History Main / AnachronicOrder

22nd Feb '17 12:37:15 PM RaygunJustice
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* "ComicBook/AstroCity" often jumps between different periods of the city. Some story takes place in the present, while others happen in the past, from the Comic version of the Silver Age to the Dark Age usually. However, in one story, readers were taken back to the Victorian Age of England. Helped, though, by the fact that the book does not really have a main character.

to:

* "ComicBook/AstroCity" ''ComicBook/AstroCity'' often jumps between different periods of the city. Some story takes place in the present, while others happen in the past, from the Comic version of the Silver Age to the Dark Age usually. However, in one story, readers were taken back to the Victorian Age of England. Helped, though, by the fact that the book does not really have a main character.
22nd Feb '17 12:36:26 PM RaygunJustice
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Added DiffLines:

* "ComicBook/AstroCity" often jumps between different periods of the city. Some story takes place in the present, while others happen in the past, from the Comic version of the Silver Age to the Dark Age usually. However, in one story, readers were taken back to the Victorian Age of England. Helped, though, by the fact that the book does not really have a main character.
17th Feb '17 10:58:20 AM MagBas
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* ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}'' games seem to be like this. ''VideoGame/PokemonDiamondAndPearl'' and ''Platinum'' seem to take place at the same time as (or possibly shortly after) the earlier ''VideoGame/PokemonGoldAndSilver'' and ''Crystal'' versions (events from ''Gold'', ''Silver'', and ''Crystal'' are referenced in ''Diamond'', ''Pearl'', and ''Platinum'', such as the Red Gyarados event being shown on TV at the beginning of the game and Professor Elm's research on Pokémon eggs being mentioned by a character), which were stated to take place three years after the original ''Pokémon'' games. ''VideoGame/PokemonRubyAndSapphire'' and ''Emerald'' never stated when they take place relative to when ''VideoGame/PokemonRedAndBlue'' took place. But the remakes of the original games are believed by many to be set at the same time as ''Ruby'' and ''Sapphire'' due to comments made by characters and perhaps more importantly trading between these games is described as trading with different countries as oppose to through time.
** The remakes of ''Ruby'' and ''Sapphire'' make placing them even more confusing, as they run alongside ''X & Y'', and reference some events and discoveries in ''X & Y'' (particularly Fairy Type, and Mega Evolution). Does this mean ''X/Y'', ''Red/Blue'', and ''Ruby/Sapphire'' take place first and the last in the series chronologically is ''Black/White'', or does ''X/Y'' and ''Ruby/Sapphire'' take place last chronologically, making ''Red'' and ''Blue'' standalone at the start?
*** Events from ''[[VideoGame/PokemonBlackAndWhite Black/White]]'' are referenced in ''X/Y'', making figuring this out even more confusing.
** Then there was the suggestion that the remakes are an [[AlternateContinuity alternate timeline]] altogether.
** Eventually, a [[WordOfGod Twitter post]] by a [=GameFreak=] member explained it, that the Remakes overwrote the originals: ''[[VideoGame/PokemonRedAndBlue Fire Red/Leaf Green]]'' and ''[[VideoGame/PokemonRubyAndSapphire Omega Ruby/Alpha Sapphire]]'' are first, ''[[Pokemon/PokemonGoldAndSilver Heart Gold/Soul Silver]]'' and ''VideoGame/PokemonDiamondAndPearl'' are next (Platinum is unspecified), ''VideoGame/PokemonBlackAndWhite'' take place after those, with ''VideoGame/PokemonBlack2AndWhite2'' and ''VideoGame/PokemonXAndY'' are the latest in the timeline. Additionally, the [[AlternateContinuity alternate timeline]] theory was confirmed as well.

to:

* ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}'' games seem to be are like this. ''VideoGame/PokemonDiamondAndPearl'' and ''Platinum'' seem to take place at the same time as (or possibly shortly after) the earlier ''VideoGame/PokemonGoldAndSilver'' and ''Crystal'' versions (events from ''Gold'', ''Silver'', and ''Crystal'' are referenced in ''Diamond'', ''Pearl'', and ''Platinum'', such as the Red Gyarados event being shown on TV at the beginning of the game and Professor Elm's research on Pokémon eggs being mentioned by a character), which were stated to take place three years after the original ''Pokémon'' games. ''VideoGame/PokemonRubyAndSapphire'' and ''Emerald'' never stated when they take place relative to when ''VideoGame/PokemonRedAndBlue'' took place. But the remakes of the original games are believed by many to be set at the same time as ''Ruby'' and ''Sapphire'' due to comments made by characters and perhaps more importantly trading between these games is described as trading with different countries as oppose to through time.
** The remakes of ''Ruby'' and ''Sapphire'' make placing them even more confusing, as they run alongside ''X & Y'', and reference some events and discoveries in ''X & Y'' (particularly Fairy Type, and Mega Evolution). Does this mean ''X/Y'', ''Red/Blue'', and ''Ruby/Sapphire'' take place first and the last in the series chronologically is ''Black/White'', or does ''X/Y'' and ''Ruby/Sapphire'' take place last chronologically, making ''Red'' and ''Blue'' standalone at the start?
*** Events from ''[[VideoGame/PokemonBlackAndWhite Black/White]]'' are referenced in ''X/Y'', making figuring this out even more confusing.
** Then there was the suggestion that the remakes are an [[AlternateContinuity alternate timeline]] altogether.
** Eventually, a
this. A [[WordOfGod Twitter post]] by a [=GameFreak=] member explained it, that the Remakes overwrote the originals: ''[[VideoGame/PokemonRedAndBlue Fire Red/Leaf Green]]'' it,VideoGame/PokemonRedAndBlue and ''[[VideoGame/PokemonRubyAndSapphire Omega Ruby/Alpha Sapphire]]'' VideoGame/PokemonRubyAndSapphire are first, ''[[Pokemon/PokemonGoldAndSilver Heart Gold/Soul Silver]]'' ''Pokemon/PokemonGoldAndSilver and ''VideoGame/PokemonDiamondAndPearl'' are next (Platinum is unspecified), next, ''VideoGame/PokemonBlackAndWhite'' take place after those, with ''VideoGame/PokemonBlack2AndWhite2'' and ''VideoGame/PokemonXAndY'' are the latest in the timeline. Additionally, the [[AlternateContinuity alternate timeline]] theory was confirmed as well.
14th Feb '17 3:31:36 PM ILikeRobots
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* ''VideoGame/FireEmblem'': The series currently has six different canons, which can sometimes play this trope straight. The ''VideoGame/FireEmblemElibe'' canon, consisting of the sixth and seventh games, goes back-to-front -- ''Blazing Blade'' ([=FE7=]) followed by ''Binding Blade'' ([=FE6=]). Then there's ''VideoGame/FireEmblemArchanea'' and ''VideoGame/FireEmblemJugdral''. The ''Jugdral'' canon takes place earliest, on the Jugdral continent, with ''Genealogy of the Holy War'' ([=FE4=]) spanning decades and generations. ''Tharcia 776'' ([=FE5=]) takes place near the end the time skip between chapters five and six. The ''Archanea'' canon (the original) takes place centuries later on the continent of Archanea. The ''Archanea War Chronicles'', a game broadcast by Satellaview (and thus not counted as part of the overall series) takes place earliest, along with the four bonus chapters in ''New Mystery of the Emblem: Heroes of Light and Darkness'' ([=FE12=]), which serves as a remake. Then go ''Shadow Dragon and the Blade of Light'' ([=FE1=]), ''Mystery of the Emblem'' Book 1 (the first half of [=FE3=]) and ''Shadow Dragon'' ([=FE11=]), which all tell the same story. While this is going on, ''Fire Emblem Gaiden'' ([=FE2=]) is going on in the distant continent of Valentia. This is followed by Book 2 of ''Mystery of the Emblem'' and the main story of ''Heroes of Light and Darkness'', which tell the same story. ''VideoGame/FireEmblemAwakening'' ([=FE13=]) takes place on Archanea and Valentia in the distant future, the respective continents now renamed Ylisse and Valm.

to:

