona made homemade explosives that looked and acted like C-4 using "spackle, petroleum jelly, and a bunch of other things I don't even wanna know about."
* Back in TheEighties, Series/MacGyver ''Series/MacGyver'' himself was omitting steps for his explosive solutions.
* The ''Series/BlueHeelers'' episode "Kicking Over the Traces" refers to an online guide to, essentially, being a terrorist, from guides to bombs and how to make weapons to how to be the giggest anarchist you possibly can. PJ doesn't call it by its real name, instead he calls it the Anarchist's Handbook. Several times (such as when Tahni and Ryan torch Tom's car) it's described how it was done... with omissions.



* In an example that doesn't involve anything dangerous, ''Series/HowItsMade'' often runs into secret ingredients or other trade secrets when filming food products; these have to be carefully omitted from the footage and narration scripts.

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* In an example that doesn't involve anything dangerous, ''Series/HowItsMade'' often runs into secret ingredients or other trade secrets when filming food products; these have to be carefully omitted from the footage and narration scripts.



* Somewhat averted for the most part in RealLife. Many people that have bomb making experience don't mind telling you the ingredients. What they generally won't explain is how to do it safely, or how to build a detonator.
* Also averted thanks to the Freedom of Information Act; while things like the aforementioned Anarchist's Cookbook are more or less illegal, quite a bit of the same information can be obtained through official Army Field/Technical Manuals, ranging from disassembling rifles to creating improvised explosive devices.
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