* ''VideoGame/FireEmblem'': The The ''Videogame/FireEmblem'' series currently has six different canons, which can sometimes play this trope straight. straight:
**
The ''VideoGame/FireEmblemElibe'' canon, consisting of the sixth and seventh games, goes back-to-front -- ''Blazing Blade'' ''Videogame/FireEmblemTheBlazingBlade'' ([=FE7=]) followed by ''Binding Blade'' ([=FE6=]). Then there's ''VideoGame/FireEmblemArchanea'' and ''VideoGame/FireEmblemJugdral''. ''Videogame/FireEmblemTheBindingBlade'' ([=FE6=]).
**
The ''Jugdral'' canon takes place earliest, on the Jugdral continent, with ''Genealogy of the Holy War'' ''Videogame/FireEmblemGenealogyOfTheHolyWar'' ([=FE4=]) spanning decades and generations. ''Tharcia 776'' ''Videogame/FireEmblemThracia776'' ([=FE5=]) is an {{Interquel}} to ''Genealogy,'' and takes place near the end the time skip between chapters five and six. six.
**
The ''Archanea'' canon (the original) takes place centuries later on the continent of Archanea. Archanea, distant from Jugdral but occupying the same world. The ''Archanea War Chronicles'', a game broadcast by Satellaview (and thus not counted as part of the overall series) takes place earliest, along with the four bonus chapters in ''New Mystery of the Emblem: Heroes of Light and Darkness'' ([=FE12=]), which serves as a remake. ([=FE12=]). Then go ''Shadow Dragon and the Blade of Light'' comes ''Videogame/FireEmblemShadowDragonAndTheBladeOfLight'' ([=FE1=]), ''Mystery of the Emblem'' ''Videogame/FireEmblemMysteryOfTheEmblem'' Book 1 (the first half of [=FE3=]) and ''Shadow Dragon'' ([=FE11=]), which all tell the same story. story.
**
While this is going on, ''Fire Emblem Gaiden'' ''Videogame/FireEmblemGaiden'' ([=FE2=]) is going occurring during the three years between ''Shadow Dragon'' and ''Mystery'' on in the distant continent of Valentia. This is followed by Valentia, which shares the same world as Archanea and Jugdral.
** After this,
Book 2 of ''Mystery of the Emblem'' ''Videogame/FireEmblemMysteryOfTheEmblem'' and the main story of ''Heroes of Light and Darkness'', Darkness'' occurs, which tell tells the same story. story.
**
''VideoGame/FireEmblemAwakening'' ([=FE13=]) takes place on Archanea and Valentia in the distant future, the respective continents now renamed Ylisse and Valm.
14th Feb '17 2:28:22 PM ILikeRobots
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* ''VideoGame/FireEmblem'': The series currently has six different canons, which can sometimes play this trope straight. The ''VideoGame/FireEmblemElibe'' canon, consisting of the sixth and seventh games, goes back-to-front -- ''Blazing Sword'' ([=FE7=]) followed by ''Binding Blade'' ([=FE6=]). Then there's ''VideoGame/FireEmblemAkaneia'' and ''VideoGame/FireEmblemJugdral''. The ''Jugdral'' canon takes place earliest, on the Jugdral continent, with ''Genealogy of the Holy War'' ([=FE4=]) spanning decades and generations. ''Tharcia 776'' ([=FE5=]) takes place near the end the time skip between chapters five and six. The ''Akaneia'' canon (the original) takes place centuries later on the continent of Akaneia/Archanea. The ''Archanea War Chronicles'', a game broadcast by Satellaview (and thus not counted as part of the overall series) takes place earliest, along with the four bonus chapters in ''New Mystery of the Emblem: Heroes of Light and Darkness'' ([=FE12=]), which serves as a remake. Then go ''The Dark Dragon and the Sword of Light'' ([=FE1=]), ''Mystery of the Emblem'' Book 1 (the first half of [=FE3=]) and ''Shadow Dragon'' ([=FE11=]), which all tell the same story. While this is going on, ''Fire Emblem Gaiden'' ([=FE2=]) is going on in the distant continent of Valentia. This is followed by Book 2 of ''Mystery of the Emblem'' and the main story of ''Heroes of Light and Darkness'', which tell the same story. ''VideoGame/FireEmblemAwakening'' ([=FE13=]) takes place on Archanea and Valentia in the distant future, the respective continents now renamed Ylisse and Valm.

to:

* ''VideoGame/FireEmblem'': The series currently has six different canons, which can sometimes play this trope straight. The ''VideoGame/FireEmblemElibe'' canon, consisting of the sixth and seventh games, goes back-to-front -- ''Blazing Sword'' Blade'' ([=FE7=]) followed by ''Binding Blade'' ([=FE6=]). Then there's ''VideoGame/FireEmblemAkaneia'' ''VideoGame/FireEmblemArchanea'' and ''VideoGame/FireEmblemJugdral''. The ''Jugdral'' canon takes place earliest, on the Jugdral continent, with ''Genealogy of the Holy War'' ([=FE4=]) spanning decades and generations. ''Tharcia 776'' ([=FE5=]) takes place near the end the time skip between chapters five and six. The ''Akaneia'' ''Archanea'' canon (the original) takes place centuries later on the continent of Akaneia/Archanea.Archanea. The ''Archanea War Chronicles'', a game broadcast by Satellaview (and thus not counted as part of the overall series) takes place earliest, along with the four bonus chapters in ''New Mystery of the Emblem: Heroes of Light and Darkness'' ([=FE12=]), which serves as a remake. Then go ''The Dark ''Shadow Dragon and the Sword Blade of Light'' ([=FE1=]), ''Mystery of the Emblem'' Book 1 (the first half of [=FE3=]) and ''Shadow Dragon'' ([=FE11=]), which all tell the same story. While this is going on, ''Fire Emblem Gaiden'' ([=FE2=]) is going on in the distant continent of Valentia. This is followed by Book 2 of ''Mystery of the Emblem'' and the main story of ''Heroes of Light and Darkness'', which tell the same story. ''VideoGame/FireEmblemAwakening'' ([=FE13=]) takes place on Archanea and Valentia in the distant future, the respective continents now renamed Ylisse and Valm.
12th Feb '17 5:04:16 PM AthenaBlue
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* ''Series/{{Arrow}}'' has two ongoing timelines: one in the present, and one made of up flashbacks to the island to show how Oliver Queen became a badass.



* ''Series/TheEvent'': Not only does the series continually switch among the main characters to tell the story from their perspectives, but it often shows events in reverse order before making its way back to the present.



* ''Series/TheGoodGuys'' uses this purely as a story telling device with no pretensions toward being ''avant-garde''.
* ''Series/HoratioHornblower'', "Mutiny"/"Retribution": The second installment can be considered a true two-parter. "Mutiny" is fully told in HowWeGotHere mode, but "Retribution" resumes the story where it was left, showing us some InMediasRes scenes with badly injured lieutenants Bush and Kennedy who lie in a prison infirmary. The other lieutenants are tried for life, and the narrative keeps jumping back and forth. The lieutenants continue giving an account of their mission which is shown in {{Flash Back}}s, and it's interspersed with their questioning at the court, the testimonies of the crew and the judges' private discussions.



* In ''Series/OnceUponATime'', the story is told by interspersing scenes set in present day [[TownWithADarkSecret Storybrooke]] with {{Flashback}}s to the fairy tale world from which it came. Moreover, the flashbacks are not in any particular order, but rather relate to which character is [[ADayInTheLimelight in the limelight for that episode]].
* The ''Series/RedDwarf'' episode "White Hole" uses this to great comedic effect. A white hole is screwing with time every which way imaginable, creating a conversation with repeated sections, the ending placed in the middle, [[ForTheLulz Cat repeating his opening question just to mess with the group,]] and the whole thing starting over again once they’re done.
** Another episode, "Thanks for the Memory," opens with the guys on a planetoid celebrating Rimmer’s "death-day." After a brief conversation between Rimmer and Lister, we cut to the next morning: Lister and Cat both have a broken foot, they’ve lost almost a whole week of memory, and the ship’s black box is missing. They spend the rest of the episode piecing together what happened.



* ''Series/TheEvent'': Not only does the series continually switch among the main characters to tell the story from their perspectives, but it often shows events in reverse order before making its way back to the present.
* ''Series/TheGoodGuys'' uses this purely as a story telling device with no pretensions toward being ''avant-garde''.
* In ''Series/OnceUponATime'', the story is told by interspersing scenes set in present day [[TownWithADarkSecret Storybrooke]] with {{Flashback}}s to the fairy tale world from which it came. Moreover, the flashbacks are not in any particular order, but rather relate to which character is [[ADayInTheLimelight in the limelight for that episode]].



* ''Series/{{Arrow}}'' has two ongoing timelines: one in the present, and one made of up flashbacks to the island to show how Oliver Queen became a badass.
* ''Series/HoratioHornblower'', "Mutiny"/"Retribution": The second installment can be considered a true two-parter. "Mutiny" is fully told in HowWeGotHere mode, but "Retribution" resumes the story where it was left, showing us some InMediasRes scenes with badly injured lieutenants Bush and Kennedy who lie in a prison infirmary. The other lieutenants are tried for life, and the narrative keeps jumping back and forth. The lieutenants continue giving an account of their mission which is shown in {{Flash Back}}s, and it's interspersed with their questioning at the court, the testimonies of the crew and the judges' private discussions.
* The Series/RedDwarf episode "White Hole" uses this to great comedic effect. A white hole is screwing with time every which way imaginable, creating a conversation with repeated sections, the ending placed in the middle, [[ForTheLulz Cat repeating his opening question just to mess with the group,]] and the whole thing starting over again once they’re done.
** Another episode, "Thanks for the Memory," opens with the guys on a planetoid celebrating Rimmer’s "death-day." After a brief conversation between Rimmer and Lister, we cut to the next morning: Lister and Cat both have a broken foot, they’ve lost almost a whole week of memory, and the ship’s black box is missing. They spend the rest of the episode piecing together what happened.
12th Feb '17 5:01:48 PM AthenaBlue
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* ''Series/DoctorWho'':
** The Doctor's encounters with the Daleks during the black-and-white era are out-of-order - the Doctor's first meeting with them ([[Recap/DoctorWhoS1E2TheDaleks "The Daleks"]]) is supposed to be his last meeting with them chronologically (although this began as a HandWave to explain how he can meet them again before they were all wiped out). Other meetings are more ambiguous in order but can be {{Fan Wank}}ed enjoyably - for instance, the dead Dalek shell in [[Recap/DoctorWhoS2E7TheSpaceMuseum "The Space Museum"]] perhaps originated from [[Recap/DoctorWhoS3E4TheDaleksMasterPlan "The Daleks' Master Plan"]], at the end of which the Doctor made all Daleks on the planet evacuate their shells, leaving them standing.
** [[Recap/DoctorWhoS29E10Blink "Blink"]], written by Creator/StevenMoffat. Most of the episode was told in the present, alongside events that happened in the twenties (Kathy Nightingale), sixties (the Doctor, Martha and DI Shipton) and (offscreen) eighties (Kathy again), warning about things in the present, all inside of a StableTimeLoop. From the viewpoint of the main character (the Tenth Doctor), he doesn't meet the episode's guest lead (Sally) until a year after the main action, despite relaying a message from the late 1960s.
** Another Moffat episode, [[Recap/DoctorWhoS31E13TheBigBang "The Big Bang"]], features the Doctor travelling back in time through his personal timeline three times. The ColdOpening is also set several minutes (from the audience's perspective, really it's [[spoiler:1900 years]] after the opening titles. Similar cold openings occurred in "The Girl in the Fireplace", "Love & Monsters" and "Silence in the Library".
** We see River Song as [[spoiler:a month-old baby]] in her fifth appearance, [[Recap/DoctorWhoS32E7AGoodManGoesToWar "A Good Man Goes to War"]] (2011), and dying in her first appearance [[Recap/DoctorWhoS30E8SilenceInTheLibrary "Silence in the Library"]]/[[Recap/DoctorWhoS30E9ForestOfTheDead "Forest of the Dead"]] (2008). In simple terms, her timeline is opposite to the Doctor's. Except when it isn't. [[spoiler:In fact, "The Impossible Astronaut" has three Rivers at once, with one of them witnessing the other's actions, which is seen from the other River's POV in "The Wedding of River Song"]].
** A less heavily timey-wimey example: [[Recap/DoctorWhoS33E3ATownCalledMercy "A Town Called Mercy"]] (2012) is implied to take place right at the end of the seven-week-anniversary vacation the Doctor took Amy and Rory on at one point in [[Recap/DoctorWhoS33E4ThePowerOfThree "The Power of Three"]].
** The debut of the Ninth Doctor in [[Recap/DoctorWhoS27E1Rose "Rose"]] skips past the Eighth Doctor [[Recap/DoctorWhoTVMTheTVMovie introduced in 1996]]. Audiences do not see Eight regenerate until [[Recap/DoctorWho50thPrequelTheNightOfTheDoctor 17 years later]], during the show's 50th anniversary. But his regeneration introduces a War Doctor fitting in between the Eighth and Ninth Doctors, and his story focuses on the Time War that had been a past event first mentioned in 2005. The [[Recap/DoctorWho50thASTheDayOfTheDoctor one story]] with the War Doctor is at the end of his life, when he's quite old. He regenerates near the end into the Ninth Doctor, who will eventually end up where he was during "Rose", knotting together all loose ends.
** The ExpandedUniverse book ''The Eye of Heaven'' starts with the chronologically earliest event in the book, then skips around in order to obscure details to the reader - in particular, one passenger on the ship is mentioned by Leela and the Doctor both before and after she executes her plan, but not shown to us until the end.
* The ''Series/{{Firefly}}'' episode "Out of Gas" is told in anachronic order, flashing between Mal and Zoe gathering Serenity's crew, a badly wounded Mal all alone on the ship, and the ship being badly damaged.
* While episodes are always broadcast in chronological order, individual episodes of ''Series/HowIMetYourMother'' make such extensive use of flashbacks and flashforwards that all of the episodes invoke this trope to varying degrees.
* ''Series/KamenRiderKiva'' keeps switching from 2008 to 1986.
* The flashbacks and flashforwards of ''Series/{{Lost}}''. The order we see them in has nothing to do with when they actually happened; it's up to the audience to slowly piece together what happened to everyone before they got to the Island (and, from the fourth season on, what's going to happen to those who leave).



* The episode "Sunday" of ''Series/StargateAtlantis'' unfolds in this manner, as does 'Tabula Rasa'.

to:

* The episode "Sunday" of ''Franchise/StargateVerse'':
** ''Series/StargateSG1'' used this in [[Recap/StargateSG1S8E5Icon "Icon"]].
**
''Series/StargateAtlantis'' unfolds in this manner, as does 'Tabula Rasa'.has the episodes [[Recap/StargateAtlantisS3E17Sunday "Sunday"]] and [[Recap/StargateAtlantisS4E6TabulaRasa "Tabula Rasa"]].



** ''Series/StargateSG1'' used this in "Icon".
* The flashbacks and flashforwards of ''Series/{{Lost}}''. The order we see them in has nothing to do with when they actually happened; it's up to the audience to slowly piece together what happened to everyone before they got to the Island (and, from the fourth season on, what's going to happen to those who leave).
* While episodes are always broadcast in chronological order, individual episodes of ''Series/HowIMetYourMother'' make such extensive use of flashbacks and flashforwards that all of the episodes invoke this trope to varying degrees.
* The ''Series/{{Firefly}}'' episode "Out of Gas" is told in anachronistic order, flashing between Mal and Zoe gathering Serenity's crew, a badly wounded Mal all alone on the ship, and the ship being badly damaged.
* ''Series/KamenRiderKiva'' keeps switching from 2008 to 1986.
* The ''Series/DoctorWho'' episode "Blink", written by Creator/StevenMoffat. Most of the episode was told in the present, alongside events that happened in the twenties (Kathy Nightingale), sixties (the Doctor, Martha and DI Shipton) and (offscreen) eighties (Kathy again), warning about things in the present, all inside of a StableTimeLoop. From the viewpoint of the main character (the Tenth Doctor), he doesn't meet the episode's guest lead (Sally) until a year after the main action, despite relaying a message from the late 1960s.
** Another Moffat episode, "The Big Bang" features the Doctor travelling back in time through his personal timeline three times. The ColdOpening is also set several minutes (from the audience's perspective, really it's [[spoiler:1900 years]] after the opening titles. Similar cold openings occurred in "The Girl in the Fireplace", "Love & Monsters" and "Silence in the Library".
** We see River Song as [[spoiler:a month-old baby]] in her fifth appearance, "A Good Man Goes to War" (2011), and dying in her first appearance "Silence in the Library"/"Forest of the Dead" (2008). In simple terms, her timeline is opposite to the Doctor's. Except when it isn't. [[spoiler:In fact, "The Impossible Astronaut" has three Rivers at once, with one of them witnessing the other's actions, which is seen from the other River's POV in "The Wedding of River Song"]].
** A less heavily timey-wimey example: "A Town Called Mercy" (2012) is implied to take place right at the end of the seven-week-anniversary vacation the Doctor took Amy and Rory on at one point in "The Power of Three" (2012).
** For an example in the Classic series, the Doctor's encounters with the Daleks during the black-and-white era are out-of-order - the Doctor's first meeting with them ("The Daleks") is supposed to be his last meeting with them chronologically (although this began as a HandWave to explain how he can meet them again before they were all wiped out). Other meetings are more ambiguous in order but can be {{Fan Wank}}ed enjoyably - for instance, the dead Dalek shell in "The Space Museum" perhaps originated from "The Daleks' Master Plan", at the end of which the Doctor made all Daleks on the planet evacuate their shells, leaving them standing.
** The debut of the Ninth Doctor in "Rose" skips past the Eighth Doctor introduced in 1996. Audiences do not see Eight regenerate until 17 years later, during the show's 50th anniversary. But his regeneration introduces a War Doctor fitting in between the Eighth and Ninth Doctors, and his story focuses on the Time War that had been a past event first mentioned in 2005. The one story with the War Doctor is at the end of his life, when he's quite old. He regenerates near the end into the Ninth Doctor, who will eventually end up where he was during "Rose", knotting together all loose ends.
** The ExpandedUniverse book ''The Eye of Heaven'' starts with the chronologically earliest event in the book, then skips around in order to obscure details to the reader - in particular, one passenger on the ship is mentioned by Leela and the Doctor both before and after she executes her plan, but not shown to us until the end.
31st Jan '17 6:14:51 AM JMQwilleran
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Added DiffLines:

* ''WesternAnimation/BeatBugs'' has "Hey Bulldog," in which the characters meet Bulldog, is one of the last installments. Earlier episodes, however, already show bulldog as an established character, one that the Beat Bugs have met and can even directly talk to using a device that Crick invented. "Hey Bulldog" also shows the invention of this device, the crickterpreter.
27th Jan '17 2:45:54 PM StFan
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* The ''VisualNovel/PhoenixWrightAceAttorney'' series is in chronological order until the second case of the second game, ''Justice for All'', which is set a few months before the first case of that game. The series takes anachronology a step further in the third game, ''Trials and Tribulations'': the first and fourth cases are set five and six years before the second, respectively.
** ''VisualNovel/ApolloJusticeAceAttorney'' goes completely crazy with the concept. [[spoiler:After the first day of trials in the fourth case of the game, you are taken seven years back to the trial that got Phoenix disbarred. Then, you play a game in which you investigate witnesses and locations from both seven years ago and the present day from Phoenix's point of view, requiring you to jump back and forth between both time periods several times.]]
** ''VisualNovel/AceAttorneyInvestigationsMilesEdgeworth'' has, so far, the biggest anachronic order yet. The chronological order of cases is [[spoiler:4th, 2nd, 3rd, 1st, 5th. Admittedly, the 4th case is a flashback case that takes place years ago, but it gets weird with the others; at the end of case 3, for instance, both the murderer and the victim of case 1 show up.]]
** The third case of ''Ace Attorney Investigations 2'', The Inherited Turnabout, has you jumping between playing as [[spoiler:Gregory Edgeworth]] in 2000 and playing as Miles Edgeworth in 2019. You'll be making an eighteen year time jump now and then.
** ''VisualNovel/PhoenixWrightAceAttorneyDualDestinies'' takes it even further by having [[spoiler: one case take place ''in the middle of another''.]] ItMakesSenseInContext. The actual order of the cases is [[spoiler: 2, DLC Case, 3, First part of 4, 1, Second part of 4, 5.]]



* The first week of ''VisualNovel/CrossChannel'' plays a trick on the reader. In order to give the illusion that everything is normal, it mixes up backstory between scenes happening in the present. For example, Taichi greeting Tomoki at the door wearing a kimono with an internal monologue that despite what he tells Tomoki, it's only the second time he's worn it. The next scene has a scene with his neighbor Yuusa while Taichi is apparently still wearing the kimono, but that was actually the ''first'' time he wore it. This is only in the first week, however. After, these flashbacks always have different lighting and coloring. The also show more detail [[spoiler:such as how Taichi accidentally ruins every one of these relationships.]]



* The true ending of ''VisualNovel/NineHoursNinePersonsNineDoors'' loves this as [[spoiler:the entire story is simultaneously taking place both in the present and 9 years ago. In fact, everything that happens on the bottom screen is in the past, including the narration of the present day events. To add to the MindScrew, the events of the present are only possible because they were perceived in the past, [[GainaxEnding which in turn is only possible because of how the past is perceived by the central character in the present]]]].
** The third game of the ''Franchise/ZeroEscape'' series, ''VisualNovel/ZeroTimeDilemma'', also makes use of this. Not only does it take place before the [[VisualNovel/VirtuesLastReward second game]] chronologically [[spoiler:(though thanks to time travel some of the characters experienced the second game "first")]], but the game is also divided into 90-minute fragments, which aren't always shown in chronological order either. You only learn each fragment's place on the overall timeline after the fragment has played out.



[[folder:Visual Novels]]
* ''VisualNovel/PhoenixWrightAceAttorney'':
** The series is in chronological order until the second case of the second game, ''Justice for All'', which is set a few months before the first case of that game. The series takes anachronology a step further in the third game, ''Trials and Tribulations'': the first and fourth cases are set five and six years before the second, respectively.
** ''VisualNovel/ApolloJusticeAceAttorney'' goes completely crazy with the concept. [[spoiler:After the first day of trials in the fourth case of the game, you are taken seven years back to the trial that got Phoenix disbarred. Then, you play a game in which you investigate witnesses and locations from both seven years ago and the present day from Phoenix's point of view, requiring you to jump back and forth between both time periods several times.]]
** ''VisualNovel/AceAttorneyInvestigationsMilesEdgeworth'' has, so far, the biggest anachronic order yet. The chronological order of cases is [[spoiler:4th, 2nd, 3rd, 1st, 5th. Admittedly, the 4th case is a flashback case that takes place years ago, but it gets weird with the others; at the end of case 3, for instance, both the murderer and the victim of case 1 show up.]]
** The third case of ''Ace Attorney Investigations 2'', The Inherited Turnabout, has you jumping between playing as [[spoiler:Gregory Edgeworth]] in 2000 and playing as Miles Edgeworth in 2019. You'll be making an eighteen year time jump now and then.
** ''VisualNovel/PhoenixWrightAceAttorneyDualDestinies'' takes it even further by having [[spoiler: one case take place ''in the middle of another''.]] ItMakesSenseInContext. The actual order of the cases is [[spoiler: 2, DLC Case, 3, First part of 4, 1, Second part of 4, 5.]]
* The first week of ''VisualNovel/CrossChannel'' plays a trick on the reader. In order to give the illusion that everything is normal, it mixes up backstory between scenes happening in the present. For example, Taichi greeting Tomoki at the door wearing a kimono with an internal monologue that despite what he tells Tomoki, it's only the second time he's worn it. The next scene has a scene with his neighbor Yuusa while Taichi is apparently still wearing the kimono, but that was actually the ''first'' time he wore it. This is only in the first week, however. After, these flashbacks always have different lighting and coloring. The also show more detail [[spoiler:such as how Taichi accidentally ruins every one of these relationships.]]
* The true ending of ''VisualNovel/NineHoursNinePersonsNineDoors'' loves this as [[spoiler:the entire story is simultaneously taking place both in the present and 9 years ago. In fact, everything that happens on the bottom screen is in the past, including the narration of the present day events. To add to the MindScrew, the events of the present are only possible because they were perceived in the past, [[GainaxEnding which in turn is only possible because of how the past is perceived by the central character in the present]]]].
* The third game of the ''Franchise/ZeroEscape'' series, ''VisualNovel/ZeroTimeDilemma'', also makes use of this. Not only does it take place before the [[VisualNovel/VirtuesLastReward second game]] chronologically [[spoiler:(though thanks to time travel some of the characters experienced the second game "first")]], but the game is also divided into 90-minute fragments, which aren't always shown in chronological order either. You only learn each fragment's place on the overall timeline after the fragment has played out.
[[/folder]]



* As mentioned in the quote above, [[LampshadeHanging lampshaded]] in the {{Troperiffic}} ([[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin and aptly titled]]) ''StartOfDarkness'' prequel book for ''Webcomic/TheOrderOfTheStick''. The scene in question is part of [[GrumpyOldMan Eugene Greenhilt's]] complicated explanation of his BloodOath against [[BigBad Xykon]] to his son, [[TheHero Roy]].

to:

* As mentioned in the quote above, [[LampshadeHanging lampshaded]] in the {{Troperiffic}} ([[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin and aptly titled]]) ''StartOfDarkness'' ''Recap/StartOfDarkness'' prequel book for ''Webcomic/TheOrderOfTheStick''. The scene in question is part of [[GrumpyOldMan Eugene Greenhilt's]] complicated explanation of his BloodOath against [[BigBad Xykon]] to his son, [[TheHero Roy]].



* OHumanStar starts with Al's death, jumps forward 16 years, and then goes back and forth between the present day and flashbacks to when Al and Brendan first met.

to:

* OHumanStar ''Webcomic/OHumanStar'' starts with Al's death, jumps forward 16 years, and then goes back and forth between the present day and flashbacks to when Al and Brendan first met.
14th Jan '17 6:46:04 PM nombretomado
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* The ''Franchise/{{Lufia}}'' series' chronological order is ''[[VideoGame/LufiaIIRiseOfTheSinistrals 2]]'', ''[[VideoGame/LufiaTheRuinsOfLore 4]]'', ''[[VideoGame/LufiaAndTheFortressOfDoom 1]]'' and ''[[VideoGame/LufiaTheLegendReturns 3]]'', although the fourth is a [[GaidenGame sidestory]].

to:

* The ''Franchise/{{Lufia}}'' ''VideoGame/{{Lufia}}'' series' chronological order is ''[[VideoGame/LufiaIIRiseOfTheSinistrals 2]]'', ''[[VideoGame/LufiaTheRuinsOfLore 4]]'', ''[[VideoGame/LufiaAndTheFortressOfDoom 1]]'' and ''[[VideoGame/LufiaTheLegendReturns 3]]'', although the fourth is a [[GaidenGame sidestory]].
This list shows the last 10 events of 293. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.AnachronicOrder